Call for Participation --- CCASR ‘11

International UnWorkshop on Climate Code and Applied Software Research (CCASR)

April 5, 2011

Available online via ccasr11.wordpress.com

Twitter: @ccasr

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PURPOSE

CCASR seeks to

Climate science makes it clear, now more than ever, that we suffer an unparalleled risk due to catastrophic climate change. We need people from all paths of society to join their efforts to fight this threat. Software research, in particular, has the potential to contribute significantly to understand and combat the climate change problem [2]. Therefore, we need a strong applied software research community that can contribute to the efforts of climate scientists, policy makers, and the general public.

One mechanism to build a strong research community is through academic workshops. Much good research occurs or is spawned from workshops: conference workshops, because participants meet and mingle with like-minded researchers and have backchannel discussions; hacking workshops because stuff gets built. A good workshop generates buzz and excitement in the participants.

But the workshop model has several problems. Having to travel to go to a workshop is unsustainable and exclusionary, workshop papers are hard to republish, and presentations are unfortunately often dull and unproductive.

We want to reboot this for a workshop that is in the intersection of unconferences and traditional conferences; focused on research outputs and generating interest, rather than updates on current work.

To this end, we seek participants interested in applying their software research to the challenge of working with climate code. Some current challenges are:

WORKSHOP FORMAT

Our workshop consists of two parts:

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POSSIBLE APPROACHES

Many software research topics are applicable:

  1. Extracting software architecture
  2. Defect detection
  3. Analysis of code complexity
  4. Modeling and discovery of social interactions in the developer community
  5. Finding performance bottlenecks
  6. Code clone detection
  7. Topic modeling and concept location
  8. Code visualisation
  9. Test case generation

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PAPERS

For the workshop on April 5, we seek a description of expected results, perhaps using paper prototyping or other mockup techniques. We anticipate researchers will have downloaded and compiled the code, then experimented with their tools on the codebase and other artifacts.

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ORGANIZATION

We will conduct the workshop online.

Chat: IRC #ccasr@irc.freenode.net.

Wiki: ccasr11.wikispaces.com

Skype:

Twitter: @ccasr

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IMPORTANT DATES

Survey completed: March 23

Prototype Workshop: April 5

Full Workshop: late summer 2011

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DATA

- http://www.cs.toronto.edu/~nernst/modelE_AR5_branch.2011.03.10_11.12.21.tgz

- Installation guide for Ubuntu and Mac OSX is at http://goo.gl/yXJWU

The model code is ~300KLOC of Fortran, plus Makefiles. Running the model requires additional data files. Links to the papers explaining the model are on GISS’s website, http://www.giss.nasa.gov/tools/modelE/.

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PARTICIPATION

We seek expressions of interest in the workshop to prepare for participants. Please fill out the form located at http://goo.gl/wmEZQ to indicate your interest. This will help us to prepare the workshop program.

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ORGANIZATION

Jon Pipitone, Neil A Ernst, Steve Easterbrook - University of Toronto

Jorge Aranda - University of Victoria

[1] http://ontolog.cim3.net/cgi-bin/wiki.pl?CommunityofPractice

[2] Steve M. Easterbrook. 2010. Climate change: a grand software challenge. In Proceedings of the FSE/SDP workshop on Future of software engineering research (FoSER '10). http://doi.acm.org/10.1145/1882362.1882383

[3] Moshe Vardi. 2010. Where have all the workshops gone? CACM 53:12 http://cacm.acm.org/magazines/2011/1/103228-where-have-all-the-workshops-gone/fulltext

[4] http://www.easterbrook.ca/steve/?p=2080