World Literature     Exam Preparation            January 2011


Midterms are 100 minutes and contain two parts: multiple choice and essay.  Review the three pieces of literature we’ve read and prepare the notes for your essay.  Bring the three books and a writing tool on the day of your exam.  

Their Eyes Were Watching God (Zora Neale Hurston)

Things Fall Apart (Chinua Achebe)

A Midsummer Night’s Dream (William Shakespeare)

Part One: Multiple Choice         

Review plot, characters, settings and such from each of the three books.  Look over any notes, charts, writings you have that could serve as good study material.

Part Two:  Essay

Choose one of the essay options below.  Using the books we’ve read, mark passages in the books with sticky notes, jot down thoughts and opinions, and write notes in order to compose a thoughtful, well-organized, focused essay on exam day.  You will bring your notes and novels to the test as well as your pen/pencil.  Also, please read and follow the general instructions for an essay test (see other side).

Option 1 – In good literature, at least one character evolves, changes, and grows throughout the course of a story.  This is a dynamic character compared to static ones who are very one-dimensional and do not change.  Using two (2) novels, discuss dynamic and static character(s) from each (at least 4 characters).  Consider behavior, personality, worldview, and experience as well as other elements you may observe, when you analyze the characters.  Cite specific examples from stories to support your ideas.

Option 2 – The power of story permeates these novels.  In accordance with the unit focus, use two (2) books to explore one character’s story in terms of inspiring passion, purpose, and leadership potential in one’s self or others (two characters, one per book).  Cite examples from the stories to support your ideas.

Option 3 – Conflict is a popular motif in literature.  In our selections, men vs. women and person vs. person are two such conflicts.  Using the three (3) pieces of literature, choose one of these conflicts, explore it, and analyze it, drawing your own conclusions about whether or not there is resolution or lesson to learn.  Cite examples from the stories to support your ideas.



General Instructions for Essay Exam



Basic Rubric





To earn and A, the essay:  focuses on the given topic; has a strong thesis; uses several direct passages from appropriate stories; shows strong transitions and links ideas from one paragraph to another; is longer than the basic five paragraph format; is organized coherently; contains few or no errors in punctuation, spelling, capitalization, grammar, etc.





To earn a C, the essay:        basically focuses on the given topic but strays occasionally; has a fairly strong thesis; uses a few direct passages from appropriate stories; shows weak or no transitions from one idea to another; is five paragraphs in length; lacks coherent organization; contains several errors in punctuation, spelling, capitalization, grammar, etc.





To earn an E, the essay:        does not focus on the given topic; has no identifiable thesis; contains no direct passages from appropriate stories; is fewer than five paragraphs in length; has no organization or linking of ideas; contains excessive amount of errors in punctuation, spelling, capitalization, grammar, etc.