Walkuski, 2010 ©

SUNY CORTLAND MOTOR DEVELOPMENT LAB

Dr. Walkuski

Fall 2010

Lab Six

11/2/10

Tuesday

Tim Crosby

        

Name: _________________________________ Lab Day: ___________         Date: ______________

Today’s lab will allow you to observe and assess the skill of catching.  Keep space and safety issues in mind as you have the children perform the lab activities, especially since we are in the smaller gym.  

Schedule:

a. Task one - reflection

b. Task two - Catching assessment (include catching instruction and associated games after the assessment is completed).

c. Task three – Dance activities

TASK ONE – REFLECTION

Thinking through all of the activities you have engaged the Dryden students in during your field experience, what are some details that you have to take into consideration while having the students involved in the assessments, games and other activities you might have planned for them.

a. Details about how you communicate the task/activity:

I think the most important thing on how to communicate the task/activity is to be clear.  It is important that the students know what you want from them, instead of being confused.

b. Details about how you structure or organize the task/activity:

When organizing the task/activity it is important to remember how easily the students can get bored.  You need to keep the children involved in the activity so that they stay focused.

TASK TWO                                 

Catching  Checklist

11/2/10

Megan

Child’s Name:_____________________________________                Date: _________________

Your task for this station is to qualitatively assess the student’s ability to perform the skill of catching  (using a tennis ball) using the following criteria from Gallahue (1998).  As you throw to the student, be consistent in how you throw.

I. Catching:

A. Initial stage

1.  There is often an avoidance reaction.

2.  Arms are extended and held in front of body.

3.  Body movement is limited until contact.

4.  Catch resembles a scooping action.

5.  Use of body to trap ball.

6. Palms are held upward.

7. Fingers are extended and held tense.

8. Hands are not utilized in catching action.

B. Elementary stage

1.  Avoidance reaction is limited to eyes closing at contact with ball.

2.  Elbows are held at sides with an approximately 90-degree bend.

3.  Since initial attempt at contact with child's hands is often unsuccessful,

arms trap the ball.

4.  Hands are held in opposition to each other; thumbs are held upward.

5.  At contact, the hands attempt to squeeze ball in a poorly-timed and

uneven motion.

C. Mature stage

1.  No avoidance reaction.

2.  Eyes follow ball into hands.

3.  Arms are held relaxed at sides, and forearms are held in front of body.

4.  Arms give on contact to absorb force of the ball.

5.  Arms adjust to flight of ball.

6.Thumbs are held in opposition to each other.

7.Hands grasp ball in a well-timed, simultaneous motion.

   Observation        

     number

      1

      2

      3

      4

 

      5

Initial Stage

Elementary Stage

Mature Stage

X

X

X

X

X

TASK TWO (continued)

Catching Checklist

Using the same information from Gallahue (1998), have the child perform the catching task with a different sized ball (medium “soft” rubber or foam ball).  Assess the child using the chart below.

   Observation number

      1

      2

      3

      4

 

      5

Initial Stage

Elementary Stage

Mature Stage

X

X

X

X

X

Questions for TASK TWO:

Was your child at “different” developmental levels for the catch?   Note where the student performed the catch at a different difference occurred. What might be the reasons for this?  Did one type of ball elicit a more mature pattern? Why?

No, Megan was not at different developmental levels, she was very mature in her development.  Some reasons that developmental levels of the catch might change are how hard the ball is thrown or how high.  The different types of balls didn’t change any of Megan’s patterns but in other students they did change.  The different types of balls could have caused the patterns to change because the ball being lighter/heavier or bigger/smaller can change how catch is made.