VVVV + MapTools : introduction to the tools of projection mapping

VVVV  + MapTools : introduction to the tools of projection mapping

Course Description

Background

Real World Example

*

Kimchi and Chips’ installation at Design Korea, December 2010 used VVVV for:

What you need to be familiar with

What we won’t cover

Software and costs

Equipment you’ll need

Suggested preparatory work

Course Syllabus

Day 1

Course Delivery

About the MadLab

Location

Aims

Course Description

Background

Around 10 years ago Processing was released (2001), marking the acceleration of international interest into merging design/art, with powerful computational graphics and hardware. In this time, VVVV, openFrameworks, Processing, Cinder, Jitter, and the many other tools have been employed and crafted to satisfy this  desire to rapidly create prototype and deploy ideas in the fields of Visual Arts, Architecture, Informational Design, Visual Music, Interactive Performance, Physical Computing and Advertising Media.

VVVV (first released 1998) is a unique tool initially created by MESO, Frankfurt to create ‘Digitial Interiors’. It is now publicly available and free to use for non commercial purposes.

VVVV is powerful toolkit of media technologies, boasting a glut of built in functionality, tools and examples. You can safely presume that you can get it to interface with almost anything you want, it can generate almost anything you want. There aren’t any other media toolkits that can perform so much ‘out of the box’, having you projecting kinect tracked video onto buildings or controlling robot arms from twitter in days rather than weeks. The true power of the tool lies within the elegance within which it makes its features available. In the opinion of this author, it can usurp all other platforms in terms of development speed, power and flexibility.

VVVV has been used for:

Real World Example

Kimchi and Chips’ installation at Design Korea, December 2010 used VVVV for:

What you need to be familiar with

You should be proficient with computers (know how to operate, setup, fix your mums).

Any experience with coding or visual based development environments will come in super useful (Flash/ActionScript, Javascript,  C/++, C#, Visual Basic, Objective-C, Python, Arduino, Max/MSP, etc), but is not necessary.

What we won’t cover

Software and costs

All software is freely available for learning/non-commercial purposes, and copies will be distributed with the course materials on the day.

We will be using the latest version of VVVV at the time of the workshops (currently 25.1, which can be downloaded from http://www.vvvv.org/downloads

Equipment you’ll need

You will need to bring a PC Computer (ideally a laptop) with:

Intel Apple Macs are fine, but you must use Bootcamp. You CAN NOT use virtualisation e.g. Parallels, VMWare, VirtualBox.

Equipment you might want to bring

We cannot promise we’ll have time to go through working with all or any of the things that you bring. But we’ll do our best!

Suggested preparatory work

Brief notes on installing are available at http://vvvv.org/documentation/installation

Course Syllabus

Day 1

Day 2

Learning Outcomes

Course Delivery

15 Places are available on this course.

It will be lead in-person by the tutor. You are encouraged to confer with other participants on the day for support and to develop your learning. There is no coursework or assessment on this programme. A teaching assistant will be on hand to assist with any difficulties the course participants will face.

Price & Payment

£200 for the full day, payable in advance via PayPal only (note, we cannot provide VAT receipts)

Included in this price is a hot buffet lunch, with vegetarian options (you must notify in advance if you are vegetarian, or if you have other dietary requirements)

Additionally, you will receive an electronic copy of the teaching materials, software, and patches for the course on a USB stick.

Dates & Times

        8th - 9th October 2011

        10am to 5:30pm, 1 hour lunch from 12:10 to 13:00

Tutor Biography

Elliot Woods is ½ of Koreo-Brittanic interaction design studio Kimchi and Chips, with works featured in Wired, Engadget and the BBC. He is a protagonist of the international projection mapping scene, creating tools and techniques that have been employed in niche experimental art projects and multi-million dollar marketing campaigns. Elliot has taught professionals, students and school children the techniques and arts of projection mapping. At NODE 10 (VVVV’s own forum of the digial arts) he gave a full time course on projection mapping for professional uses.

About the MadLab

Location

The MadLab is on Edge Street, in the Northern Quarter of Manchester, a ten minute walk from Piccadilly or Victoria train stations.

It is easy to walk to from the main transport hub around Piccadilly Gardens, and there are plenty of independent coffee shops in the area for early birds.

Our address is 36-40 Edge Street, Manchester, M4 1HN

(view on Google maps at  http://bit.ly/MadLab )

Aims

Established in late 2008, the MadLab is a not-for-profit organisation providing space, infrastructure and and outlet for the region’s digital and creative communities. We bring in some of the most interesting people are projects from around the world, run workshops and themed technology and arts days, and host exhibitions with our partners. A “youth club for adults” where you can learn and share with likeminded individuals.

omniversity.madlab.org.uk

MADLAB005 - 001  Last uplated 25/01/2011