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Comprehensive School Counseling Plan - Pea Ridge
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Pea Ridge

Comprehensive

School Counseling

Program

A Manual for Program Development, Implementation,
Evaluation and Enhancement

Table of Contents

  1. Component One

                Foundation

  1. Component Two

                Program Management

  1. Component Three

                Delivery

  1. Component Four

                Accountability

Component One

Foundation/Define

School Counseling Team

School

Name

Email

Pea Ridge Primary

Kelsey Brodie

kelsey.brodie@pearidgek12.com

Pea Ridge Intermediate

Madison Holliday

madison.holliday@pearidgek12.com

Pea Ridge Middle

Megan Harness

megan.harness@pearidgek12.com

Pea Ridge Junior High

Taylor Jackson

tjackson@pearidgek12.com

Pea Ridge High

Holly Blevins

holly.blevins@pearidgek12.com

College and Career Counselor

Jessica Thomas

jessica.thomas@pearidgek12.com

Beliefs

Pea Ridge School Counselors Believe:

  1. An effective school counseling program is comprehensive and data driven.
  1. An effective school counselor applies the ASCA ethical standards.
  1. An effective school counseling program supports student achievement.
  1. An effective counseling program is a collaborative effort between school counselors, the community, and other stakeholders to promote academic, career, and social/emotional development.
  1. All students can develop academic, career, and social/emotional skills.
  1. All students should have equitable access to comprehensive school counseling programs and services.

Vision Statement

Pea Ridge Schools Counselors will foster a future where all students are empowered to achieve greatness by maximizing their individual potential emotionally, personally, and professionally.  Students will be strong self-advocates who respond to life’s challenges with resilience.  We believe in forging future leaders and productive citizens that will strive to positively impact their environments as well as those around them and are driven life-long learners who are able to adapt to an ever changing world.  

Mission Statement

Utilizing academic, career, and social/emotional education to ignite creativity, inspire collaboration, and foster growth in every child so that they may reach their fullest potential and enter post secondary opportunities with the confidence to become world leaders and passionate contributors to their community.

Program Goals

District Counseling Goals:

  1. Pea Ridge Students will improve and work on social and emotional skills through building relationships and understanding empathy.
  2. Pea Ridge School Counselors will build an advisory council in order to assess the school counseling program and communicate with stakeholders.

Elementary Level (K-2)

Elementary School Students will improve and work on social emotional coping skills in order to improve their peer relationships and disciplinary write ups.

  1. Implement the use of PBIS to decrease discipline referrals
  2. Students exhibiting motivation to attend school.
  3. Aid in integrating SEL into the classrooms on a daily basis

Strategies

Action Steps

Data

  • Determine current discipline referrals based on start of the year data
  • Identify students that need reinforcement in coping skills and use varied intervention strategies.
  • for improvement based on their last year’s data.  This goal may range from .5-1% improvement.
  • Each elementary school will determine if there is a specific coping skill that requires more targeted interventions or if the goal should be school wide
  • Meet with students individually or in groups.
  • Pea Ridge School District will use data and graphs from imported sources.
  • Referral Reports will be utilized to see if there was an increase/decrease.
  • Pea Ridge counseling interns will run and document groups that are based on referrals and students identified that display lack of coping skills.

Intermediate Level (3-4)

Intermediate School Students will begin working on coping skills in both individual interactions and group interactions in order to encourage safe, responsible and respectful students.

Strategies

Action Steps

Data

  • Determine and monitor discipline referrals through PBIS
  • Identify students that need reinforcement in coping skills and use varied intervention strategies.
  • Identify potential advisory council members and begin building a team.
  • Integrate Conscious Discipline strategies to assist students with de-escalation or coping skills
  • Integrate G.U.I.D.E for life lesson plans with an emphasis on Empathy.

G.U.I.D.E for life curriculum 

  • Meet with students individually or in groups.
  • Plan and begin an advisory council meeting.
  • Pea Ridge School District will use data and graphs from sources such as PBIS.
  • Referral Reports will be utilized to see if there was an increase/decrease.
  • PRIS counselor will run and document groups that are based on referrals and students identified that display lack of coping skills.
  • Develop advisory council meeting agendas and document meetings.

Middle School Level (5-6)

Middle School Students presenting with identified low coping skills will be able to improve them with peer mediators, the School Counselor, guidance lessons, and small groups. This should result in minimal loss of instruction time and lower the number of discipline referrals.

Strategies

Action Steps

Data

  • Determine Needs Through Assessments
  • Determine Current Behavior Needs Based on Data
  • Identify Students That Need Reinforcement in Coping Skills and Use Varied Intervention Strategies.

  • Teach classroom guidance lessons focusing on conflict resolution and coping skills.
  • Work with individual students.
  • Identify needed skills and conduct small group work.
  • SEL Self Assessments administered during designated class times.
  • Practice coping skills in targeted groups of students that can train others.

  • Pea Ridge School District will

use data and graphs gathered from imputed data.

  • Referral reports will be utilized to see if there was an increase/decrease
  • Pea Ridge counseling interns will run and document groups that are based on referrals and students identified that display lack of coping skills.

Junior High School Level (7-9)

Junior High School students presenting with identified low coping skills will be able to improve on their coping skills and frequency of their visits to the counseling office.  Students will exhibit increased coping skills that will be taught through large groups,small groups, and individual counseling resulting in minimal loss of instruction time and lower the number of discipline referrals.

Strategies

Action Steps

Data

  • Determine Needs
  • Provide Responsive

Services

  • Teach Coping Skills
  • Model Coping Skills
  • Teach classroom guidance lessons on coping skills.
  • Work with individual students

on coping skills.

  • Identify needed skills and conduct group work.
  • SEL Self Assessments administered during designated class times.

  • Pea Ridge School District will

use data and graphs gathered from imputed data.

  • Referral reports will be utilized to see if there was an increase/decrease

High School Level (10-12)

High School Students will begin working on coping skills in both individual interactions and group interactions in order to reduce conflict amongst peers and disciplinary referrals.  

Strategies

Action Steps

Data

  • Determine Needs
  • Provide Responsive

Services

  • Teach Coping Skills
  • Model Coping Skills
  • Work with individual students

on coping skills.

  • Identify needed skills and conduct group work.
  • SEL Self Assessments administered during designated class times.
  • RTI/MTSS designated times to address SEL skills and identified behavior needs.

  • Pea Ridge School District will

use data and graphs gathered from imputed data.

  • Referral reports will be utilized to see if there was an increase/decrease
  • Pea Ridge counseling interns will run and document groups that are based on referrals and students identified that display lack of coping skills.

Component Two

Program Management/Manage

Pea Ridge School Counselors will utilize SCUTA in order to track use of time throughout the school year. Counselors will look specifically at hours differing between direct, indirect, program management, and non-school counseling data.

Program Assessment

Administrative Conference:

It is best practice for counselors to hold administrative conferences to assess their program. School Counselors will schedule annual administrative conferences with their building principal in order to promote and assess their counseling program.

Administrative Conference

Self-Assessment:

It is best practice for school counselor’s to complete the Comprehensive School Counseling Self-Assessment. PRSD counselors will use the Arkansas School Counselor template to assess their program.

School Counselor Program Self-Assessment.pdf

Advisory Council

PRS Counselors plan to create an advisory council beginning in the 2022/23 school year. The purpose of this council will be to educate stakeholders on the role of a counselor and share plans each counselor has in supporting their students.

The counselors will begin by building the advisory council of stakeholders. Counselors will be looking to include at least one building principal, teacher, board member, parent, and an assistant superintendent.

Counselors will hold a minimum of three advisory council meetings throughout the year to assess their programs. One meeting taking place towards the beginning of the school year, one throughout the middle, and one to end the year with data.

The final advisory council meeting will consist of counselors sharing student outcomes and  data collected from each building with stakeholders. All agendas will be linked below and the counseling program will be listed on the district website for public viewing.

Advisory Council Agenda

Component Three

Deliver/Delivery

Direct Counseling

Level (K-12)

Service

Description

At least 90% Direct and Indirect

Face-To-Face

Individual and Group Counseling

Data is reviewed to determine student needs.  Interventions are based on the identified gaps in the school and student needs  Follow up should occur to ensure students are continuing to develop the skills taught.

Examples: friendship groups, social/emotional groups, behavioral support

Core Curriculum Lessons

Limited to forty-minute class sessions, not to exceed three (3) class sessions per day, and not to exceed ten (10) class sessions per week

Lessons are developmentally appropriate, based on ASCA Standards, individual needs identified through school data review, and the associated goals that are created to address those needs.  They also address the components of the School Counseling Improvement Act of 2019.

Pea Ridge School District is focusing on empathy from the G.U.I.D.E for life throughout the 2022/23 school year.

G.U.I.D.E for life curriculum 

Examples: sexual harassment prevention, bullying, suicide awareness, conflict/resolution, character lessons.

Orientation/Transition Programs

Students are provided orientation and transition support through individual conferences, group sessions, parent/transition programs, building tours, and other specialized groups and mentorships.

Academic Advisement/Goal Setting

The counselor promotes understanding of the relationship between classroom performance/success and provides interpretation of educational assessment results to develop academic goals.  This is done by providing individual conferences, classroom guidance, and advisory.

Starting in 8th grade counselors work with students on creating Student Success Plans that will grow with them throughout their high school years.

Social Emotional

Counselors provide students with opportunities to develop skills in the areas of personal growth (problem solving skills, mindfulness, and perseverance), personal understanding (self-awareness, strengths and weaknesses, critical thinking skills), interactions with others (appropriate treatment of others, building communication skills, how to seek assistance &/or offering help to others when needed), decision-making skills (considering personal beliefs, safety, consequences of actions), and empathy (seeing others’ perspectives, valuing others’ feelings, appreciating diversity).

Example: school wide initiatives, individual counseling, modeling, classroom counseling lessons

Bullying Prevention and Responsive Services

Annual bully prevention is presented to staff and students to assist in recognizing and responding to bullying situations in accordance with the Pea Ridge School District Policy and Protocols, as well as federal, state, and local laws. Students are taught to recognize and access a trusted adult in classroom counseling lessons and through individual counseling. Pea Ridge School District has appointed a Bullying Coordinator who reviews every complaint and

presents it to the appropriate administrator. School administration communicates with the Pea Ridge School District School Board. Communication takes place between involved students and parents as well as issues consequences as appropriate. Counselors provide coping strategies to students impacted by bullying.  Pea Ridge School District has a zero tolerance policy regarding bullying.

Examples: district and school wide initiatives, individual and group counseling, classroom guidance lessons, guest speakers, ongoing dialogue with teachers, administrators, school board, and parents.

Supporting Link:  Guidance on Bullying Prevention

Suicide Prevention and Responsive Services

Pea Ridge Counselors provide a safe environment for students to communicate and share if they, or another student, displayed at-risk behaviors.  

Examples: individual counseling, crisis prevention, mobile assessments, outside agency referrals, parent contact

Supporting Link: SafeTalk Suicide Prevention Course

Career Planning

Pea Ridge Counselors provided educational sessions with individual classes to promote and introduce career and postsecondary academic opportunities.

Pea Ridge College and Career Counselor works with counselors on developing college and career readiness programs specific for each building. Examples may be holding career fairs and college and career lessons.

Accelerated Learning Opportunities

Opportunities are provided during designated times for students to grow academically, socially and emotionally.  Enrichment opportunities are provided for identified Gifted and Talented (GT) Students.

Parent Partnerships

School counselors create, support, and maintain relationships with families, supporting agencies, and community members to ensure that all stakeholders are provided with appropriate representation in decisions made within the school.  In addition, results of specialized programs are regularly shared with stakeholders through the school administrators’ and individual school websites and social media informational outlets.  

Responsive Services

Supporting students whose immediate concerns put the student’s academic, career, or social emotional development at risk.  Referrals for outside counseling are made when student needs exceed what is appropriate in the school counseling setting.

Example: outside referrals, mobile assessments, crisis interventions

Indirect Counseling

Level (K-12)

Service

Description

At least 90% of Direct and Indirect on behalf of, referral, consultation

Consultation

Consultation occurs on behalf of a student.  They can include interactions with parent or legal guardians, school staff, and community agencies concerning a student’s behavior/discipline, academics or attendance.

Referrals

Indirect services include referring a student for school-based mental health services and making child maltreatment reports.

Decision -Making Teams

Serving as a contributing member of decision-making teams which include without limitation:

  • Section 504- PRIS, PRMS
  • Response to Intervention
  • Parental Involvement
  • PBIS
  • Leadership teams

Administrative Activities

Level (K-12)

Service

Description

No more than 10%

Coordination, Chair, Duties

Coordination of Programs and Data Input

All PRSD Counselors coordinate programs including but not limited to:

  • Section 504- PRIS, PRMS
  • Student Success Plan- PRJH, PRHS
  • Course Selection Process/Planning- PRJH, PRHS
  • Application Recommendations: job, college admissions, scholarships- PRJH, PRHS
  • Professional Development

Chairing Committees and Meetings

  • Parent/Family Involvement Committee.
  • 504 Designee- PRIS, PRMS
  • Transition meetings
  • Staffing meetings
  • MTSS

Data Input

  • SCUTA Input
  • PBIS Data

Duties

  • None - ASCA Standards do not support counselors having assigned duties

Calendars

July

August

  • Schedule cleanup-PRHS
  • Concurrent course registration- PRJH, PRHS
  • Open House- PRPS, PRIS, PRMS, PRJH, PRHS
  • Prepare and disseminate Section 504 Plans- PRMS, PRIS
  • District Professional Development- PRPS, PRIS, PRMS, PRJH, PRHS
  • Building Professional Development- PRPS, PRIS, PRMS, PRJH, PRHS

September

October

  • Identify areas of need for small groups
  • Class meetings - senior timeline- PRHS
  • PSAT- PRHS
  • ASVAB- PRHS
  • Red Ribbon Week- PRPS, PRIS, PRMS
  • Parent/Teacher conferences
  • Career/College Fair-PRHS

November

December

  • Pre-registration preparation- PRHS
  • Thanksgiving meal lists

  • Spring semester schedule cleanup- PRJH, PRHS
  • Failure conferences- PRJH, PRHS
  • Pre Registration Conferences- PRHS
  • Shop with a cop- PRPS, PRIS
  • Angel Tree

January

February

  • Transcript credit check- PRHS
  • Spring 504 Annual Reviews- PRIS, PRMS
  • Concurrent credit registration- PRJH, PRHS
  • Suicide Awareness and Prevention Month
  • Registration presentations- PRHS
  • Parent/Transition Meetings 2020-2021-PRHS
  • Scholarship Information Presentations-PRHS
  • Kindness Week- PRPS, PRIS, PRMS
  • NSCW

March

April

  • Transitions to PRJH- PRMS
  • Registration cleanup- PRHS
  • Honor Graduate list- PRHS
  • National Merit list- PRHS
  • Parent/ Teacher Conferences
  • Registration cleanup-PRHS
  • Graduation presentations- PRHS
  • Intense interventions with seniors-PRHS
  • Scholarship committee-PRHS
  • Rising Parent Nights-PRPS, PRIS,PRMS, PRJH, PRHS

May

June

  • Scholarship Ceremony- PRHS
  • Finalize graduation list-PRHS
  • Senior credit check-PRHS
  • Graduation-PRHS
  • 9-11 student interventions
  • 504 completions- PRIS, PRMS
  • End of year credit checks-PRJH, PRHS
  • Complete credit checks for 2022/23- PRJH, PRHS
  • Reschedule failures-PRJH, PRHS
  • Schedule cleanup-PRJH, PRHS
  • Resolving schedule conflicts-PRJH, PRHS
  • Planning meeting for next school year

Professional Competencies and Ethical Standards

Description

Link

Pea Ridge Public School Counselors review the ASCA Professional Standards and Competencies annually.

Standards | American School Counselor Association

Pea Ridge School Counselors abide by the Code of Ethics for Arkansas Educators

Division of Elementary and Secondary Education

Career Planning

Level (K-6)

Elementary Career Plan:

Elementary school counselors collaborate with general education teachers to provide a multi-tiered program to all students and grade levels that may include, but is not limited to, classroom curriculum, guidance lessons, online tools, guest speakers, engagement and community partners, and special career-related activities.  Students develop real-world skills for success, which may include self-regulation, problem-solving, social awareness, and communication skills.

  • G.U.I.D.E. For Life

  • *The Collaborative for Academic, Social and Emotional Learning (CASEL):  https://casel.org

K - 2:  Explore career interests, abilities and relationships between school and the world of work; develop work-related skills such as  time management, cooperation, effort, perseverance, goal setting and organization.

3 - 6:  Identify personal interests and abilities related to the world of work; integrate work-related skills; identify career clusters; explore the relationship between school and the world of work; initiate goal setting for secondary school and post-secondary opportunities.

     

*BrainPOP: www.brainpop.com

Other possibilities:

*Children’s Dictionary of Occupations

*Local Professional Development

*Labor market data on job demands and career salaries

*Mock interviews and practice resume development

*Feature a weekly career

*Teach use of organizational planners

Level (7-8)

Middle school counselors collaborate with the career/technical department to provide a multi-tiered program to all grade levels including, but not limited to, classroom curriculum, guidance lessons, career day, and Student Success Plans.

Level (9-12)

Counselors work with students annually to develop and maintain their student success plan. Student Success Plans help students take ownership of their coursework and focus on post-high school success.

High School counselors meet with students to help them connect the importance of education, school attendance, classroom performance and work.  Through direct counseling students understand the importance of setting goals and how to do so.

9th Grade:

Create Academic Goals

View and edit high school course plans

Build resume - career search

Develop a 4-year Academic Plan for high school

10th Grade:

Adjust academic goals (if necessary)

Build/update resume

View and edit high school 4 year plan

View and discuss career clusters

11th Grade:

Take ACT

Adjust academic goals (if necessary)

Build/update resume

View and discuss career clusters

Interests Inventories

12th Grade:

Take ACT

Adjust academic goals (if necessary)

Scholarship search

Career Day participation

Job Shadow

“Adulting Day” participation

Guest Speakers

Interventions

Level (K-12)

Elementary School Counselors design/utilize proactive programs to increase the likelihood of graduation.

  • Attendance Monitoring
  • Goal Setting
  • Individual Counseling
  • Classroom Counseling Lessons
  • Small Groups
  • School Transition Tours
  • G.U.I.D.E. for Life Essential Skills
  • Career Exploration
  • College/University Tours- PRHS
  • Financial aid/scholarship search and support- PRHS

Component Four

Accountability/Assess

Data Tracking

Level (K-12)

Pea Ridge Counselors utilize SCUTA.  SCUTA is used by school counselors and school districts to develop a data-driven, evidence-based school counseling program. It follows the ASCA National Model® recommendations and offers confidential, comprehensive documentation and a use-of-time analysis system.

Counselors also utilize digital office discipline referrals and classroom management forms to monitor and document student behaviors.Counselors also meet weekly with stakeholders and academic teams to monitor and problem solve to address student behaviors.

Graduation Data

Completion rate and student graduation rate.

Documentation of personal conferences reviewing annual progress toward post-secondary goals.  This can be accomplished through individual conferences with the counselor and also through Spring program reviews/course selection conferences with teachers/advisors.

Data will be collected through senior exit interviews.  The survey will include post secondary plans and personal readiness to execute those plans.

Program Results

2020/2021 School Counseling Data

Direct

62%

Indirect

27%

Program Management

10%

Non-School Counseling

1%