NEUROPSYCHOLOGY STUDENT

TRAINING GUIDELINES

University of Alabama at Birmingham

Medical-Clinical Psychology PhD Program

Revision Date: 8/2011

This document was originally prepared in 2009 by

UAB ANST co-representatives Cady K. Block and Jacquelynn N. Copeland.

It was created with input from the program, clinical faculty, and original ANST members.


TABLE OF CONTENTS


  1. UAB Medical-Clinical Psychology Administration…………………………………..……….. Page 4

  1. General Program Introduction ………………….…………………..………………..…… Page 4

  1. Academic Advising …………………………………………….………..……..………..…... Page 5

  1. Annual MPCC Review …………………….…………...……………..…...……..…………. Page 6

  1. Psychology Administration & Support Staff……………..…………………………….…….. Page 7

  1. Medical-Clinical Psychology Doctoral Program …………………………..…….…… Page 7

  1. Department of Psychology ………………………………….………..……..………..…... Page 8

  1. Neuropsychology at UAB …………………….…….……………………………………..……... Page 9

  1. Houston Conference Guidelines ……………………..………………………..…….…… Page 9

  1. UAB Neuropsychology Emphasis ……………………….………..……..………..…... Page 10

  1. UAB ANST …………………….……………….…………………………….……………..………. Page 11

  1. Getting a Well-Rounded Experience ….………………………………………..…………….. Page 12

  1. Didactics ………………………………………………………….……………………..………….. Page 14

  1. General Knowledge …………………………………………………………………………..Page 14

  1. Coursework ………………….………………………………………………………………… Page 15

  1. Extracurricular Didactics ……………..…………………….………..……..………..…... Page 17

  1. Teaching …………………………….….….…………...……………..…...……..…………. Page 19

  1. Essential Texts …………………….…………...……………..…...……..……………..…. Page 19

TABLE OF CONTENTS


  1. Clinical Training …..…………………………….……………….………………….…..………... Page 21

  1. General Skills ……..…………………………………………………………………………...Page 21

        Birmingham Veteran’s Affairs Medical Center …………….………………Page 23

        Children’s Hospital ……...…………………………………….…..……..……… Page 26

        Private Practice …….……………………….…………...………..…...……..…. Page 28

        Spain Rehabilitation Center ………………….……………....…….………... Page 31

        UAB System ……………………………………………………….…………….…. Page 33

        UAB Department of Neurology, Division of Neuropsychology …….. Page 34

  1. Additional Opportunities for Experience in Assessment ……….……..………….Page 37

  1. Research Training ……………………………………………………………..……..……..……. Page 40

  1. General Skills ………………………………………………………………………….......... Page 40

  1. Organization Membership ……..……………………….……………………..………….Page 41

  1. Listserv Membership ……..…………………………..…………………………….……….Page 42

  1. Sample Timeline for Neuropsychology Students ……………………………………..…... Page 43

  1. Clinical Completion Checklist …………………………………….…………..………………... Page 44

  1. Research Completion Checklist ………………………………….……..……………………... Page 45


UAB MEDICAL-CLINICAL PSYCHOLOGY



General Program Introduction


Before delineating training guidelines as they pertain to students of neuropsychology at UAB, they must first emphasize the program wherein neuropsychology students work and grow. First and foremost, students are to review and adhere to all criterion and policies as put forth by the Medical-Clinical Psychology Doctoral Program at UAB. The primary aim of this program is to educate and train well-rounded and competent clinicians. The following section presents crucial information from the program policies manual given to each student at first-year orientation; however, it is not a substitute and this manual should be carefully and often reviewed.

 The Medical-Clinical Psychology Program is one of four Psychology graduate programs at UAB. As a scientist- practitioner model research and clinical training program, it represents the collaborative efforts of faculty with primary appointments in the Department of Psychology and the School of Medicine, along with psychologists in independent practice in the Birmingham community.

The Medical-Clinical Psychology Program operates within the policies of the UAB Graduate School (see http://www.uab.edu/graduate/polproc.htm) and the Department of Psychology. Policies specific to the Medical (Clinical) Psychology Graduate Program are established by the Medical Psychology Coordinating Committee (MPCC). The MPCC has primary responsibility for the program, and is made up of the Director of the Medical (Clinical) Psychology graduate program (“program director”), four representatives of the Department of Psychology, four representatives of the Psychology Training Consortium (PTC), and two student representatives. The Psychology Training Consortium is the committee of psychologists in the UAB School of Medicine who direct UAB's Psychology Internship Program and share responsibility for the Medical (Clinical) Psychology Graduate Program.

Faculty representatives are elected separately by the Department of Psychology and the PTC, and serve overlapping 2-year terms that are renewable. Two elected student representatives serve 2-year overlapping terms and one vote each. Student representatives have voting rights on general program issues, but are excluded from discussions and votes pertaining to specific students and/or program personnel. The MPCC meets as a full committee on approximately a monthly schedule, at least 10 times per year. MPCC meetings are open to all students and faculty affiliated with the program, although the MPCC may meet in closed session to deal with personnel and/or individual student issues. Further information on the administrative structure of the program is available from the chair of the Department of Psychology or the chair of the PTC.

Students are accepted into the Medical-Clinical program unbound to any advisors. The first-year students are advised by the associate director of the program. During the first year, students are encouraged to seek out individuals in the department and university who may serve as advisors after the first year. The student is guided by two bodies: a research studies committee (RSC, for the thesis and dissertation) and graduate studies committee (GSC).


Academic Advising


Each student's GSC consists of a chair and two additional faculty members. GSC members must be psychologists holding the Ph.D. degree and a primary, secondary, or clinical faculty appointment in Psychology at UAB. As a group, each GSC should have sufficient clinical and research expertise and familiarity with important aspects of the program, such as the curriculum and training opportunities, to adequately advise students as they progress through the program.

The associate director of the program is the initial GSC chair for each incoming student during the first year.  The initial chair is responsible for reviewing student’s coursework and experience to date, and for meeting with the student at least once during his or her first semester in residence and thereafter as necessary during the first academic term to assess the student's goals, interests, and background and to provide general advising as needed.  As the year progresses, the associate director and student together nominate faculty to serve as chair and members of the GSC beginning after the first academic year. Thereafter, students are encouraged to suggest changes in their GSC membership to accommodate evolving interests, advising needs, research collaborations, etc. Ultimately, all GSCs are approved by the program director, which is formally responsible for making changes.  However, students play a major role in selecting their own GSCs, and the program director is expected to intervene in this process only when the GSC nominated by the student appears to be deficient along one of the dimensions described above.

It is expected that as a student progresses through the program the overlap between the GSC and the thesis and dissertation committees will increase. However, this is not a requirement, and students who choose to maintain an independent GSC are free to do so. In such circumstances, the GSC and the thesis and/or dissertation chair are responsible for maintaining communication so that each is apprised of the views of the other.

Students submit a written report to their GSCs (copied to the program) at the end of each fall and spring term. The report details progress to date and objectives for the coming year in the three general areas of coursework, research, and clinical training, and is accompanied by an updated check-sheet of program requirements and an updated vitae.  At the end of the fall term, the student reviews these materials in a meeting with the GSC chair, whereas in the spring they must be reviewed with the full GSC.  Additional GSC meetings may be called by the student or GSC chair, as needed.


Annual MPCC Review


At the end of each spring term, in May or June, the MPCC meets for an annual review of all students.  The purpose of this review is to evaluate the progress of individual students, assess the status of the program as a whole, and identify issues that may require programmatic change.  GSC chairs are responsible for preparing and presenting a brief report of their students' strengths and accomplishments, as well as weaknesses and areas needing further improvement.  The MPCC asks questions and provides feedback to the GSC chair during the meeting.  The MPCC may make additional recommendations or set additional requirements for individual students based on this review.  In general, the attempt is to be constructive and explicit, so that students understand any particular steps that they need to take to address areas of difficulty.

After the meeting the program director writes a written evaluation of each student.  These evaluations are edited with the assistance of the GSC chair and ultimately forwarded to the student.  Students are required to sign and return a copy of their evaluations, to document their receipt.  Students may also comment on or respond to the evaluation, in which case the response is attached to the evaluation in the student’s file.


PSYCHOLOGY ADMINISTRATION & SUPPORT STAFF


The following is a list of important individuals within the Department of Psychology and the Medical-Clinical Psychology Doctoral Program, as well as the UAB Psychology Internship Program Director. Contact information is provided.


UAB Medical-Clinical Psychology Doctoral Program


Mailing Address:

CH 201

1530 3rd Ave. South

Birmingham, AL 35294-1170

Physical Address:

Campbell Hall 201

1300 University Blvd.

Birmingham, AL 35233

Program Administrative Assistant

Janice Lambert

Office: Campbell Hall 201

Telephone: (205) 934-8723

Facsimile: (205) 975-6953

E-mail: jlambert@uab.edu

Program Director

Jesse Milby, PhD

Office: Campbell Hall 201

Telephone: (205) 934-8960

Facsimile: (205) 975-6953

E-mail: jmilby@uab.edu

        

Acting Program Associate Director

Faculty Advisor for 1st Year Med Psych Students

David Schwebel, PhD

Telephone: (205) 934-3850

Facsimile: (205) 975-6953

E-mail: schwebel@uab.edu 


UAB Department of Psychology


Mailing Address:

UAB Department of Psychology

CH 415

1530 3rd Ave. South

Birmingham, AL 35294

Physical Address:

Department of Psychology

Campbell Hall 415

1300 University Blvd.

Birmingham, AL 35233

Department Chair

Karlene Ball, PhD

Office: Campbell Hall 415

Telephone: (205) 934-3850

E-mail: kball@uab.edu 

Department Executive Program Director

Mary Frances Thetford

Office: Campbell Hall 415

Telephone: (205) 934-3850

E-mail: mblanton@uab.edu 

Department Office Services Specialist

Monica Robinson

Office: Campbell Hall 415

Telephone: (205) 934-3850

E-mail: monie@uab.edu 

Department Systems Analyst

Aeron Gault

Office: Campbell Hall 415

Telephone: (205) 975-0489

E-mail: agault@uab.edu 

Psychology Internship Program Director

Hal Thurstin, PhD

Office: Center for Psychiatric Medicine C472

Telephone: (205) 934-6054

E-mail: hadrian@uab.edu 


NEUROPSYCHOLOGY AT UAB


These training guidelines were created with students of neuropsychology at UAB in mind. Students should carefully and often review these guidelines, as well as the program policies manual, to ensure that they are meeting all benchmarks in a timely manner and keeping a balance between clinical and neuropsychology competencies. As they progress through and exit the program, students should keep all syllabi and obtain current copies of transcripts to demonstrate having met the guidelines put forth by neuropsychologists at the national level.


Houston Conference Guidelines


For the express purpose of each incoming UAB student of neuropsychology, the present section integrates the UAB neuropsychology emphasis guidelines with the aspirational training model set forth by clinical neuropsychologists that is applied in both education and practice. A clinical neuropsychologist, according to the Houston Conference Guidelines, is a professional psychologist trained in the science of brain-behavior relationships. The clinical neuropsychologist specializes in the application of assessment and intervention principles based on the scientific study of human behavior across the lifespan as it relates to normal and abnormal functioning of the central nervous system [1].

The Houston Conference convened from September 3rd to the 7th in 1997 with the express purpose of creating training guidelines for clinical neuropsychologists. In February 1998, a special issue of the Archives of Clinical Neuropsychology published the Proceedings of the Houston Conference [1]. This encompassed the first integrated model of professional education and training in neuropsychology. It is an aspirational model involving training at the doctoral, internship, and post-doctoral levels.

Specialization in clinical neuropsychology begins at the doctoral level, which provides the generic psychology and clinical core. In addition, it includes foundations for the study of brain-behavior relationships and the practice of clinical neuropsychology. Doctoral education in clinical neuropsychology occurs at a regionally accredited institution. All basic aspects of the generic psychology and generic clinical cores should be completed at this level. The foundation of brain-behavior relationships should be developed to a considerable degree at this level of training; however, it is understood that variability may occur between doctoral programs in the degree to which foundations of brain-behavior relationships and clinical neuropsychology practice are emphasized. [1]

The Houston Conference guidelines detail the knowledge and additional skills necessary to become a competent clinical neuropsychologist. These are found throughout this document at three tiers: didactics, clinical practice, and research.

Foundations for the practice of clinical neuropsychology:

  1. Specialized neuropsychological assessment techniques.

  1. Specialized neuropsychological intervention techniques.

  1. Research design and analysis in neuropsychology.

  1. Professional issues and ethics in neuropsychology.

  1. Practical implications of neuropsychological conditions.


UAB Neuropsychology Emphasis


The creation of a neuropsychology-specific track has been previously discussed on several occasions at UAB. However, the program decided that it was not in the best interest of students or the program, and would also not substantially alter the utilization of neuropsychology resources to the benefit of these parties. At this time, the emphasis involves neuropsychology coursework, dissertation topic in neuropsychology, and practicum experiences in neuropsychology as desired. For more information pertaining to available coursework and practica sites, please see relevant sections in this document [2].


References


  1. Hannay, H. J., Crosson, B.A., Hammeke, T. A., Hamsher, K. deS., & Koffler, S. P. (1998). Proceedings: The Houston Conference on Specialty Education and Training in Clinical Neuropsychology. Archives of Clinical Neuropsychology, 13.

  1. UAB Neuropsychology Emphasis. A product of the Neuropsychology Working Group. Copies may be obtained through the Medical-Clinical Psychology Program Director’s office in Campbell Hall.


UAB ANST CHAPTER


UAB also has a chapter of the Association for Neuropsychology Students in Training (ANST). This is a graduate student organization sponsored by the Neuropsychology Division (Division 40) of the American Psychological Association. ANST is critical to students of neuropsychology as it acts as a platform for discussion, is a source of valuable resources and services, and provides a voice for students in training (http://www.div40-anst.com).

The UAB ANST chapter was established in 2008 and continues to strive to the goals and ideals of the national organization. It is a model chapter, and was the first chapter selected for the national organization’s chapter highlight series (Spring 2011). Our chapter faculty sponsor is Dr. Paul Blanton, a neuropsychologist from the Birmingham VA Hospital. UAB ANST meets twice per month, including Monthly Meetings with topics ranging from informational, current issues being debated in the field, and education and training, as well as Monthly Events to promote resources and activities on campus, in the community, and at the national/international levels.

The UAB chapter serves to orient new graduate students to the wealth of neuropsychology opportunities around UAB and Birmingham, as well as promote dialogue, collegiality, and act as a support system for existing students. Thus far, students have participated in an internship event to ask questions from students applying, interns, our program director, and an internship advisor from a clinical setting. Students have also toured a MEG neuroimaging lab, attended the International Neuropsychological Society conference, and enjoyed a year-end celebration dinner with each other. There is a Student Spotlight featuring a new student each fall and spring semester, with a certificate of appreciation for each student nominated. New ideas from students are always appreciated.




UAB ANST Website:



http://sites.google.com/site/uabanst 





GETTING A WELL-ROUNDED EXPERIENCE


First and foremost, each neuropsychology student recognizes that they are training to be a clinical psychologist prior to specialization. Therefore, there are broad clinical training requirements that must be met to be a competent generalist. One should structure doctoral training in such a way that they become well-rounded generalists prior to entering the internship year. There must be a balance struck between breadth and depth of clinical training and neuropsychological training for the purposes of future licensure and board certification or other specialization.

Each and every student must meet the program’s core elements of clinical intervention training experiences, per the program policies manual:

  1. Introduction to clinical assessment, including history taking, interviewing skills, use of clinical assessment measures (e.g., depression inventories, anxiety measures, specific problem-focused assessments such as alcohol use, eating disorder severity, etc.) and integration of assessment results.

  1. Establishing the therapeutic climate, including establishing a therapeutic relationship, effective interpersonal communication with patient/client, and preparing the patient/client for treatment.

  1. Case conceptualization, including diagnosis, case formulation and hypothesis generating and testing within a theoretical framework.

  1. Treatment planning and evaluation including developing a treatment plan, integrating assessment into the therapeutic process, establishing therapeutic goals, measuring progress toward these goals, evaluating the therapeutic process and assessing professional development and competence.

  1. Case presentation, including note taking, report writing, case conferences, and formal case presentations.

  1. Ongoing intervention with a range of patient/client populations presenting with psychological distress.  

  1. Integration of clinical training experiences with research oriented activities such as review of relevant empirical literature, systematic evaluation of treatment effectiveness, etc.

Because of the dual nature of the Medical-Clinical psychology program, when selecting your clinical intervention training experiences, there are specific criteria that must be met, per the program policies manual:

  1. Clinical training experiences can be characterized in terms of the clinical setting, the patient population, and the theoretical perspective of the individual providing supervision. The range of training experiences elected by a student must include at least two different clinical settings, two distinct patient populations, and two different clinical supervisors.

  1. The training distribution across clinical settings may reflect any combination of inpatient, outpatient, psychological or medical patient care environments.  Intervention experience in a medical patient care environment is not required. However, because the logistics of patient management, the context of treatment, and the clinical perspective of health care providers can vary dramatically across medical and psychological patient care environments, experience in both types of settings is strongly recommended.

  1. The intervention training distribution across patient populations must include at least one structured training experience with patients who are presenting for the management of a medical/physical condition for which psychological intervention is a significant component of comprehensive treatment. This intervention experience may be conducted in either a medical or psychological patient care environment.

While keeping in mind the criteria of the Medical-Clinical program, neuropsychology students must also satisfy additional criteria necessary for a foundation of neuropsychology. For the purposes of the present revision of the training guidelines, these criteria were best conceptualized as three main elements. These elements of neuropsychology training at UAB are: didactics, clinical training, and research training.


DIDACTICS



General Knowledge


Didactics involves the coursework students may take while enrolled at UAB. It also includes taking advantage of any extracurricular instruction, including grand rounds, seminars, workshops, and case conferences, available to students.

Clinical neuropsychologists possess the following knowledge base. This core knowledge may be acquired through multiple pathways, not limited to courses, and may come through other documentable didactic methods:

Generic Psychology Core:

  1. Statistics and methodology.
  2. Learning, cognition and perception.
  3. Social psychology and personality.
  4. Biological basis of behavior.
  5. Life span development.
  6. History.
  7. Cultural and individual differences and diversity.

Generic Clinical Core:

  1. Psychopathology.
  2. Psychometric theory.
  3. Interview and assessment techniques.
  4. Intervention techniques.
  5. Professional ethics.

Foundations for the study of brain-behavior relationships:

  1. Functional neuroanatomy.
  2. Neurological and related disorders including their etiology, pathology, course and treatment.
  3. Non-neurologic conditions affecting CNS functioning.
  4. Neuroimaging and other neurodiagnostic techniques.
  5. Neurochemistry of behavior (e.g., psychopharmacology).
  6. Neuropsychology of behavior.

The American Board of Professional Psychology (ABPP) Certification for Specialization in Neuropsychology specifies several areas of relevant coursework for neuropsychologists. They note that some of the following requirements may be fulfilled by different means (e.g., for Clinical Neurology, attending neurology grand rounds is acceptable) and would be asked about when applying for board certification. The areas include:

  1. Basic Neurosciences.
  2. Clinical Neurology.
  3. Neuroanatomy.
  4. Neuropathology.
  5. Clinical Neuropsychological Assessment.
  6. Psychological Assessment.
  7. Psychological Intervention.
  8. Psychopathology.


Coursework


Several courses comprise a basic foundation for neuropsychological knowledge:

  1. Clinical Neuropsychology. 3 credits. A survey of neuropsychological findings concerning relationships between brain and behavior.

  1. Neuropsychological Assessment. 3 credits. This course addresses the theory and practice of neuropsychological assessment, with focus on current tests & diagnostic techniques pertinent to the evaluation of adults & children with suspected neurological dysfunction.

  1. Functional Neuroanatomy. 3 credits. A survey of the anatomy of the human brain, along with functional and applied anatomy as it relates to common clinical findings. It utilizes a lecture format and dissection laboratory sessions.

  1. Behavioral Neuroscience. 3 credits. Neurobiological basis of behavior. Central nervous system mechanisms that mediate processes such as learning, motivation, sensation, speech, and emotional behavior.

To obtain a neuropsychology course at UAB:

  1. Students make it known they want a course offered. A commitment must be obtained from at least five students. Students may be from any one of the Department of Psychology graduate programs; they are not limited solely to Medical-Clinical Psychology doctoral students.
  2. Get the student decisions to the program director as soon as possible. The program director and the potential course instructor will need at least two semesters in advance, if not three, to prepare the course and budget.
  3. The students may recommend a potential faculty member or members as the course instructor; however, the final decision rests with the program director and associate director.
  4. Although the program attempts to offer courses on a regular time schedule recognize that, give the variety of interests in incoming students and fluidity of current students’ schedules, this may change. Follow this procedure to obtain a course when needed.

Other coursework may be added that adds to the breadth of neuropsychological knowledge. These courses must be specially arranged through the Department of Psychology and depend on the level of interest and commitment in students. Thus, the availability of these courses may vary from year to year, and are not limited to what is contained within this manual. As a reminder, elective coursework should only be taken after completing what is considered to be the fundamental coursework as listed above. Fundamental coursework was derived from Houston Conference guidelines and is considered essential to later board certification. Elective coursework is tailored to furthering skills in specific areas of interest, and may also be obtained through practice experience.

Additional coursework offered by UAB per student interest may include:

  1. Psychopharmacology.
  2. Neurobiology of Learning/Memory.
  3. Overview of Cognitive Neurosciences.
  4. Sensory & Perceptual Processes.
  5. Motor Control after Stroke.
  6. Developmental Psychobiology.

Additional neuropsychological elective coursework that has come of topic at ANST meetings that have not been offered at UAB, but are potential elective ideas:

        

  1. Rehabilitation Psychology.
  2. Lifespan Neuropsychology.
  3. Pediatric Neuropsychology.
  4. Forensic Neuropsychology.

Although not provided through specific courses, throughout the course of their clinical training, students should also seek out experience in the following areas:

  1. Test construction and research.
  2. Neuroimaging.
  3. Psychopharmacology.
  4. Neuropathology.
  5. Case conceptualization.


Extracurricular Didactics


There is a plethora of neuropsychology and related events around campus that are available to students. These are offered through the Department of Psychology, University Hospital Department of Neurology, the VA Medical Center, and are usually well attended by other students, interns, physicians, medical residents, and/or neuropsychologist. Thus, these events present not only the opportunity to learn, but to interact and network with other professionals.

At other times, additional events may be highlighted around campus, including workshops, training for behavioral interventions, visiting speakers, and opportunities to present student clinical work and/or research. Students should take full advantage of these opportunities to enhance their knowledge base and skills.

Extracurricular opportunities include, but may not be limited to:

  1. Neuropsychology Case Conference

The Neuropsychology Case Conference is offered on a weekly basis at the Sparks Center, located at the corner of 18th St. South and 7th Ave South. Each week, a selected neuropsychologist presents one or more cases in a round table lecture or fact-finding discussion. Topics have ranged from sports concussion to intractable epilepsy, from mutism in TBI to driving in Alzheimer’s disease patients. Schedules are e-mailed out at the beginning of each semester. Contact is always the Department of Neurology, Division of Neuropsychology’s postdoctoral fellow, which may vary by year.

  1. Neurology Grand Rounds

Each Tuesday morning, faculty, residents, medical and graduate students attend grand rounds in the West Pavilion Auditorium, Conference Room E. This is located on the second floor of UAB University Hospital. Presenters include Current Neurology and Neurosurgery Faculty, Neurology Senior Residents, Endowed Lectureships, and Visiting Professors from universities across the United States and the world. Topics range from sleep, epilepsy, neuroimmunology, polyneuropathies, mild cognitive impairment, and more. Schedules are available through the Department of Neurology website, under the Education link. Contact: Valencia Bonham, vbonham@uabmc.edu.

  1. Brain Cutting Seminars

Dr. Richard Powers hosts a brain cutting conference every Tuesday morning where specimens are displayed, discussed with residents, medical and graduate students. This seminar is held in the UAB University Hospital Division of Anatomical Pathology, located in the first floor of the Faculty Office Tower. Follow the signs to the demonstration room. Schedules are available through the Department of Neurology website, under the Education link. See updated schedule: under “Pathology Seminars” at http://pathuab.infomedia.com/content.asp?id=332799.

  1. Aging Conference

The Birmingham VA Medical Center’s (BVAMC) Geriatric Research, Education and Clinical Center (GRECC) holds an aging conference every Friday. Topics range from dementia, glioblastoma, quality of life issues, return to driving, and more. Please contact the BVAMC for more information about when and where this event is held. Contact: Ellen Durham, epdurham@uab.edu.


Teaching


The Houston Guidelines also highlight some relevant teaching skills. Students are encouraged to take the opportunity to teach an undergraduate course or lab section. At UAB, there is a variety of undergraduate courses or labs students have taught in the past, including lab sections for undergraduate statistics, Introduction to Psychology, Abnormal Psychology, and senior-level special topics courses of the graduate student’s choosing.  Interested students are to contact the Department of Psychology if they wish to do so. It is also important to note that compensation is involved in the teaching of courses at UAB. The recommended skills obtained from teaching include:

Teaching:

  1. Methods of effective teaching.
  2. Plan and design of courses and curriculums.
  3. Use of effective educational technologies.
  4. It is recognized that the relative weightings of these dimensions may vary from one program to another.


Essential Texts


Students of neuropsychology should be aware of the existence of essential texts that, although not required (unless in the context of a course), may be beneficial to your knowledge of neuropsychology. Some of these texts may be required reading for neuropsychology courses at UAB. This list was compiled from querying of the UAB ANST listserv and neuropsychologists practicing in Birmingham. These texts include, but certainly are not limited to:

Clinical Neuropsychology:

  1. Neuropsychological Assessment. Lezak.
  2. Handbook of Neuropsychological Assessment. Puente & McCaffrey.
  3. Clinical Neuropsychology. Heilman & Valenstein.
  4. Clinical Neuropsychology: A Pocket Handbook for Assessment. Snyder, Nussbaum, & Robins.
  5. Fundamentals of Neuropsychology. Koln and Whishaw.

Normative Textbooks:

  1. A Compendium of Neuropsychological Tests: Administrations, Norms, and Commentary. Sherman, Strauss, and Spreen.
  2. Handbook of Normative Data for Neuropsychological Assessment. Mitrushina, Boone, Razani, and D’Elia.

Specific Populations:

  1. Dementia: A Clinical Approach. Mendez & Cummings.
  2. Mild Cognitive Impairment: Aging to Alzheimer’s Disease. Peterson.
  3. Neuropsychological Evaluation of the Child. Baron.
  4. Clinical and Neuropsychological Aspects of Closed Head Injury. Richardson.

Psychopathology and Neuropsychology/Neurology:

  1. Psychiatric Aspects of Neurologic Diseases: Practical Approaches to Patient Care. Lyketsos, Rabins, Lipsey, and Slavney. 
  2. Assessment of Neuropsychological Functions in Psychiatric Disorders. Caley.

Neurology & Neuroanatomy:

  1. Subcortical Structures and Cognition. Koziol and Budding.
  2. Fundamental Neuroscience. Squire and Bloom.
  3. Behavioral Neurology and Neuropsychology. Feinberg and Farah.
  4. Clinical Neuroanatomy: A Neurobehavioral Approach. Mendoza and Foundas.
  5. Neuroanatomy and Neuropathology: A Clinical Guide for Neuropsychologists. Reitan and Wolfson.
  6. Neurology Secrets. Rolak.
  7. Principles of Behavioral and Cognitive Neurology. Mesulam.
  8. Principles of Neural Science. Kandel, Schwartz, and Jessel.
  9. The Mental Status Examination in Neurology. Strub and Black. 


CLINICAL TRAINING



General Skills


The Houston Conference Guidelines note that clinical neuropsychologists should possess the following generic clinical skills and skills in clinical neuropsychology. These core skills may be acquired through multiple pathways, not limited to courses, and may come through other documentable didactic methods. Domains of skills and examples are:

Assessment:

  1. Information gathering.
  2. History taking.
  3. Selection of tests and measures.
  4. Administration of tests and measures.
  5. Interpretation and diagnosis.
  6. Treatment planning.
  7. Report writing.
  8. Provision of feedback.
  9. Recognition of multicultural issues.

Treatment and Interventions:

  1. Identification of intervention targets.
  2. Specification of intervention needs.
  3. Formulation of an intervention plan.
  4. Implementation of the plan.
  5. Monitoring and adjustment to the plan as needed.
  6. Assessment of the outcome.
  7. Recognition of multicultural issues.

Consultation (patients, families, medical colleagues, agencies, etc.):

  1. Effective basic communication (e.g. listening, explaining, negotiating).
  2. Determination and clarification of referral issues.
  3. Education of referral sources regarding neuropsychological services (strengths and limitations).
  4. Communication of evaluation results and recommendations.
  5. Education of patients and families regarding services and disorder(s).

Neuropsychology students, keeping in mind that broad clinical training is important during graduate school, should seek practica placements in three domains:

  1. Hospitals:
  1. Community Mental Health Clinics.
  2. Private Practice.

For neuropsychology students, the main areas to cover clinically include: stroke, traumatic brain injury, epilepsy, and dementia. It is ideal to seek out these patients across different settings. It may also be ideal to seek out experience with these and other populations across clinical interview, psychiatric assessment, neuropsychological assessment, and psychotherapy.

One is also reminded to seek out patients not only across different diagnoses, but also of varying ethnicities, age groups, and sexuality. These are requested by AAPIC for the internship application process and help to make you a well-rounded clinician.

To supplement their clinical training, students should also seek out a wide range of experience in the following areas:

  1. Diagnoses.
  2. Tests.
  3. Clinical Settings.
  4. Age Ranges.
  5. Conceptualization Style.

One important thing for students to remember during clinical training is to carefully record all clinical and support hours obtained. This will greatly ease the process of applying for internships. Online companies, such as http://www.Time2track.com, are available for a nominal yearly fee to record your hours per AAPIC standards.

BIRMINGHAM VETERAN’S AFFAIRS MEDICAL CENTER

PAUL BLANTON, PhD

CONTACT INFORMATION

Telephone: (205) 933-8101 x 5558

E-Mail: Paul.Blanton2@va.gov

Office: VA Medical Center room 3924

Affiliation:

Department of Mental Health

Neuropsychology

CLINICAL EXPERIENCE:

Clinical Practicum offered? Yes.

Clinical Assistantship offered? No.

Any experience for undergraduates or post-baccalaureates? No.

PSYCHOTHERAPY:

Psychotherapy experience offered? No.

Clinical orientation? No.

ASSESSMENT:

Opportunity for Assessment? Yes.

Type of tests and batteries administered? Intellectual/global cognitive functioning, new learning/memory, attention/concentration and speeded cognitive processing, language and related functions, visuospatial and visuoperceptual skills, and executive functions. Occasionally, objective personality testing.  

Experience in projective testing? No.

CLINICAL POPULATIONS:

Inpatient or outpatient? Outpatient.

Type of population: Epilepsy, Substance Abuse, Dementia, Severe Psychiatric, and Mild Cognitive Impairment.

Age Ranges: Middle Aged Adults, and Older Adults.

Gender: Predominantly male, although some females are seen.

Ethnicity: 60% Caucasian and 40% African American.

Other: Veteran populations. Most have high-school education or the equivalent.

RESEARCH EXPERIENCE:

Do you perform research? No.

Research Assistantship offered? No.

Do you have an existing database? No.

Any experience for undergraduates or post-baccalaureates? No.

RESEARCH POPULATIONS:

Research Interests: N/A.

KATIE FABRIZIO, PhD

CONTACT INFORMATION

Telephone: (205) 933-8101 x 4697

E-Mail: Katherine.Fabrizio@va.gov 

Office: VA Medical Center room G907

Affiliation:

Department of Mental Health

Neuropsychology

CLINICAL EXPERIENCE:

Clinical Practicum offered? Yes.

Clinical Assistantship offered? No.

Any experience for undergraduates or post-baccalaureates? No.

PSYCHOTHERAPY:

Psychotherapy experience offered? Yes.

Clinical orientation? Cognitive-Behavioral.

ASSESSMENT:

Opportunity for Assessment? Yes.

Type of tests and batteries administered? A brief neuropsychological battery tapping all cognitive domains. Commo tests: WASI, portions of the WAIS-III, portions of the WMS-III, Rey-O, BNT, COWAT, WCST, Trails,  Grooved Pegboard, and RBANS.

Experience in projective testing? No.

CLINICAL POPULATIONS:

Inpatient or outpatient? Outpatient.

Type of population: Brain Injury, Chronic Pain/Stress, Substance Abuse, Veterans, Stroke, and Dementia.

Age Ranges: Young Adults, Middle Aged Adults, and Older Adults. Often ages 20 to 50.

Gender: Predominantly Male.

Ethnicity: Predominantly Caucasian and African-American.

Other: Veterans who have sustained head injuries in both combat and non-combat related events.  The population consists primarily of OEF/OIF veterans. The neuropsychological evaluation is part of a comprehensive assessment conducted by the multi-disciplinary TBI Team. Co-morbid conditions, such as PTSD and depression, are common.

RESEARCH EXPERIENCE:

Do you perform research? Yes.

Research Assistantship offered? No.

Do you have an existing database? Yes.

Any experience for undergraduates or post-baccalaureates? No.

RESEARCH POPULATIONS:

Research Interests: Mild traumatic brain injury.

KRISTINE LOKKEN, PhD

CONTACT INFORMATION

Telephone: (205) 933-8101 x 4962

E-Mail: Kristine.Lokken@va.gov

Office: VA Medical Center room G906

Affiliation:

Department of Mental Health

Neuropsychology

CLINICAL EXPERIENCE:

Clinical Practicum offered?  Yes.

Clinical Assistantship offered?  Yes.

Any experience for undergraduates or post-baccalaureates? Yes.

PSYCHOTHERAPY:

Psychotherapy experience offered? Yes.

Clinical orientation? Cognitive-Behavioral.

ASSESSMENT:

Opportunity for Assessment? Yes.

Type of tests and batteries administered? A full neuropsychological battery.

Experience in projective testing? No.

CLINICAL POPULATIONS:

Inpatient or outpatient? Outpatient.

Type of population: Bariatric, Brain Injury, Epilepsy, Substance Abuse, Veterans, Severe Psychiatric, and Dementia.

Age Ranges: Young Adults, Middle Aged Adults, and Older Adults.

Gender: N/A.

Ethnicity: N/A.

Other: Veteran populations.

RESEARCH EXPERIENCE:

Do you perform research? Yes.

Research Assistantship offered? No.

Do you have an existing database? Yes.

Any experience for undergraduates or post-baccalaureates? Yes.

RESEARCH POPULATIONS:

Research Interests: Adult, Brain Injury, Medical/Preventative, Health, Military, and Other (Bariatric).

CHILDREN’S HOSPITAL

AVI MADAN-SWAIN, PhD

CONTACT INFORMATION

Telephone: (205) 939-9285

E-Mail: amadanswain@peds.uab.edu

Office: CH-ACC 512

Affiliation:

Department of Pediatrics

Hematology/Oncology

CLINICAL EXPERIENCE:

Clinical Practicum offered? Yes.

Clinical Assistantship offered? No.

Any experience for undergraduates or post-baccalaureates? No, with some exceptions.

PSYCHOTHERAPY:

Psychotherapy experience offered? Yes.

Clinical orientation? N/A.

ASSESSMENT:

Opportunity for Assessment? 

Type of tests and batteries administered?

Experience in projective testing? 

CLINICAL POPULATIONS:

Inpatient or outpatient? Inpatient and Outpatient.

Type of population: Chronic Pain/Stress, Transplant, Hematology/Oncology, Stroke in Sickle Cell Patients, Academic Assessment, and Brain Tumor.

Age Ranges: Children, Adolescents, and Young Adults.

Gender: Male and Female.

Ethnicity: N/A.

Other: N/A.

RESEARCH EXPERIENCE:

Do you perform research? Yes.

Research Assistantship offered? Yes.

Do you have an existing database? No.

Any experience for undergraduates or post-baccalaureates? No, with some exceptions.

RESEARCH POPULATIONS:

Research Interests: Chronic Pain/Stress, Medical/Preventative, Health, Pediatric, Quality of Life, and Late Effects in Cancer.

DAN MARULLO, PhD

CONTACT INFORMATION

Telephone: (205) 934-0932

E-Mail: daniel.marullo@chsys.org 

Office: CH 19, 307

Affiliations:

Department of Pediatrics, Hematology/Oncology

Sparks Clinic

CLINICAL EXPERIENCE:

Clinical Practicum offered? Yes.

Clinical Assistantship offered? No.

Any experience for undergraduates or post-baccalaureates? No, only limited observation.

PSYCHOTHERAPY:

Psychotherapy experience offered? Yes.

Clinical orientation? Cognitive-Behavioral.

ASSESSMENT:

Opportunity for Assessment? Yes.

Type of tests and batteries administered? Pre-transplant evaluations, as well as some neuropsychological testing.

CLINICAL POPULATIONS:

Inpatient or outpatient? Inpatient and Outpatient.

Type of population: Brain Injury, Chronic Pain/Stress, Epilepsy, Transplant, Hematology/Oncology, Stroke, and Academic Assessment.

Age Ranges: Children, Adolescents, and Young Adults.

Gender: N/A.

Ethnicity: N/A.

Other: N/A.

RESEARCH EXPERIENCE:

Do you perform research? No.

Research Assistantship offered? No.

Do you have an existing database? No.

Any experience for undergraduates or post-baccalaureates? No.

RESEARCH POPULATIONS:

Research Interests: Pediatric.

PRIVATE PRACTICE

JOE ACKERSON, PhD

CONTACT INFORMATION

Telephone: (205) 324-8499

E-Mail: jackerson@ackersonandassociates.com 

Office: Ackerson and Associates

               Magnolia Financial Building, Suite 100

Affiliations:

Private Practice

CLINICAL EXPERIENCE:

Clinical Practicum offered? Yes – requires two semesters.

Clinical Assistantship offered? No.

Any experience for undergraduates or post-baccalaureates? No.

PSYCHOTHERAPY:

Psychotherapy experience offered? No.

Clinical orientation? N/A.

ASSESSMENT:

Opportunity for Assessment? Yes.

Type of tests and batteries administered? Flexible battery for most outpatients. Fixed battery for clinical research cases.

Experience in projective testing? No.

CLINICAL POPULATIONS:

Inpatient or outpatient? Outpatient.

Type of population: Brain Injury, Epilepsy, Sports Injury, Stroke, and Academic Assessment.

Age Ranges: Children, Adolescents, and Young Adults. Ages 3 to 21, sometimes older if the clinical questions include a developmental disorder or the condition was acquired during childhood.

Gender: N/A.

Ethnicity: N/A.

Other: A mix of clinical, forensic, and research cases. Also sports concussion. Education and consultation.

RESEARCH EXPERIENCE:

Do you perform research? Yes.

Research Assistantship offered? No.

Do you have an existing database? Yes.

Any experience for undergraduates or post-baccalaureates? No.

RESEARCH POPULATIONS:

Research Interests: Assessment, Brain Injury, Health, Pediatric, Sports Injury, and Demyelinating Disorders.

JAMES BAÑOS, PhD

CONTACT INFORMATION

Telephone:

E-Mail:

Office:

Affiliations:

Private Practice

CLINICAL EXPERIENCE:

Clinical Practicum offered? 

Clinical Assistantship offered?

Any experience for undergraduates or post-baccalaureates? 

PSYCHOTHERAPY:

Psychotherapy experience offered? 

Clinical orientation?

ASSESSMENT:

Opportunity for Assessment? 

Type of tests and batteries administered? 

CLINICAL POPULATIONS:

Inpatient or outpatient?

Type of population: 

Age Ranges: 

Gender: 

Ethnicity: 

Other: 

RESEARCH EXPERIENCE:

Do you perform research? 

Research Assistantship offered? 

Do you have an existing database? 

Any experience for undergraduates or post-baccalaureates? 

RESEARCH POPULATIONS:

Research Interests: 

H. RANDALL GRIFFITH, PhD, ABPP(CN)

CONTACT INFORMATION

Telephone: (205) 324-8499

E-Mail: henrygriffithphd@yahoo.com 

Office: Ackerson and Associates

               Magnolia Financial Building, Suite 100

Affiliation:

Private Practice

CLINICAL EXPERIENCE:

Clinical Practicum offered? Yes.

Clinical Assistantship offered? No.

Any experience for undergraduates or post-baccalaureates? No.

PSYCHOTHERAPY:

Psychotherapy experience offered? No.

Clinical orientation? N/A.

ASSESSMENT:

Opportunity for Assessment? Yes.

Type of tests and batteries administered? Process Approach with fixed or flexible batteries. Personality and neuropsychological measures.

Experience in projective testing? No.

CLINICAL POPULATIONS:

Inpatient or outpatient? Outpatient.

Type of population: Bariatric, Brain Injury, and Dementia.

Age Ranges: Young Adults, Middle-Aged Adults, and Older Adults.

Gender: 65% Male, 35% Female.

Ethnicity: 85% Caucasian and 15% African American.

Other: N/A.

RESEARCH EXPERIENCE:

Do you perform research?  No.

Research Assistantship offered? No.

Do you have an existing database? No.

Any experience for undergraduates or post-baccalaureates? No.

RESEARCH POPULATIONS:

Research Interests: N/A.

SPAIN REHABILITATION CENTER

TOM NOVACK, PhD, ABPP(CN)

CONTACT INFORMATION

Telephone: (205) 934-3454

E-Mail: novack@uab.edu

Office: Spain Rehab room 530

Affiliations:

UAB University Hospital

Department of Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation

CLINICAL EXPERIENCE:

Clinical Practicum offered? Yes.

Clinical Assistantship offered? No.

Any experience for undergraduates or post-baccalaureates? No.

PSYCHOTHERAPY:

Psychotherapy experience offered? No.

Clinical orientation? N/A.

ASSESSMENT:

Opportunity for Assessment? Yes.

Type of tests and batteries administered? Eclectic, standardized tests.

Experience in projective testing? No.

CLINICAL POPULATIONS:

Inpatient or outpatient? Inpatient and Outpatient.

Type of population: Brain Injury, Stroke.

Age Ranges: Young Adults, Middle-Aged Adults, and Older Adults.

Gender: Predominantly male.

Ethnicity: A variety.

Other: N/A.

RESEARCH EXPERIENCE:

Do you perform research? Yes.

Research Assistantship offered? No.

Do you have an existing database? Yes.

Any experience for undergraduates or post-baccalaureates? No.

RESEARCH POPULATIONS:

Research Interests: Adult, Assessment, Brain Injury, and Rehabilitation.

SARAH WRIGHT, PsyD

CONTACT INFORMATION

Telephone: (205) 934-3454

E-Mail: wrightse@uab.edu 

Office: Spain Rehab room

Affiliations:

UAB School of Medicine

Department of Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation

CLINICAL EXPERIENCE:

Clinical Practicum offered? 

Clinical Assistantship offered?

Any experience for undergraduates or post-baccalaureates? 

PSYCHOTHERAPY:

Psychotherapy experience offered? 

Clinical orientation?

ASSESSMENT:

Opportunity for Assessment? 

Type of tests and batteries administered? 

CLINICAL POPULATIONS:

Inpatient or outpatient?

Type of population: 

Age Ranges: 

Gender: 

Ethnicity: 

Other: 

RESEARCH EXPERIENCE:

Do you perform research? 

Research Assistantship offered? 

Do you have an existing database? 

Any experience for undergraduates or post-baccalaureates? 

RESEARCH POPULATIONS:

Research Interests: 

UAB DEPARTMENT OF OPHTHALMOLOGY

LAURA DREER, PhD

CONTACT INFORMATION

Telephone: (205) 325-8681

E-Mail: dreer@uab.edu

Office: Callahan Eye Foundation, Suite 609

Affiliations:

UAB University Hospital

Department of Ophthalmology

CLINICAL EXPERIENCE:

Clinical Practicum offered? Yes.

Clinical Assistantship offered? No.

Any experience for undergraduates or post-baccalaureates? Yes.

PSYCHOTHERAPY:

Psychotherapy experience offered? Yes.

Clinical orientation? Evidence-based and Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy.

ASSESSMENT:

Opportunity for Assessment? Yes.

Type of tests and batteries administered? Empirically-supported tests depending upon the question and patient.

Experience in projective testing? No.

CLINICAL POPULATIONS:

Inpatient or outpatient? Outpatient.

Type of population: Brain Injury, Chronic Pain/Stress, Veterans, Stroke, Dementia, and Vocational.

Age Ranges: Younger Adults, Middle-Aged Adults, and Older Adults.

Gender: A variety.

Ethnicity: A variety.

Other: Specializing with populations with low vision or visual impairment.

RESEARCH EXPERIENCE:

Do you perform research? Yes.

Research Assistantship offered? Yes.

Do you have an existing database? Yes.

Any experience for undergraduates or post-baccalaureates? Yes.

RESEARCH POPULATIONS:

Research Interests: Adult, Assessment, Brain Injury, Gerontology, Medical/Preventative, Health, Rehabilitation, Dementia, Vision Impairment, Adjustment to Low Vision and other Chronic Health Conditions, Caregiving, and Adjustment to Caregiving.

UAB: DEPARTMENT OF NEUROLOGY, DIVISION OF NEUROPSYCHOLOGY

ROY MARTIN, PhD

CONTACT INFORMATION

Telephone: (205) 934-7216

E-Mail: rmartin@uab.edu

Office: Sparks Center room 650

Affiliations:

UAB Department of Neurology

Division of Neuropsychology

CLINICAL EXPERIENCE:

Clinical Practicum offered? Yes.

Clinical Assistantship offered? No .

Any experience for undergraduates or post-baccalaureates? Yes.

PSYCHOTHERAPY:

Psychotherapy experience offered? No.

Clinical orientation? N/A.

ASSESSMENT:

Opportunity for Assessment? Yes.

Type of tests and batteries administered? A flexible neuropsychological battery.

Experience in projective testing? No.

CLINICAL POPULATIONS:

Inpatient or outpatient? Inpatient.

Type of population: Brain Injury, Epilepsy, and Dementia.

Age Ranges: Young adults, Middle Aged Adults, and Older Adults.

Gender: N/A.

Ethnicity: N/A.

Other: N/A.

RESEARCH EXPERIENCE:

Do you perform research? Yes.

Research Assistantship offered? No.

Do you have an existing database? No.

Any experience for undergraduates or post-baccalaureates? No.

RESEARCH POPULATIONS:

Research Interests: Epilepsy.

DAN MARSON, JD, PhD

CONTACT INFORMATION

Telephone: (205) 934-2334

E-Mail: dmarson@uab.edu

Office: Sparks Center room 650

Affiliations:

UAB Department of Neurology

Division of Neuropsychology

CLINICAL EXPERIENCE:

Clinical Practicum offered? Yes.

Clinical Assistantship offered? No.

Any experience for undergraduates or post-baccalaureates? No.

PSYCHOTHERAPY:

Psychotherapy experience offered? No.

Clinical orientation? N/A.

ASSESSMENT:

Opportunity for Assessment? Yes.

Type of tests and batteries administered? Flexible batteries depending on referral. Includes Wechsler tests, motor tests, mood measures, CLOX, and capacity measures.

Experience in projective testing? No.

CLINICAL POPULATIONS:

Inpatient or outpatient? Outpatient.

Type of population: Brain Injury, Hematology/Oncology, Stroke, Dementia, and Competency/Forensic Evaluations.

Age Ranges: Young Adults, Middle Aged Adults, and Older Adults.

Gender: N/A.

Ethnicity: N/A.

Other: N/A.

RESEARCH EXPERIENCE:

Do you perform research? Yes.

Research Assistantship offered? No.

Do you have an existing database? Yes.

Any experience for undergraduates or post-baccalaureates? Yes.

RESEARCH POPULATIONS:

Research Interests: Brain Injury, Neuroimaging, Dementia, Parkinson’s Disease, and Financial Capacity.

KRISTIN TRIEBEL, PsyD

CONTACT INFORMATION

Telephone: (205) 934-8155

E-Mail: ktriebel@uab.edu

Office: Sparks Center room 650

Affiliations:

UAB Department of Neurology

Division of Neuropsychology

CLINICAL EXPERIENCE:

Clinical Practicum offered? Yes.

Clinical Assistantship offered? No.

Any experience for undergraduates or post-baccalaureates? Yes.

PSYCHOTHERAPY:

Psychotherapy experience offered? No.

Clinical orientation? N/A.

ASSESSMENT:

Opportunity for Assessment? Yes.

Type of tests and batteries administered? Fixed-flexible neuropsychological batteries - usually about 2 hours - occassionally will give MMPI/MCMI, but usually just NP tests.

Experience in projective testing? No.

CLINICAL POPULATIONS:

Inpatient or outpatient? Outpatient.

Type of population: Brain Injury, Epilepsy, Stroke, Dementia, Hematology/Oncology, Vocational, Pre-Surgical Evaluations for Deep Brain Stimulation surgery or Parkinson’s Disease.

Age Ranges: Young Adults, Middle-Aged Adults, and Older Adults. 70% are over the age of 50.

Gender: Both Males and Females.

Ethnicity: Predominantly Caucasian and African American though all are seen.

Other: N/A.

RESEARCH EXPERIENCE:

Do you perform research? Yes.

Research Assistantship offered? Yes.

Do you have an existing database? Yes.

Any experience for undergraduates or post-baccalaureates? Yes.

RESEARCH POPULATIONS:

Research Interests: Adult, Assessment, Dementia, Gerontology, Experimental, Medical/Preventative, Health, and Other.

ADDITIONAL OPPORTUNITIES FOR EXPERIENCE IN ASSESSMENT

BAIR, PEACOCK, McDONALD, & McMULLEN PRIVATE PRACTICE

JULIE McDONALD, PhD

Telephone: (205) 822-7354

E-mail: jmcdonald07@gmail.com 

Office: 800 Valleydale Road, Birmingham, AL

Primary Population: Adolescent and some child learning disability assessment. Experience can be obtained in administration of comprehensive batteries that comprise a learning disability evaluation for various referral questions such as dyslexia, ADHD, math disability, etc. May observe or participate in interviews of the client and family. Students will learn the pattern of results that are consistent with different learning disabilities when the cognitive test results are reviewed. Comprehensive report-writing is also an option for students with experience, or who want to gain experience.

THE DOLEYS CLINIC

LEANNE CIANFRINI, PhD

Telephone: (205) 591-7246

E-mail: ba1ley@uab.edu 

Office: 800 Valleydale Road, Birmingham, AL

Primary Population: Outpatient multidisciplinary pain practice involving adults with nociceptive or neuropathic pain conditions, some traumatic injuries such as head injury. Experience can be obtained in Intake interviews, interpreting MMPIs. The student primarily performs 1-hour initial evaluations and follow-up medical psychology/psychotherapy sessions every 3 to 6 months. Therapy is from a CBT standpoint, with elements of ACT (acceptance) and motivational interviewing. Lots of practice in relaxation techniques can be obtained. The student can also teach classes in the inpatient pain program on a variety of topics (e.g., anxiety, depression, stress management, sleep hygiene). Cognitive assessment is also available but this is infrequent.

HILL CREST PSYCHIATRIC HOSPITAL

SHANNON HARTLEY, PhD

Telephone: (205) 838-4002

E-mail: schnell133@hotmail.com

Office: Hill Crest Behavioral Health Services, 1st Avenue North 

Primary Population: Inpatient psychiatric hospital with experience in psychodiagnostic assessment of children, adolescents, and adults. Experience can be obtained in interviewing, as well as use of objective and projective measures.

DEHRYL MASON, JD, PhD

Telephone: (205) 838-2070

E-mail: dehryl@bellsouth.net

Office: Hill Crest Behavioral Health Services, 1st Avenue North 

Primary Population: Inpatient psychiatric hospital with experience in psychodiagnostic assessment of children, adolescents, and adults. Experience can be obtained in interviewing, as well as use of objective and projective measures.

        

UAB CENTER FOR PSYCHIATRIC MEDICINE (CPM)

HAL THURSTIN, PhD

Telephone: (205) 934-6054

E-mail: hadrian@uab.edu 

Office: Center for Psychiatric Medicine C427

Primary Population: Adult and geriatric psychiatric assessment including evaluations for medical/surgical candidates, and treatment of depressive, personality, and anxiety as well as eating disorders. He also oversees therapy training experience for all Medical-Clinical psychology graduate students.

SPARKS CENTER FOR DEVELOPMENT & LEARNING

KRISTEN BAILEY, PhD

        Telephone: (205) 934-5559

E-mail: kirstin@uab.edu

Office: CH 19, 307U

Primary Population: Evaluation of children with neurodevelopmental disabilities such as autism. Therapy and research experiences also available.

FRED BIASINI, PhD

Telephone: (205) 934-9465

E-mail: fbiasini@uab.edu

Office: CH 19, 127

Primary Population: Evaluation and treatment of children with developmental disabilities such as autism. Involvement with Head Start programs. Research experience also available.

CRYSHELLE PATTERSON, PhD

Telephone: (205) 934-4683

E-mail: cspatter@uab.edu

Office: Ch 19, 307N

Primary Population: Evaluation and treatment of children with developmental delays and behavioral or emotional difficulties, specifically Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder. Oversees the UAB Summer Treatment Program.


RESEARCH TRAINING



General Skills


It is important to note that, even if you do not intend to perform research in the future, UAB, as well as many internship sites, emphasize research and scholarly interest and product. Competent neuropsychologists are capable of producing as well as consuming research. The Houston Conference Guidelines addresses criterion for research training as well as education and clinical skills. They include:

Research Skills:

  1. Selection of appropriate research topics.
  2. Review of relevant literature.
  3. Design of research.
  4. Execution of research.
  5. Monitoring of progress.
  6. Evaluation of outcome.
  7. Communication of results.

While at UAB, students should seek out the following experiences:

  1. Have neuropsychologists sit as either chairs or members of the student’s Graduate Studies Committee (GSC) as well as the student’s Research Studies Committee (RSC).
  2. Complete a neuropsychology-related master’s thesis and doctoral dissertation.
  3. Obtain membership in professional associations.
  4. Attend national conferences.
  5. Do poster presentations locally, regionally, and/or nationally.
  6. Serve as an author or co-author on a book chapter or peer-reviewed publication.
  7. Obtain experience with grant writing.
  8. Apply for awards and fellowships.


Membership in Professional Organizations


Organization membership is highly encouraged. There are several national neuropsychology organizations available to student affiliates:

  1. American Psychological Association, Division 40 (Neuropsychology)

http://www.div40.org/ 

  1. Association of Neuropsychology Students in Training (ANST, via APA Division 40)

http://www.div40-anst.com 

  1. International Neuropsychological Society

http://www.the-ins.org/

  1. National Academy of Neuropsychology

http://nanonline.org/NAN/home/home.aspx 

  1. American Academy of Clinical Neuropsychology

http://www.theaacn.org/ 

  1. Hispanic Neuropsychological Society

http://www.hnps.org-a.googlepages.com/ 

There are also more specialized organizations one may join, including the Brain Injury Association USA, Alabama Head Injury Foundation, Gerontological Society of America, American Academy of Neurology, Society of Behavioral Medicine, Alzheimer’s Association, and American Epilepsy Society.

In terms of conferences, conference attendance and participation, whether in the form of posters or presentations, is encouraged over organization membership. The department, the Medical-Clinical Psychology doctoral program, and the Graduate Student Association provide travel funding for those individuals who present at conferences.

Remember that most national organizations will seek out students interested in working at conferences (e.g., checking in members, collecting surveys after sessions) and will waive conferences fees or even provide room and board in exchange for a student’s commitment.


Listserv Membership


Students can also stay abreast of current topics in the field in regards to professional, research, and training issues through Listserv membership. A Listserv is an e-mail membership where you receive communication through e-mail threads. There are several current listservs focused on neuropsychology that include, but are not limited to:

  1. APA Division 40 Announcement Listserv

http://lists.apa.org/cgi-bin/wa.exe?A0=DIV40ANNOUNCE 

  1. Association of Neuropsychology Students in Training (ANST) Listserv

http://www.div40-anst.com 

  1. Neuro Listserv

        http://www.neurolist.com/ 

  1. Pediatric Neuropsychology Listserv

 http://www.div40.org/anst/index.html 

  1. Women in Neuropsychology (WIN) Listserv

http://www.div40.org/Committee_Activities_Pages/Advisory_Committee/win.htm 

There are other listservs that, although not related to psychology, may also be beneficial for graduate students, including the APA science directorate listserv, APAGS listserv, and others.


SAMPLE TIMELINE FOR NEUROPSYCHOLOGY STUDENTS


By end of Year…

Recommended Progress is:

Minimally Adequate Progress is:

1

Functional Neuroanatomy

Shadowing

Observe one thesis defense

Thesis area identified

Shadowing

Observe one thesis defense

2

Behavioral Neuroscience

Neuropsychological Assessment

Thesis proposed & data collected

Functional Neuroanatomy

Behavioral Neuroscience

Thesis area identified

3

Human Neuropsychology

At least one neuropsychology assistantship or year-long practicum

Observe one dissertation defense

Thesis defended

Dissertation area identified

Neuropsychological Assessment

Observe one dissertation defense

Thesis data collected

Dissertation area identified

4

At least one neuropsychology assistantship or year-long practicum (if not already done)

Dissertation proposed & data collected

Human Neuropsychology

Thesis defended

Dissertation proposed

5

Dissertation defended

Dissertation data collected

6

Internship completed at end of year

Graduation

Dissertation defended

7

Internship completed

Graduation

Note: These are suggested guidelines, and individual circumstances are also considered when evaluating student progress. Not all neuropsychology courses are offered continually, so these are just recommendations.


DIDACTICS COMPLETION CHECKLIST


NEUROPSYCHOLOGY COURSEWORK BENCHMARKS

Class

Semester Taken

Professor

Grade

Functional Neuroanatomy 

Behavioral Neuroscience

Neuropsychological Assessment

Human Neuropsychology

Other related coursework


CLINICAL COMPLETION CHECKLIST


PRACTICA BENCHMARKS

Area of Training

Specifier

Site & Advisor

Completed?

Neuropsychology

TBI

Stroke

Dementia

Epilepsy

Child

Psychiatric

Adult

Child/Adolescent

Substance Abuse

Psychotherapy

Health/Medical Psychology

*Program requires two

Note: Throughout the course of their clinical training, students should also seek out a wide range of experience in the following areas: Diagnoses, Tests, Clinical Settings, Age Ranges, and Conceptualization Style.


RESEARCH COMPLETION CHECKLIST


REQUIRED RESEARCH BENCHMARKS

Project

Date

Advisor or Presenter

Observe Thesis Proposal/Defense

Master’s Thesis  Proposal

Master’s Thesis Defense

Observe Dissertation Proposal/Defense

Doctoral Dissertation Proposal

Doctoral Dissertation Defense

OTHER RESEARCH

Year

Topic

Site & Advisor

Year One

Year Two

Year Three

Year Four

Year Five

Year Six


© 2009; By Cady K. Block and Jacquelynn N. Copeland


PAGE