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2020-21 Course Catalog

The following table outlines required courses and elective choices for each grade level.

9th Grade REQUIRED COURSES

9th Grade ELECTIVE CHOICES

All 9th graders will be automatically placed into the following courses, which are required:

  • Humanities 9
  • Biology
  • Math 9
  • Digital Art Foundations 

In addition to their required classes, 9th grade students have 2 periods available for electives or Project Application (descriptions below).  Options include:

  • Math, Spanish, French, Science, Humanities, Art and Music electives
  • Project Application

 MUST take at least 7 periods of AHS course offerings.

10th Grade REQUIRED COURSES

10th Grade ELECTIVE CHOICES

All 10th graders will be automatically placed into the following courses, which are required:

  • Humanities 10
  • Physics
  • Math 10

In addition to their required classes, 10th grade students have 3 periods available for electives or Project Application (descriptions below).  Options include:

  • Math, Science, Humanities, Spanish, French Culture, Art and Music electives
  • Project Application

 MUST take at least 7 periods of AHS course offerings.

11th Grade REQUIRED COURSES

11th Grade ELECTIVE CHOICES

All 11th graders will be automatically placed into the following courses, which are required:

  • Humanities 11
  • Chemistry
  • PreCalculus

In addition to their required classes, 11th grade students have 3 periods available for electives or Project Application (descriptions below).  Options include:

  • Math, Science, Humanities, Spanish, Art and Music electives
  • Project Application

MUST take at least 7 periods of AHS course offerings.

12th Grade REQUIRED COURSES

12th Grade ELECTIVE CHOICES

All 12th graders will be automatically placed into the following courses, which are required:

  • Humanities 12 (2 periods)
  • Statistics

In addition to their required classes, 12th grade students have 4 periods available for electives or Project Application (descriptions below).  Options include:

  • Math, Science, Humanities, Spanish, French, French Culture, Art and Music electives
  • Project Application
  • LINK 2.0 Senior Internship
  • Concurrent enrollment in classes offered at local colleges

Seniors MUST take at least 5 periods of AHS course offerings.  That means that at least 2 of their elective spots must be filled by AHS offerings.

Graduation Requirements

Subject Area

Requirements

Language Arts (in Humanities)

4 years

Social Studies (in Humanities)

4 years

Math

4 years

Science

3 years of lab science

Foreign Language

2 years of the same foreign language (the French Culture class does NOT count toward foreign language credit, but French 1 does count)

Art

1 year 

Electives

At least 12 semesters worth of electives

Digital Art Foundations and the first 2 years of foreign language do not count toward elective credit requirements as they fulfil other requirements. Project Application may not be used to fulfill any graduation requirement.

X-Block (physical education)

3 years

LINK Internship

1 year

Senior Project

1 year (non credit-bearing)

Course Selection Process and Timeline

Title

Date

Description

Course Catalog and Credit /Review

Early May

Advisors will meet with students to review the Course Catalog and discuss what classes they need to graduate and to best meet college/career goals, as well as what they need to do to remediate any classes they may have failed.

Course Selection for Current Students

Early May

Current students will receive information via email outlining the online course request process..

Course Selection for New Students

Summer

We will send information to new students about how to connect with our Academic Advisor and register for electives via email.

Schedules Created

August

We hope to have schedules created and available to view in IC for current students by the end of August. 

Add/Drop Date

Two weeks after start of semester

Students may add or drop an elective class in the first two weeks of the semester.  After the drop date, withdrawing from a class will result in a “W” on the transcript.


Important Course Registration Information

Teacher Requests

We are thoughtful and intentional about how we determine a student’s schedule, and we do not place students in classes based upon individual student or parent requests for a particular teacher.  Please understand that we believe this to be the most fair and equitable system for all of our students.  

Course Fees

Some courses require a course fee to cover materials cost and community partnerships.  Those who qualify for free/reduced lunch will have these fees adjusted accordingly.

Elective Registration Priority

Because we are committed to keeping class sizes small, some elective classes may fill and some students may not receive their 1st choice.  We give priority in the following ways:

  1. Seniors get 1st priority (with a specific eye towards what they need to graduate)
  2. Juniors get 2nd priority
  3. Sophomores get 3rd priority
  4. Freshmen get 4th priority

Elective Grading

Elective classes are academically rigorous and specialized in their content.  All elective courses are graded (with the exception of Project Applications), and will factor into a student’s GPA.  

Independent Study

AHS does not accommodate independent study requests. 

Online Classes

AHS does not accept online classes in place of core classes or elective credits, except in rare instances or for summer school remediation.

Students interested in pursuing online instruction must meet with the Head of School. In order for AHS to grant credit for an online course, it must be offered through an accredited program that has been pre-­approved before the course begins. There are many accredited online schools and programs. Please consult with AHS’s Head of School and College Counselor to select the best one, based on cost and postsecondary goals.  Families are responsible for the cost of online classes and summer school, though we can work with families for whom this is a hardship.  Students must ensure their grade/transcript from their online course is submitted to the school in order to receive credit.  

Students can enroll in online concurrent enrollment classes following the guidelines below.

Concurrent Enrollment

Students are encouraged to pursue concurrent enrollment at local colleges to further their studies in a way that works well with the AHS curriculum.  Please note that concurrent enrollment cannot be used to replace any of the core classes (Humanities, Digital Art Foundations, Math 1-4, Physics, Biology and Chemistry), but can give a student elective credit.  For concurrent enrollment classes, students will receive the same credit per semester they would receive for an AHS class, 0.5 credits, unless the class includes a lab, in which case they will receive 1 credit per semester.  The grades from concurrent enrollment classes will not be factored into a student’s GPA.

Please note that not all concurrent enrollment classes will provide students with college credit. Not all colleges will accept concurrent enrollment classes for credit; it will be up to the student’s future college to make this determination.  Students must ensure that concurrent enrollment transcripts are submitted alongside AHS transcripts to their postsecondary college in order to potentially receive college credit at that institution.

It is important that students understand that they must schedule their concurrent enrollment classes around their AHS classes. For Seniors, this means that any concurrent enrollment classes must meet in the morning before 10:00am or in the afternoon after 2:30pm. Students should not enroll in any college classes outside of these times, as it will interfere with their success in their AHS classes. Students must ensure their grade/transcript from their concurrent class is submitted to the school in order to receive credit and be demonstrated on their high school transcript.

Dual Enrollment Classes

Due to a collaboration with Pueblo Community College (PCC), some of the courses offered at AHS will be available to take as Dual Enrollment Classes.  This means that these classes have the potential to give students both high school and college credit.  Transfer credit to any college is determined by that institution.  Dual enrollment classes must meet the same course objectives as their equivalent courses at Pueblo Community College, and may require students who choose this option to complete work with higher academic expectations, deeper content knowledge and more difficult assessments than the regular class assignments.

Students may choose to opt in to a dual enrollment course option within the first two weeks of the semester if they meet the placement requirements by passing the prerequisite class, or by placing into the class via Accuplacer or other placement tests determined by PCC or AHS.  Teachers will give students more information about this option in the first week of school.  Currently, we offer dual enrollment for Consumer Math.

Remediating Credits

Animas High School requires that students receive a C- (70 percent) or higher in all core academic courses and electives in order to receive credit.  For students who fail a class, there are two options for remediating that credit:

Course Descriptions

Humanities Core Courses

Course Title

Course Instructor

Course Description

Humanities:

English 9 and Social Studies 9

Stephen Sellers

Ninth grade Humanities focuses on preparing students for being an effective project-based learner and positive member of Animas' academic and social culture. Fundamentally, the class is a space for students to build upon their skills as writers, readers, critical thinkers, creatives and collaborators. Students will engage with a wide sampling of disciplines, such as literature, history, sociology, psychology, philosophy and media literacy all in a student-driven, project-based manner. An array of canonical and diverse texts, tailored for an inclusive classroom, underpin the curriculum and help to build academic and cultural perspective for each student.

Humanities:

English 10 and Modern World History 10

Lori Fisher

Sophomore Humanities is a course focused on students looking outward at the forces that have shaped our modern world, and placing their own experiences within that larger context.  Students read works of literature in various genres, historical documents, and supplementary research to help them build a diverse picture of how our world works today, and how it got to be that way.  Students build their academic voices and skills in formal writing, and work on crafting coherent and powerful perspectives through the use of academic argument, narrative writing, and various creative forms of expression. Topics that have been covered in the past include colonialism, modern conflict and warfare, poetry and performance, adolescence, and globalization.  

Humanities:

English 11 and US History 11

Jessica McCallum

Junior Humanities is an exploration of American ideology, politics, and literature. Students read numerous works of literature, historical documents and other media sources to explore how America’s story has been shaped by a multitude of different perspectives and ideas.  Students express themselves in writing and speech in a variety of genres with a focus on developing skills necessary to succeed in the Humanities disciplines in college such as critical analysis, historical inquiry, crafting sophisticated arguments and managing a robust reading and writing workload.  

This course may be taken for Honors credit. Students may choose this option in the first two weeks of school. More advanced writing assessment and expanded writing assignments will be required for this option. More details will be given to students in the first week of class.

Humanities:

English 12 and Civics 12

Sara Price and Ashley Carruth

12th grade Humanities is focused on preparing students for college-level research and writing.  In the first semester, students explore a social or political issue from many angles in conjunction with Math 4.  In the second semester, we focus heavily on complex academic research, extended writing and speaking as students engage in college level research for their Senior Project, which includes a Senior Thesis, TED Talk style presentation and Take Action Project.  

This course may be taken for Honors credit. Students may choose this option in the first two weeks of school. More advanced writing assessment and expanded writing assignments will be required for this option. More details will be given to students in the first week of class.

Math Core Courses

Course Title

Course Instructor

Course Description

Math 9

Torrey Baldwin

The first year of math supports students to develop problem solving skills via problems of the week (POWs), exploration of the Habits of a Mathematician, and interdisciplinary projects. Topics include algebraic representation and manipulation, functions and function transformations, data analysis and statistics, writing and solving equations, and budgeting/personal finance..

Math 10

Ande Lloyd

The second year of the math sequence emphasizes development of the Habits of a Mathematician through problems of the week (POWs) and interdisciplinary projects. Topics include right triangle trigonometry and Euclidian geometry, inequalities and graphing, linear programming, laws of exponents, statistics and probability, an introduction to trigonometry and quadratic functions and various complex topics related to projects.

PreCalculus

Julian Springer

The third year of math is a wide study of math subjects, working towards perfecting the Habits of a Mathematician and writing strong problems of the week (POWs).  Topics include dimensional analysis, scientific notation, matrices, linear programming, probability, statistics, exponential growth, rates of change, logarithms, derivatives, factoring, trigonometry and geometry.

This course may be taken for Honors credit. Completing challenge extensions will be required for this option, which students will provide evidence for via their portfolio work. More details will be given to students in the first week of class.

Statistics

Kyle Edmondson

The final year of the math sequence has a distinct focus on applied use of data within projects.  Students learn statistical analysis for application in Senior Project, as well as complete a class project using mathematical techniques to address an economic or social issue in conjunction with Senior Humanities class .

This course may be taken for Honors credit. Completing challenge extensions will be required for this option, which students will provide evidence for via their portfolio work. More details will be given to students in the first week of class.

Science Core Courses

Course Title

Course Instructor

Course Description

Biology

Dave Farkas

This lab-based course focuses on the study of life. It includes introductions to the scientific method and literacy, cytology, genetics, anatomy, ecology, taxonomy, evolution, chemistry and microbiology. This course will shift between project-based and college preparatory curriculum.

This course has a course fee of $10

Physics

Tina Trujillo

Physics will be split into two subdisciplines; Mechanics and Electricity and Magnetism.  In addition to concepts including force, gravity, kinematics (velocity and acceleration), projectile motion and energy students will collect and analyze data from a variety of hands on investigations.  Students can expect to develop skills for data analysis using spreadsheets.  The second semester will include static electricity, electric and magnetic field behavior and modeling, simple circuits, motors and power generation.  Each semester will include an independent group project for in depth exploration and demonstration of one key concept covered in the class.

Chemistry

Steve Smith

Chemistry is the study of the interactions of matter and energy on the atomic, molecular and macroscopic scale.  Throughout the year students will investigate atomic theory and structure, the periodic table and periodic trends, chemical bonding, chemical reactions, kinetic theory and the states of matter, the mole and stoichiometry, solutions, acids and bases, thermochemistry and introductory organic chemistry.  This course contains a significant lab component, using facilities at Fort Lewis College, during which students will become proficient in safely designing, conducting, analyzing and communicating results from experiments in the chemistry laboratory.  Students will approach all of the above topics and skills through relevant thematic projects that require extensive critical thinking and communication skills.

Art Core Courses

Course Title

Course Instructor

Course Description

Digital Art Foundations

Roxy McKnight

This course will cover the basics of digital art and design through various media and mediums. It is designed to provide many of the skills necessary to create beautiful work in a project-based learning environment.  Students will begin to create their digital portfolios that will archive and showcase their entire educational portfolio.

This course has a course fee of $10

 

LINK Internship

Course Title

Course Instructor

Course Description

LINK Internship

Janae Hunderman

In their junior year, all students prepare for and complete a three-week-long, full-time internship. Students complete career interest surveys, refine their resumes, and participate in mock interviews in the first semester in order to prepare to reach out to potential mentors. During the second semester, students are supported to represent themselves professionally as they contact potential mentors, ultimately confirming their placement for late April. During LINK, students have no classes and they are fully immersed in the working world. LINK culminates in presentations of learning where students share the insights they gained through their experience and the contributions they made to their workplaces as well as how the experience will affect their future goals.

Humanities Electives

Course Title

Course Instructor

Course Description

Length

Prerequisites

Positive Psychology: The Science of Well-being (SS)

Torrey Baldwin

Students in this course will learn about the field of positive psychology, through engaging in a series of challenges designed to increase happiness and help them to build more productive habits. As preparation for these tasks, students will learn about common misconceptions about happiness, annoying features of the mind that lead us to think the way we do, and the research that can help us change. This class is based on the most popular course in Yale University’s history, designed by Professor Laurie Santos and completed by an additional 2+ million people online.

Semester

None

Film Studies (LA, SS) 

Stephen Sellers

Film Studies is a writing and reading intensive introduction to film analysis, providing students with the basic tools to understand, appreciate, and analyze the technical and aesthetic dimensions of film and to understand how these elements come together to create meaning. The course will focus on specific filmmaking techniques, provide a brief overview of film history, and introduce students to the concepts of genre, ideology and style.

Semester

None

Journalism/Quill Media (LA)

Jessica McCallum

Students in this course become members of Quill Media, Animas High School’s student news organization.  They study and practice the art of journalism: gathering, documenting, and producing news and features from the Osprey Nest and beyond.  We will learn to report and document in a variety of journalistic genres, producing content for both print and digital media.  We will also study the practice of journalism at a societal level, answering the essential question: “What is the role of the journalist in a democratic society?”

Yearlong

Sophomores, Juniors, and Seniors only

Advanced Journalism/Quill Media

Jessica McCallum

Students will continue their work on Quill Media, often taking on editorial and leadership positions and mentoring new staff members.

*This course can be taken multiple years

Yearlong

Successful Completion of Journalism/Quill Media and teacher approval

Creative Writing Workshop (LA)

Lori Fisher

Come and hone your creative writing skills, in a workshop and critique based class.  In this class we’ll be covering the basic tools for writing personal narratives, short stories, and poetry by analyzing examples from the masters of the craft, learning about the technical craft and tools of creative writing, and above all, writing and revising.  Come prepared to write, to take risks in your writing, and to offer critique of your classmates!

Semester

None

On Course: Paths to Learning (LA)

Lori Fisher

This class is designed to help students develop mindsets, habits, and tools that will help them to be more successful in school and in life.  By blending research from psychology, education, and other fields, this course uncovers the essential behaviors of successful people, and helps students to apply those principles to their own lives through journals, essays, discussion, mini-projects, and other activities.  This is an interactive class that requires active participation, and is great for ALL students who want to increase their academic performance, their self-knowledge, and their ability to accomplish their goals.

Semester

Sophomores, Juniors, and Seniors only

SAT Preparation (LA)

Julian Springer

Learn all you need to know to excel on the SAT.  This course will focus on content, strategies, and practice for both the math and humanities portions of the SAT.  Highly recommended for Juniors taking the SAT in April, yet open to all students who wish to improve their test taking skills.  After students take the SAT, they will have a chance to explore a passion project.

Semester

None

Advanced:

Imperialism and Foreign Aid in Sub Saharan Africa (IFASA)

Ashley Carruth

This is an advanced seminar-style class that  aims to deconstruct stereotypical notions of “Africa” as we zoom in on the legacy of imperialism and humanitarian aid in Sub-Saharan Africa.  We will study European Imperialism of Africa during the late 1800’s through early 1900’s with a particular focus on the Congo. We’ll read The Heart of Darkness by Joseph Conrad, which is a classic (yet controversial) novella about Belgium’s King Leopold’s brutal exploitation of the Congo Free State.  We will then move on to learn about anti-colonialist and African independence movements in the 1960’s.  To end the course, students will make connections with new forms of modern day imperialism in other parts of the world.

Semester

Juniors and Seniors.

Interested Sophomores should speak to Ashley, and may need a teacher recommendation

SciFi & the Human Condition

Sara Price

Science fiction is defined by James Gunn as a literature of change since new ideas entail consequences. The nature of change is central to the genre of science fiction writing and in reading it we think about the world we want and can visualize and articulate the unforeseeable consequences. Yes, we will read about aliens, machine intelligence, and time machines, but what will really be doing is better understanding the human condition, through an imaginative exploration of the jungle of political, social, psychological, and ethical issues. Science fiction empowers us to think about and deal with the consequences of change, in a real world that keeps changing ever faster. In this class, we will read some short stories, and a couple of novels, with the intention of better understanding the literature we are reading, while applying what we are learning to the world around us through Socratic seminars and group lit circles. The class will culminate in writing our own short science fiction story, with the potential for a student voice driven project to accompany your writing.  

Semester

None

Podcasting: Digital Storytelling

Stephen Sellers

In this semester long course, we will deconstruct and analyze everything about digital storytelling in order to make our own powerful, professional podcasts. We will learn the essentials of quality sound and podcast production as well as seek to understand the role of ethics and diversity in podcasting. Through practice we will Improve broadcast skills, including writing, research, interviews, editing and on-air presentation with the aim of benefiting ourselves and society.

Semester

None

Race & Identity in US American Literature

Ashley Carruth

Come hang out with Ashley and explore the way in which race and identity have shaped and been shaped by US American literature. We'll read a variety of American novels that focus on race and identity, some critical analysis to help understand the themes we uncover, a smattering of poetry to enrich our readings, and some contemporary commentary via podcasts, satire, comedy shows and short form journalism. We'll spend our class time together engaged in lively discussion about  race and identity, and the ways in which those constructs shape the culture of "America".  You'll need to write a couple college-level literature analysis essays.  We'll drink some tea and maybe have some crumpets.

This will be a fast-paced course as we cover a lot of reading.  Classes will be primarily discussion-based with a little bit of lecture here and there. Please make sure you're ready to dive deep into conscious reading and critical thinking before signing up for this class.

Semester

Juniors and Seniors.

Interested Sophomores should speak to Ashley, and may need a teacher recommendation

Science Electives

Course Title

Course Instructor

Course Description

Length

Prerequisites

Anatomy

Tina Trujillo

This is a rigorous college preparatory course that focuses on human anatomy. There is a large lecture, memorization and test taking portion for this class designed to foster a collegiate environment. This course is also intended to provide a look into careers in Life Science and the medical field.

This course has a course fee of $10

Semester

Successful completion of Biology

Introduction to Computer Science Term 1 - Python

Dusty Grannis

Introduction to Computer Science is an introductory-level course for students brand new to programming and computer science. In this course, you will learn problem-solving strategies, software design, and the foundations of computer science. You'll do so using two key tools: the Edhesive programming environment and EarSketch, a software package that turns your code into music.

Not only will this course prepare you for continuing your studies in computer science (for example, by taking AP Computer Science A and AP Computer Science Principles), but it will also teach you how to think like a scientist and solve real-world problems, skills that are important to every 21st-century citizen.

There are no prerequisites for this course, although you should have basic familiarity with how to operate a computer and use applications. It's also recommended that you have familiarity with basic algebra principles before starting this course.

Semester

None (recommended to have basic algebra principles)

Introduction to Computer Science Term 2 - Python

Dusty Grannis

This course will continue to introduce students to the python programming language.  Students will acquire the programming skills oriented around data processing, variables, functions and control structures to solve real programming challenges.

Semester

Successful completion of Introduction to Computer Science Term 1

Geology

Julian Springer

In this course students will explore the core discipline of the earth sciences, and can expect to learn about many different phenomena, including plate tectonics and mountain building, volcanoes and earthquakes, and the long-term evolution of the Earth's atmosphere, surface and life.  Because of the ever-increasing demand for resources, the growing exposure to natural hazards, and the changing climate, geology is of considerable societal relevance. This course introduces students to the basics of geology. Through a combination of lectures, labs, and field time, we will address topics ranging from mineral and rock identification to the origin of the continents, from geologic mapping to plate tectonics, and from erosion by rivers and glaciers to the history of life.

Semester

None

Ecology

Tina Trujillo

Ecology is the study of the interactions between organisms and their environment. This course will study the fundamentals of ecological science with an emphasis on sustainability. During the semester students will investigate the current ecological state of our local region including impacts from the 416 Fire. This college preparatory course is designed for students who want to practice hard science and get experience in the field.

$10 fee for the course.  

Semester

Successful completion of Biology

Math Electives

Course Title

Course Instructor

Course Description

Length

Prerequisites

Calculus

Kyle Edmondson

An in-depth study of limits, derivatives, optimization and integrals.

Yearlong

Successful Completion of  Pre-Calculus or Placement Test

Advanced Calculus

Kyle Edmondson

Extension of Calculus including sequences and series, advanced integration techniques and additional advanced topics to be determined by class. Past subjects have included special relativity, Fourier analysis, differential equations, the Riemann Zeta function and the Mandelbrot set.

Yearlong

Successful Completion of  Calculus or Placement Test

Consumer Math 

Christine Imming

Students will develop financial life skills including creating budgets, managing

money and debt, using credit cards, paying taxes, financing student loans/ mortgages and other adulting life skills.

This course is eligible for dual enrollment credit at AHS and Pueblo Community College.

Semester

None

Advanced Consumer Math 

Christine Imming

Students will take a deeper dive into  financial literacy  skills and expand learning around Consumer Math topics creating budgets, managing money and debt, using credit cards, paying taxes, financing student loans/ mortgages and other important topics related to financial literacy.

Semester

Successful Completion of  Consumer Math

SAT Preparation

Julian Springer

Learn all you need to know to excel on the SAT.  This course will focus on content, strategies, and practice for both the math and humanities portions of the SAT.  Highly recommended for Juniors taking the SAT in April, yet open to all students who wish to improve their test taking skills.  After students take the SAT, they will have a chance to explore a passion project.

Semester

None

Engineering Mathematics: Tiny Home Construction

Dave Farkas

Welcome to the world of tiny homes and a revolution that’s sweeping the continent. Thousands of people are leaving traditional expectations of big homes and expensive mortgages and are building energy efficient, smaller homes focusing on what’s needed to live in a structure that has all the amenities you want without all the wasted space and needless square footage. The objective of this course is to design a liveable, awesome, energy efficient, tiny home while studying math concepts such as area, perimeter, volume of irregular objects, trigonometry, geometry, and scale drawings. We will also be studying and learning about materials, insulation, wiring, framing, electricity and associated components, fixtures, cabinetry, appliances, and everything else you could think of for a tiny home. This course focuses on research and design along with construction concepts.

Semester

None

Advanced Engineering Mathematics: Tiny Home Construction

Dave Farkas

The next step in tiny home construction, students will be taking their learning further, understanding “finish work” to finalize our project. This semester focuses on electrical, plumbing, cabinetry, and installation of the final pieces to make the home complete. Due to Covid-19, CAD will be the focus as we create drawings to illustrate our installation. Students will be researching solar systems and appliances that utilize solar power along with alternative methods of dealing with human waste. How wonderful would it be if our Tiny Homes were off the grid?

Semester

Successful Completion of  Engineering Mathematics: Tiny Home Construction

Art of Mathematical Thinking

Ande Lloyd

Have you ever sat in a math classroom and didn’t feel like you fit in? Just the

mere mention of the word mathematics makes you want to run out the door?

The Art of Mathematical Thinking course is designed to break through these barriers in order to facilitate an experience with students that empowers, energizes, and makes you realize that math is actually pretty cool and incredibly useful! The goal of this course is for students to see that mathematics is a powerful tool for living, as you develop confidence with mathematics, habits of inquiry, and logical thinking. We will combine classical math practices with project-based learning to complete thoughtful, elegant, and interesting projects that highlight what you’ve learned. Topics covered include algebra, geometry, and statistics. Students as co-designer for project development will be expected so voice and choice is key.

Semester

Sophomores, Juniors, and Seniors only

College Algebra

Ande Lloyd

This course will cover linear and quadratic equations, introduce more advanced functions including polynomial, rational, exponential, and logarithmic functions, and explore trigonometry and the unit circle.

Semester

None

Foreign Language Electives

Course Title

Course Instructor(s)

Course Description

Length

Prerequisites

Spanish 1

Susy Raleigh and Jenny McKenzie

Learn the basics of Spanish through Comprehensible Input, a method that incorporates high frequency words in the context of stories, books and cultural activities. Students will acquire language with music, film, and meaningful interactions in the target language.

Yearlong

None

Spanish 2

Susy Raleigh

Students will continue to build literacy and conversational skills through  Comprehensible Input methods which include storytelling, reading, music, historical and cultural activities.

Yearlong

Placement test or Successful Completion of  Spanish 1

Spanish 3

Jenny McKenzie 

Students will take their language skills to the next level in this immersion-style, comprehensible class.  With a heavy focus on reading, conversation and film, this class will also explore more advanced grammar in preparation for ongoing language study.

Yearlong

Placement test or Successful Completion of  Spanish 2

Spanish 4

Jenny McKenzie

¡Ya hay que encender el fuego del bilingüismo!  The goal of this class is to find the heartbeat of language skills through immersion and authentic expression.   Through intensive studies in literature, history and world issues, students will examine the human story coming out of the Spanish-speaking world (in its native tongue!).  Students will work to express themselves authentically and build the bridges of communications across culture and language barriers with the ultimate goal of advancing a personal path of bilingualism.    

Yearlong

Placement test or Successful Completion of  Spanish 3

French 1

Susy Raleigh

This class will focus on learning to speak and understand French in a fun, natural, interactive, and hands on environment.

Yearlong

None

French 3

Susy Raleigh

In this course, we will continue our practice in French, emphasizing conversational skills, augmenting our knowledge of other verb tenses (subjunctive, conditional, and future), increasing our vocabulary through podcasts, film, music, and reading short stories and novels.

Yearlong

Placement test or Successful Completion of  French 2

Visual and Performing Arts Electives

Course Title

Course Instructor

Course Description

Length

Prerequisites

Drawing

Britt Blasdell

Drawing is a skill that can be developed with practice. In this course, students will learn how to draw with proper techniques, discovering how to represent what you see through studies in contour drawing, perspective, positive/negative space and value.

Semester

None

Advanced Drawing

Britt Blasdell

Advanced Drawing is designed to follow the Drawing class. In Advanced Drawing students continue to practice and strengthen techniques learned in their previous drawing class. Students learn new techniques, skills and vocabulary to apply to their drawings. Students have freedom to choose what drawing projects to focus on based on the types of drawing techniques they learned in the previous drawing class. Students are encouraged to create drawings on a larger scale, using the time needed to make art that reflects the Elements of Art in drawing. Students help design and facilitate University style artistic critique for Drawing students as well as for peers in Advanced Drawing students.

*This course can be taken multiple semesters/years

Semester

Successful Completion of  Drawing

Studio Art

Britt Blasdell

Studio Art Class introduces students to the Elements of Art and Principles of Design while honing in their drawing and painting skills. Studio experiences in the classroom will provide the opportunity to play and work with a multitude of mixed media (block printing, acrylic mediums,watercolor etc.). Students will be encouraged to work with these constraints to develop individual style and creative problem solving, producing an overall professional art portfolio. Art history will play a role into every art project as well as the practice of University style critique.

Semester

None

Advanced Studio Art

Britt Blasdell

Advanced Studio Art is a continuation of Studio Art. In Advanced Studio Art students explore the Elements of Art and Principles of Design in greater depth while they continue to strengthen their painting and drawing skills. Students learn techniques to nourish their own individual artistic style that they discovered in Studio Art. Students also help design and facilitate University style artistic critique for Studio Art students as well as for peers in Advanced Studio Art.

*This course can be taken multiple semesters/years

Semester

Successful Completion of  Studio Art

Painting

Britt Blasdell

This course is designed to introduce students to the basic elements of painting. Students will explore color, light, texture,transparency/impasto and composition. Experience or no experience needed!  Come with an open mind and willingness to create.

Semester

None

Advanced Painting

Britt Blasdell

Advanced Painting is designed to follow the Painting class. In Advanced Painting students continue to practice and strengthen techniques using the basic elements of painting.  Students learn new techniques, skills and vocabulary to apply to their paintings. Students have the freedom to choose what painting projects to focus on. They are encouraged to paint on a larger scale and use the time to create paintings that reflect the Elements of Art and various painting techniques. Students help design and facilitate University style artistic critique for painting students as well as for peers in Advanced Painting students.

*This course can be taken multiple semesters/years

Semester

Successful Completion of  Painting

Advanced Digital Art 

Roxy McKnight

This course centers around the exploration of Digital Collage.  Collage is the natural progression of illustration, as it combines drawing with the other mediums. It is the fusing of methods that makes for a new language. Part of the beauty of collage is its flexibility: It can employ many different media, including painting and drawing, paper, photomontage, wood, mosaic—and of course, today, digital media.  Increasingly, collage is being used in ads, magazine editorials, fashion spreads, street art, album covers, animation and websites.

*This course can be taken multiple semesters/years

Semester

Successful Completion of  Digital Art Foundations

-or-

 Digital Art

Digital Photography

Roxy McKnight

Photography courses provide students with an understanding of photographic media, techniques, and processes. These courses focus on the development of photographic compositions through manipulation of the fundamental processes of artistic expression. Students may learn to make meaningful visual statements with an emphasis on personal creative expression to communicate ideas, feelings, or values. This Photography course may also include the history of photography, historic movements, image manipulation, critical analysis, and some creative special effects. Students engage in critiques of their photographic images, the works of other students, and those by professional photographers for the purpose of reflecting on and refining work.

Semester

Student must have access to a DSLR camera for the duration of the class (we are working to acquire some for students to borrow.)  

Advanced Digital Photography

Roxy McKnight

Experienced student photographers will continue to develop their understanding of photographic media, techniques, and processes with a goal of expanding their individual style and portfolio of work.

*This course can be taken multiple semesters/years

Semester

Successful Completion of Digital Photography

Student must have access to a DSLR camera for the duration of the class (we are working to acquire some for students to borrow.)

Music Production

iAM Music Instructors

The iAM Music Production course will allow students to explore creative sound making using digital interfaces. This course is designed to help students develop the skills needed to record, make beats, and integrate sound loops by producing their own musical works. The course will also teach basic fundamentals of music to make the production process more fluid and to heighten their overall understanding of music.

At the end of the semester students will submit their final selected production project of their choice. Students can explore any style they choose and can collaborate with whomever they like to create the best possible end product.

Semester

None

Advanced Music Production

iAM Music Instructors

Students will continue The iAM Music Production course will allow students to explore creative sound making using digital interfaces. This course is designed to help students develop the skills needed to record, make beats, and integrate sound loops by producing their own musical works. The course will also teach basic fundamentals of music to make the production process more fluid and to heighten their overall understanding of music.

At the end of the semester students will submit their final selected production project of their choice. Students can explore any style they choose and can collaborate with whomever they like to create the best possible end product.

*This course can be taken multiple semesters/years

Semester

Successful Completion of Music Production

Music Performance: Guitar Class

iAM Music Instructors

This is an introductory course to guitar that will take students through the necessary steps to understanding the basics of the most important elements of the guitar. Each student will come out of the course with a solid foundation in basic rhythms and strum patterns and the primary chords needed to play most popular music. The final project will be a recorded video performance of each student playing a song on guitar from start to finish.

Semester

None

Advanced Music Performance: Guitar Class

iAM Music Instructors

This is an introductory course to guitar that will take students through the necessary steps to understanding the basics of the most important elements of the guitar. Each student will come out of the course with a solid foundation in basic rhythms and strum patterns and the primary chords needed to play most popular music. The final project will be a recorded video performance of each student playing a song on guitar from start to finish.

*This course can be taken multiple semesters/years

Semester

Successful Completion of Music Performance: Guitar Class

VAM Theatre Class

Joy Kilpatrick

VAM is a Theatre Class designed to explore and develop the instrument of the actor (student) through the study and training of their Voice, Acting, and Movement. This experiential process and reflection, along with the collective collaboration of the class, will prepare the actor (student) to “apply what they have learned to the art of translating life into art: The Art of Theatre.

Semester

None

Advanced VAM Theatre Class

Joy Kilpatrick

Students continue to pursue and refine their Theatre skills. VAM is a Theatre Class designed to explore and develop the instrument of the actor (student) through the study and training of their Voice, Acting, and Movement. This experiential process and reflection, along with the collective collaboration of the class, will prepare the actor (student) to “apply what they have learned to the art of translating life into art: The Art of Theatre.

*This course can be taken multiple semesters/years

Semester

Successful Completion of VAM Theatre Class 

Postsecondary Preparation  Electives

Course Title

Course Instructor(s)

Course Description

Length

Prerequisites

LINK 2.0 Senior Internship

Janae Hunderman

This opportunity is for highly motivated seniors who would like a second internship experience. Students must connect with a mentor and confirm with the LINK Internship Coordinator before the Add/Drop deadline in order to be signed up for the course. Students will have a free period during the school day and complete 60 hours in their internship as it fits into their schedule, often including hours outside of school.

Semester or Yearlong

Successful completion of LINK 1.0 and approval from LINK Internship Coordinator

Personal and Career Readiness

Carlin Nielsen and Heather Prekup

This course introduces students to the skills and strategies that are helpful in becoming more focused, productive individuals. Emphasize goal-setting; decision-making; managing time, energy, and stress; refining study skills; and identifying alternatives and coping strategies that are broadly applicable to all areas of high school.

Semester or Yearlong

By Invitation Only- 9th grade

Personal and Career Readiness- Access Skills

Carlin Nielsen and Heather Prekup

This course introduces students to the skills and strategies that are helpful in becoming more focused, productive individuals with an emphasis in specific access skills such as decision-making, time management, study skills, organization, work completion, and identifying alternative behaviors and coping strategies.

Semester or Yearlong

By Invitation Only- 10th grade

Personal and Career Readiness- Career Success

Carlin Nielsen and Heather Prekup

This course introduces students to the skills and strategies that are helpful in becoming more focused, productive individuals, specifically in their careers, with an emphasis in goal-setting; decision-making; managing time, energy and stress; developing well written cover letters and resumes, and skills around acquiring and maintaining a job.

Semester or Yearlong

By Invitation Only- 11th grade

Personal and Career Readiness- College Success

Carlin Nielsen and Heather Prekup

This course introduces students to the skills and strategies that are helpful in becoming more focused, productive individuals, specifically in preparing for and attending college, with an emphasis on goal-setting; decision-making; managing time, energy and stress; refining study skills; applying for scholarships and acceptance to schools, and preparing to use life skills

Semester or Yearlong

By Invitation Only- 12th grade

Non Credit-Bearing Classes

Course Title

Course Instructor

Course Description

Advisory

Varies

Beginning in 9th grade, each student is paired with a faculty/staff member who is his/her Advisor. Advisory groups are made up of 10­-15 students in the same grade. Advisory groups meet weekly.  We use advisory groups to strengthen our school culture and provide personalized academic and social/emotional support for each and every student.

Senior Project

Senior Team

As a culmination of their senior year, all seniors complete an independent, self-designed project.  Senior Project includes a Senior Thesis, TED Talk style presentation and Take Action Project.  

Course Title

Course Instructor

Course Description

Length

Prerequisites

Project Application

Varies

A teacher-supervised period where students have space and time to complete work for projects in any of their classes.  This class will be graded on a pass/fail basis and does not receive elective credit towards graduation requirements.

Semester

None