MLPFMTORPG

My Little Pony Fantasy Multiplayer Text Only Role Playing Game 

First Edition — version 1.2

GDocs: http://goo.gl/WKvUM
Image: https://dl.dropbox.com/u/22475244/mlpfmtorpg-1.2_core.jpg
Multiclasses:
http://goo.gl/7SuS3 — Improved Spells: http://goo.gl/D0Wn5
Monster Manual:
http://goo.gl/KiyhY

These are not unbreakable rules, just guidelines for ideas. Change the rules as you need for your specific campaigns; and please share any such ideas you have! MLPFMTORPG is a relatively simple system meant to provide a base on which to build, run, and play epic fantasy adventures set in the MLP:FIM universe and settings inspired by it. We’re not here to recreate the show, and we’re not trying to reskin a pre-existing highly-complex RPG system, and we’re certainly not out to make money off of MLP:FIM or claim any of it as ours. We just want you to have fun.

BASICS

>What do I need to know?
Pick a race and class, roll d10’s. That is all.
>But I can't think of a character
Use this http://www.seventhsanctum.com/generate.php?Genname=mlpony
>But...
Shut up and play

Character Creation Quick Guide

Choose a race, class, skills, talent, some equipment, and your alignment and/or deity. With a few exceptions, you can choose any race and class combination. Typical characters start with 5 skill points to spend on class skills. Your talent can be just about anything, and grants an in-game benefit. Choose armor appropriate for your class, though weapons are largely a matter of taste. You can choose any alignment that the DM feels is appropriate; you must follow a deity’s alignment if you choose to follow a deity.

Here is a quick template for a character.

Name:
Race:
Gender:
Cutiemark or Talent:
Class:
Skills:

Alignment:
Inventory (brief or detailed):
Character traits (optional, just for roleplaying):

TABLE OF CONTENTS

BASICS

Character Creation Quick Guide

ROLLING

RACES

CLASSES & SKILLS

Multiclassing

Bard

Cleric

Knight

Mage

Necromancer

Paladin

Rogue

Shaman

Tracker

Bear

MAGIC

Improved Spellcasting

COMBAT

Initiative and Starting Combat

Attacking

Counterattack

Helplessness and Death

Pets

Player vs Player

CUTIE MARKS AND SPECIALTIES

EQUIPMENT AND ITEMS

Armour

Inventory, Items, and Tools

Special Weapons

ALIGNMENTS AND GODS

Alignments

Opposing Alignments

Modern Deities

Old Gods

MONSTER MANUAL

DUNGEON MASTER’S GUIDE

MODDING: CREATING NEW SETTINGS

Creating the Splat

ROLLING

10-sided dice (d10s) are used to resolve the success of all actions, from negotiating a conversation to landing a blow in combat. If you intend to play on a reasonably fast-paced chan-style imageboard that doesn’t have a dice function, you can use the last digit of your post number to simulate dice rolls. If you use post numbers, treat 0 as 10.

1

Critical failure. You messed up hard. Always fails, disregards bonuses.

2-4

Failure. It just didn’t work.

5

Partial success. Not what you hoped for, but not a disaster.

6-8

Success. Well done!

9

Notable success. Your plan didn’t just work, it went flawlessly.

10

Critical success (crit). Holy balls, whatever you did it was awesome.

An autocrit is an automatic critical if the roll is successful. 4- is still a miss, but 6+ are all crits.

Difficulty Check (DC) is the minimum roll needed for a success. The default DC for any action is 6, but the DM can announce a lower or higher DC. For example, hopping over a small pit might be DC 2, while leaping between moving trains might be DC 8. Situational bonuses also apply to DC: for example, a pegasus might get +2 (minimum roll of 6 for DC 8) to the above jump rolls due to their wings and agility, while a lumbering buffalo might take a -2 penalty instead (minimum roll 10 for DC 8). A roll of 1 always fails, regardless of modifiers.

Supercrits are rare circumstances where a DM may choose to amplify the effects of a critical roll. One such instance is when you roll a critical with modifiers that push the final result past the usual critical threshold (0- or 11+). Supercrits may also apply to rolling multiple criticals in the same or consecutive turns. If playing on an imageboard, getting double or triple digits may also be considered a supercrit. The use and application of supercrits is entirely at the DMs discretion.

RACES

The first step to creating a character is usually choosing their race. All kinds of intelligent creatures exist in the MLP:FIM universe, and with few exceptions you can choose any race and class combination. Every race has a racial skill.

Earth pony - Sturdy, tough and often big. Can move, lift, and carry heavier weights than other races.

Tough: passive; Earth ponies take an additional hit before becoming helpless (for a total of 6), and they can lift, carry and move heavier objects than unicorns or pegasi.

Pegasus pony - Speedy and adventurous. Can fly freely when they’re not carrying too much weight.

Pegasus Flight: Pegasi can fly wearing up to medium armor, and get a +1 bonus to actively evade and dodge midair. This is about as taxing as running at full speed.

Unicorn pony - Noble and intelligent. Can levitate objects with telekinesis and cast magic. A unicorn’s horn counts as a catalyst for spellcasting.

Unicorn Telekinesis: spell; manipulate objects through sheer force of will. Complex tasks and heavier objects may require more focus.

Buffalo - Hardy desert dwellers, a buffalo's charge is as strong as their connection to the land. They are big, lumbering things with thick muscle and bones.

Huge: passive; if a buffalo has more than one hit remaining till helpless, any attack that would normally render a character helpless instead reduces a buffalo to one hit remaining.

Diamond Dog - Subterranean gorilla dogs with a taste for gems.

Burrowing: Diamond dogs can dig tunnels and holes with ease, setting traps, moving unseen and fleeing in unexpected directions.

Donkey - Similar to earth ponies in a physical sense, if somewhat less bulky and far more stubborn.

Unbreakable Will: passive; famously stubborn, donkeys are immune to mind control, domination, intimidation and suggestion.

Goat - A curious sight in the lands of ponies, some say they are distantly related to the dread ram Grogar.

Goatcraft: passive; DC -1 for all climbing and agility rolls, and can use anything as food, including non-food items.

Griffon - Half eagle, half lion. Flight-capable and larger than ponies, they can carry more weight while flying, but tire quickly when doing so.

Griffon Flight: Griffons can fly wearing up to heavy armor, and have a +1 bonus to divebomb attacks from high altitude. This is about as taxing as running at full speed.

Zebra - Hailing from a faraway land, zebras are knowledgeable in natural healing and shamanism. They are often regarded with suspicion by ponies.

Heightened Senses: passive; +1 to perception-based rolls (spotting, searching, listening, etc)

Bear - Very strong and tough, but also dumb and incapable of speaking. Bears, and only bears, can be bears, and are always bears.

Bear: passive; Bears have access to the exclusive class of Bear, and are the sole wielders of Bear Lore.

Alicorn - Haha nope, you can’t be an alicorn.

CLASSES & SKILLS

A character’s class is the archetype for their abilities and role in a world of high adventure. Characters start with five (5) Skill Points to spend on class skills. When using most skills, you must roll a dice to determine the result. Some skills have keywords:

Instant: no roll is needed, this skill takes effect immediately when used

Passive: no roll is needed, this skill is always in effect

Recharge #: you must wait # turns after activating this skill before you activate it again

Spell: this is a magic spell, and may be subject to special rules for magic
Weapon: this skill applies weapon quality to its roll

Divine classes and multiclass characters with at least one Divine class must choose a deity and adhere to that deity’s alignment.
Spellcaster classes must possess a catalyst of some kind to channel their spells, such as a holy symbol, fetish, wand, or power crystal. A unicorn’s horn counts as a catalyst.

Multiclassing

You can also choose to mix two classes. A multiclass character starts with three (3) Skill Points to spend on skills from either class. You also gain a special free skill, unique to your multiclass. Refer to this chart of multiclass descriptions and skills: http://goo.gl/7SuS3

Bard

Entertainers by trade, bards travel in search of new tales and new adventures to partake in. Most commonly armed with light weapons like rapiers or knives, as well as their musical instruments.

1 point
Cheap Shot: weapon; if used to initiate combat, this skill is instant and autocrits, rendering the target helpless. Otherwise, 9+ renders the target helpless.
Entertain: gather extra info, favors or trinkets from the locals with an impromptu show
Inspire: Entire party gains +1 to all rolls next turn; this bonus does not stack with repeated use. On critical failure, this entire bonus is replaced with a -1 penalty to all rolls next turn.

2 points
Bluff: whatever you say to someone, they firmly believe it
Terrify: recharge 2; DC 8 renders target helpless

3 points
Heroism: recharge 5; the entire party is immune to critical fails for the next 3 turns. The bard can choose to grant immunity to all failures, but is immediately rendered helpless in doing so and does not gain the benefit.

Cleric

Divine Spellcaster. Clerics channel higher powers to heal and protect allies, and crush the unholy. Often armed with blunt weapons like maces, staves or large holy icons.

1 point
Heal: spell; mends the wounds of an ally. Required to survive harder beatings.
Compassion: passive; persuasion DC lowered by one.

            Cure: spell; removes poison, burns, frostbite, temporary blindness, incomplete petrification and other similar effects

2 points
Detect Alignment: spell; see into the hearts of others to reveal their alignment, intentions and influence.
Divine Wrath: spell; blast away all nearby foes, moving them out of melee range; renders targets helpless on 9+

3 points
Prayer of Healing: spell; fully heals the entire party, but you are helpless afterward

Knight

Clad in armour and armed with both an iron will and an iron blade, knights excel at protecting others and themselves from harm. Knights are martial masters, able to wield every variety of weapon but most commonly armed with swords, axes, polearms, and shields.

1 point
Sentry: passive; always win initiative
Slam: deals a crushing blow to the enemy via body slam. Heavier armor increases crit range (9+ for Heavy; 8+ for Superheavy)
Superheavy Proficiency: passive; you are able to equip Super Heavy Armour

2 points
Protect: recharge 2 after it ends;Takes all damage for one party member during the next 2 turns. Neither can be rendered helpless in that time.
Suppress: weapon; overpowers the target, rendering it helpless.

3 points
Last Stand: Immune to all damage for three turns, but rendered helpless afterwards.

Mage

Spellcaster. Magic is useful for everyday work, though some train to become devastatingly powerful mages instead. When forced to fight without magic, most mages rely on staves, daggers or heavier spellbooks for self defense.

1 point
Magic Bolt: spell, recharge 2; a non-elemental bolt of energy, see “A Canterlot Wedding” for reference. This volatile rapid-fire ranged attack lets you roll once to attack a single target twice, but crit fails on 2-.
Scholar: passive; immune to all failures when researching books, scrolls, texts, etc.

2 points
Dragon Breath: spell, recharge 2; fuck them, you're a dragon. When you choose this spell, choose the elemental type it channels; you can train multiple instances of this spell to use different elements. This element does not confer additional effects, but can affect specific types of targets differently. You can use this spell to attack at range as though you were using Cleave, targeting closely-grouped enemies with a +1 increase to your crit fail range (2- crit fails on 2 targets, 5- on 5 targets, etc).
Farsight: instant spell; peer into the distance without a spyglass, and even see through darkness.
Fireball: spell, recharge 1; you throw the magical equivalent of a molotov cocktail. A reliable single-target ranged attack.
Freeze: spell, recharge 2; the target is rendered helpless on a crit. Objects become easier to shatter, and surfaces become slippery. Any character that fails an action while on a frozen surface becomes helpless.
Lightning: spell, recharge 2; the rampant energy of lightning seeks a target. You attack one enemy at range as though dual wielding.
Teleport: spell, recharge 2; warps you or target object about up to 100 meters in any direction. A critical failure when traveling to an unknown space can kill you via telefrag.

3 points
Spell Focus: instant spell; next spell is critical, whether a hit or miss.

Necromancer

Spellcaster. Everypony lives, not everypony truly dies. If death seems like too much to deal with, a necromancer is the one to call when you need to hug grandma one last time. Or when you need some zombies to take hits for you. Necromancers often favour symbolic weapons like scythes and sickles, though many also fall back on the more traditional staves and daggers.

1 point
Commune: spell; ask the dead for aid. The better you roll, the more helpful they are. Crit fail summons a hostile undead.
Raise Dead: spell; raises the freshly dead as a mindless servant. Crit fail summons a hostile undead.
Touch of Death: spell; touch an enemy to cause them to age rapidly. Kills on a crit.

2 points
Corpse Explosion: spell; explodes a dead creature’s corpse, dealing damage to all nearby enemies on success. +1 to crit range per target corpse’s power level (10+ crits on Weak, 9+ on Medium, 8+ on Strong etc). Exploded corpses cannot be resurrected, raised or communed with. Target reanimates as a hostile on miscast
Transfix: spell; overpowers an opponent's mind, keeping them helpless. You must maintain the effect with successive rolls.

3 points
Resurrect: spell; brings one of the dead back, good as new, but renders both you and the target helpless.

Paladin

Divine Spellcaster. Paladins smite their foes with great power and steel, blessed by unwavering devotion to their deity and an inner fire. Most Paladins favor large weapons like greatswords, warhammers, battle axes or larger holy books tied to sticks.

1 point
Blast: weapon, recharge 1; your weapon lands with explosive force. This attack autocrits undead and unholy foes, and hits all nearby targets on a crit.
Spellbreaker: recharge 1, spell; nullify a spell or magic effect
Word of Power: In combat, forces an enemy to miss their next attack and renders them helpless on a crit. Outside combat, can extract information on a success.

2 points
Fervor: recharge 2 after it ends;next two attacks are critical successes, but you are helpless afterward.
Shatter: weapon; reduces enemy armour by one level; a crit can target their weapon or render them helpless. Can also target objects.

3 points
Aura of Protection: spell; no allies can be rendered helpless during the next 3 turns. You cannot take any actions while maintaining the aura, but become helpless if attacked during that time.

Rogue

Thieves, assassins and dwellers of shadow, rogues prefer to remain hidden and strike when least expected. They often prefer easy to hide weapons like dagger or knives, as well as throwing knives and hidden blades.

1 point
Backstab: weapon; strikes the enemy from behind. Auto crits if hidden. Crits on a 9+ otherwise. Kills helpless targets.
Disguise: Pretends to be someone else. DC6 allows the user to pass as a generic person (a guard, a noble, a commoner, etc). DC8 allows the user to pass as a specific person. DC10 allows the user to mimic another race and/or gender.
Stealth: become hidden. Enemies cannot attack you until you reveal yourself, and you win initiative if hidden when combat begins.

2 points
Blind: temporarily blinds an enemy, giving a +2 bonus to all rolls targeting it for 2 turns
Escape Artist: instant; break free of all immobilizing effects (grabs, roots, freeze traps etc.) and also removes helplessness.

3 points
Vanish: recharge 1; vanish from sight and reappear behind the target. Counts as stealth, and you may pick to attack any target within range of your new location.

Shaman

Spellcaster. While only mages wield spells and only the devout wield divine power, all can turn to the elements of nature itself for help. Often the tools of the shaman double as his weapons, including ritual knives, staves, heavy ornaments or small totem poles.

1 point
Bear Bash: weapon; rear up and punch your enemy with the power of a Bear. Crits on 9+, but crit fails on 2-.
Child of Gaia: passive; you gain a +1 bonus to rolls when fighting in natural environs (forests, natural caves, etc.)
Natural Remedy: Heal an ally with an unpredictable tincture. Crits on 9+, but crit fails on 2-.

2 points
Root: spell; summoned roots entangle your enemies, leaving them helpless (or immobilized if large or bigger)
Tiger Stance: weapon; jab at your enemy with the speed of a tiger. Roll once and attack twice.

3 points
Animal Mastery: spell; you can talk to and understand animals, and wild animals obey your orders.

Tracker

Trackers live off the land and love it. They know nature like the back of their forelimb, and can thrive in situations that would drive many others to giving up or endless whining. Trackers are masters of ranged weapons such as bows and crossbows, but often also carry survival tools like knives or axes.

1 point
Locate: passive; lowers DC of spot checks by 3.
Point Blank Shot: passive; can fire ranged weapons at enemies while in melee
Survival: can make basic supplies like rope, bandages, tents, torches and low-quality meals out of whatever happens to be around at the time. Also used to make special ammo on the road.

2 points
Marksman Shot: weapon; autocrits, but 2- is a critical failure.
Trick Shot: weapon; 2- is a critical failure. Fires a special shot with one of the following effects that must be chosen when creating your character:
Explosive: hits the target and anything near it
Fire: ignites the target
Knockout: renders target helpless on a hit
Poison: poisons target, causing it to take wounds over time even when not helpless

3 points
Mark for Death: For one turn, every attack against the target can autocrit.

Bear

Only bears are bears. Bears poop in the woods, eat berries, and slap your shit with their bear hands.

1 point
Poop in Woods: Poops. Only works in woods. Marks the territory to let other bears know you are the boss around here.
Roar: Renders all nearby enemies helpless on a crit, but deals no damage.
Slap Shit: Renders enemy helpless on a 9+

2 points
Bearhug: Crushes the enemy, rendering them helpless and damaging them for as long as you can maintain the hug.
Brothers in Bearing Arms: Any bears you face will follow your orders on a 6+

5 points
Bear Lore: Said to be the ultimate power. Renders target helpless even on a failure. Kills target on a 8+. Kills the user on a critical failure. Casts the user into the pit of unbearable torment for all eternity if he ever attempts to share the secrets of bear lore with non-bears.

MAGIC

Although the world is filled with magic, there exist spells that are specific manipulations of magical energy. Skills with the spell keyword are subject to special rules concerning the use of magic spells.

Armour Penalty: Normal armour blocks the flow of magic, making it harder to tap into such power. Each armour class adds a -1 penalty to spellcast rolls: 0 for Unarmoured, -1 for Light, -2 for medium, -3 for heavy, -4 for super heavy. Some special armour types don’t restrict spellcasting.

Critical Failure and Miscasting: A critical failure when casting a spell leads to a catastrophic miscast, as opposed to fizzling ineffectually. In most cases this means the spell backfires instead of just failing to work. A miscast of a stronger spell can have more dire consequences.

Improved Spellcasting

1 point
Improved Spellcasting: passive; for each spell you know or learn, you also learn an Improved version of that spell. Whenever you cast the spell, you may cast either the normal or Improved version.

Any character with a spellcaster class can take the Improved Spellcasting passive skill for one point. This unlocks more powerful versions of all their known spells, allowing the spellcaster to use either the improved or unimproved version when activating the spell. Note that miscasting the stronger versions can be A Very Bad Thing™. Spells with recharge prevent casting of either version until the last version’s recharge has been fulfilled.

Some spells have multiple Improved variants, in which case you must choose which one you learn (a talented caster might even compose their own variants). Spellcasters can choose to spend a skill point to add a new variant to their repertoire.

You can see a complete list of Improved Spells here: http://goo.gl/D0Wn5

Examples:

  • Aura of Protection can knock away enemies and place static protective barriers
  • Farsight allows astral projection for studying minute details and listening to sounds
  • Root calls forth a root golem or treant that casts Root on its own
  • Raise Dead summons several long dead creatures from deep within the earth
  • Teleport moves large objects or groups of creatures
  • Unicorn Telekinesis can be used on complex tasks or extreme weights

COMBAT

Big adventure comes with tons of fun, often in the form of violent encounters with hostile NPCs. Combat is typically resolved through determining initiative, attacks and counterattacks, rendering opponents helpless, and ultimately killing your enemies.

In summary, the typical amount of damage a character can take in combat is:

5 hits while standing to render a character helpless; reset to 0 when they get up

and
5 wounds while helpless to kill a character, which remain until healed

Wearing heavy or super heavy armour increases the number of wounds you can take before dying.

Initiative and Starting Combat

Combat begins typically by determining initiative: characters make their combat actions as normal, while the DM makes an initiative roll. Characters must beat the initiative roll to succeed. The DM can also choose to skip making an initiative roll and determine success/failure normally.

Attacking

An attacking character can perform a normal attack with their weapons, use a skill, or take some other action. The attack roll made by an attacking character determines the results of the attack. On a success (6+ by default), the attack hits the target, applying damage or other effects.

Counterattack

Attackers always leave themselves open to counterattack; if their attack roll misses (5- by default), the defending character automatically hits with a counterattack, and the attacker takes damage accordingly. On a roll of 2-5, the attacker takes a varying number of hits, but a critical miss of 1 immediately renders the attacker helpless. Wearing armour decreases the number of hits you take from counterattacks.

Helplessness and Death

A character usually takes five hits to become helpless; powerful blows and some skills can instantly render a character helpless. While helpless, a character cannot take many actions, and most attacks against them incur wounds. The helpless character or an ally must make a successful roll to get them back into the fight. After four wounds, they cannot get up on their own. Five wounds kills a character. Unlike hits, wounds are permanent damage, and will remain until healed. Wearing heavy or superheavy armour increases the number of wounds you take before dying.

Pets

Skills such as Raise Dead, Animal Mastery and Command allow the player to take a pet. In combat, a player may choose to not take an action themselves, and instead command their pet to take an action. Normally, player can only have one pet at a time; for one skill point, they can take the Pet Mastery skill to increase the number of pets they control by one. Multiple pets require multiple rolls.

1 point
Pet Mastery: passive; you can take this skill multiple times. Each instance increases the number of pets you can control at the same time by one.

Player vs Player

When friendship is no longer magic and players must turn against each other, the DM can step aside and let players make dice rolls against each other, determining and reacting to the results of each action appropriately. In PvP combat, failed rolls don’t incur counterattack damage. The DM may feel the need to intervene if PvP combat is no longer tenable, so play nice! To help speed up combat, you should stay down after being rendered helpless three times in PVP, regardless of wounds.

CUTIE MARKS AND SPECIALTIES

Your character gains +2 to rolls when using their specialty. In some cases, it may confer a different benefit. Every character gets to pick one thing they are really good at. Your specialty can be just about anything, but you should check with the DM to make sure your specialty is appropriate and not overpowered. For ponies and zebras, a special talent is symbolized by a cutie mark on their flanks, and you should describe what it looks like.

Example specialties include:

  • An active skill or racial talent
  • Using a specific type of weapon or combat style
  • Social functions like interrogation or persuasion
  • Intellectual functions like a specific field of research or examination
  • Professional functions like crafting or entertaining

EQUIPMENT AND ITEMS

The right equipment can be the difference between success and failure, life and death. Before you send your character out into the world, make sure to select some armor, weapons, and other tools to give them the extra edge they’ll need.

Armour

Wearing armour reduces damage taken from attacks and counterattacks, and can also help characters survive taking damage while helpless. Heavier armor offers better protection but also hinders movement, stealth, and spellcasting. Sometimes enemies wear armour as well. If this is the case, all non-elemental attacks against these enemies take a -1 penalty per armour class (0 for unarmoured, -1 for light, -2 for medium, -3 for heavy, -4 for superheavy).

Unarmoured creatures prefer to go unclothed, or only wear light everyday clothing. This allows total freedom of movement, is completely silent, and doesn’t impede spellcasting, but won’t reduce damage from counterattacks.

Light Armour is usually made from reinforced leather or unintrusive pieces of metal, offering some protection while still allowing range of motion. Spellcasters suffer a -1 penalty to cast when wearing light armour. Light armour reduces counterattack damage on a failed attack roll, and negates damage on a roll of 5.

Medium Armour consists of half-plate and chainmail, offering good defense against most attacks, but it is significantly weighty and noisy. Spellcasters suffer a -2 penalty to cast when wearing medium armour. Medium armour further reduces counterattack damage on a failed attack roll, and negates damage on a roll of 5.

Heavy Armour is made of full plate and other such heavy protective suits offer great protection; a character wearing heavy armour takes 6 wounds to die. Running, leaping, flying, and other maneuvers are nearly impossible in this armor. Spellcasters suffer a -3 penalty to cast when wearing heavy armour. Heavy armoured characters take dramatically less counterattack damage on a failed attack roll, and no damage on a roll of 5.

Super Heavy Armour are massive mountains of metal for which the term "heavy" is little more than an insult. In most cases, super heavy armor is restricted to characters with specific training for it. A character in super heavy armour takes 7 wounds to die, but cannot hope to take any sort of agile or stealthy action. Spellcasters suffer a -4 penalty to cast when wearing super heavy armour. Super heavy armoured characters take negligible counterattack damage on a failed attack roll, and no damage on a roll of 4-5.

Shields are strapped to a forelimb to deflect attacks, reducing counterattack damage by 1 hit. A greatshield reduces damage by 2 hits, but makes spellcasting, agile movement and stealth difficult, equivalent to heavy armor. Shields require mobility and control to use properly, and preclude the use of a great weapon, dual weapons, or any kind of two-handed weapon. Using two shields doesn’t increase the defensive bonus; greatshields cannot be dual wielded.

Special Armour is made from exotic or magical materials that offer extraordinary benefits. Adventurers just starting out can expect to sekzgear of this quality late in their campaigns.

  • Adamantium: A metal second only to Dragonforce in strength, adamantium armour cannot degrade or break.
  • Crystal: Crystal armour is ideal for Battlemages and Spellswords, but is extremely rare. It does not hinder spellcasting at all, regardless of weight.
  • Chameleon: Magical armour that can change appearance to almost anything, without changing its actual physical properties. The user can appear to be wearing any grade of armour they choose, but does not gain additional penalties or bonuses.
  • Ironbark/Ironweave: Strange materials that are much sturdier than they seem, armour made from these grants protection equal to one armour class higher, without the corresponding penalties. Example: a character in ironweave light armor takes reduced damage on counterattacks but can cast spells and use stealth freely.

Armour Table

Armour

Penalties

Bonuses

Counterattack on 5

4

3

2

1

Unarmoured

full stealth

take 1 hit of damage

2 hits

3 hits

4 hits

helpless

Light

stealth hindered; Spells -1

no damage

1

2

3

helpless

Medium

limited agility, stealth; Spells -2

no damage

1

2

2

helpless

Heavy

little agility, stealth; Spells -3

6 wounds

no damage

1

1

2

helpless

Superheavy

no agility or stealth; Spells -4

7 wounds

no damage

no damage

1

2

helpless

Shield

-1 hit suffered

-1

-1

-1

helpless

Greatshield

as heavy armour

-2

-2

-2

-2

helpless

Inventory, Items, and Tools

Nopony would go out on an adventure without some adventuring gear. Usually this includes things like food rations, rope, camping supplies, personal items, and crafting tools. Choose a few items that are appropriate to your character’s interests and the dangers they expect to see.

Special Weapons

In addition to the normal weapons starting characters choose from, experienced adventurers in longer campaigns can expect to find special weapons with unique properties, allowing new methods and means of attack. Special weapon properties do not apply to the use of skills unless otherwise noted.

Weapon Quality
Weapons of exceptional quality or condition add modifiers to normal attack rolls. Skills with the weapon keyword apply weapon quality to their rolls.

+1/+2: fine or masterwork, a fortuitous creation or the product of expert craftsmen
+3/+4: epic or legendary, the result of magical endowment or divine power
-1/-2: poor or damaged, worn down and in dire need of maintenance
-3/-4: worthless or useless, missing pieces and best abandoned if not melted down and remade

Unarmed Combat

A character fighting without a weapon cannot cause wounds with normal attacks, but can still do so by using skills. A character whose special talent is unarmed combat can deal wounds without a weapon.

Great Weapons

Heavier than most weapons, Great Weapons require more strength to wield, but offer far greater damage potential at increased risk. A great weapon user can use Cleave or Power Attack instead of a normal attack.

Cleave: can attack multiple targets as long as they are in range and close to each other. Every target beyond one increases the chance of a critical miss (attacking 2 targets crit fails on 1-2; attacking 5 targets crit fails on 1-5; etc)

Power Attack: counts 9+ as a critical hit, 2- as a critical miss. This attack puts your entire body into the blow, giving more damage on a good hit, but a larger opening on a miss.

Dual Wielding

Light weapons are perfect for use in pairs or with a second light weapon. Doing so requires great skill, but can yield impressive results if done well. Light weapons include: daggers, katars, rapiers, small hammers and maces, sickles, and shortswords.

When dual wielding, you can make two normal attacks in a single turn. Make two attack rolls; if either is a critical miss, both attacks miss. Rolling criticals on both rolls may be treated as supercrits.

Enchanted Weapons

With enough skill or money, weapons can be enchanted to become stronger than mundane counterparts, but often with a drawback. Example enchantments:

  • Blessed weapons are chosen by Good deities as their tools in the world. These weapons gain a bonus on normal attacks against undead and Evil foes, but become useless if faith ever falters.
  • Cursed weapons are the Evil counterpart of blessed weapons and gain a bonus on normal attacks against living and Good foes, but punish the user if they miss in combat or disrespect their deity.
  • Elemental weapons have been imbued with the power of fire, frost, or lightning. When a normal attack hits, the elemental weapon discharges magical energy, converting the attack into a hit with the corresponding Mage spell (Fireball, Freeze, Lightning; Lightning weapons do not reroll misses). Due to the chaotic energy of these weapons, dual wielding them does not double the effect.
  • Ethereal weapons are not wholly real, existing between this world and the next. Their ghostly forms pass through all materials as if through air. An ethereal weapon can never harm objects or undead, and always counts an armored target as wearing Light Armor.
  • Poisoned weapons are created by applying the substance beforehand, storing it within some vessel in the weapon, or even impregnated within the metal itself. A normal attack with this weapon deals a wound of damage, instead of a hit. A crit miss deals a wound to the user.
  • Spellbound weapons have been built as conduits for a single kind of spell. This can be a staff that shoots fireballs, a ring that cures poison, a book that raises the dead etc. The bound spell disregards divinity, and is considered a spell with at least recharge 3. While Improved spells may be bound to weapons at a monumental cost, the Improved Spellcasting skill does not affect a spellbound weapon.

Unique Weapons

Sometimes it might be appropriate to reward a player with a truly unique weapon (or other item). Determining the properties of a unique weapon is a highly freeform affair: they could just have simple bonuses or whatever unique abilities you dream of. Here are some examples:

  • Beyond Blade: A weapon from unfathomable realms. Cuts through anything in a single swing and instantly slays foes on a hit. Cuts nearby scenery apart on a miss. Kills the wielder on a critical miss.
  • Crown of Tartarus: A jagged obsidian crown that can rend flesh with a swift headbutt, and grants a +1 bonus to attack rolls.
  • Forgotten Knight’s Runesword: A black rune-covered blade that destroys magical wards and protective spells with a touch and can reflect spells back at the caster.
  • Hammer of the Sun: blessed great weapon; autocrits against undead and evil foes, blasts the wielder if they attempt dishonourable acts.
  • Torch-Staff of Fireweaver Singebrow: Protects from miscasts when casting fire spells. Also counts as a spellbound weapon containing Fireball.

ALIGNMENTS AND GODS

Your group may elect to using alignments and gods in your game, for a more traditional roleplaying experience. If you do, all characters have an Alignment that summarizes their general attitude, beliefs and code of conduct. Lawful characters favor order and adherence to authority that serves its purpose, while Chaotic characters value freedom and individual judgment. Good characters seek to help or at least benefit others, while Evil characters want to exploit or destroy them. Characters may sometimes make choices or take actions that are counter to their stated alignment, but with good reason; as a character’s beliefs change, it’s entirely possible for a character’s alignment to change temporarily or permanently.

Characters don’t have to follow deities, but adhering to a deity’s tenets and alignment may grant advantages when interacting with others of your faith. Characters of a divine class must adhere to a deity and the corresponding alignment or risk losing their divine powers.

Alignments

Lawful Good

You want to help people and uphold the law.

Neutral Good

You want to help people, and will do whatever it takes.

Chaotic Good

You want to help people and remain free from oppressive law.

Lawful Neutral

The law is the law, it applies to all individuals equally.

True Neutral

You act on reason and instinct, or prefer the middle path.

Chaotic Neutral

Screw the rules, you do whatever you want.

Lawful Evil

You exploit the law for personal gain and subjugation of others.

Neutral Evil

Evil is its own reward, or perhaps you like being an asshole.

Chaotic Evil

You will tear down everything to claim what is yours.

Modern Deities

These deities are the most commonly worshiped entities in the world of MLPFMTORPG.

Celestia is the Lawful Good Princess of the Sun and ruler of Equestria. She is a physical god that resides in Canterlot Castle, ruling over daylight.

Luna is the Neutral Good Princess of the Moon, younger sister of Celestia and guardian of the night.

Pinkie, The Laughing God is a Chaotic Good creature of joy and laughter that exists beyond the observable world.

The Law is a Lawful Neutral abstract concept, and has more followers than any other. Those most devoted to it can even draw strength from it. It treats all as equals, and rarely looks into the details of each individual.

Nature is True Neutral, taking no sides in the circle of life, death, and rebirth.

Discord is a Chaotic Neutral Draconequus that once ruled Equestria with an iron claw. He is a trickster above all, and while certainly not benevolent will often go out of his way to disrupt order than being purely evil.

Nightmare Moon is the Lawful Evil incarnation of Luna’s corrupted madness and jealousy. Nightmare Moon seeks to bring about eternal night so she may reign over all.

Grogar is a Neutral Evil necromancer ram from the banished kingdom of Tambelon, worshiped by those who seek to subvert their mortality. In life, he had a great liking to hands.

Tirek is the Chaotic Evil Demon Lord of Midnight and ruler of Midnight Castle. Wielding the Power of Darkness, he can corrupt even the most benevolent creature into a twisted monster.

Old Gods

Before the time of Celestia, Luna and Discord, mortals worshiped other things in their place.

The Virtuous Sun, Lawful Good light that shines upon the pure

The Vigilant Moon, Neutral Good light who reveals the guilty

The Laughing One, Chaotic Good spirit who finds joy in all things

The Law, Lawful Neutral philosophy which is equal to all

Nature, Neutral force which takes no sides

Chaos, Chaotic Neutral primordial force of change

The Godless, Lawful Evil will of those who serve none but themselves

Death, Neutral Evil enemy of all things

Destruction, Chaotic Evil inevitable end

MONSTER MANUAL

For more details, refer to this document: http://goo.gl/KiyhY

God tier creatures are unmatched in power, and can reshape history with a single word. They are most often plot devices in a campaign setting.
Alicorn, Changeling Broodmother, Draconequus, Dragon (Ancient), Dracolich, God Avatar

High tier beings are what most would regard as incredibly difficult if not impossible to overcome; the stuff of legend.
Ahuitzotl, Cerberus, Dragon (mature), Hydra, Ursa Major, Water Serpent, Windigo

Mid tier foes should be faced only with the right tools and a good plan.
Cockatrice, Dragon, young, Manticore, Minotaur, Ursa Minor, Quarray Eel

Low tier things are still big and scary, and can easily rout novice adventurers.
Bear, Buffalo, Giant Squid, Lion, Phoenix, Tiger, Timberwolf

Weak tier critters most would-be heroes can confidently take on.
Changeling, Diamond Dog, Donkey, Dragon (baby), Goat, Griffon, Mule, Parasprite swarm, Pony, Wolf, Zebra

DUNGEON MASTER’S GUIDE

So you want to be the guy who runs the game, tells players what happens and what to do, plays the part of all NPCs, gets blamed for everything that goes right or wrong, and such? Follow these hints and tips when you host an adventure of your very own. We’ll have a proper guide later, if ever.

  • Be polite. Try to get a feel for everyone in the party and make sure they all have things to do in an out of combat.
  • Be efficient. If a story hook isn't working, forget it and do something else. Do not railroad if possible. Let the players go where they want. Only ever give suggestions.
  • Have a plan. Or at least a general idea of where you want things to go.
    Example: in one of the Ironhide games I wanted you to meet the dragons and somehow find out Ironhide was a pony cursed by Tirek. The rest was made up on the go.
  • (Don’t) Kill everyone you meet. Try to balance talking and combat. If there is way too much talking going on, toss in an assassin or have someone get mad at the party. If there’s nothing but combat, introduce an objective or NPC that players want to protect or investigate.
  • Trust in the heart of the dice. 4 can count as a partial success when appropriate. 0 should in most cases lead to the situation getting worse. Supercrits should do something notably flashy. If using post numbers, dubs and trips may count as supercrits.
  • Make them bleed. Try to keep combat short and dramatic, with most enemies going down to a single crit or a few successes.
  • You are not a special snowflake. DMPCs are for faggots, NPCs are good enough (and offer more flexibility).
  • Cope with the situation. If you are faced with a situation there are no clear rules for, don’t panic;improvise. For example, bad rolls with ranged weapons can lead to the character launching their weapon instead of the projectile if no enemies are in range for a counterattack. The same goes for making new enemy types, unintended use of skills, attempting to use skills for which there are no rules, etc.
  • Keep it simple. If things are starting to look too complex, simplify them. For example it can be a pain to keep track of ammo and money, so if those start becoming a problem, it is perfectly ok to just stop tracking them. Perhaps you can just limit special ammo types and assign values along the lines of “affordable” “expensive” and “too expensive for you” to stuff in shops. The original test campaigns never even featured shops.
  • Reward the worthy. Remember to give out rewards for beating hard encounters and roleplaying. Rewards include better equipment, extra skill points or even unlocking a multiclass. In some cases you may have a list of predetermined loot for the players to distribute amongst themselves as they see fit, or you may even let the players suggest their own rewards. Whatever you decide, make sure you prepare them for the quest ahead.

MODDING: CREATING NEW SETTINGS

MLPFMTORPG is intended to be a fairly simple system you can use for quests in settings other than the standard fantasy. When making your new setting, consider how classes and items may change, be replaced, added, or even removed entirely. If anything, try to maintain a good variety for your players, and keep things simple if you add new items or mechanics.

Creating the Splat

In tabletop RPGs, additional books for new materials are called “splatbooks”, or splats. For the potential MLPFMTORPG mod, this mostly amounts to creating a list explaining how the core classes, equipment, and other things are adapted to work in your setting. Whatever setting you choose, always tailor the material for your specific campaign. Don’t be afraid to remove things entirely if they won’t work, or introduce new rules for things that aren’t covered.

Here are some example splats of how various settings might be adapted:

CYBER PUNK: Welcome to the magitech capital of Canterlot, where mane meets magic and machine. Corporate espionage and criminal syndicates mean all kinds of dirty jobs to be done.

Classes

Bard

face, fixer, inside man

Cleric

street doctor, priest

Knight

gangster, gladiator, private security

Paladin

corporate security, police

Mage, Shaman

hacker, mystic, scholar

Necromancer

cybermancer, drone tech, hacker

Rogue

hacker, hitman, spy

Tracker

sniper, urban survivalist

Armour

Unarmoured

normal clothes

Light

civilian armor, driving and sports gear

Medium

force fields, police and security armor

Heavy

combat and military armor, riot suits

Super Heavy

mech suits, powered armor

Weapons

bows, crossbows

blasters, guns

shields

personal force fields

spellbound

autoguns, rocket launchers, tesla coils

swords, etc

energy blades, tasers

Special Rules

Cybernetics

Characters can be mechanically augmented for bonuses, skills, and more.

LOL Internet

Everypony knows how to use computers. Except Applejack.

SPAAAAAACE: Go above and beyond to explore the final frontier. Whether you’re a cowboy making runs in ten parsecs flat or a browncoat on a bug hunt, a universe of possibility awaits freelancer and federation alike.

Classes

Bard

negotiator, translator

Cleric

diplomat, medic

Knight, Paladin

drop trooper, marine

Mage, Necro

cyberdoc, navigator, mystic

Rogue

agent, bounty hunter

Shaman

mystic, xenobiologist

Tracker

bounty hunter, explorer

Armour

Unarmoured

plain clothes, uniforms

Light

civilian armor, environmental and flight suits

Medium

personal suits, energy fields

Heavy

combat and military armor

Super Heavy

mech suits, powered armor

Weapons

bows, crossbows

blasters, phasers

shields

personal energy fields

spellbound

beam weapons, plasma weapons, weapon droids

swords, etc

energy blades, grav hammers

Special Rules

Force Melange

Improved Spellcasting exposes the caster to extradimensional forces and entities

Pilotwings

Any character can own and pilot spacecraft

Ten Parsecs Flat

Interplanetary/interstellar travel takes days if not hours

URBAN NOIRE: A modern or retro setting in a big city like Manehatten, with law enforcement, vigilantes, underworld criminals and everyone in the middle tied up in detective work, intrigue, and the occasional shootout.

Classes

Bard

comedian, lounge musician

Cleric

doctor, priest

Knight, Paladin

police, soldier, thug

Mage, Necro, Shaman

gypsy, psychic, scholar

Rogue

hitman, street urchin

Tracker

detective, sharpshooter

Armour

Unarmoured

normal clothes

Light

lucky pocket flasks, padded vests

Medium

bulletproof vests, military and police gear

Heavy

antique armor, homemade metalworks

Super Heavy

black market, custom gear, military R&D

Weapons

bows, crossbows

guns

spellbound weapons

big game rifles, flamethrowers, grenades, machine guns

Special Rules

Horse Outside

Any character can own and operate motor vehicles

Irish Needn’t Apply

Characters must wear fedoras or equivalent stylish headwear