May Rules Quiz 2018

True or False for 2019 Rules  Answer available at the May General Meeting.

  1. When dropping a ball in a relief area, it must be let go from knee height so that if falls through the air.

  1. Taking relief that is not a penalty area, i.e. cart path, is 20 inches from the the reference point or reference line.
  2. Taking relief from a penalty area is 80 inches from the reference point or reference line.
  3. Using distance measuring devices is allowed, unless a Local Rule has been adopted prohibiting their use.

April Rules Quiz 2018

True

1. Will the penalty for double hitting your ball change for 2019?

        There will be no penalty for accidental hitting the ball

2. Will the time allowed for a ball search change for 2019?

        The new time allowed for searching a ball is 3 minutes. Then it is deemed lost.

March Rules Quiz 2018

False

Touching the line comes with a penalty of loss of hole (match play) or two shots (stroke play).

As long as the line is no improved.

February Rules Quiz 2018

False

When in the bunker, you may declare an unplayable ball in a bunker, allowing the to be played from outside the bunker with a two-stroke penalty.

For 2019, this will be a new option for bunker play.

Rules Quiz January 2018

Answer is #1 & #3

On the putting green, prior to putting, you may…

1. Repair old plug holes

2. Repair damage by golf shoes

3. Repair any or all ball marks

4. Repair damage to the hole

Repairing Damage on the Putting Green (Adoption in 2019/2020)

MARCH 1, 2017

Modernizing Golf's Rules: Major Proposed Changes

  2019 New Rule 13.1b(1) allows repair of almost any damage on the green.

December Rules Quiz 2017

Answer is #3

Shadow Hills Golf Course - Hole #17, Par 3, 140 yards

Karla hit her first shot from the tee box. The ball settled on the right side of the cart path in a groove bordering the cart path and the elevated native landscape bordering the cart path.

She knows that if she were to take relief without penalty from the cart path, she knows that the elevated native landscape will not hold her ball and will need to be placed on the elevated native gravel stone landscape near the point where the ball was dropped. She will have an awkward stance for her second shot.

Answers

1. She can declare that the ball is unplayable, take a 1 stroke penalty and hit her second shot from the tee box. She will be hitting her 3rd shot.

2. She can declare that she is taking relief without penalty. She can take full relief no closer to the hole and play from the native landscape that may have an awkward lie.

3. 1 or 2

4. None of the above

November Rules Quiz  2017

How many local rules have Shadow Hills Women’s Golf Club adopted?

Circle  1        2        3        4        5        6        7

ANSWER - 4, SHWGC Directory- see page 10 & 11

Distance Measuring Devices   Rules of Golf (Rule14-3)

Stones in the Bunker Stones in bunkers are movable obstructions (Rule 24-1)

Accidental Moving of a Ball on the Green  - Rules 18-2, 18-3 and 20-1.

        

Sprinkler Head Relief - Rule 24-2 & Appendix 1

                        ----------------------------------------------------------------------

Rules Quiz Closing Feb. 28

Answer:

According to rule 20-2. Dropping and Re-Dropping:

If the ball, when dropped, touches any person or the equipment of any player before or after it strikes a part of the course and before it comes to rest, the ball must be re-dropped, without penalty. There is no limit to the number of times a ball must be re-dropped in these circumstances.

14 answered

7 correct

Winner Kathy Budzik

Rules Quiz Closing Jan. 31

Mary’s ball is embedded in the high face of a bunker which she deems as an unplayable lie.  What are her options?

  1. Go back to where she hit the ball last, and play the ball from there with a one- stroke penalty.
  2. Remove the ball and drop it in the bunker on a line from the hole and where the ball was, as far back as she wants.
  3. Remove the ball, clean it, and then drop the ball within two club lengths, no nearer the hole but still in the bunker.
  4. All of the above.

Answer:   D.   Rule 28 applies.   An unplayable lie with a one stroke penalty.

Winner: Janet Donahue

Rules Quiz Closing December 31

 

In a stroke play event, Mary hits her putt beyond the hole and her ball hits another competior’s ball on the green.  What happens next?

  1. Mary gets to retake her putt
  2. Mary gets a two-stroke penalty for her ball hitting another ball
  3. The competitor hits her ball from where it came to rest.

  Answer:    B.    Reference Rule 19-5

Winner: Linda Lunghamer

Rules Quiz Closing Nov. 30 2016

Your tee shot  comes to rest in ground under repair.  Yuo take a club and tap the ball out of the area to  a better spot and then take your next shot.  How many strokes do you have?

Answer:    Five.      A two-stroke penalty for an improper drop, the tee shot, the tapping of the ball, and the next shot. Rule 20 applies.

Winner: Linda Andrews

Rules Quiz Closing Jan 31

 On the 6th hole of a Stableford competition Tracy drives her ball straight down the middle of the fairway, where she can easily see it from where she has teed. On reaching her ball she sees it is not the same one that she played the 5th hole with. She concludes that she either changed balls between holes, or played a wrong ball on the previous hole on which she did not score any points. In practicing for her next stroke, three paces to the side of her ball she accidentally takes a large divot, which lands in front

of her ball, affecting her intended swing. She removes and replaces the divot and then plays to about 80 yards from the green. Her chip onto the putting green, which has a severe slope towards her, goes much too far and she is left with a tricky downhill putt. Uncharacteristically, she putts much too strongly and races her ball past the hole, all the way down the slope and into a greenside bunker. She calmly picks it out of the bunker, replaces it where she estimates it was on the putting green, and putts down

to the hole again. This time she judges the pace much better and is able to hole out the resulting two-footer to finish out. What is Tracy's score for the hole?

Answer:

1 - Drive down the fairway.

Note: Players are permitted to change balls between holes. There is no

requirement to inform a fellow competitor/marker, though it is good

etiquette to do so.

2 - Stroke to 80 yards from green.

Note: There is no penalty for either removing a detached divot, a loose

impediment, from the line of play or for replacing it back in its divot

hole, which was not near her stance or intended line of play (Rule 23-1).

3 - Chip onto the green.

4 - Putt past the hole, down the slope and into the bunker.

5 - Stroke and distance penalty.

Note: A player may always play a ball as nearly as possible at the spot

from which the original ball was last played for a penalty of one stroke.

(Rule 27-1a), so she was entitled to retrieve her ball from the bunker and

replace it at the spot where she took her putt from.

6 & 7 - Two putts to finish the hole.

Tracy scores 7 for the hole.

11 answered

4 correct

Winner: Christie Green

Rule Quiz Closing Jan 15

 

Susan is playing in the Princess Tournament. Her second shot comes to rest in the middle of the fairway one foot in front of the cart path which crosses the fairway. When Susan takes her stance her feet are on the path so she decides she wants relief informs the other players and picks up her ball.

What are her options?

Choose all that are correct.

Take her stance behind the cart path and drop the ball with in one club length no closer to the hole.

Take her stance to the right until the cart path bends back and drop the ball within one club length no closer to the hole.

Play the ball as it lies.

Take the ball back as far as she wants keeping a straight line to the flag.

Answer:

According to Rule# 24-2:  Immovable Obstruction

If the ball lies through the green, the player must lift the ball and drop it, without penalty, within one club-length of and not nearer the hole than the nearest point of relief. The nearest point of relief must not be in a hazard or on a putting green. When the ball is dropped within one club-length of the nearest point of relief, the ball must first strike a part of the course at a spot that avoids interference by the immovable obstruction and is not in a hazard and not on a putting green.

In this situation the closest point of relief would be behind the cart path. Moving sideways would require her go farther away. Since she has already picked up her ball, the option to play it as it lay is no longer an option.

18 answered, 7 correct

Winner: Jill Bull

Rule Quiz closing Dec31.

 

Jennifer takes her second shot on hole# 9 and ball comes to rest inside the red water hazard line but not in the water on the right. Jennifer thinks she has a shot so she removes the red stake which is in her way and picks up a loose divot that is in front of her ball, then proceeds to take her shot to the green.

Does Jennifer incur a penalty?

Choose the correct answer:

 

Yes

No

Answer:

According to rule 13-4c:

In removing a loose impediment from a hazard Jennifer incurs a 2 stroke penalty in stroke play and a loss of hole in match play.

21 answered,20 correct

Winner: Ginny Doell

Rules Quiz Closing Dec.15

 

Lucy hits her tee shot on hole 16 and her ball comes to rest against the rake beside the left bunker.  Lucy removes the rake and her ball rolls into the bunker. What are her options:

Lucy must replace the ball and take a one shot penalty.

Lucy must play the ball as it lays no penalty.

Lucy must replace the ball with not penalty.

Lucy must drop the ball as close as possible to the original spot no closer to the hole.

 

Answer:

As stipulated in rule 24-1a, movable obstructions:                Lucy must replace the ball with not penalty.

22 answered

17 correct

 

Winner of the draw:

Cres Conaster

Rules Quiz Closing November 30th.

Jane and Susan are partners in match play. Jane is about to putt and askes Susan confirm her read on the line of the putt.  Susan bends over to get a good look and her sunglasses which were on her hat fall and hit Jane’s ball causing it to move 2 or 3 inches.

Jane replaces the ball where it was and continues to putt.

Does Jane incur a penalty?

Choose the correct answer.

No. Since she didn’t move the ball she does not incur a penalty.

Yes she incurs a one stroke penalty.

Yes because it is match play they lose the hole.

Answer:

Yes she incurs a one stroke penalty.

According to Rule 18-2, a ball at rest moved by a player or her partner or their equipment, results in a one stroke penalty for the player.

According to the definitions, equipment is anything used, worn, held or carried by the player or partner.

16 people answered. 5 got it right.

Winner:  Ethelwyn Hintz

Rules Quiz ending April 20.

Jean is playing in a regular sweeps medal play day. She and Shirley are playing with the same type of ball so she marks it with her initial. On the fairway of hole15 she cannot see her mark so she announces that she is going to identify her ball and picks it up an inch or 2 and looks at the bottom of the ball then replaces it. It is her ball so she proceeds to take her next shot.

Is Jean in violation of any rule?

Choose the correct answer:

No she is allowed to move her ball for identification.

Yes she incurs a 2 stroke penalty.

Yes she incurs a 1 stroke penalty.

 

Answer :

According to rule 12-2 Jean is allowed to move her ball for identification. She must notify her fellow competitor and mark the position of the ball before proceeding. In this case Jean did not mark the position of her ball. Therefore she is assessed a one stroke penalty.

7 people answered. 2 got it right. Winner was Jan Junkin

Rules Quiz Ending March 31

Carol and Linda are playing in the member/ member as partners.  Carol has a difficult putt and asks Linda to indicate where she thinks the putt will break. Linda places her putter on the green where she thinks the break will be until Carol is ready to putt and then takes it away before she putts.

One of the other two players indicated that they had broken a rule and would incur a penalty.

Choose the answer that is the correct solution.

Carol incurs a two stroke penalty.

There is no penalty because they are partners.

Carol incurs a one stroke penalty.

Answer:

Carol incurs a two stroke penalty because she touched the green when she was showing her partner the line of play. See rule 8-2b.

12 answered. 9 were right. Winner: Joyce Johnson

Rules Quiz Ending Feb 28th

Which of the following items will cause a 1 stroke penalty if the ball moves while you are removing it on the fairway or in the rough?

·         bottles & cans

·         leaves & twigs

·         rocks

·         rakes

·         hazard markers

Answer:

·         Leaves & twigs

·         Rocks

Rules 23 Loose impediments and 24 Movable obstructions apply.

In both cases if the ball moves you must put it back.

Rules Quiz Ending Feb.15 2015

Susan and Jennifer are playing a match. Both players have hit toward the green. Susan’s ball lies off the green about 10 feet from the hole. Jennifer’s ball lies on the green about 15 feet from the hole.

hich player should play their ball first?

A. Susan

B. Jennifer

If the wrong player goes first and her opponent makes a claim, what should happen?

A. A one stroke penalty should be assessed.

B. Loss of hole.

C. No penalty is assessed.

D. No penalty is assessed but the shot may be recalled by the opponent and must be replayed.

ANSWER:

Rule 10 ORDER OF PLAY

10-1Match Play

1.       B: 10-1 b. During Play of Hole

After both players have started play of the hole, the ball farther from the hole is played first. If the balls are equidistant from the hole or their positions relative to the hole are not determinable, the ball to be played first should be decided by lot.

 

2.        D:  10-1 c. Playing Out of Turn

If a player plays when his opponent should have played, there is no penalty, but the opponent may immediately require the player to cancel the stroke so made and, in correct order, play a ball as nearly as possible at the spot from

which the original ball was last played.

Note: In stroke play if a player plays out of turn there is no penalty.

Winner:

Pat Banister

Rule Quiz Ending Jan 31,2015.

Jennifer and Susan are playing a match at Shadow Hills Golf course.  On the 8th hole Susan’s tee shot skips across the water and comes to rest on the very edge of water, short of the fairway in front of the green. Susan intending to hit the ball from there goes to her ball and discovers that it is sitting on a big rock. She decides to take a drop and measures 2 club lengths to the right no closer to the hole, drops the ball and proceeds to finish the hole.

When they finish the game they are is telling another player about the hole and the other player says that she dropped and played her ball in the wrong place.

What would be the ruling?

Susan gets a 2 stroke penalty for playing from the wrong spot.

Susan loses the hole to Jennifer.

No penalty is assessed.

ANSWER

In match play, if your opponent breaks a rule you have the option to not make a claim. If you do wish to make a claim, you must do so before teeing off on the next teeing ground or in the case of the last hole before leaving the green.

Since Jennifer did not make a claim, there is no penalty for Susan. If Jennifer had made the claim in the appropriate time, Jennifer would lose the hole to Jennifer.

Rule Quiz Ending Jan. 15, 2015

Rule quiz Ending  Jan 15.

 My ball was lying on the fairway and in taking a practice swing I accidentally moved my ball. Do I incure a penalty?

Choose the correct answer:

Because there was no intent to make a stroke at the ball, there is no penalty. Replace the ball and continue with the game.

  1. I caused my ball at rest to move so I incur a penalty of one stroke. The ball must be replaced.
  2. I caused the ball to move so I incur a penalty of one stroke. The ball must be played as it lies.

Because there was no intent to make a stroke at the ball, there is no penalty. The ball must be played as it lies.

ANSWER: b. I caused my ball at rest to move so I incur a penalty of one stroke. The ball must be replaced.

Rule 18 Ball at rest moved

18-2 - By Player, Partner, Caddie or Equipment

a. General

Except as permitted by the Rules, when a player's ball is in play, if:

(i) the player, his partner or either of their caddies: lifts or moves the ball, touches it purposely (except with a club in the act of addressing the ball), or causes the ball to move, or

(ii) the equipment of the player or his partner causes the ball to move, the player incurs a penalty of one stroke.

If the ball is moved, it must be replaced, unless the movement of the ball occurs after the player has begun the stroke or the backward movement of the club for the stroke and the stroke is made.

Note: A player’s ball is considered in play after it is hit from the teeing ground until it is holed out.

Rule Quiz ending Dec. 15, 2014

QUIZ Dec1-15

You hit the ball from the tee on number 16 and it lands short of the first bunker. On your second shot it plugs in face of the first bunker. What are your options?

Choose all that are correct from the answers below:

A.                Play the ball as it lies.

B.               With a one stroke penalty, drop the ball in the bunker within 2 club lengths no closer to the hole.

C.               With a one stroke penalty, drop the ball as far back as you want keeping it in a straight line from the hole through the spot where it landed.

D.              With a one stroke penalty, drop the ball as far back in the bunker as you want keeping it in a straight line from the hole through the spot where it landed.

E.               With a one stroke penalty, drop the ball on the site of the last stroke.

 

Answer to RULE QUIZ Dec1-15’14

You may play the ball as it lies or proceed under the following rule. Note the highlighted text.

Rule 28 Ball Unplayable

The player may deem his ball unplayable at any place on the course, except when the ball is in a water hazard. The player is the sole judge as to whether his ball is unplayable. If the player deems his ball to be unplayable, he must, under penalty of one stroke:

If the player deems his ball to be unplayable, he must, under penalty of  one stroke: a. Proceed under the stroke and distance provision of Rule 27-1 by playing a ball as nearly as possible at the spot from which the original ball was last played (see Rule 20-5); or b. Drop a ball behind the point where the ball lay, keeping that point directly between the hole and the spot on which the ball is dropped, with no limit to how far behind that point the ball may be dropped; or c.  Drop a ball within two club-lengths of the spot where the ball lay, but not nearer the hole.

If the unplayable ball is in a bunker, the player may proceed under Clause a, b or c. If he elects to proceed under Clause b or c, a ball must be dropped in the bunker. When proceeding under this Rule, the player may lift and clean his ball or substitute a ball.

________________________________________________________________

Rule Quiz ending March 31, 2014

Vera is playing in a stroke play tournament with three other women from different clubs.  She sees that one of her fellow competitors, Rachael, (who is using Rule 26- the water hazard rule), has dropped her ball in a place that is not even close to where she should have dropped it.  What would be the correct thing for Vera to do?

A.      Don’t say anything at the time, but tell Rachael after the game where she should have dropped so that she will know for next time.

B.      Tell Rachel, before she hits that ball, that she should re-drop in the correct place.

C.      Tell Rachael at the time that she is sorry, but Rachael has dropped in the wrong place so she should be penalized.

D.      Wait until they finish and then tell the Rules Committee that Rachael hit her ball from the wrong place.

E.       Ignore it.

I can tell the season is winding down as only ten of you answered this quiz.   Eight, in my mind, had the correct answer.  In some ways there is no correct answer, as you would not be penalized for doing any of these options.  One of your jobs when you are playing in a tournament, or any time in a competition for prizes or money, is to protect the entire field from a player who does not follow the Rules of Golf.  On the other hand you want to as kind to your fellow competitors as possible.  If you know one of them has not followed the Rules and it can be corrected before she makes her shot, then of course you would correct her and help her.  So the answer is B.  When a player drops a ball to be replayed, if she has dropped it in the wrong place, this can be corrected and she may re-drop before she hits the ball.

This is sometimes called the ‘Eraser Rule’.  If a player has dropped incorrectly….maybe from the wrong place, maybe by not dropping from shoulder height with arm extended, maybe by hitting her body or her club with the ball before the ball  lands, maybe spinning the ball as she drops it so that in her mind it would roll further etc.  These are all ways of dropping that are WRONG.

Rule 20-6 says, a ball incorrectly substituted, dropped or placed in a wrong place or otherwise not in accordance with the Rules but not played may be lifted, without penalty, and the player must then proceed correctly.


Rule Quiz ending March 15, 2014

 

 

Jean played a poor tee shot and was not sure whether or not her ball would be lost.  She walked forward about 25 yards to go and search for her ball when she realized that she may not find it and should have played a provisional ball to save time.  Although she did not initially plan to play a provisional ball, she changed her mind and told her fellow players that she was going back to play a provisional ball to save time in case she did not find her first ball.  She went back to the tee and played another ball.  Melissa, another player in her group, questioned her actions and claimed that Jean is now three off the tee.

 

What is the correct ruling?

 

A.       As long as Jean has not found her first ball, she can go back and play a provisional ball at any time within 5 minutes of starting to search for her first ball.

B.      Jean has proceeded correctly and is not penalized for going back to play a provisional ball.

C.      Jean was not entitled to go back and play a provisional ball after she had started to go forward and search for her first ball.  Hence she is three off the tee.

 

14 answered and 6 were correct.

And the answer is……….B

Revised Decision 27-2a/1.5:  A revision to the Decisions on the Rules of Golf that came into effect on the 1st of January, 2014 allows a golfer to walk forward up to approximately 50 yards and then change her mind and go back and play a provisional ball.  Therefore Jean has proceeded correctly and is not penalized.  As was the case before, a player must inform her opponent in match play or her fellow competitors in stroke play that she intends to play a provisional ball.


Rule quiz ending February 28, 2014

This isn’t a Rules Question, but I have been asked to cover this issue in one of the Rule Quizzes.

Tina, who had a 22 handicap, and Marnie were playing in a best ball competition with two other fellow competitors.  This is the same format as we are using for our Member/Member Tournament.  On Hole # 8 Tina hit her ball into the water with her tee shot.  She hit another ball from the tee and went into the bunker on the right.  Since Marnie was on the green, and only about four feet from the pin, with her tee shot, Tina decided to pick up on that hole.  The question for the day is…..what should Tina count for her score for posting purposes?

A.         Since Tina did not finish the hole, she must record her most likely score.    She has already taken 3 plus probably 3 or 4 more for a 6 or a 7.

B.         Since Tina didn’t really play the hole, she should count 3 because it is a par three, plus the number of strokes (pops) she gets on that hole for a total of 5.

C.         Since Tina did not finish the hole she should take her max which in this case would be 8.

 

The answer is A.  18 answered and 15 had the correct answer.  Good going!  The USGA Handicap Manual Section 4-1 says, A player who starts, but does not complete a hole or is conceded a stroke must record for handicap purposes the most likely score.  The most likely score may not exceed the player’s Equitable Stroke Control limit. The Manual also explains the meaning of ‘most likely score’ in Section 4, Decision 4-1/1 which says, Most likely score is a judgment that each player must make based on the player’s own game.  It consists of the number of strokes already taken plus, in the player’s best judgment, the number of strokes needed to complete the hole from that position more than half the time.  The player must evaluate each situation based on what the player may reasonably expect to score.

In this case, Tina would evaluate how good she is at getting out of bunkers.  Would it take her two shots to get out more than half the time?  If she were to get out in one shot, would she get it close enough to make a two putt more than half the time? etc.

 


Rule Quiz ending February 15, 2014

While we are on the topic of match play and players hitting the wrong ball, let’s talk about a scenario that happened during Spring Team Play at Shadow Hills a few weeks ago.  Jean and Florence from Mission Hills were playing a match against Jo and Rita from Heritage Palms.  When they got to the green of hole # 13 Jean realized she had the wrong ball.  Rita found that she had played Jean’s ball and Jean had played her ball.  They talked about it and realized that they had played one another’s tee shots and that Jean was the one who had played the wrong ball first.  They came in afterwards and told the Committee what had happened.  Which of the following statements is correct?

A.       Since it is match play and they both played one another’s ball, they may continue play with the balls exchanged until both balls have been holed.

B.      Since it is match play, and since Jean was the first to play the wrong ball, she is disqualified from the hole.  Her partner, Florence then plays out the hole against Rita and Jo.

C.      Both players are disqualified from the hole and the winner of the hole is the winner between Florence and Jo.

This stumped us because the first Rule we went to was #2….Match Play.  Nothing about it there.  On to  #15….Wrong Ball.  Rule 15-3a under Match Play says, If a player makes a stroke at a wrong ball, he loses the hole.  And it continues…If the player and opponent exchange balls during the play of a hole, the first to make a stroke at a wrong ball loses the hole.  This is still not totally applicable because it is not a one on one match.   Rule 30 covers Four Ball Match Play.  Rule 30-3c says, If a player incurs the loss of hole penalty under Rule 15-3a for making a stroke at a wrong ball, he is disqualified for that hole….  Since both Jean and Rita made strokes at a wrong ball, both players are disqualified from the hole and therefore C is the correct answer.  Each player is responsible for playing her own ball.


Answer to Quiz ending January 31, 2014

Marion and Margot are playing a match on the South Course.  When they reach the 15th green, Marion discovers that she has hit the wrong ball.  Margot checks what she thinks is her ball and sure enough, it is Marion’s ball.  They try to think back over their shots, but they cannot figure out where they made the mistake.  What happens now?

A.       They both get a 2 stroke penalty for hitting one another’s ball and must go back and try to correct their mistake and finish the hole from there.

B.        If they cannot figure out which one first hit the wrong ball, the hole is played with the balls exchanged.

C.       If they cannot figure out where the mistake was made, they half the hole and go on to the next hole.

 

27 answered this quiz.  12 had the correct answer which is B.  10 said C and 5 said A.  I am not sure I would have had the correct answer without looking it up in the Rule Book.  I think I would have thought C as well.

 

Rule # 15-3a  - Wrong Ball…Match Play.  If a player makes a stroke at a wrong ball, he loses the hole…..If the player and opponent exchange balls during the play of a hole, the first to make a stroke at a wrong ball loses the hole; when this cannot be determined, the hole must be played with the balls exchanged.


RULE QUIZ ENDING JANUARY 15, 2014

Jamie was playing the South Course in a foursome and was on #15.  She hit her second shot toward the love grass on the left side of the fairway.  Thinking that her ball did not go into the love grass and that it would be easy to find, she did not hit a provisional ball.  The group looked for her ball for about three minutes, but with no luck.  The others told her to go back to hit another ball and they would keep looking and call her if they found it.  Now the question is…..when does the new ball become the ball in play and the original ball cannot be used even if it has been found within five minutes of beginning the search for it?

A.       The new ball becomes the ball in play when Jamie decides to go back to hit the shot over.

B.        The new ball becomes the ball in play once it is dropped to be replayed.

C.         The new ball becomes the ball in play once Jamie has made a stroke at it.

This is a complicated answer to find in the Rule Book and I am guessing that is why so few got the correct answer. The correct answer is B.  27 answered and only 5 were correct.  Many of you answered C and that would have been the correct answer if it had been Jamie’s tee shot and she had gone back to re-tee it.  Since the substituted ball would be on the tee, it would not be put into play until she made a stroke at it.  But since it was her second shot, the substituted ball that she dropped became the ball in play as soon as it was dropped.

The way you would find this in the Rule Book would be to look up the definition of a “lost ball” to find when the original ball would be deemed lost.  That definitions says, A ball is deemed lost if:….c. The player has put another ball into play under penalty of stroke and distance under….27-1, and the definition for “ball in play” which says, A ball is in play as soon as the player has made a stroke at it on the teeing ground.  It remains in play until it is holed, except….when another ball has been substituted….A ball so substituted becomes the ball in play.   It is still a little confusing at this point but becomes clearer if we go to the Decisions Book.  Decision 27-1/1 Q.  A player plays from the teeing ground, searches briefly for his ball and then goes back and tees another ball.  Before he plays the teed ball and within the 5 minute search period, the original ball is found.  May the player abandon the teed ball and play the original ball?               A.  Yes.  The teed ball was not in play since the player had not made a stroke at it….and the original ball was not lost.  Decision 27-1/2 Q.  A player plays his second shot, searches for his ball briefly and then goes back and drops another ball.  Before he plays the dropped ball, and within the 5 minute search period, the original ball is found.  Is the player required to continue with the dropped ball?  A.  Yes.  When the player put the substituted ball into play at the spot of the previous stroke with the intent to play a ball under penalty of stroke and distance…..the original ball was lost.

So long story short…..if the original ball was hit from the tee and you are going back to replay the shot, the substituted ball becomes the ball in play after you make a stroke at it.  If the original ball was hit from anywhere else on the course and you are going back to replay the shot, the substituted ball becomes the ball in play as when it has been dropped.


Rule Quiz ending December 15, 2013

On #16 of the South Course at Shadow Hills, Dora hit her ball to the right side of the green.  No one in her foursome was sure if the ball stayed up on the green or apron OR went into the water.  Dora declared that she was hitting a Provisional ball just in case her original went into the water. This ball landed behind the green.  When they arrived at the green they found Dora’s original ball beside the green.  Since Dora found her original ball, she continued to play out the hole with that ball.  Which of the following statements is correct?

 A.        When Dora played her original ball she chipped it on the green and one putt and so she counts 3 for the hole.

 B.        When Dora played a second ball from the tee that became the ball in play.  Since Dora did not finish the hole with the ball in play, and she did not correct this before teeing off on #17, she is disqualified from the competition for the day.

 C.        When Dora played a second ball from the tee it became the ball in play.  When Dora found her original ball and played it, she played a wrong ball.  She incurred a two stroke penalty for playing a wrong ball, so she counts 5 for the hole.

Answer:  And just as a point of interest…if you got the wrong answer, you weren’t alone.  Only 2 out of 20 were correct.  This situation is a little complicated, but it happened during play on a Wednesday.  The correct answer is B.  The Provisional Ball Rule (#27-2) says, “If a ball may be lost OUTSIDE a water hazard or may be out of bounds, to save time the player may play another ball provisionally in accordance with the Rule 27-1”.  So in this case, Dora could not hit a provisional ball.  When she hit this second ball, it became the ball in play and she must continue play with it.  Since she did not do this, and did not correct her mistake before teeing off on #17 she is disqualified.  There is a decision that’s not exactly the same as this, but it covers all the bases of this question and might make it clear.

Decisions 15/5 - Question:  A player unable to find his ball after a brief search drops another ball (Ball B) and plays it.  His original ball is then found within five minutes.  The player lifted Ball B and continues to play with the original ball.  Was this correct?   Answer:  No.  When the player put the substituted ball (Ball B) into play at the spot of the previous stroke with the intent to play a ball under 27-1, he proceeded under an applicable Rule.  Therefore, Rule 20-6 (which is the Rule that allows you to re drop if you have dropped incorrectly) does not apply, and he must continue with the substituted ball.  The original ball was lost when Ball B was dropped. (Or in this example the original ball was lost when Dora hit another ball off of the tee.) And the answer continues…….

When the player lifted ball B, he incurred a penalty of one stroke under Rule 18-2a (this would be for moving his ball in play without marking it).  When he made a stroke with the original ball after it was out of play, he played a wrong ball and incurred a penalty of loss of hole in match play or an additional penalty of two strokes in stroke play.  In stroke play, the player would be disqualified if, before playing from the next teeing ground, he did not correct his error.

So….If Dora did play her original ball and someone in the group reminded her, after the fact, that she could not do that and she wanted to correct her mistake, this is what she would have to do.  She would be three off the tee in this case.  Then she would receive a two stroke penalty for playing a wrong ball.  Then she would get a penalty for having picked up her second ball (Ball B).  But she could put ball B back to a place as close as possible to where it had landed and play it from there.  So counting the strokes….3 off the tee, 4 and 5 penalties for playing a wrong ball, 6 a penalty for moving Ball B without marking it, 7 her chip shot onto the green plus her number of putts.  

There are times when it is very difficult to see whether or not a player’s ball has gone into a water hazard.  In order to save time there is a local rule that can be adopted by a golf course.  It is  Appendix 1-Part A -2b and the actual specimen Local Rule Part B tells one exactly how to word this Local Rule.  We use a shortened version of this Local Rule on #7.  So on #7 it is okay to hit a provisional ball if you are not sure whether or not your ball has gone into the water hazard.


Rule Quiz ending Nov. 20, 2013

1.      If your ball becomes embedded in its own pitch mark during your game….

A.  You get relief if the embedded ball is in the ground anywhere on the course OR

B.  You only get relief if the ball is in the ground in the closely mown area of the course.

2.      When you are taking relief from a ball embedded in its own pitch mark….

A.  You may clean the ball before you take your drop OR

B.  You are not allowed to clean your ball before you take your drop.

3.      When you are taking relief from a ball embedded it is own pitch mark….

A. You are not allowed to repair the pitch mark before you take your drop OR

B.  You may repair the pitch mark before you take your drop.

Answers:

One of the general Rules of golf is to play the ball as it lies.  Rule 13-1 says, “A ball must be played as it lies, except as otherwise provided in the Rules.”

Rule 25-2 covers an Embedded Ball and says, “A ball  embedded in its own pitch mark in the ground in any closely mown area through the green may be lifted, cleaned, and dropped, without penalty, as near as possible to the spot where it lay but not nearer the hole.  The ball when dropped must first strike a part of the course through the green.  ‘Closely mown area’ means any area of the course, including paths through the rough, cut to fairway height or less”.

So this answers 1 which correctly would be B and 2 which correctly would be A.  Just as an aside, a committee may make a local rule giving relief through the green, which means anywhere on the course except hazards and the teeing ground and putting green of the hole being played.  The PGA tour makes this local rule at times when there has been so much rain that balls embed all over the course and the players on the tour are kind of wimpy and expect the course to be in perfect condition for them.

Now for answer #3.  The correct answer is A and it can be found in Rule 13-2 which says, A player must not improve or allow to be improved: the area in which he is to drop or place a ball.  This part of the Rule is explained very clearly in Decision 13-2/10 which has the question, “ Through the green, a player’s ball was embedded in its own pitch mark in a closely mown area.  He lifted the ball under Rule 25-2 but, before dropping it, repaired the pitch mark.  Is such repair permissible?  And the Answer…..”No.  The player was in breach of Rule 13-2 when he improved the area in which his ball was to be dropped by eliminating an irregularity of surface.”

I mentioned there is going to be a new decision on embedded ball in the new Decisions Book coming out in January.  This new Decisions is going to show a picture defining an embedded ball.  No change to the questions and answers included in this Quiz.

 

Rule Quiz ending March 31

Darlene hit her second shot on #10 Shadow Hills South Course into the native grass to the right of the cart path near the green.  No one saw if it bounced out of the native grass area.  She announced and hit a provisional ball which ended up

about 1 foot from the hole.  Which of the following is correct?

A.         Darlene must look for her original ball for 5 minutes

B.         Darlene can putt her provisional ball before her original ball is found and,

            if she sinks it, she counts 5 for the hole.

C.         Darlene can say that she does not wish to find her original ball and

            therefore her fellow competitors cannot look for it.                              

 

The answer is B.  When you hit a provisional ball, you can keep hitting it until you get to the place where you expect your original ball might be.  If you make a stroke at your provisional ball when it is past the point where you expect your original ball to be, the provisional becomes the ball in play.  Rule 27-2b says, The player may play a provisional ball until he reaches the place where the original ball is likely to be.  If he makes a stroke with the provisional ball from the place where the original ball is likely to be or from a point nearer the hole than that place, the original ball is lost and the provisional ball becomes the ball in play under penalty of stroke and distance (Rule27-10).   If Darlene had gone up to the green and putted her provisional before her fellow competitors found her original, she would be counting 5 for the hole.

When searching for a ball, the Rules never say you MUST search for your ball for 5 minutes.  That is the maximum time you can search, but there is no minimum time in the Rules.  In fact, the Rules never say you MUST search for your ball at all.  That takes care of answer A.  The first part of answer C is correct.   Darlene may say that she does not wish to find her original ball, but there is nothing stopping her fellow competitors from looking for it.  They may be competing in a game against her and they may wish to find her original and they have every right to go and look for it.  That is why Darlene, if she wishes to use her provisional ball, should go up to the green and quickly make her putt before the competitors find her original.

If Darlene had actually holed the provisional ball with her second shot, it would become the ball in play as soon as she picked it out of the hole, provided her fellow competitors had not already found the original ball inbounds before she did this.  (And she would be counting 4 for the hole).

 


Rule Quiz ending March 14

Cindy and her fellow competitors all marked their balls on the green.  The two players whose balls were further from the hole putt out.  Cindy placed her ball in front of what she thought was her marker and putt her ball, which stopped about 3 inches from the hole.  Jane, whose marker was equidistant from the hole, but at a little different angle, noticed that it was not her marker that was left on the green.  Cindy had putt from Jane’s marker and therefore had played from a wrong place.  What should Cindy do  next?

A.      Cindy must place her ball in front of her own marker and putt from there.  She receives a two stroke penalty for playing from a wrong place.

B.      Cindy has already putted so must carry on from there and now must putt her ball that is three inches from the hole.  She receives a two stroke penalty for playing from a wrong place.

18 answered and only 4  were correct.  The answer is B.  I know it is quite shocking that you don’t have to replace the ball and do it over.  That is what we think we have been taught to do since we started playing golf.  But in Rule 20-7c we learn – If a competitor makes a stroke from a wrong place, he incurs a penalty of two strokes under the applicable Rule.  He must play out the hole with the ball played from the wrong place, without correcting his error, provided he has not committed a serious breach.  A serious breach would occur if the player gained a significant advantage by playing from the wrong place.  In that case he would have to correct his error and play from the correct place.  In the example I gave you, a serious breach did not occur, therefore the player must just continue playing but would incur the two stroke penalty.

Now to add insult to injury…and this is a scenario that is an extension of this question.   This happened to Davis Love many, many years ago in a tournament.  At the time I just couldn’t understand it.  Using Cindy in our example…. Remember she putted from the wrong place and the ball ended up 3 inches from the hole.  The thing to do according to the Rules was to then putt her ball that is 3 inches from the hole.  Now since she did not interpret this Rule correctly, as most of you would have done, she picked up her ball and placed it in front of her own marker and putted over.  She already had a 2 stroke penalty for putting the first time from a wrong place, but was supposed to continue putting that ball.  Because she picked it up, she now incurs another two stroke penalty for picking up her ball (which was still in play) without marking it and not replacing it.  Are you confused yet?  The decision explaining this is 20-7c/2.

Q.  In stroke play, A mistakenly replaced his ball in front of B’s marker (which was near A’s ball marker) and putted.  The ball came to rest about one foot from the hole.  The error was then discovered and A lifted his ball without marking its position, placed it in front of his own ball-marker and finished the hole.  What is the ruling?

A.  When A replaced his ball in front of B’s ball marker and putted, he played from a wrong place and incurred a penalty of two strokes; the ball was in play (Rule20-7c).

         When A then lifted his ball from where it lay about one foot from the hole without marking its position and did not replace it, he incurred the general penalty (two strokes) for breach of Rule 20-1.  Thus, A incurred a total penalty of four strokes.

In match play the player simply loses the hole and all these complications are avoided.


Rule Quiz ending February 28/2013

Remember Melissa and her dilemma last week.  Her ball was buried in the face of a bunker.  She found it by digging in the bunker where she thought it might have buried in the sand. This time she declares her ball unplayable.  Which (one or more) of the choices below is not an option for her?

A.       Using the place where her ball buried in the sand as a reference point, she may drop the ball within two club-lengths of that point, no closer to the hole, and in the bunker, with a one stroke penalty.

B.      Using the place where her ball buried in the sand as a reference point, she may go as far back in the bunker as she wishes, keeping the reference point between her and the hole, and drop her ball with a one stroke penalty.

C.      Using the place where her ball buried in the sand as a reference point, she may take the ball out of the bunker, keeping the reference point between her and the hole, and drop her ball as far back in that line as she wishes, with a one stroke penalty.

D.      She may go out of the bunker and drop her ball where she last hit from when she went into the bunker, with a one stroke penalty.

Answer:

The answer is C.  Rule 28 is all about a ball being unplayable.  The player is the sole judge as to whether her ball is unplayable.  Her fellow competitors should not suggest this option to her (giving advice), nor should they say that they don’t think it is unplayable.  The ball can be declared unplayable any place on the course, except when the ball is in a water hazard.

If the player deems her ball unplayable, she must, under penalty of one stroke:        

a.           Proceed under the stroke and distance provision of Rule 27-1 by playing a ball as nearly as possible at the spot from which the original ball was last played  (our option D above) OR

b.          Drop a ball behind the point where the ball lay, keeping that point directly between the hole and the spot on which the ball is dropped, with no limit to how far behind that point the ball may be dropped  (our option B above) OR

c.           Drop a ball within two club-lengths of the spot where the ball lay, but not nearer the hole (our option A above).

If the unplayable ball is in a BUNKER, the player may proceed under Clause a, b, or c.  If she elects to proceed under Clause b or c, a ball must be dropped in the bunker.

Clause a.  in this Rule is definitely something to keep in mind in this situation.   If Melissa had been right in front of the bunker when she hit her ball into the buried lie in the bunker (which could very easily happen on this course) she could, under penalty of one stroke, take an unplayable lie and drop her ball at the spot from which her original ball was last played.   This would be the ONLY time she could come out of the bunker to drop her ball, but definitely an advantage considering how soft the sand is in the entire bunker.


Rule Quiz ending February 14

The sand on our Shadows Golf Course is very soft (an understatement).  Occasionally a ball is hit so hard into the face of a bunker, it may be almost buried, or it may actually disappear.  The last Rule Quiz told us that you may search for your ball in the sand, and if you accidentally move it in the search, you are not penalized. Now the Quiz….Melissa is pretty sure she hit her ball into the bunker.  When she arrives at the bunker, there is no sign of her ball except for a small mark in the sand near the top of the face of the bunker.  She digs around for her ball and actually finds two balls.  She picks up both of them, and finds one of them is hers.  Of the three choices below, which one is correct?

A.         She must place her ball very carefully in the place where it originally came to rest and bury it as closely as possible to where it was with only a small part of the ball showing, with no penalty.

B.         She must smooth the area where she dug for her ball and then carefully place her ball on top of the sand in that spot, with no penalty.

C.         She must drop her ball and play it from where it comes to rest in the bunker, with no penalty.

Answer:

Well, the questions I am asking are too easy.  Almost all of you that answered got the correct answer.  And besides, I know you were thinking that you didn’t like any one of these options.  If this happened to you, you would just say your ball was unplayable and use one of the unplayable options to get out of this situation.  Most of us would, I’m sure, but that wasn’t the question.

The correct answer is A.  We can find this answer in Rule 12-1a If the player’s ball lying anywhere on the course is believed to be covered by sand, to the extent that he cannot find or identify it, he may, without penalty, touch or move the sand in order to find or identify the ball.  If the ball is found, and identified as his, the player must re-create the lie as nearly as possible by replacing the sand.  If the ball is moved during the touching or moving of sand while searching for or identifying the ball, there is no penalty; the ball must be replaced and the lie re-created.

In re-creating a lie under this Rule, the player is permitted to leave a small part of the ball visible.


Rule Quiz ending January 31

Mabel hit her ball into an area of native grasses.  She and her fellow competitors walked through the native grass area, shaking the plants as they looked for the ball.  Mabel saw a ball and pulled the plant slightly apart to see if it was her ball.  As she did this, her ball fell out of the plant and rolled onto the ground.  What does she do next?

A.      She may hit the ball from the new place, and receives no penalty as she is not penalized for moving her ball while searching for it.

B.      She must replace the ball to where it was in the same kind of lie, but receives no penalty as she is not penalized for moving her ball while searching for it.

C.      She incurs a one stroke penalty for moving her ball and must replace it to where it was in the same kind of lie.

The correct answer is C.  Mabel is not allowed to move her ball which is in play except that there are a few exceptions in Rule 18-2a.  Under the Rules there is no penalty if a player accidentally causes his ball to move in the following circumstances:

·         In searching for a ball covered in sand, in the replacement of loose impediments moved in a hazard while finding or identifying a ball, in probing for a ball lying in water in a water hazard, or in searching for a ball in an obstruction or an abnormal ground condition.

·         In repairing a hole plug or ball mark

·         In measuring

·         In lifting a ball under a Rule

·         In placing or replacing a ball under a Rule

·         In removing loose impediments on the putting green

·         In removing a movable obstruction.

What happened in the above Quiz, does not fit any of the exceptions listed in this Rule.  So Mabel must put her ball back where it was in the grass, with a penalty for moving her ball while it was in play.  Then she can decide what she will do next.  She can try to hit the ball from that place in the grass.  Or she can take an additional penalty and use the unplayable ball options.  Golf can be a cruel game!

There is something to think about here.  If your ball is in such an area, be very careful while searching for it.  Your fellow competitors can search more vigorously for it because if they accidentally move it, there is no penalty for anyone.  They simply put it back in its original lie in the grass and then you decide what you will do with it.

 

 


Answer to Rule Quiz ending January 15.

On the Shadow Hills Golf Course there are several large culverts where the water drains from the streets onto the golf course in a heavy rain.  One such culvert is on the right side of the fairway on #1 in an area of native grass.  Where the culvert ends, on this particular hole, there is usually water sitting here as well.  Lillian’s ball landed in the dirt very close to the culvert, and she decided, because of the culvert that she could not make a swing at the ball.  What are her options?

A.       She can drop the ball within one club length of her nearest point of relief (no closer to the hole) with no penalty.

B.        She must treat this as an unplayable ball and drop a ball using the unplayable options with a one stroke penalty.

A Decision (24-3b/1) tells us that An underground drainpipe or culvert is an obstruction.  Therefore Lillian would get free relief from this immovable obstruction and the answer is A.

To go a little further with this particular area, where there is water standing at the end of this culvert, this water would be classed as casual water and once again the player would get free relief from the water within one club length of her nearest point of relief, no closer to the hole.

There are other such culverts on our course where there are rocks placed at the end of the culvert to stop soil erosion.  Once again, the player gets free relief from the rocks.

Please note these culverts are usually in areas of native grass plantings.  Sometimes the nearest point of relief from the culvert or casual water, or rockwork, is still in the native grass area, so it is possible that the player would have to drop her ball in this native grass area.  She gets free relief from the culvert, the rockwork and the casual water, but does not necessarily get free relief from the native grasses.


Answer to Rule Quiz ending Dec. 31/12

Following are a few phrases that players use to announce that they are hitting a provisional ball.  Which one/ones are acceptable for making this announcement?

A.       I think I better reload.

B.       I don’t think I’ll find that ball.  I’ll play another ball.

C.       I’m going to hit a provisional ball.

D.        That ball might be out of bounds.  I’m going to hit another ball.

E.         All of the above

 

Okay, you are all so smart.  24 answered and 23 were correct.  Of course the answer was C.  You must say that you are hitting a provisional ball and no other phrase works.  Also, if you say NOTHING and just play a new ball, the new ball is not a provisional ball and becomes the ball in play under penalty of stroke and distance ( Rule 27-1) and the original ball is lost.  The reason that I asked this question is that I have played with many gals that do not say the correct phrase or more often don’t say anything.  If nothing is clarified when the provisional ball is hit, the player’s intentions are not clear to the rest of the foursome.

The Rule is there to take away any doubt as to what the player is intending to do.  Remember if you are hitting a provisional ball, you must use the word PROVISIONAL or the second ball, no matter what you call it, automatically become the ball in play and you CAN NOT play your original ball.


Answer to Quiz ending Dec. 14/12

Lorraine, in trying to avoid the water on Hole # 18 at Shadow Hills, hit her ball (a really poor shot I might add) to the right in the deer (love, native) grass.  She found her ball and it was about 8 feet into this deer grass area.  She decided it was unplayable.  Which of the following statements, if any, was not an option for her according to the Rules of Golf?

A.       She may go back to the place from where she last hit the ball and drop a ball, with a one stroke penalty.

B.      She may take the ball out of the grassy area and drop a ball within two club lengths of the grassy area, no closer to the hole, with a one stroke penalty.

C.      She may take the ball as far behind the grassy area as she chooses keeping the point where her ball had come to rest between her and the hole, with a one stroke penalty.

D.      All of these suggested options are correct.

The correct answer was B.

When you are playing a golf course and your ball lands in a questionable area such as a flower garden, 150 yard marker, or an area of native grasses, you will find a list of local rules on the back of most scorecards to see how you should play from this particular area.  Our scorecard tells us that if your ball lands in “planter Areas or Native Grasses---play as the ball lies”.

Therefore Lorraine, if she decides she can’t play from this area (the Quiz said she decided it was unplayable) she takes an unplayable ball.  She refers to Rule 28 and finds her options which are, UNDER PENALTY OF ONE STROKE:

1.       Proceed under the stroke and distance provision (Rule 27-1) by playing a ball as nearly as possible at the spot from which the original ball was last played.  This was option A in the Quiz.

2.           Drop a ball behind the point where the ball lay, keeping that point directly between the hole and the spot on which the ball is dropped, with no limit to how far behind that point the ball may be dropped.  This was option C in the Quiz.  

3.           Drop a ball within two club-lengths of the spot where the ball lay, but not nearer the hole.  This option was not listed as a choice in our Quiz.

Answer B which said, “She may take the ball out of the grassy area and drop a ball within two club lengths of the grassy area, no closer to the hole, with a one stroke penalty”, is not an option and therefore was the correct answer to the Quiz.  You may have confused this with #3 in Rule 28 quoted above.  But in that case she would only get two club lengths from where her ball lay in the grasses.  Since she was in the middle of this area, two club lengths would not take her completely out of the grasses.  So the moral of the story is that you cannot come completely out of the grasses unless two club lengths from where your ball lies, gives you that kind of relief.