SUNY CORTLAND MOTOR DEVELOPMENT LAB

Spring 2010 – Professor Yang

Locomotor Lab Part A:  Lab Two

Name: Bree Zogaria                                                 Date: September 29, 2010                  Lab Group, Day, and #: Tracy, Ian, Bree - Weds. 201

Tasks

A. To observe the interaction between Cortland students and St. Mary’s students while playing the pre-planned games with a pirate theme

B. Locomotor Tasks Part A Worksheet

TASK A – OBSERVATION/REFLECTION: Observe the interaction between St. Mary’s students and Cortland students.

  1. Observe the St. Mary’s student(s) as they participate in the activities.  Describe the variability of the movement patterns you observed in your students.  Be sure to note with whom you worked, what grade they were in, and any differences in age, gender, or ability.

On Wednesday, we were able to take a pretty good look at two of St. Mary’s younger students in particular (in the pre-K to 2nd grade age group). Adam and Nancy were observed running, hopping, and galloping during the opening games of the pirate lab. There didn’t seem to be any significant difference in their movement patterns that was gender nor age related. There were some slight differences in their execution of these skills, however. Adam demonstrated that he was a great runner. He was able to skillfully and effortlessly execute all of the critical characteristics of running and was able to change direction during a run very quickly. Both students seemed to be in the stages of refining their galloping skills. They understood the gallop and the major characteristics of the skill but had some fine tuning to do in the performance areas. For example: Nancy rarely held her arms bent and at her waist (although, it didn’t keep her from executing her gallop) and Adam seemed to stop galloping fairly quickly. He definitely showed a dominance for his left leg, which might suggest that we have him practice his right as the lead, just to develop the skill more thoroughly. Nancy’s hop was first observed during her skip. She seemed to perform her hop more correctly in her skip than as a solo single leg hop. When she hopped on one leg only she didn’t always have her free leg swinging like a pendulum and it tended to not be carried behind her body at all times. From what I was able to observe of Adam, he was able to hop fairly well but, like his gallop, he only performed the activity for a short period of time before stopping. He didn’t seem to be as continual a mover as some of the other children. This could possibly be a strength endurance issue or a sign that we might want to work on his cardiovascular endurance. This may have perhaps been his personal strategy for the games as well. More observation would be needed to formulate any sort of conclusion. Both children also readily interchanged a jump and a hop. A more thorough review of their skills can be found in chart below.        

  1. Describe the effective “teaching strategies” that you observed.  What were they and on whom did you use them?  How were they used?  What was the effect?  Were there any strategies that were more effective than others?  If so, why?

It seemed that the best way to get the younger kids (well, all kids for that matter) enthused was to get really hyped up yourself! If you were psyched to play a game or to talk to them, they were usually just as psyched back. It also was very important to get your explaining done quickly (very quickly in some cases). The kids had serious ants in their pants and wanted to run and play, NOW – and not sit and listen! Quick instruction for games was essential! I also believe a useful and sometimes necessary implement is a whistle. The whistle was like an instant signal for the kids to turn their attention to you and wait for further instruction. Definitely, a must - for ease of instruction and efficiency! It was also essential to adjust your voice and word selection towards the age group you were working with. Older students wanted to be granted the courtesy of having you speak to them as young adults and not so much little children. We must position ourselves down at their level and ensure all of our actions be age appropriate. It was evident that when you combined these factors you were more successful at provided a fun and effective lesson. I also noticed that a lot of kids really enjoyed a challenge. With the younger students, especially pre-k, you were able challenge them to most anything (though, it was important to remember that it is necessary to set these students up for success during these challenges). Just to illustrate - towards the finish of lab a group of pre-k students and myself were seeing how far we could throw little light fluffy balls and then seeing how fast we could pick them all back up and put them back in the basket. We even did it by color! They LOVED it! With the older kids, a challenge was sometimes the key to getting certain kids to participate in a game they might have thought “uncool”. If they were disinterested in a game you were offering, you could say, “why don’t you just get in there and show me just how fast you can run” or “let’s see if you can do it better than the instructors” (like Pam did in her relays)! Most of the time they would eat it right up and have an absolute blast playing! Practice makes perfect for the kids and their skills - just as practice makes perfect for a teacher and their continuous development of their teaching skills/strategies/abilities.  

 MOTOR DEVELOPMENT LAB- Locomotor Skills (Part A) = TGMD-2: Test for Gross Motor Development

Name of Students: Adam / Nancy                        Grades: (pre-k through 2nd)                Ages: 4-6                     Gender: Male / Female, respectively

Locomotor Skills- (Lab 2) Part A

Skill

Materials

Directions

Performance Criteria

Adam

Nancy

1. Run

Use a clear space

During a game or activity, watch a student run. They may not run as fast as they can or for a long period of time due to space but do your best.

  1. Brief period where both feet are off the ground.

x

x

  1. Arms in opposition to legs, elbow bent.

x

x

  1. Foot placement near or on a line (not flat footed).

x – good run, change dir. quickly/swiftly

x

  1. Nonsupport leg bent approximately 90 degrees (close to buttocks). Neither student bent legs this much.

x

x

2. Gallop

Use a clear space

During a game or activity, watch a student gallop. Tell the student to gallop leading with one foot and then the other.

  1. A step forward with the lead foot followed by a step with the trailing foot to a position adjacent to or behind the lead foot.

x

x – very swift

  1. Brief period where both feet are off the ground.

x

x

  1. Arms bent and lifted to waist level.

x

x – at times, down or out flailing

  1. Able to lead with the right and left foot.

x – able to see a left dominance

x

3. Hop

Use a clear space

During a game or activity, watch a student hop. Ask the student to hop first on one foot and then on the other foot.

  1. Foot for nonsupport leg is bent and carried in back of the body. Both didn’t always carry leg in rear.

x

x

  1. Nonsupport leg swings in pendulum fashion to produce force.

Both tended to hop (jump) 2-foot unless otherwise instructed.

unobserved

x – to some degree

  1. Arms bent at elbows and swing forward on take off.

x

x

 4.   Able to hop on the right and left foot.

x – activity usually brief

x