SUNY CORTLAND MOTOR DEVELOPMENT LAB

PED 201 – Professor Yang

Locomotor Lab Part A:  Lab Two

Name: Beka Fredrickson                  Date: 9/26/11             Lab Group Day and #: MONDAY/ Pre-K group

Tasks

A. To observe the interaction between Cortland students and St. Mary’s students while playing the pre-planned games with an Olympic Theme:

B. Locomotor Tasks Part A Worksheet.

TASK A – OBSERVATION/REFLECTION

Observe the interaction between St. Mary’s students and Cortland students.

1. Observe the St. Mary’s student(s) as they participate in the activities.  Describe the variability of the movement patterns you observed in your students.  Be sure to note with whom you worked, what grade they were in, and any differences in age, gender, or ability.  While watching the children run, gallop, skip, hop, and jump it was easy to pick out the ones who were having difficulty. It was clear to me that the majority of the time any child who was unsuccessful either did not notice, or was one of the youngest. Most children could accomplish the skills however it was common for them to switch the skill to a simple walk or run after about 30 seconds. This is probably due to muscle sensation from the skills they were performing which is good! It was also simple to pick out the students who were really strongly developed in motor skills. The two students we observed we both 1st grade or younger. There was a boy named John and a girl named Sara. John was very small and very hyper! He loved to move around and did a great job attempting all tasks thrown at the group. He was not fully developed and I could notice during certain skills he was not completely performing it. He was a great runner but galloping was a bit harder. I think because he is a boy it made him feel more comfortable in trying the new skills and getting hot and sweaty running around. He seemed to be having fun. At first Sara was participating and she was quiet skilled and proper. Her jumps, hops, and gallops were all fairly good. She could get more air time if she tried more though. I could tell she was not totally into the activities because towards the end she sat out and did not want to participate anymore. I think that sometimes the girls would rather hang out on the side and I just cannot put my finger on the reason why yet. For the most part I think both children did a great job with the skills and had strong motor skills for such a young age.

2. Describe the effective “teaching strategies” that you observed.  What were they and on whom did you use them?  How were they used?  What was the effect?  Were there any strategies that were more effective than others?  If so, why? The teacher candidates did a great job reinforcing rules before and during the activities. They were great with asking effective questions that showed understanding or not. I saw that when whoever was speaking to the children they always kneeled down to their level which is a great strategy for helping students feel more on equal levels. The Cortland students who taught today taught to the kindergarten and first graders. I think they were trying to be patient with the kids while they were doing the activities but being more forceful and loud might have helped keep them on track more. The only thing I noticed that was not effective was the fact that the instructions and organization took way to long. After about a minute even us Cortland students observing were thinking ‘what is going on’. It was so hard to keep the children’s attention! One of the games the Cortland students actually played in with them which I thought was a smart approach in having all the children want to be involved.

MOTOR DEVELOPMENT LAB- Locomotor Skills Part A

TGMD-2: Test for Gross Motor Development- Second Edition- Revised

Name of Students (first names only):__John__________/______Sara________                Grades:__kindergarden___/__first___Ages: _5__/__6___

Gender:  _male______/___female_____

Locomotor Skills- (Lab 2) Part A

Skill

Materials

Directions

Performance Criteria

Child 1

Child 2

1. Run

Use a clear space

During a game or activity, watch a student run. They may not run as fast as they can or for a long period of time due to space but do your best.

  1. Brief period where both feet are off the ground.

yes

yes

  1. Arms in opposition to legs, elbow bent.

Mostly

yes

  1. Foot placement near or on a line (not flat footed).

Not always

yes

  1. Nonsupport leg bent approximately 90 degrees (close to buttocks).

yes

Not fully

2. Gallop

Use a clear space

During a game or activity, watch a student gallop. Tell the student to gallop leading with one foot and then the other.

  1. A step forward with the lead foot followed by a step with the trailing foot to a position adjacent to or behind the lead foot.

yes

yes

  1. Brief period where both feet are off the ground.

Mostly

Mostly

  1. Arms bent and lifted to waist level.

yes

yes

  1. Able to lead with the right and left foot.

yes

yes

3. Hop

Use a clear space

During a game or activity, watch a student hop. Ask the student to hop first on one foot and then on the other foot.

  1. Foot for nonsupport leg is bent and carried in back of the body.

yes

yes

  1. Nonsupport leg swings in pendulum fashion to produce force.

no

no

  1. Arms bent at elbows and swing forward on take off.

no

no

 4.   Able to hop on the right and left foot.

yes

yes