Resource Library for COVID-19

Introduction  Please read! 

Howdy y’all! My name’s B and I created this resource document because in the wake of any kind of problem, large or small, we need each other. We must be informed, be prepared, take action, and take care of each other. We aren’t acting out of fear or panic, we’re acting in solidarity with one another and with empathy and care to protect the vulnerable among us.

To submit additional resources, you can message me @blackcatbarrera on Twitter. The short link for this document is tiny.cc/beatCOVID-19. I’ve also created a local resource document for the city I live in, San Antonio: tiny.cc/SACOVID-19. If you are able to do so, I recommend creating one for your city or town!

Please bookmark this document and share with your networks! Click here for an Instagram graphic for sharing. Feel free to make any graphics of your own!

Information

Big Action #1: Social Distancing

Big Action #2: Effective Handwashing

Big Action #3: Make and Wear a Mask in Public

Other Important Actions: Do these too!

Supplies and Preparation

Local Resources: What are the resources in your community?

What do I do if I think I have COVID-19?

Mutual Aid and Support: How do we help each other?

Wellbeing: How do I help myself?

What should I do if I’m unsafe?

Who should I give money to?

Organizing: How do we use this moment to fight for justice?

Information

Flatten the Curve: Really helpful, comprehensive guide about what COVID-19 is, is not, and what we should do. I recommend everyone start here.

Basic Facts About COVID-19 from the CDC: Easily digestible page with quick and basic facts about COVID-19.

It’s not overreacting to prepare for coronavirus. Here’s how.: Highlights: 1.) Seriously, wash your hands. 2.) Wearing a mask in public will help you and others stay safe even if you’re not feeling sick. 3.) If you get sick, you might be out of commission for a few days or weeks. Get the things you’d need to manage that. 4.) Consider what you’d do if schools and daycares are closed. 5.) Psychological preparation is important too.

Virology: Interesting and informative podcast episode from Ologies about COVID-19. Also debunks myths and answers common questions.

What Taiwan can teach the world on fighting the coronavirus: Taiwan got their shit together and they got it together fast. Here’s what we can learn from them.


Covid-19, your community, and you — a data science perspective: “We are data scientists—that is, our job is to understand how to analyze and interpret data. When we analyze the data around covid-19, we are very concerned. The most vulnerable parts of society, the elderly and the poor, are most at risk, but controlling the spread and impact of the disease requires us all to change our behavior. Wash your hands thoroughly and regularly, avoid groups and crowds, cancel events, and don’t touch your face. In this post, we explain why we are concerned, and you should be too.”

Big Action #1: Social Distancing

What is Social Distancing?: One of the best and most effective methods for preventing the spread of the virus is social distancing. This article explains what it is and how to practice it.

What is “social distancing,” and how can it slow the coronavirus outbreak?: This article explains the difference between quarantine, isolation, and social distancing and goes into more depth about social distancing. Highlights: stay six feet from others as much as possible, avoid mass gatherings, avoid traveling, work from home if you can, stay home if you’re sick.

Big Action #2: Effective Handwashing

CDC: When and How to Wash Your Hands: Handwashing is the one of the other best and most effective methods at preventing the spread of the virus. We must wash our hands often and properly. This article explains how.

Handwashing Song: If you have children, are around children, or work with children, this is a cute song about effective handwashing that you could print out and teach them. If you're an adult you should learn it too because easily memorized rhymes are good for any age.

Big Action #3: Make and Wear a Mask in Public

This is a simple no-sew mask. You shouldn’t buy masks and you should donate any that you do have to healthcare workers, but DIY masks are a good measure to keep yourself and others safer when in public. If you can sew, consider making and donating masks. There are many patterns available.

Wear your mask safely: Wash your hands thoroughly before putting your mask on. Don’t touch your face or mask when wearing. Throw washable masks in the laundry or hamper after wearing and wash your hands thoroughly again.

Other Important Actions: Do these too!

CDC: Steps to prevent illness: Other important actions to take include: staying home if you’re sick, covering your coughs and sneezes, wear a facemask when in public, even if you’re not feeling sick, and clean and disinfect. Click the link to learn more.

CDC: Travel: Basically, you should postpone or cancel any upcoming travel.

OSHA: What should I do at work?: Frequently wash your hands, avoid touching your eyes, nose, or mouth with unwashed hands, and avoid close contact with people who are sick. See document for more depth. Has a section for both workers who could have occupational exposure to COVID-19 and workers who don’t.

Supplies and Preparation

Your medicine cabinet: Now is as good a time as any to restock on over-the-counter medicines and first aid kit supplies. Check this link to see what you should have at home. (But don't hoard resources, especially with masks!)

Cleaning Supplies: This list has re-approved cleaning products by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) for use against emerging enveloped viral pathogens and can be used during the coronavirus (COVID-19) outbreak. 


Research: Vitamin D supplementation to prevent acute respiratory tract infections: systematic review and meta-analysis of individual participant data: If you are deficient in vitamin D, supplementation may reduce your risk of contracting acute viral and bacterial respiratory infections by up to 70%. Vitamin D is fat soluble, so if you choose to supplement, be sure to take it with food.

10 Dinners You Can Make Without a Trip to the Grocery Store: Worried about going to the grocery store in the coming weeks? These 10 recipes that focus on pantry staples.

Local Resources: What are the resources in your community?

Below are links to local, community-level resources. If you know of any documents like these, send them to me and I’ll link them.

What do I do if I think I have COVID-19?

CDC: Steps to help prevent the spread of COVID-19 if you are sick: “If you are sick with COVID-19 or suspect you are infected with the virus that causes COVID-19, follow the steps below to help prevent the disease from spreading to people in your home and community.”

CDC: Testing in the U.S.: Check out this link for more information and a map concerning the testing status of each state. Contact your state health department regarding questions about testing.

COSA COVID-19 Self Screening Tool: This Self Screening Tool will ask you questions about symptoms and determine wether you should take steps to get tested.

Mutual Aid and Support: How do we help each other?

Autonomous Groups Are Mobilizing Mutual Aid Initiatives to Combat the Coronavirus: Check out this link for local mutual aid resources across the United States organized by state.

Collective Care Is Our Best Weapon against COVID-19: This document is a growing list of mutual aid pandemic disaster care, in alphabetical order.

COVID-19 Community Care Resources: A collection of community-centered resources from Collaborative for a Just Transition in the Gulf.

COVID-19 Messengers: “We’re a nationwide network of healthy young people who can help run errands. A small gesture for a larger pandemic.”

Flatten The Curve Volunteers: Do you have skills or expertise that could be useful in addressing this pandemic and want to help out? Julie McMurry, author of Flatten the Curve, has put together this form as a central organizing place for volunteers.

Help One Another Cards: These cards can be filled out and given to people who are immunocompromised with the contact information of someone who will run errands for them.

Mutual Aid Inspiration: Read this Twitter thread for real-world examples of mutual aid. Take what you need and support each other!

Pod Mapping for Mutual Aid: Great exercise for everyone to engage in. Gets people thinking and talking about mutual aid and their social networks and the resources within them, including the ones they can provide.

Treating Yellow Peril: Resources to Address Coronavirus Racism: “As we continue to track the development of the coronavirus, racial fears and anxieties have become a dominant frame in which people evaluate the concerns over the ongoing COVID-19 coronavirus infection. This page is intended to gather textual and digital resources to provide easy access to material useful for teach-ins, talking points, and classroom teaching.”

Wellbeing: How do I help myself?

Coronavirus Anxiety: How to Cope: Teen Vogue at it again with the good content. This is a good read if you're dealing with health anxiety.

Care for Your Coronavirus Anxiety: Check out this comprehensive and very useful toolkit! This toolkit covers anxiety, mediation, financial fears, and more!  

Crisis Text Line: Text SHARE to 741741 for a mental health crisis hotline.

Coronavirus: Wisdom from a Social Justice Lens: “We bring you timely medical information, invocations, grounding practices and reflections from the March 7, 2020 webinar: COVID-19 (Coronavirus) Preparation for People Living with Chronic Illnesses in the United States. Unlike much of what we’re seeing in the media and public discussion, this virtual gathering centered on the wisdom and life experiences of people who live with chronic illnesses and disability.”

Resources from adrienne maree brown: “here are some resources that might help you think about where to be, how to be, and how to see the possibilities even in this moment, how to move towards life.”

Accessible Immune Supportive Medicine: Rosemary: “In curanderismo Rosemary is known as a grandmother plant, one that protects you from harm and heals the spirit. This plant is used in many traditional rituals such as limpias, spiritual bathing, soaks and also burned to heal a sad heart. Good medicine for those that may feel "burnt out" by the state of things. Those that carry lots of worry or anxiety until they eventually have more energy left to give, a Rosemary bath would be perfect for those in this dance.” I recommend following this account, Mama Maiz, for more herbal guides and remedies.

Free or Fair Cost Online Wellness Classes: These are led by people of color, women, and queer folks.

What should I do if I’m unsafe?

National Domestic Violence Hotline: The NDVH lays out ways how to create a safety plan, practice self care, and reach out for help if you’re the target of domestic violence.

The Network: “The Network/La Red’s 24-hour hotline provides confidential emotional support, information, referrals, safety planning, and crisis intervention for lesbian, gay, bisexual, queer and/or transgender (LGBQ/T) folks, as well as folks in SM/kink and polyamorous communities who are being abused or have been abused by a partner. Call 617-742-4911 (voice) or 800-832-1901 (Toll-Free).

Family Violence Prevention Services:All services will be available throughout the crisis. Crisis Hotline: 210-733-8810. (website is currently unavailable)

Who should I give money to?

National Domestic Workers Alliance: “For many in-home care workers, nannies, and house cleaners the threat from Coronavirus is especially severe. Without access to health care, paid sick leave, or job security, they are being forced to navigate this crisis alone — without a safety net. The money you donate to the Coronavirus Care Fund will provide immediate financial support for domestic workers, and enable them to stay home and healthy — protecting themselves, their families and their communities while slowing the spread of the Coronavirus.”

Service Workers Mutual Aid Fund: “As bars and restaurants close to slow the spread of COVID-19, many service workers will be left without income. This fund will provide temporary relief for the most immediate costs for service workers who have just been laid off or sent home, such as stocking up on food or emergency supplies of helping with medical bills, childcare, rent, or tution.”

Emergency grants available to artists and creatives: List of relief funds to support artists and creatives.

Restaurant Workers Relief Funds: List of relief funds providing support to restaurant workers.

Organizing: How do we use this moment to fight for justice? 

Now is the Time for Solidarity: This national statement on COVID-19 from DSA provides an analysis of the political moment we’re in and how we organize our way out of it. This document also lists concrete suggestions on how to make organizing spaces safer and healthier.  

Puro Mutual Aid Network: San Antonio DSA put together a form for giving and receiving support. This can be a template for mutual aid in your own city or town.


Organizing in a Pandemic: Labor Notes Resources: Labor Notes has put together an extensive list of organizing resources. The COVID-19 ciris is a pivotal moment for the labor movement and we must organize with urgency and militancy.

Demands from Grassroots Organizers Concerning COVID-19: Great resources for organizers, healthcare workers, and city and public health officials. Lays out the demands of what city and state governments should be doing in the wake of this pandemic.

Walmart, Apple and Olive Garden are among major employers updating sick leave policies as coronavirus cases spread: Largely due to continued organizing from workers, as well as the urgency of the pandemic, more and more companies are being successfully pressured into adopting paid sick time policies. Once the pandemic is over, continued effort should be made to ensure the benefits become permanent.

On the Coronavirus and the social crisis: an open letter to Union leadership: “We implore all trade unions to call for an immediate stoppage of non-essential work. We ask that union funds be made available to members taking this course of action, and that donations be made to support community initiatives like food banks and other services, which are essential for working class survival.” → Share to your union and its leadership. 

What if you can’t stay home?: “Recommendations to support the health of people experiencing homelessness during the Coronavirus State of Emergency.”