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Section 1 of 1
Questions Following American Meteorological Society (AMS) Climate Reading
Answer the questions below after reading the AMS Climate Statement (Updated April 15, 2019)*.  The text below in "quotes" are the section headers in bold from the reading.  Questions are in the same order as presented in the reading.
*AMS Climate Statement: https://www.ametsoc.org/index.cfm/ams/about-ams/ams-statements/statements-of-the-ams-in-force/climate-change1/
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Under the "Executive Summary" section, the increase in global surface temperatures observed during the last approximate half-century:
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can be explained by natural variability (non-human) phenomena (i.e., volcanic eruptions).
can not be fully explained by natural variability (non-human) phenomena (i.e., orbital changes or solar activity).
are not significant, as these is not a clear trend in recent surface temperature data.
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Under the "How is climate changing?" section, the approximate increase in global surface (air) temperatures during the last century (100 years) is:
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approximately 0.1 degrees Celsius.
approximately 10 degrees Celsius.
approximately 1.0 degrees Celsius.
approximately 1.0 degrees Fahrenheit.
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Again, under the "How is climate changing?" section, the increase in global average sea level during the twentieth century (1900's) period is:
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17 centimeters.
7 centimeters.
17 meters.
17 millimeters.
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Again, near the end of the same "How is climate changing?" section, there is evidence that:
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Antarctica during the period 2002 to 2016 has shown an accelerated (increasing) rate of ice loss mass compared to the preceding decade.
Antarctica during the period 2002 to 2016 has shown no change in ice mass compared to the preceding decade.
Antarctica during the period 2002 to 2016 has shown a decreasing rate of ice loss mass compared to the preceding decade.
both Antarctica and the Arctic show no clear increase or decrease in total ice mass in recent decades.
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Again, near the end of the same "How is climate changing?" section, there is evidence that:
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all locations in the United States have become drier (decreased precipitation).
some locations recently are drier (decreased precipitation), and some locations are wetter (increased precipitation).
all locations in the United States have become wetter (increased precipitation).
locations on earth have not shown any change in precipitation.
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Again, near the end of the same "How is climate changing?" section, there is evidence that:
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all hurricanes are becoming more intense worldwide.
all hurricanes are decreasing in their intensity worldwide.
oceans are cooling worldwide, and thereby, causing hurricanes to weaken.
while warmer oceans are providing more energy for hurricanes, there is not a clear worldwide trend (all ocean basins) in hurricane intensity or frequency.
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Under the "Why is climate changing?" section, there is evidence that:
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the changes in the climate over the last 120 are most likely natural (not human-caused) variability.
only changes in atmospheric water vapor have caused the climate to change in the last 120 years.
the changes in the climate in the last half century is anthropogenic (human-induced or human-caused) due to greenhouse gases.
ocean biologic activity is the cause of climate change in the last 120 years.
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Under the "Why is climate changing?" section, there is evidence that:
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most aerosols (dust and sulfates from air pollution) generally warm the planet.
most aerosols (dust and sulfates from air pollution) have no effect on climate.
most aerosols (dust and sulfates from air pollution) generally cause a predictable 20 to 25 year cycle of warming and cooling.
most aerosols (dust and sulfates from air pollution) generally cool the planet.
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Under the "How is the climate projected to change in the future?" section, there is evidence that:
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the warming predicted over the next 100 years will decrease compared to the warming experienced during the last 100 years.
the warming predicted over the next 100 years will be at least much, or perhaps 2 -- 6 times more, compared to the warming experienced during the last 100 years.
the warming predicted over the next 100 years will remain the same compared to the warming experienced during the last 100 years.
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Under the "How is the climate projected to change in the future?" section, there is evidence that:
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average sea level will likely increase by 0.1 meters (approximately 4 inches) by the end of current century.
average sea level will likely increase by 0.3 to 0.4 meters (approximately 1.0 foot) by the end of current century.
average sea level will likely increase by 0.3 to 1.2 meters (1.0 to 4.0 feet) by the end of current century.
average sea level will likely increase by 0.3 to 0.6 meters (approximately 1.0 to 2.0 feet) by the end of current century.
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