Resources used:

Readingsoft http://www.readingsoft.com/ 

Congress.gov HTML/XML Version of GOP Bill https://www.congress.gov/115/bills/hr1/BILLS-115hr1pcs.xml

WordCounter https://wordcounter.net/

Google Sheets https://docs.google.com/spreadsheets/u/1/d/e/2PACX-1vRFtjhoL9gptQogqyh0xuxmBNyANzXmV6_oLrMDK3q__58raNr73aK_Jlsx5UQ3WLhgBciYbZLbkKX2/pubhtml 

In order to determine the amount of time it would take for the average person to read the entire GOP Tax Plan, I considered the National Average Words per Minute, and the National Average Efficient Words per Minute. I did a simple Google Search on the “National Reading Speed”, and came to a value of 200 Words per Minute at 60% Efficiency, which sets their Efficient Words per Minute to 120, according to Readingsoft.

The next thing I did was set up the Google Sheet. I set out a location to hold the total amount of words in this bill. I then set out three tables, one holding the National Average Words per Minute, calculating how many Minutes, Hours, Days, and Weeks it would take to read every word at that speed, and one holding the National Efficient Words per Minute.

I went to Congress.gov and retrieved the HTML/XML version of the full bill. I copied the entire bill into WordCounter to determine how many words are in the bill. This came out to 68,306 Words in the entire bill.

Now, the calculations. At 200 Words Per Minute, with 60% Accuracy, I calculated that it would take 341.53 minutes to read the entire text as posted on Congress.gov. By dividing this by 60, I found it would take 5.69 hours to read this whole text.

At the efficient 120 Words Per Minute, I calculated that it would take 569.22 minutes to read the entire text. By dividing this by 60, I found it would take 9.49 hours to read this whole text.

If the bill was given as posted on Congress.gov, it would be necessary for the senate to have at least 10 hours just to read this bill, that’s not including comprehending this bill and determining what effects it would have on the American people. However, the version they had to vote on was filled with unlegible hand-written amendments on the margins, whole sections just crossed off, and even a monopoly man included in the bill.

Given this data, it is clear that the Senate was not given enough time between receiving the final bill, and voting on it, to even read it, whether it be the version they were given, or the version on Congress.gov.

This concludes my report on the matter.