Thursday, 9 August, 2:45 p.m. - 3:45 p.m.

Seeds of Discontent: Regulatory Hurdles to Practicing an Ancestral Diet

Nate Rosenberg, J.D. (moderator)

Emily Broad Leib, J.D

Baylen J. Linnekin, M.A., J.D., LL.M.

Margaret Sova McCabe, J.D.

Many federal and state regulations steer people toward certain dietary practices, both by making it easier to produce some foods than others and by recommending certain foods. The science behind these regulations may be disputed, unsettled, or--even worse--wrong. Unfortunately, regulations promulgated by the USDA, FDA, and other agencies have made it increasingly difficult to produce and sell healthy, local foods, and have discouraged people from practicing an ancestral diet by supporting other dietary practices. Our panel, made up of three attorneys who teach and practice in the area of food law and policy, will present an overview of current laws and policies that may make it challenging to practice an ancestral diet, looking at regulations that impact both food producers/sellers and consumers. We will review several salient examples, such as agricultural subsidies that promote commodities like corn, wheat, and soy; federal and state regulations that create barriers to small-scale meat production and sale; onerous food safety regulations and other barriers to fruit and vegetable production such as the recent Food Safety Modernization Act; government dietary guidelines (including the previous Food Pyramid and current MyPlate as well as nutrition labeling); impacts of the current training and licensure of registered dietitians; and government procurement of food products. We will discuss barriers to the production and consumption of these food items, describe several recent positive actions taken by federal and state governments, including new rules that allow for a geographic preference in food procurement, and offer policy prescriptions for the future.

Nate Rosenberg, J.D. (moderator)

Nathan Rosenberg is a joint fellow at Harvard Law School and Mississippi State University, where he works on issues relating to food law and policy. He serves on the Ancestral Health Society’s board and co-founded the Harvard Food Law Society in 2010 while a student at Harvard Law School.

Emily Broad Leib, J.D.

ebroad@law.harvard.edu

Emily Broad Leib is Lecturer on Law at Harvard Law School and directs the Harvard Food Law and Policy Clinic. The Clinic educates law students about the food system and provides legal/policy advice to nonprofits and government agencies seeking to increase access to healthy foods and reduce market barriers for small producers.

Baylen J. Linnekin, M.A., J.D.

baylenlinnekin@gmail.com

Baylen Linnekin, an attorney, is executive director of Keep Food Legal—a Washington, DC nonprofit that fights for food freedom—and an adjunct food studies professor at American University. His writing has appeared in Chapman University Law Review, Hastings Constitutional Law Quarterly, Reason (where he writes a weekly online column), Huffington Post, and elsewhere.

Margaret Sova McCabe, J.D.

margaret.mccabe@law.unh.edu

University of New Hampshire Law Professor Margaret Sova McCabe teaches courses that engage students in critical thinking about how law affects society, food systems, and policy. Her primary teaching and research goal is to engage students in public interest issues concerning citizens’ access to healthy, nutritious, and sustainable food.


Friday, 10 August, 10:15 a.m. - 11:15 a.m.

room 1                                                                                       room 2  

Fix Our Food Initiative: A Comprehensive Approach to Food and Nutrition Reform

Nate Rosenberg, J.D. (moderator)

Peter Ballerstedt, Ph.D.

Lynda Frassetto, M.D.

Adele Hite, Ph.D., M.P.H.

Anna Kelles, Ph.D.

Our food system and the nutrition policies that shape it are complex and interconnected.  The Fix Our Food initiative proposes a comprehensive approach to changing the system. Primary areas of focus are the need to:  1) reform food and nutrition policy processes, 2) support the creation of a safe and sustainable food system, 3) improve healthcare outcomes through improved nutritional practices and administration, 4) promote scientific integrity in food and nutrition research, and 5) engage commercial interests in the process of creating standards and strategies for improving the food supply in safe and sustainable ways.  

With this framework of evidence-based advocacy, the grassroots communities that already utilize non-standard healthcare and dietary approaches can strengthen connections to each other and to current movements already underway in food system reform and government accountability. This network will be able to use this initiative as a framework for communication and coordination to enhance public involvement, creating a clearinghouse of strategies and a repertoire of actions that can be taken by individuals, organizations, communities, and businesses to lower the barriers to change. This organized bottom-up call for reform will provide the impetus for top-down actions by policymakers.  

The Fix Our Food initiative presentation will give participants an opportunity to contribute ideas to furthering public participation in a movement that will address the ways food and nutrition policy impacts civil rights, individual liberties, healthcare, science, the environment, humanitarian and hunger issues, and government transparency and accountability, changing the world for better for generations to come.

Nate Rosenberg, J.D. (moderator)

nate.rosenberg@gmail.com

Nathan Rosenberg is a joint fellow at Harvard Law School and Mississippi State University, where he works on issues relating to food law and policy. He serves on the Ancestral Health Society’s board and co-founded the Harvard Food Law Society in 2010 while a student at Harvard Law School.

Peter Ballerstedt, Ph.D.

pballerstedt@barusa.com

Peter received his Ph.D. in forage production and utilization. He was the forage extension specialist at Oregon State University and is currently the forage product manager at Barenbrug USA. The combination of his forage-based livestock production system expertise with his understanding of human diet and health produced “Grass Based Health.”

Lynda Frassetto, M.D.

frassett@gcrc.ucsf.edu

Lynda Frassetto, M.D., is a Professor of Medicine and Nephrology at the University of California San Francisco.  Her research interests include dietary influences on acid-base balance and drug or uremic toxin influences on membrane transporter-metabolizing enzyme interactions.  She is the director of a clinical research center at UCSF, supervises patient care at three of the University’s hospitals, and helps teach courses on improved communications and behavioral stress modification techniques.

Adele Hite, M.P.H. Ph.D. cand.,

adele.hite@gmail.com

Adele Hite is a Registered Dietitian and doctoral student in Nutrition Epidemiology at the University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill.  Prior to her graduate studies, she worked at the Duke Lifestyle Medicine Clinic, educating patients with obesity and diabetes.  She is also a yoga instructor and mother of three.

Anna Kelles, Ph.D.

arkelles@gmail.com

Anna R. Kelles, Ph.D. is the Dean of the School of Applied Clinical Nutrition at New York Chiropractic College. Her research explores the impact of urbanization and economic status on patterns of obesogenic behaviors. She currently dedicates her time to building a high-quality and diverse nutrition work force.  

New Technologies and New Opportunities

Paul Jaminet, Ph.D.  (moderator)

Ned Kock, M.Sc., Ph.D.

Chris Kresser, M.S., L.Ac.

Frank Moss, Ph.D.

Dan Pardi, M.S., Ph.D. cand.  

The ancestral health community includes hundreds of thousands of highly engaged members who routinely engage in self-experimentation to improve their health. Yet knowledge discovered through self-experimentation is rarely captured, validated, and disseminated. We know that dietary, nutritional, and lifestyle (exercise, circadian rhythm) therapies patterned on ancestral lifeways, alone or in combination with conventional medical therapies, can tremendously improve health. But we don’t yet know which interventions are most likely to work in specific health conditions.

The purpose of this panel is to explore how emerging technologies – quantified self tools for gathering data; software web services for sharing information; and analytical and annotation engines for developing and disseminating useful knowledge – can be utilized by the ancestral health community to make experimentation systematic and fruitful.

We envision a new model of science, in which the ancestral health community is able to systematically gather and share information using QS tools, web services, and analytical and annotation engines. The community tests therapeutic strategies under the guidance of scientists and clinicians, and results are rapidly validated and disseminated via blogs and the Ancestral Health Society’s Journal of Evolution and Health. Experts develop the results into protocols for diagnosing and treating disease.

The panel brings together technology entrepreneurs, a venture investor, technologists, a clinician, and three popular bloggers. The panel’s goal is not only to explore opportunities, but to design a pilot program and to identify entrepreneurial companies who would partner with the ancestral health community to implement a pilot program.

Paul Jaminet, Ph.D. (moderator)

pauljaminet@perfecthealthdiet.com

Paul Jaminet, Ph.D., is the author with his wife Shou-Ching of Perfect Health Diet: Four Steps to Renewed Health, Youthful Vitality, and Long Life and blogs at PerfectHealthDiet.com. A former astrophysicist and entrepreneur, Paul turned to diet to repair his own health, and now seeks to share what he’s learned.

Ned Kock, M.Sc., Ph.D.

nedkock@gmail.com 

Ned Kock (http://nedkock.com) is the developer of WarpPLS, the first ever nonlinear variance-based structural equation modeling software. He writes a popular blog, Health Correlator, on the intersection of evolution, statistics and health. He is also a professor of information systems and advanced statistics at Texas A&M International University.

Chris Kresser, M.S., L.Ac.

chris@chriskresser.com

Chris Kresser, M.S., L.Ac. is a practitioner of integrative medicine and the creator of ChrisKresser.com, a popular blog and podcast challenging mainstream myths on nutrition, health and disease.  He has a private practice in Berkeley, CA and consults with patients around the world via telephone & Skype.

Frank Moss, Ph.D.

fmoss@media.mit.edu

After completing undergraduate work at Princeton University, Frank Moss completed his Ph.D at  Massachusettes Institute of Technology (M.I.T.). Dr. Moss’ positions include or have included managing partner of Strategic Software Ventures, head of M.I.T.’s Media Lab’s New Media Medicine group, former C.E.O. of Tivoli Systems, founder of Infinity PharmMceuticals. He is interested in creating innovative web services to improve health.

Dan Pardi, M.S., Ph.D. cand.

danpardi@gmail.com

Dan Pardi, M.S., is a Ph.D. candidate in cognitive neuroscience working with collaborators at Leiden and Stanford Universities. He is the CEO of Dan’s Plan, which promotes optimal health in our modern world. He has conducted research on diet, sleep, and exercise and is a former Division I Strength Coach.

                                                                                 


Friday, 10 August, 2:15 p.m. - 3:15 p.m. 

 room 1                                                                                 room 2

Safe Starches: Are they Essential to an Ancestral Diet?

Jimmy Moore (moderator)

Paul Jaminet, Ph.D.

Chris Kresser, M.S., L.Ac.

Ron Rosedale, M.D.

Catherine Shanahan, M.D.

In his book The Perfect Health Diet, Paul Jaminet puts forth a controversial concept known as "safe starches," including white rice, white potatoes, yams and more. He's referring to the lack of toxicity that comes from consuming them within the context of ancestral nutrition. But not everyone agrees these "safe starches" are completely harmless to the people who consume them. We'll explore the potential dangers that these "safe starches" can cause in some people and attempt to come to a consensus about one of the most important topics of discussion over the past year. This panel of prestigious experts includes Jaminet along with three medical doctors who will discuss and debate this idea as an extension of the conversation that first began at Jimmy Moore's "Livin' La Vida Low-Carb" blog in a post entitled "Is There Any Such Thing As ‘Safe Starches’ On A Low-Carb Diet?" on October 6, 2011.

Jimmy Moore

livinlowcarbman@charter.net

Jimmy Moore quickly became an overnight Internet sensation following his incredible triple-digit low-carb weight loss success in 2004. From his relentless work on the top-rated ""Livin' La Vida Low-Carb"" blog to the hundreds of highly-respected guests who have appeared on his podcast ""The Livin’ La Vida Low-Carb Show with Jimmy Moore,"" Jimmy is a steady voice of reason in an ever-increasing sea of diet insanity.

Paul Jaminet, Ph.D.

pauljaminet@perfecthealthdiet.com

Paul Jaminet, Ph.D., is the author with his wife Shou-Ching of Perfect Health Diet: Four Steps to Renewed Health, Youthful Vitality, and Long Life and blogs at PerfectHealthDiet.com. A former astrophysicist and entrepreneur, Paul turned to diet to repair his own health, and now seeks to share what he’s learned.

Chris Kresser, M.S., L.Ac.

chris@chriskresser.com

Chris Kresser, M.S., L.Ac is a practitioner of integrative medicine and the creator of ChrisKresser.com, a popular blog and podcast challenging mainstream myths on nutrition, health and disease. He has a private practice in Berkeley, CA and consults with patients around the world via telephone and Skype.

Ron Rosedale, M.D.

ron@drrosedale.com

Ron Rosedale M.D. is an  internationally known expert in nutrition, aging, and metabolic medicine. His now famous lectures on insulin nearly 20 years ago foretold of its importance to the chronic diseases and aging.  He has done the same for the hormone leptin with his book “The Rosedale Diet”.

Catherine Shanahan, M.D.

ktshanahan@gmail.com

Catherine Shanahan is a board certified Family Medicine physician and author of PaleoDiet for Dummies (August 2012) and the underground classic Deep Nutrition: Why Your Genes Need Traditional Food. Her clinical practice in Napa, CA reunites medicine with the culinary arts in collaboration with some of the best chefs in the world.

Working to Reclaim Ancestral Health in Latino Communities

Elisa Maldonado, Ph.D. (moderator)

Armida Ayala, Ph.D.

Daria Galdindo

Declining health outcomes and insurance coverage in Latino communities are modern health challenges requiring an ancestral health approach. Latinos are the ethnic group most impacted by the obesity epidemic in the US. They are more likely to be overweight and obese and twice as likely to be diagnosed with diabetes compared to non-Hispanic whites. Complicating this, Latinos saw the sharpest increase in poverty among any group in 2011, limiting their access to nutritious foods and health insurance. As a result, American taxpayers are shouldering increasing healthcare costs for Latinos, also the demographic segment of the population most likely to be uninsured. Prevention and wellness programs that focus on an ancestral health approach would be significantly less expensive and, consequently, beneficial to all Americans. Through personal testimonies, interactive discussion, and community building, this panel of Latinas, including two Ph.D. scientists, will focus on educating others about modern health challenges affecting Latino communities and developing solutions based on an ancestral approach.

Elisa Maldonado, Ph.D.

emaldona@seas.harvard.edu

Elisa Maldonado, Ph.D. is a National Science Foundation Minority Postdoctoral Research Fellow at Harvard University. A recent medical diagnosis tied to her Mexican-American background and family history of diabetes inspired her to use her scientific background to educate others about nutrition and physical and mental health, especially in minority communities.

Armida Ayala, Ph.D., M.H.A.

ayalausc@aol.com  

Armida Ayala is an anthropologist leading a private group, Native Fusion, committed to social justice.  She translates the science behind the Paleolithic diet to under-resourced populations in ways that are understandable and in settings familiar to them.  She uses media and mobile technology to conduct community interventions.

Daria Galdindo

dottie-d@verizon.net

Daria Galindo is a single mother of two who has struggled with obesity, depression, and anxiety. Her participation in the Nutritional Reclamation Project at Native Fusion helped her overcome these struggles and inspired her to become a Promotora (lay health worker) to help others facing comparable challenges.

Saturday, 11 August, 10:50 a.m. - 11:50 a.m.

Insulin Signaling - Science and Policy

Eric Daniels, Ph.D. (moderator), Richard David Feinman, Ph.D., Eugene J. Fine, M.D., Judith Wylie-Rosett, Ed.D., R.D.

The Food Pyramid, established by the USDA in 1982, recommended ingestion of 55-70% of calories as carbohydrate. The subsequent 30 years showed a growing epidemic of obesity, metabolic syndrome, type 2 diabetes mellitus, as well as identifiably increased frisks for cancer, arthritis and cardiovascular disease. The Food Pyramid has recently been abandoned. Recommendations for carbohydrate intake now are in the range of 40-55% of total calories. Some propose that we should increase consumption of whole grain foods, natural fruits, etc. Other approaches recommend reducing total carbohydrate consumption further than current recommendations on grounds that 90% of the carbohydrates ingested nowadays are sugars or starches that digest to sugars.These are points of discussion, but regardless of specific dietary recommendations, we believe that a new dietary paradigm can be identified that calls for reducing overall insulin signaling. Benefits include reduced risks for type 2 diabetes, obesity, dyslipidemias, cardiovascular disease, arthritis as well as cancers: in short, many of the chronic diseases of our time.The panel and audience will discuss risk factors for chronic diseases and their inter-relations, mechanisms of insulin signaling that appear likely to contribute to these relationships challenges and possible suggestions toward improving dietary patterns.

Eric Daniels, Ph.D.

edan@clemson.edu

Richard David Feinman, Ph.D.,

feinman@me.com

Eugene J. Fine, M.D.

eugene.fine@einstein.yu.edu

Judith Wylie-Rosett, Ed.D., R.D.

judith.wylie-rosett@einstein.yu.edu