Wasabi Pea Panisse

Adapted from David Lebovitz

4 Cups Vegetable Stock

1 Tablespoon Olive Oil

1 - 1 1/2 Tablespoon Wasabi Paste*

3/4 Teaspoon Salt

2 1/4 Cups Green Pea Flour

Mildly Flavored Olive Oil or Canola Oil, for Frying

Coarse Sea Salt

Shichimi Togarashi (Optional)

Miso Aioli:

1/4 Cup Olive Oil

1/2 Cup Plain Greek-Style Coconut Yogurt**

1/4 Cup Shiro (White) Miso Paste

1 Tablespoons Rice Vinegar

1 Tablespoon Lemon Juice

1 Tablespoon Mirin

2 - 3 Cloves Roasted Garlic

1 Teaspoon Tamari or Soy Sauce

*Beware of less than savory wasabi pastes that include sneaky stabilizers and curious fillers, such a milk derivatives. Wasabi pastes can vary greatly in intensity, so add it according to your tastes and the brand you have on hand. You can also use reconstituted wasabi powder in a pinch, but I've found that they tend to taste dusty and can never reach the same heat level.

**If you can't get a hold of this, you can also use regular vegan yogurt, but bear in mind that the consistency of your aioli will be considerably thinner.

Lightly grease a 11 x 7-inch baking dish and set aside. [David recommends a 9-inch square, which also works fine, but I found that the panisse had to be cut in half horizontally so that they weren't thick slabs.]

Place the vegetable stock, oil, wasabi paste, and salt in a medium or large saucepan, and whisk thoroughly to incorporate the wasabi. Set over medium heat, and bring the liquid just to the brink of boiling. When the bubbles threaten to erupt on the surface, add in the green pea flour, whisking vigorously the whole time to prevent lumps from forming. As the mixture begins to think, you'll need to switch to a wooden spoon to continue stirring, as it will become quite stiff in no time at all. Continue to cook and stir for up to 10 minutes, until the batter is thick enough to hold its shape. In my experience, this took much less time, but it will vary depending on your stove and how much moisture is in the air, so stay connected to the process at all times.

Transfer the pea batter to your prepared pan, and smooth out the top with a spatula. Let cool completely before proceeding. If making this for a specific function, it's helpful to prepare this a day in advance and refrigerate it overnight.

Meanwhile, prepare the miso aioli simply by placing all of the ingredients in your blender or food processor, and puree until smooth. Store in an airtight container in the fridge until ready to serve.

Once the pea mixture has cooled and solidified into a block, turn it out onto a cutting board and slice it into fingers about 3/4 inch x 3 inches- But please don't break out the ruler, the exact measurements aren't critical! Heat your oil of choice in a high-sided saute pan, and set out a landing strip of paper towels nearby to rest the finished panisse on. When the oil is hot and shimmering, fry just a handful of panisse at a time so as not to crowd the pan. Use tongs to turn them, and cook so that each side is golden brown. Remove and drain on the paper towels, sprinkling them with salt and shichimi togarashi if desired while still hot. Serve immediately with miso aioli on the side.

Makes about 40 Panisse; about 1 Cup Aioli

©Hannah Kaminsky http://www.bittersweetblog.com