Last update 5/16/2013

Prepare a full draft prior to the IEP meeting or come to the meeting with a blank sheet?  As a teacher, this is a question that I have struggled with for years.  If I come with a completed draft am I discouraging the participation of the student, parents and the other members of the IEP team?  If I have a blank sheet am I doing my best to facilitate discussion?  For several years I have been sending home a draft, usually a week before the meeting, but often I feel that the draft has not encouraged participation in the process.  Karen Thompson, Director of ASK Resource Center, provided a solution by suggesting the development of a Dialogue IEP that would allow students, parents and others to prepare the draft together using the modern technology of google docs.  The framework of the Dialogue IEP is based on the Iowa IEP Transition Form with links to many resources to assist in the development of the Dialogue Draft.  Based on my research most IEPs contain these basic elements. This is a living document and can always be improved by input.  I suggest you make copies of all the resources in order to keep information confined to relevant parties but you are free to use the public resources.  Instructions on how to copy can be found on my website. Please send suggestions to kurtis.broeg@gmail.com.  Together we can transform the IEP from a required written document to a vehicle for collaboration.

Present Levels of Academic Achievement and Functional Performance

Strengths, interests and preferences of the individual.

Parent Input Form                Parent Input Form Data

Student IEP Prezi Example - Read more about the Student IEP Prezi.

Parents' concerns regarding their child's education.

Parent Input Form                Parent Input Form Data

Consideration for Assistive Technology - All students must be considered for Assistive Technology

WATI Assistive Technology Consideration Guide

More Assistive Technology Assessment Material

Transition assessments and other information essential for the development of this IEP (address living, learning & working):

Present Levels of Academic Achievement and Functional Performance Form - This survey based on North Dakota’s IEP is an excellent way to assure that you have covered the entire individual. It can be used as an interview tool and/or for reporting of results.

Present Levels of Academic Achievement and Functional Performance Data

Living: Information Sources:

Broeg Transition Assessments - Please choose two or three assessments form the site that address the concerns of the IEP team.  

Living: Results:

Both of these can be used to keep track of results over time and can be attached to the student’s IEP:

SPIN

Present Levels of Academic Achievement and Functional Performance Form - This survey based on North Dakota’s IEP is an excellent way to assure that you have covered the entire individual. It can be used as an interview tool and/or for reporting of results.

Present Levels of Academic Achievement and Functional Performance Data

Learning: Information Sources:

Examples: MAPS Testing, ITED Testing, Reading Probes, Writing and Math Probes

Learning: Results:

Working: Information Sources:

Both of these can be used to keep track of results over time and can be attached to the student’s IEP:

SPIN

Present Levels of Academic Achievement and Functional Performance Form - This survey based on North Dakota’s IEP is an excellent way to assure that you have covered the entire individual. It can be used as an interview tool and/or for reporting of results.

Present Levels of Academic Achievement and Functional Performance Data

 Working: Results:

Based on the transition assessments, describe the post secondary expectations for living, learning, and working.

Post secondary expectation for living:

Post secondary expectation for learning:

Post secondary expectation for working:

The Post- School Goals Form is an excellent way for the student to reflect on their long term goals and the steps necessary to reach those goals.  Even though the survey is directed at the student, other team members can complete the survey.  The data can be see here.

 Course of study

What requirements does this student need to meet to graduate?

The Post- School Goals Form requires the student to complete a program of study which should include both requirements, electives, etc..  All students should be held to high expectations.  The state of Vermont has created an Alternative Credit Approval Plan which should be considered if the student cannot complete the typical requirements for graduation.

Goals:

State of Iowa Core Content Standard and Grade Level Benchmark(s) upon which this goal is based:

We have a drop down menu.  However, in Iowa we have been instructed that the standards must be at the students grade level which is not possible for all students.  The state is in the process of adding 21st Century Skills so currently we select “No Standard exists”

District Standard and Grade Level Benchmark(s) upon which this goal is based:

When a state standard exist we use the same for the district standard.  When “No Standard exists” is selected we use the 21st Century Skills to find a relevant standard.

Current Academic Achievement and Functional Performance (Results of the initial or most recent evaluation and results on district wide assessments relevant to this goal; performance in comparison to general education peers and standards.)

Results from the assessments and other essential information that is relevant to the goal area should be listed.

Baseline (Describe individual's current performance in measurable terms using the same measurement as measurable annual goal and progress monitoring procedures.)

Should be the current measure using the same assessment as used in the goal.

Measurable Annual Goal: conditions (when and how the individual will perform); behavior (what the individual will do); and criterion (acceptable level of performance). For students 14 years and older, indicate if this goal is related to post secondary expectations of: (check all that apply to this goal) living learning working.

In Iowa, goals must be in one of four areas:  Reading, Mathematics, Written Expression, and or Behavior. Please send examples. Below are some examples:

Reading:

In the next 36 weeks, given #th grade level Jamestown probes, **** will read at the ##% comprehension level.

Mathematics:

In 36 weeks, given a timed basic algebra probe, **** will score 20 correct.

Written Expression:

Given a story starter and 1 minute to think, 3 minutes to write, **** scored ## Correct Word Sequences.

Behavior:  I struggled to write measurable behavior goals until the resource below was shared with me:

Behavior Goals

Progress Monitoring procedures (State how progress toward meeting this goal will be measured, how often progress will be measured, and the decision making rule that will be used in considering instructional changes.)

Bi weekly **** probes. The team will consider changing instruction and/or goal if four or more data points fall below or above the goal aim line (four point decision making rule).

Special Education Services

Indicate the special education and related services, supplementary aids and services, based upon peer reviewed research to the extent practical, that will be provided in order for this individual: 1) to advance appropriately toward attaining the annual goals 2) to be involved and progress in the general curriculum; 3) to be educated and participate with other individuals with disabilities and nondisabled individuals. 4) to participate in extracurricular and other nonacademic activities; and 5) by age 14, to pursue the course of study and post high school outcomes (living, learning & working);

Describe each service, activity and support indicated above:

Students need self determination and knowledge of accommodations as there are no IEP after high school. Iowa does not have guidelines for accommodations unlike some other states.  Below are forms I developed based on Nebraska’s Guidelines.

Determining Appropriate Accommodations for Student Name Form

Determining Appropriate Accommodations for Student Name Data

Accommodations Survey for Student Name Form

Accommodations Survey for Student Name Data

ACCOMMODATIONS:

Presentation:  See Nebraska’s Guidelines for examples

ACCOMMODATIONS:

Response:  See Nebraska’s Guidelines for examples

ACCOMMODATIONS:

Timing: See Nebraska’s Guidelines for examples

ACCOMMODATIONS:

Setting: See Nebraska’s Guidelines for examples