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|    Dominance: Core Rules   |

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-= Table of Contents =-

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I. Introduction

II. Map Overview

--- A. The World Map

--- B. Terrain

------ i. Plains

------ ii. Hills

------ iii. Woods

------ iv. Mountains

------ v. Deserts

------ vi. Water

------ vii. Farmland

------ viii. Settlement

------ ix. Town

------ x. City

--- C. Units

--- D. Communities

III. Turns

--- A. Actions

--- B. Turn Sequence

------ i. Collecting income/Resolving actions

------ ii. Movement

------ iii. Combat

------ iv. Initiating new actions

IV. Combat

--- A. Starting combat

--- B. Terrain effects

--- C. Units

------ i. Settlers

------ ii. Rangers

------ iii. Militiamen

------ iv. Warriors

------ v. Cavalry

------ vi. Siege Engines

------ vii. Sappers

------ viii. Boats

------viv. Ironclads

-----vv. Sloops

--- D. Resolution

V. The Gamemaster


-= Introduction =-

-----------------------

Dominance is meant to be a game of both strategy and creativity, a mix of combat and construction. Over the course of the game, you as a player will develop your tiny settlement into a massive empire of commerce and war- or get crushed under the heel of someone who expands too fast. The choices and chances are all in play, the only thing to do is take advantage of them.

-= Map Overview =-

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        The map is the sole visual aspect of Dominance and is therefore quite key to the gameplay.

+ The World Map +

        The world map is laid out in hexes. Each hex contains one type of terrain, and in addition can also play host to units and communities.

+ Terrain +

        Terrain affects gameplay in several different ways. First, each terrain has its own movement rating, which determines how fast or slow units attempting to move through the hex can go. The effect of terrain on movement is measured in how many miles it takes (i.e. a terrain with a rating of 0.5 miles means that a unit with 2 miles/turn can cross 4 of these tiles in a single turn). Most types of terrain also have a resource attributed to them, that is collected via settlers (this will be covered under ‘Settlers’, in a later section). The third attribute of a terrain type is Defense; that is, the bonus or penalty it inflicts on any units that are attacked while standing in that tile. Any type of terrain may be turned into a Settlement, and subsequently a Town and a City, but the terrain will usually lose all of its stats in favor of the new type. The only exception to this is that Settlements, Towns, and Cities placed on a Mountain or Woods tile gain +1 to their defense.

        Terrain with resources can be drained of said resources after 10 rounds of collection (not necessarily back-to-back, so it’s wise to keep track of which tiles have been harvested. The Gamemaster may decide to waive this rule if it becomes too much bookkeeping).


- Plains

Movement Rating: 0.5

Resource: None

Defense: 0

        Plains can be turned into Farmland by Settlers.

- Hills

Movement Rating: 1

Resource: Stone

Defense: +1

- Woods

Movement Rating: 1.5

Resource: Logs

Defense: +1

- Mountains

Movement Rating: 2

Resource: Iron

Defense: +2

- Deserts

Movement Rating: 1

Resource: Glass

Defense: -1

- Water

Movement Rating: 4 without boats, 1 with boats

Resource: None

Defense: -2 without boats, 0 with boats

- Farmland

Movement Rating: 0.5

Resource: Food

Defense: 0

- Settlement

Movement Rating: 1

Resource: Food, Stone

Defense: 1

- Town

Movement Rating: 1

Resource: Food, Stone, Logs

Defense: 1

- City

Movement Rating: 2

Resource: Food, Iron, Stone, Logs

Defense: 2

- Watchtower

Movement Rating: 0.5

Resource: Food, Iron, Stone, Logs

Defense: 2

- Border Keep

Movement Rating: 1

Resource: Food, Iron, Stone, Logs

Defense: 3

- Fortress

Movement Rating: 2

Resource: Food, Iron, Stone, Logs

Defense: 4

- Mine

Movement Rating: 1

Resource: Food, Iron, Stone, Logs

Defense: 1

+ Units +

        Units show up on the map as small icons with numbers by them, indicating how many are in the unit itself. The Gamemaster should prevent the World Map from becoming too cluttered, as units may end up occupying the same tile for extended periods of time. This will usually be handled by a separate image or text layout indicating which units occupy which tiles.

+ Communities +

        Communities is the collective term for Farmland, Settlements, Towns, and Cities. As a tile, they replace the stats of whatever tile they occupy with their own until they are destroyed.

-= Turns =-

---------------

        Turns are how the actions of the multiple burgeoning empires within the game are handled.

--- A. Actions

--- B. Turn Sequence

------ i. Collecting income/Resolving actions

------ ii. Movement

------ iii. Combat

------ iv. Initiating new actions

IV. Combat

--- A. Starting combat

--- B. Terrain effects

--- C. Units

        Units have quite a significant stat block attached to them. All units will have a Base Attack, Base Defense, and Strong Vs./Weak Vs. stat for determining battle outcomes. Strong Vs. grants the unit a +1 Base Attack when fighting units of the specified type(s), while Weak Vs. subtracts 1 from their Base Defense while fighting units of the specified type(s). Base Attack/Defense will be added onto a die roll to determine that unit’s... (?)

        When Units are first generated, they begin at a strength of 5, and can be added onto afterwards up to a total strength of 20. How many troops are within each unit (again starting at 5) provides an easy system for calculating the “health” of a unit; if a unit drops to no troops, then it’s obviously no longer effective and is removed from the map. Units are restricted to one type of troop, however you can hold up to 5 units on a single hex at any given time, allowing you to amass small armies with which to conquer.

        Units that have lost some troops in combat may regenerate those losses by sitting on a Settlement, Town, or City at a rate of 1 troop per turn (a unit of Warriors that has a strength of 3 and spends a turn on a nearby Town after a fight will make it back up to 4, and so on for the following turns).

- Settlers

Base Attack: 0

Base Defense: 1

Can Collect?: Yes

Movement: 2

Weak Vs.: All

Strong Vs.: None

- Rangers

Base Attack: 1

Base Defense: 1

Can Collect?: Yes

Movement: 4

Weak Vs.: All

Strong Vs.: Settlers

- Militiamen

Base Attack: 2

Base Defense: 2

Can Collect?: No

Movement: 2

Weak Vs.: Warriors

Strong Vs.: Settlers, Cavalry

- Warriors

Base Attack: 2

Base Defense: 3

Can Collect?: No

Movement: 2

Weak Vs.: Cavalry

Strong Vs.: Settlers, Militiamen

- Cavalry

Base Attack: 2

Base Defense: 3

Can Collect?: No

Movement: 6

Weak Vs.: Warriors

Strong Vs.: Settlers, Militiamen

- Siege Engines

Base Attack: 3

Base Defense: 2

Can Collect?: No

Movement: 1

Weak Vs.: Warriors, Cavalry, Militimen

Strong Vs.: Settlements, Towns, Cities

- Sappers

Base Attack: 2

Base Defense: 2

Can Collect?: No

Movement: 2

Weak Vs.: Cavalry

Strong Vs.: Settlements, Towns, Cities

- Transport Ship

Base Attack: 0

Base Defense: 0

Can Collect?: No

Movement: 2

Weak Vs.: None

Strong Vs.: None

- Ironclad(Boat)

Base Attack: 2

Base Defense: 4

Can Collect?: No

Movement : 2

Weak Vs.: None

Strong Vs: Sloops, Transport Ships

- Sloop(Boat)

Base Attack: 2

Base Defense: 2

Can Collect?: No

Movement: 6

Weak Vs.: Ironclads

Strong Vs: Transport Ships

--- D. Resolution

V. The Gamemaster