SITL 2015 Registration

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    SITL 2015 Focus Teams

    How are Lasers Like Squirrels? Metaphor and Analogy in the Classroom – Matthew Rave, Department of Chemistry and Physics The use of metaphors (along with analogies and allegories) is one of the primary ways we learn. In fact, I agree with Douglas Hofstadter’s assessment that an analogy is “…the very blue that fills the whole sky of cognition—[it] is everything, or very nearly so”. Knowing this, how can we best use analogous thinking to enhance a student’s experience? We will discuss the current pedagogy behind the use of metaphors in instruction, and also spend some time developing creative metaphors that each participant can use in their own classroom. Plus, lasers and squirrels. Virtual Learning Spaces: Transforming Collaboration from Stressful to Successful --Lori Caudle, Birth to Kindergarten Virtual collaboration in online learning environments can be cumbersome, ineffective, and even miserable at times. This focus team will explore teaching strategies and tools that transform online and hybrid courses into powerful communities of practice. This team will consider the elements of teaching, cognitive, and social presences (Garrison, Anderson, & Archer, 2000) as we negotiate how to create effective, collaborative virtual spaces. Through the use of both synchronous and asynchronous technology tools in Blackboard and beyond, participants will leave the summer institute with a range of ideas for how to enhance the quality of student-student and student-instructor interactions. Space Between – “Filling Spaces Between Disciplines” --Laura DeWald, Department of Biology, Natural Resource Management Discipline-specific content and concepts of academic curricula can be considered patches of a quilt. Unfortunately, many curricula poorly facilitate piecing the patches together to assemble the quilt, particularly where the quilt patches represent different disciplines. This SITL group will explore a novel way of piecing curricula together to fill the “spaces between” and thus effectively “assemble the quilt”. The outcome of this SITL group will be a strategy you can use to effectively piece a course you teach into a curriculum “quilt”. No sewing will be involved but fun will be! Learning without borders: Making the world your classroom --Lori Oxford, Department of Modern Foreign Languages The spaces that surround us when we teach and learn can affect how we initially interact with material as well as how we eventually assimilate and retain it. Are there lessons in your discipline that would be more effectively experienced in a different setting? This SITL group will explore the hows, what-ifs, and why-nots of bringing global perspectives into your classroom and taking your students out into the world, with a focus on how to create meaningful faculty-led study abroad sessions. Creating Space for the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning (SoTL) --April Tallant, The Honors College Make space in your thinking for your scholarship by attending this session to explore how you can engage in the scholarship of teaching and learning. Learn how to set up a SoTL project to evaluate student learning and improve your teaching, and how you can make your scholarship public (including publication). Also learn about support to meet your SoTL goals. The outcome of our time together will be a SoTL project plan and research agenda with timeline for one of your courses. Upside Down and Inside Out: Up-ending the Classroom Space –James Scifers, College of Health and Human Sciences Many faculty choose to rearrange their physical classroom spaces in order to facilitate activities that maximize student learning. The flipped classroom is an established best practice, so many professors have shifted lectures and other passive learning activities from in-class to online in order to facilitate increased student engagement and interaction. Still the online and hybrid classroom needs consideration from a spatial perspective as well. This SITL group will consider flipped classroom spaces, after having put essential class content online. The team will also consider responses to specific student concerns in (flipped) courses they currently teach. In this context, we will work together toward participants re-envisioning and re-designing their classes in flipped space. Step across the threshold: Getting students into disciplinary thinking --Tonya Westbrook, College of Health and Human Sciences Threshold spaces typically present difficulties for learners: students might need to grasp fully the threshold concept in order to master the discipline. Once across the learning threshold, the learner is likely to be unable to return to previous ways of thinking about the discipline and capable of using discipline specific terms with accuracy. Learners may also find themselves able to pull seemingly disparate elements of a discipline together coherently. Don’t you want this for your students? Come learn more with us.
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