Teaching & Learning About the Oil Spill with Teachers Teaching Teachers.

A space to dump information and synthesize our collective thinking in preparation for teaching and learning about the oil spill this fall.

Table of Contents

Questions

Enduring Concepts

Understanding by Design/backwards planning considerations

Brainstorm of project learning activities

Students sharing and publishing their work

Connecting students in the region with other students around the country/world

Resource Repository (bookmark using our tag -- youthspill AND voicesonthegulf )

Connecting to the standards

Voices on the Gulf: Specs for the website we need

Gaming to Learn about the Gulf Oil Spill

Gaming ideas

Questions


Enduring Concepts

Interrupting our habit of moving on once the initial response seems to have improved the situation.


Understanding by Design/backwards planning considerations


Brainstorm of project learning activities

In an authentic situation, can we separate oil from seawater in a classroom setting or environment?  

What strategies, potential tools and materials can be of use?

Gulf Oil Spill FAQ - The Gulf of Mexico oil disaster began April 20 after the Deepwater Horizon oil rig exploded.

STORY HIGHLIGHTS

RELATED TOPICS

(CNN) -- Here are answers to some basic questions about the massive oil leak in the Gulf of Mexico.   http://www.cnn.com/2010/US/07/15/oil.spill.faq/index.html?hpt=T1

Edutopia PBL Camp:

PBL community discussions

Camp archives/webinar recordings

Camp wiki/collaborative project planning space (including page of driving questions)

Due to the high level of interest in the on-going oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico, Data.gov is featuring data from the Department of Energy (DOE), the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), the Department of the Interior (DOI), and the states of Florida and Louisiana related to the spill, its effects, and the cleanup effort. Data include oil and gas flow and recovery measurements, air and water sample data, oil spill-related exposure information, and other data of interest to scientists, recovery workers, and citizens. Data.gov will continue to provide access to as much oil spill-related information as possible.

 http://www.data.gov/restorethegulf  


Students sharing and publishing their work

Where will they share?? Youth Voices, a wiki perhaps, social networks, blogs, Learning Network of the New York Times, etc.

Standard tag published learning objects, bookmarks? we kicked around edoilspill, oilspilledu, etc.

Let’s start using ‘voicesonthegulf’ as one of the tags for delicious, diigo, flickr, etc.


Connecting students in the region with other students around the country/world

Synchronous connection via skype

Asynchronous via blogs, wikis, social networks, voicethread, flickr, etc.


Resource Repository (bookmark using our tag -- youthspill AND voicesonthegulf )

TEDxOILSPILL Videos: http://bit.ly/tedxoilspill (higher res videos coming soon)

Audio Slideshow Chronicling the Spill - created by one of the members of the TEDxOILSPILL Expedition

People as resources: students, ‘experts,’ locals, etc


Connecting to the standards

Common Core Standards


Voices on the Gulf: Specs for the website we need 

We need a site that makes it easy for students and their teachers K-16 to upload and display images, audio, video, text, and any media that can be embedded, such as flash files..The basic unit would be a discussion post. A teacher or a student should be able to open a discussion and easily add any media in the composing window for that document. At any point in the body of a discussion a student should be able to insert any media by simply clicking an insert button. A drop-down menu should appear for:

A student or a teacher should be able  to include this media in a discussion from four sources:

Each of these Import pages would be kept as simple as possible.

It should be easy to save a discussion at any point after it is opened, but a teacher or a student should only be able to publish it to the site after he or she includes the following controlled vocabularies:

All discussions should be easy to re-use.in part or in whole by anybody who comes to the site. This would include the following possibilities:

Gaming to Learn about the Gulf Oil Spill

Wouldn't a game be a good way to study the Gulf oil failure?

Gaming is about empathy, system, making connections, solving problems, and these themes keep coming up as we imagine teaching about the Gulf oil failure this fall. Some of the systems involved are ecological, estuarine, food-chain, weather patterns, economic, engineering... My list is off the top of my head. A lot could be added to it, and that's the point!

I don't know how to build a game that would put the players into different roles, situations, and systems, but isn't it all there to explore?

The thing is, I'm also impatient. I don't think we can wait for this to be developed over the next six months, tested, and then released a year from now.

How could we build a game that is, perhaps, like Evoke or another of Jane McGonigal's games?

Or perhaps, it's about getting students to participate in the research necessary in building such a game? That could happen right away.

                                 

Perhaps students we could invite students to create games in some sort of design challenge. Perhaps students could be introduced to 'design thinking' methodology which encourages rapid prototyping and repeated iteration. So instead of creating a game in six months, students could have prototypes and alpha game versions created in a matter of days. More on design thinking at: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Design_thinking and Stanford's d.School site: http://dschool.stanford.edu/

We would also want to encourage students to create games in all sorts of mediums...scratch, board games, Android, choose your own adventure games in google docs forms, outdoor education style simulations, etc, etc.

Gaming ideas