SUNY CORTLAND MOTOR DEVELOPMENT LAB

Spring 2010 – Professor. Yang

Locomotor Lab Part A:  Lab Two

Name: Andrew Hettinger                                        Date: 9/30/10                                                     Lab Group Day and #: Locomotors

Tasks

A. To observe the interaction between Cortland students and St. Mary’s students while playing the pre-planned games with an Pirate Theme:

B. Locomotor Tasks Part A Worksheet.

TASK A – OBSERVATION/REFLECTION

Observe the interaction between St. Mary’s students and Cortland students.

1. Observe the St. Mary’s student(s) as they participate in the activities.  Describe the variability of the movement patterns you observed in your students.  Be sure to note with whom you worked , what grade they were in, and any differences in age, gender, or ability.  

   

 While observing the activity that was put on by other class mates in my lab, it was interesting to see the movement patterns and motor development skills for each a male and female student at St.Marrys school. The male and female subjects were six years of age and in first grade. The patterns of the same age group seemed to be around the same in variability but for gender the boy seemed to be more efficient in movement patterns and areas of the run, gallop, and hop then the female student that will be explained. First for the running aspect of the observation it seemed that the male subject had a good understanding of the run. His feet were off the ground at brief periods during this run and also he had good opposition with his arms to his legs. However the female subject had some opposition issues in that it was not consistent like the male subject. One thing however that both the female and male subject shared in movement patterns was that they were flat footed at some times when stopping then starting to run again. The male subject showed a little flat footed at points but not as much as the female subject.

        Another movement pattern that I observed was that of the gallop. Both genders were able to gallop and have their feet off the ground at brief periods of time. Also both the female and male subjects had there arms bent and at waist level. However one thing that I saw in the female subject when observing the gallop was that she was not able to lead with her opposite foot. When I was observing I saw that she kept her right leg in front, and when the lab teachers said to switch and gallop with opposite legs, she attempted it but went right back to leading with her right foot. What was interesting in observing the male and female for the gallop I was that they understood very well to keep one foot behind them as it trails adjacent to their front foot.

        One last observation I observed for movement patterns was the hop. This movement gave trouble to the female subject. While observing you can see that she kept her non-support leg in front rather than in the back. This in turn caused her not to get momentum to go forward as easy as the male subject who kept his non-support leg behind him, which allowed him to move his non support leg in a pendulum fashion to produce force to allow the hop to be easier and more consistent. Also the male subject used his arms and elbow to help him move forward. During takeoff the male subject used his arms to help allow him to produce momentum as he swung them forward. Observing this pattern was different with the female subject. The female subject seemed to have her arms bent but never really swung her arms forward consistently.

2. Describe the effective “teaching strategies” that you observed.  What were they and on whom did you use them?  How were they used?  What was the effect?  Were there any strategies that were more effective than others?  If so, why?

        

Some teaching strategies that I observed that were effective was that the teachers seemed enthusiastic about teaching the game, and this in turn made the kids interested in what was going to be taught. They did not seem bored and were not just going through the motions of teaching. Also another teaching strategy that I observed was that the teachers went down to their level, in which they kneeled close to the students so that they did not seem intimidating if they were standing in front of them. This helps the students feel more comfortable and allows them to listen a little bit better than if a teacher was towering over them. The effect this strategy had on the students were that they were able to focus on the teacher and not thinking in their mind how big and tall the teacher was and it made them feel safe in a way that everyone is at the same level.

        One strategy that I believed did not go as well as some others was when the group that was performing the last activity trying to get the students attention. Here the students were all over the place and they were not listening to the lab teacher at all. Some were having their own conversations as the lab teachers were trying to explain an activity. Here the lab teachers should have had a strategy of getting the students attention. Such strategy they could have used was having whoever was listening put their hands in the air, and the students that were still talking would see that something is going on. Now the students will look around at what is going on and hopefully catch on to be quiet and listen. However after they got the students attention there was a good teaching strategy that was used during the song and dance. The lab teacher had everyone in a circle in which all the students can see what the teacher is doing. Also the lab teacher took each step slowly and had the students practice. Once it seemed that the students understood the song and dance they put it all together and were participating with them. This had a great effect because now the students while there participating can see the lab teacher and if there not sure about a step they can just watch the lab teacher and can catch on. All in all I felt that for the first lab went well. Yes, there were some poor teaching strategies but you can only move forward from it and learn better was to teach and have better skills and techniques.

 MOTOR DEVELOPMENT LAB- Locomotor Skills Part A

TGMD-2: Test for Gross Motor Development- Second Edition- Revised

Name of Students (first names only):____________/______________                Grades:___1st__/_1st____                Ages: ____6_/__6____

Gender:  ___male____/____female____

Locomotor Skills- (Lab 2) Part A

Skill

Materials

Directions

Performance Criteria

Child 1

Male

Child 2

Female

1. Run

Use a clear space

During a game or activity, watch a student run. They may not run as fast as they can or for a long period of time due to space but do your best.

  1. Brief period where both feet are off the ground.

yes

yes

  1. Arms in opposition to legs, elbow bent.

yes

no

  1. Foot placement near or on a line (not flat footed).

Yes/no

no

  1. Nonsupport leg bent approximately 90 degrees (close to buttocks).

no

no

2. Gallop

Use a clear space

During a game or activity, watch a student gallop. Tell the student to gallop leading with one foot and then the other.

  1. A step forward with the lead foot followed by a step with the trailing foot to a position adjacent to or behind the lead foot.

yes

yes

  1. Brief period where both feet are off the ground.

yes

yes

  1. Arms bent and lifted to waist level.

yes

yes

  1. Able to lead with the right and left foot.

yes

no

3. Hop

Use a clear space

During a game or activity, watch a student hop. Ask the student to hop first on one foot and then on the other foot.

  1. Foot for nonsupport leg is bent and carried in back of the body.

yes

no

  1. Nonsupport leg swings in pendulum fashion to produce force.

yes

no

  1. Arms bent at elbows and swing forward on take off.

yes

Yes/no

 4.   Able to hop on the right and left foot.

yes

yes