.

PROGRAM REVIEW

English as a Second Language

February 9 - March 30, 2011

Review Committee Chair

Anniqua Rana

Review Committee Members

Alicia Aguirre

Jenny Castello

Jeanne Gross

Linda Haley

Jacque Phillips

Katie Schertle

Liz Schuler


CAÑADA COLLEGE

Annual Dept/Program Plan (Instructional)

Adopted spring 2009

The purpose of this document is to collect information to be used by the college planning bodies CPC, IPC, SSPC.  Attach the dept/program data package provided by the Office of Institutional Planning & Research.  Complete this document in consultation with your Dean and then submit a copy to the IPC.  The deadline for submission of the annual program review to the IPC is March 31.  Once received by the IPC the IPC will comment on the document and return the comments to the author for use in the next program review.

The ultimate evaluation of this document is in how useful it is to the planning bodies.   This document replaces the previous hiring justification document and equipment requests documents. It is expected that a typical instructional department would take less than three hours to complete this document.  

  1. Department Name:

English as a Second Language

  1. Completed By:

Aguirre, Alicia

Brodskaya, Marina

Castello, Jenny

Gross, Jeanne

Haley, Linda

Phillips, Jacque

Rana, Anniqua

Schertle, Katie

Schuler, Liz

  1. Curricular Offerings

Guidelines:  This section should include the following

        •        Status of curriculum updates for all courses

        •        Status of SLOAC for all courses

        •        A description of the complete curriculum offering cycle

        •        A plan for necessary curriculum development

Due to the major changes to our program structure and content as a whole and the growing emphasis on the need for comprehensive and precise SLOs, it has become evident that our department needs an official packet of assessment materials which includes descriptions of grading standards, rubrics for the various skills we teach, and samples of graded student work (anonymous) for every skill and level. To that end, Katie Schertle has undertaken the task of compiling a preliminary set of such materials, focusing on writing standards, to present to the department by the end of the spring semester. These materials will be reviewed, revised, and further developed by the whole department. It is hoped that the final set of writing assessment materials will be ready for use by the department by the end of 2011. We intend to produce similar assessment materials for the other major skills taught in ESL (reading, listening, speaking, and grammar) along similar timelines (1 – 2 semesters per skill).

Core curriculum updated in fall 2009-reference below

SLOAC: Vocabulary, Pronunciation, ESL 901, ESL 805

Discussion about SLOs in spring

Support in content courses

Create a process and structure to provide language support for students in content courses

Create a transition process for students to register for core ESL courses ESL?

Sequence content courses  

Plan a flexible way to support language needs

Arrange for release time needed for ESL faculty collaborating with other departments such as ECE, Human Services and Math

Posted on Department website: ESL Student Learning Outcomes Spring 2011

http://canadacollege.net/academics/esl/faculty-resources.html



COURSE

Last COR update

SLOs identified

SLOAC completed

Notes

ESL 400

Fall 2009

Yes

 

Updated and Distance Ed added

ESL 800

Spring 2011

Yes

 

To Curriculum Committee Spring 2011

ESL 805

Spring 2011

 

 

To Curriculum Committee Spring 2011

ESL 829

Spring 2011

New for Fall 2011

 

 

To Curriculum Committee Spring 2011

ESL 830

Spring 2011

New for Fall 2011

 

 

To Curriculum Committee Spring 2011

ESL 836

Spring 2011

 Yes

 

To Curriculum Committee Spring 2011

ESL 837

Spring 2010

 Yes

 

 

ESL 839

Spring 2010

New for Fall 2010

 

 

 

ESL 900

Spring 2011

New for Fall 2011

 

 

To Curriculum Committee Spring 2011

ESL 901

Fall 2009

 Yes

 

 

ESL 911

Fall 2009

New for Fall 2010

Yes

In progress Spring 2011

 

ESL 912

Fall 2009

New for Fall 2010

Yes

In progress Spring 2011

 

ESL 913

Fall 2009

New for Fall 2010

Yes

In progress Spring 2011

 

ESL 914

Fall 2009

New for Fall 2010

Yes

In progress Spring 2011

 

ESL 921

Fall 2009

New for Fall 2010

Yes

In progress Spring 2011

 

ESL 922

Fall 2009

New for Fall 2010

Yes

In progress Spring 2011

 

ESL 923

Fall 2009

New for Fall 2010

Yes

In progress Spring 2011

 

ESL 924

Fall 2009

New for Fall 2010

Yes

In progress Spring 2011

 

 

 

 

 

 

  1. Enrollment Data

Guidelines:  The data is prepared by the office of Research and Planning and is to be attached to this document. This section should include the following:

        •        Identification of trends

        •        Thoughtful reflection on trends and analysis of causes of trends

Three-year Action Plan

Guidelines:  This section should include:

        •        Reflections on Dept/ Program needs and goals

        •        An action plan for what is to be accomplished in the next three-years

Department Goals

  1. Increase the percentage of students who receive ESL Certificates (ACE, PASS, VESL)
  2. Create a plan to improve retention rates that includes best practices in the classroom
  3. Create a plan to improve persistence rates that includes best practices in the classroom
  4. Strengthen and expand collaborations with adult school and other community partners
  5. Strengthen and expand collaborations with other departments and divisions

Where are we now?

Create a plan to improve persistence rates that includes best practices in the classroom: The ESL Department faculty have discussed, shared, and used the following best practices in their classrooms to improve retention rates:  

 

Since there is not consistent use of these best practices, a department meeting devoted to presenting these best practices to fulltime and adjunct faculty is recommended.

Create a plan to improve persistence rates that includes best practices in the classroom:  In addition to the best practices listed for improving retention, the ESL Department faculty have discussed, shared, and used best practices in their classrooms to improve persistence rates.

 

Strengthen and expand collaborations with adult school and other community partners:

Expanded collaboration with Sequoia Adult School in Spring 2011 includes Canada College ESL course offered day and evening for students who have completed the highest level of ESL at the Adult School. We continue to collaborate with Sequoia Union High School District (SUHSD) and Redwood City School District (RCSD), both of whom contract with the College to offer beginning level English and Vocational ESL courses and childcare in the community.

Discussions have taken place with two community partners to try to connect Canada College ESL classes with their services:

        Acterra:  ESL and Green Gardening Certificate with the City of Redwood City

        Puente de la Costa Sur

Strengthen and expand collaborations with other departments and divisions: We continue to build more learning communities with the Early Childhood Education (ECE) department.  These learning communities support Spanish speaking students in completing the core courses- as well as some electives- of Early Childhood Development classes, including Early Childhood Curriculum, Early Childhood Principles, Child Development, and the Child, Family and Community course.  These companion courses build vocabulary and other language skills in English, with the goal of preparing them for future study of ECE coursework in English and or bilingual positions in the field of Early Childhood.  We are currently creating new curriculum to better align with the ECE courses.  External funding from the Grove Family Foundation was secured for this purpose by one of the members of the ESL department.  One unit of coordination was granted for both spring 2011 and fall 2012 for this purpose.

  1. Faculty and Staff hiring requests:

Guidelines:  The request should explain clearly and with supporting data how it will serve Department/Program/Division/College needs.  Information from the most recent comprehensive program should be included.

ESL Recruitment and Retention Specialists to offer wrap-around needs

As the department is working on projects like the Neighborhood College and collaboration with Sequoia Adult School to support community needs, a recruitment and retention specialist will help support the needs of ESL students.  

  1. Professional Development needs:

Guidelines:  The request should explain clearly how it will serve Department/Program/Division/College needs

Release time, workshops and in-house training in the following areas are needed to support the innovations promoted in the department

  1. Equipment Requests: (Item description, Number of Items, Total Cost)

Guidelines:  The request should explain clearly how the request will serve Department/Program/Division/College needs including Item description, Number of Items, Total Cost

ELMO TT-02RX Classroom Visual Presenter, $718 (without ed discount)

Details and cost

Amount

Latitude XT2 Tablet PC

Price                $3,028.00

Instant Savings                $614.60

Price                $2,413.40

4

Dell 464-7196 Latitude E-Port Docking Station

Compatibility: Dell Latitude E-Family Only Ports Spec: 1 x 9-pin DB-9 RS-232 Serial 2 x 6-pin mini-DIN (PS/2) Keyboard/Mouse 5 x 4-pin Type A USB

$199.99

$228.14 with tax and shipping

5

Dell M410HD Projector

Digital Multimedia Projector

2000 Lumens, 2100:1 Contrast, 2.6 lbs, DLP Projector

Price (USD) :         $859

Please see attached document

  1. Facilities Requests: (Either new or maintenance issues)

Guidelines:  The request should explain clearly how the request will serve Department/Program/Division/College needs and goals

  1. Reflections on comments made to  previous reviews

The program has been adjusted to include integration and creation of pathways to support student success and persistence.


Cañada College

Comprehensive Program Review Self-Study Document

In preparing this Program Review, keep the college mission in mind as a reminder that Program Review is to ensure that all programs are aligned with the institutional mission.

Cañada College’s Mission:  It is the mission of Cañada College to ensure that students from diverse backgrounds achieve their educational goals by providing quality instruction in transfer and general education courses, professional/technical programs, basic skills and activities that foster students’ personal development and academic success. Cañada College accepts responsibility for serving the community’s diverse needs for lifelong enrichment and highly values close teacher to student teaching and learning relationships, support services and a co-curricular environment that contributes to personal growth and success for students.

PROGRAM NAME: English as a Second Language

PART A: Overview of Program

  1. If the program has completed a previous self-study, evaluate the progress made toward previous goals.

        The ESL Department had a goal of gathering and analyzing data. The department identified questions for which data is necessary, including query on some the following questions:

         How many of our students are taking advantage of the compressed schedule to take courses in other disciplines?

         What was the success, retention and persistence of students in those classes?

         How has the data increased or improved since the restructuring of our program?

         How many CBET students enrolled in on-campus classes after completing CBET?

         How many former CBET students have finished four levels of the on-campus program?

The department collects data concerning student demographics within the CBET program to evaluate program events as to whether the event accomplished the objectives originally established for the event. Other related data concerning our students as well as the community is also collected as needed for the grants received by the Department. Additionally, the Office of Planning, Research, and Student Success has provided some data on these questions and the department has discussed them. However, the ESL Department would like to have easier access to data.

Collaboration: An important aspect of the previous self-study was to develop collaborative activities with other departments and divisions. Significant efforts were made to expand and deepen this collaboration. For example, Transfer Parade involves collaboration with disciplines across the campus. Additionally, the Department collaborated with the Chemistry Department to provide a hands-on activity for students. Deep collaborations have occurred during the development of the learning communities with CBOT, ECE.  The Faculty Inquiry Network with Math has offered another opportunity for collaboration. However, additional collaborative efforts are necessary.

Incorporating Technology: Successfully developing academic and career pathways for ESL students is at the center of the ESL Mission. In reviewing previous goals, building the technological goals of ESL students was central to achieving this Mission. There is one computerized classroom on campus, 13-11; some of the Grammar/Writing classes use the space, and most instructors utilize the classroom to teach email skills, and other technology skills that support classroom work.

  1. State the goals and focus of this program and explain how the program contributes to the mission, comprehensive academic offerings, and priorities of the College and District.

Cañada College ESL Department Mission Statement:

The mission of the Cañada College ESL Department is to help students develop the communicative competence necessary to achieve their academic, professional, and personal goals.

ESL Program Level Outcomes (SLOs) & Assessment

Program Level Outcomes:

  1. Students can produce and interpret oral and written English at an advanced level in order to successfully enter academic or career pathways.
  2. Students can use academic skills and study skills to succeed at the transfer level.
  3. Students can use technology skills and information competency skills to succeed at the transfer level.

Being discussed as possible Program Level Outcome:

Assessment:

  1. Within ESL 400, students will be able to write a well-developed essay with a clear thesis statement.
  2. Within ESL 400, students will be able to research, create and deliver a well-organized oral presentation.

In 2010, the ESL department restructured its classes to integrate skills and to reduce exit points at each level. Prior to Fall 2010, ESL students were expected to complete 16 units of ESL at each of the four core levels in the program followed by ESL 400 which is a transfer level composition class. This has been reduced to 10 units at each level. The impact of this reduction on student success is unclear. The ESL faculty members are collaborating with the college researchers to identify whether this change has helped students in the ESL department transition to vocational or academic areas earlier or more successfully than previously.

The scheduling of these classes has also been based on data shared by the college researcher which indicates that students who enrolled in ESL and other content areas tend to persist longer than students who enrolled only in ESL classes. The schedule therefore allows students enrolled in ESL classes to be able to enroll in math, Career, and CBOT courses. These are not in the form of learning communities but students are advised that they should enroll in these classes.

The Math and ESL collaboration is being investigated by Jeanne Gross and Rita Sabatini, joined by Jenny Castello, Amelito Enriquez, Denise Hum and Michael Hoffman through a focused inquiry network to identify how students taking Math can be supported in the language needs. They administered a student survey in Fall 10 to students in all the level 4 classes. 65 students responded. The survey indicates that students need additional support to enroll in and to succeed in their Math classes. 91% of the students indicated that they would like to take a Math class supported by an ESL Instructor. In a focus group students gave a variety of suggestions on how the College could support their work, including coursework in Spanish, workshops within ESL classes and learning communities. The FIN group would like to develop a learning community with Math, using the two- unit vocabulary classes, the three-unit integrated grammar classes, or a one-unit contextualized class. Additionally, they are collaborating to investigate the ways that Math and ESL instructors approach word problems. These collaborative approaches are consistent with best practices reported in the Final Report on the Development of Developmental Mathematics and Language Project by Guadalupe Valdes and Bernard Gifford. Further, the report indicated that the difficulties that ESL students experience in Math are a combination of vocabulary and grammar issues.

The collaboration with early childhood education is based on the needs of the students in that department. Students taking these courses in Spanish were provided the language support through the two-unit ESL vocabulary classes. Faculty  are now looking into providing a stronger support by creating learning communities with three-unit ESL classes so that students completing the early childhood education courses are more competent in their language skills.

        




  1. If the student population has changed, state how the program is addressing these changes. Document the demographic trends.

Figure 1 Student Education Attainment Level

Student population has not changed very much over the past 5 years. The ESL Department is addressing the students’ literacy levels by discussing mastery grading, the revalidation of placement test scores, and strengthening the collaboration with adult schools.  The ESL Department is addressing the computer literacy and math skills needs of many ESL students by offering learning communities with CBOT and ECE courses, integrating skills so that ESL students can take computer classes and math classes while still taking ESL courses, and collaborating with the Business, Workforce, and Athletics Division and Science and Technology Division in scheduling courses so that students can include these courses along with their ESL courses each semester.

Counseling support for new students’ matriculation is critical for this particular population of ESL students, since many of them do not have an extensive academic background. The counseling department has instituted new ESL-specific orientations at the beginning of each semester designed to help student integrate successfully into the program and college.  

The process of enrollment, registration and assessment should be very clear for students with a limited English ability who also do not have a strong academic background.  The ESL department will continue to work with the counselors  in regards to serving this particular population of students to the best of our abilities.

Academic Year

        

Figure 2 ESL Department Enrollment Patterns & Course Offerings

The decrease in the number of ESL sections offered from 2005 two 2010 is reflective of a trend in the community/economy.  When many ESL students are struggling to keep their jobs, they are, therefore, unable to attend college, which results in a decrease in the number of sections offered. The department has made a conscious effort to be more efficient in its course offerings by reducing the number of sections and thereby increasing the average enrollment per section. The increase over the past year might be indicative of a positive change in the job market. If this number keeps increasing, the department will try to meet those needs by offering more sections in areas where students need language support.

Figure 3 ESL Department Efficiency

These graphs may represent good introductory information about the effects of combining our skills and reducing the overall unit load for our courses. However, more longitudinal data is needed. It is not yet possible to draw conclusions based on data from only one semester.

Specifically, questions have arisen about the best configuration of ESL classes with respect to unit value and actual content of courses. These questions stem from preliminary data which suggest ESL students persist at higher rates if they take other (non-ESL) courses concurrently. Additionally, college students, in general, persist at higher rates if they take 12 or more units. It is not yet clear that the increase in units that students take, or the combination of ESL/non-ESL courses is the cause of greater persistence. It is possible that the students who are more likely to succeed academically and stay in college are the ones who are, by their nature, inclined to take more units and a wider variety of courses. However, a causal connection between higher units, combining types of courses, and greater persistence is also possible. So one question for the ESL department is, should ESL courses be designed specifically to complement non-ESL courses at Cañada? This could happen in a number of ways:

1. Reorganize ESL courses in terms of skills and unit values (e.g. reading, writing, grammar, listening/speaking, etc.) so that ESL students can easily take non-ESL courses at the same time.

2. Revise the core course content to reflect the content of non-ESL courses (e.g. writing for nursing, grammar for computers, etc.) in order to encourage students to enroll in learning communities.

3. Identify more non-ESL programs on campus to align with in such a way that ESL students will be eligible to take them, thus providing students with a wider variety of non-ESL courses from which to choose.

It should be noted that, if and when such changes to our program are made, a collaboration between the ESL teachers, counselors, and administration will be required to provide clear and widespread promotion of any and all newly designed courses/course pairings to the ESL students on campus and in the community at large. Such promotional efforts would have to include information about registration and SEPs.

  1. If the program utilizes advisory boards and/or professional organizations, describe their roles.

VESL Advisory Committee

Our new VESL Advisory Committee brings together people from the Business, Education, and Government sectors from our community once a semester (twice a year) and gives guidance and feedback on our curriculum as well as builds synergy within sectors to strengthen our community.

Current Committee members include:

        


PART B: Curriculum

  1. Describe how the courses offered in the program meet the needs of the students and the relevant discipline(s). (This may be answered through narrative or quantitative evaluation).

        

CBET/VESL

The VESL program, which is offered within the Community-Based English Tutoring (CBET) program off-campus in the local community, is funded by several community partners.

Projected Program Outcomes:

  1. Students will complete a series of three levels of language acquisition courses to achieve a certificate (either pre-academic or vocational);

Semester

# of CBET courses, including VESL

# of CBET students

# of VESL courses

# of VESL students within CBET

Fall 2009

19

440

0

n/a

Spring 2010

13

376

4

83

Fall 2010

12

309

5

185

Spring 2011

13

TBD

6

TBD

The VESL Program has been developed to include two levels beyond the initial level of ESL 800 Prep offering in the CBET: ESL Level 1 (ESL 901 + ESL 921) and the CBOT Transfer Level (CBOT 430 + CBOT 431). These levels consist of the following four courses:

  1. ESL 901 Language Skills for the Workforce I (Listening, Speaking and Reading)

ESL 921 Grammar and Writing I ( (Grammar and Writing)

  1. CBOT 430 Computer Applications I (CBOT = Computer Business Office Technology)

CBOT 431 Computer Applications II

At the completion of these levels, students receive the “English for the Workforce” Award.

  1. 70% of our students will transition to campus credit courses:

76% of our Spring 2010 VESL students have transitioned to Cañada College credit classes; we anticipate this number to increases for the Spring 2011 semester.

  1. Four model community-based courses established in Spring 2010 with at least 10 courses established by Spring 2011

Four community-based courses were established in the Spring 2010 semester at three off-campus sites. In Fall of 2010, the ESL 880 English for the Workforce/Computers classes were changed to ESL 901 Language Skills for Workforce Careers I and ESL 921  Grammar & Writing I was added. We also offered classes at two more off-campus sites in the Fall. As seen below, there have been a total of 20 courses:                

Spring 2010 - Fall 2010 Course Offerings by Site (2 semesters)

Course Offerings

Hawes Elementary

Hoover Elementary

Taft Elementary

John Gill Elementary

Boys & Girls Club – EPA

Total

ESL 880/901

2

3

1

2

1

9

CBOT 430

2

2

1

5

CBOT 431

2

2

1

5

ESL 921

1

1

20

  1. Create six “Learning Communities” cohorts of at least 20 students that will take VESL courses in Computer Technology, Career and Personal Development taught by a certified teacher:

We have created six “Learning Communities” these past two semesters--two “Learning Communities with VESL/CBOT Spring semester with at least 20 students in each community and three more VESL/CBOT Learning Communities this Fall. A 6th “Learning Community” with VESL/ECE (Early Childhood Education) was established this Fall as well, with an additional grant of $25,500 from the Grove Foundation. While these are popular classes, we were only able to create six due to limited resources. We have scheduled three more “Learning Communities” with VESL/CBOT and another VESL/ECE for the Spring 2011 semester. Fall 2010 has included six hours per week of individual and small group academic and career counseling sessions for students in the VESL Program and classroom presentations by a College counselor.

  1. Create an emergency loan program for “Learning Community” students to borrow relevant textbooks for the semester. 72 CBOT books were purchased and made available to all “Learning Community” students.

ESL 400 and Library

Faculty Reflection on Pre- & Post-Survey Results

 

Course Objective #3:   Locate, retrieve, and use print and digital resources

Students view of their ability to use search tools (book catalog, databases, websites) improved significantly:

I know how to use the library catalog to find books in the library

Strongly Agree                                                                                                                                      12%                            3                                  47.8                                    11

Agree                                                                                                                                                        28%                            7                              47.8%                        11

I know how to use a database to find articles from magazines, journals and newspapers

Strongly Agree                                                                                                                                      8%                              2                              54.2%                        13

Agree                                                                                                                                                        36%                            9                              37.5%                        9

Disagree                                                                                                                                                  44%                            11                                   8.3%                          2

I know how to decide if a website has information that I can trust

Strongly Agree                                                                                                                                      16%                            4                                  50%                                    12

Agree                                                                                                                                                        52%                            13                                   45.8%                        11

Disagree                                                                                                                                                  32%                            8                              4.2%                          1

Nearly 100% of students felt confident using the most common search tools for academic essays.  This is encouraging because students are familiar with these tools and confident about using them.  This puts them in a great position to improve their skills using these tools in ENGL 100.

 

Course Objective #5:  Effectively integrate and cite sources

All of the students agreed or strongly agreed they were able to cite books, articles, and websites using MLA:

I know how to cite books, articles, and websites in MLA format

Strongly Agree                                                                                                                                      12%                            3                                      54.2%                        13

Agree                                                                                                                                                        24%                            6                                      45.8%                        11

This view is supported by their performance on the MLA Quiz (use as an SLO Spring 2011?).

 

Course Objective #6:   Competently use the electronic databases, the internet and other information technology tools.

The classes’ view of their ability to use databases and websites improved significantly.  At the beginning of the semester, 44% disagreed with the statement “I know how to use a database to find articles from magazines, journals, and newspapers.”  At the end of the semester, 91.7% of students agreed (37.5%) or strongly agreed (54.2%) with the same statement.  Only 8.3% of students disagreed with the statement.   Databases – both their interface and their content – are an entirely new concept to most community college students, and can be quite intimidating.  Yet databases are the key tool for any form of academic research.  We are pleased that the majority of ESL 400 students expressed confidence in their ability to use these resources.

Students view of their ability to assess websites also improved.  At the beginning of the semester, 32% of students disagreed with the statement “I know how to decide if a website has information I can trust.”  By the end of the semester 95.8% of students agreed (45.8%) or strongly agreed (50%) with the statement, and only 4.2% disagreed.

 

SLO for Spring 2011:  track the success of ESL 400 students who have taken LIBR 100 in ENGL 100.  Compare to ESL 400 students who have not taken LIBR 100.

  1. State how the program has remained current in the discipline(s).

The level of professional development among faculty in the ESL Department is high. Members of the Department are extremely active in professional organizations such as CATESOL (California Association of Teachers of English and Other Languages), TESOL (Teachers of English as a Second or Other Languages). Additionally, Anniqua Rana has been a statewide leader in the Basic Skills Initiative, sharing professional resources developed across the state and nation. Members of the Department attend professional conferences, such as CATESOL and AA & U, etc. Additionally, they read, write and discuss professional journals and articles.

One of the current directions within ESL is the contextualization of language instruction. For this reason, the department has made changes to its curriculum, has developed coursework and built partnerships to provide means of providing contextualized language instruction that supports students pursuing academic and vocational pathways.  

  1. All course outlines in this program should be reviewed and, if appropriate, revised every six years. If this has not occurred, please list the courses and present a plan for completing the process.

Curricular Offerings Fall 2010

New Course Outlines
  1. ESL 839 Advanced Vocabulary Development – 2 units  
  2. ESL 901  Language Skills for the Workforce-  3 units ESL 901 Course Outline NEW

All courses are Web assisted to accommodate the TBA hours

  1. ESL 921 Grammar-Writing I          5 units  Course Outline NEW
  2. ESL 922 Grammar-Writing II        5 units   Course Outline NEW
  3. ESL 923 Grammar-Writing III        5 units   Course Outline NEW
  4. ESL 924 Grammar-Writing IV         5 units   Course Outline NEW 
  5. ESL 911 Reading-Listening/Speaking I        5 units   Course Outline NEW
  6. ESL 912 Reading-Listening/Speaking II        5 units   Course Outline NEW
  7. ESL 913 Reading-Listening/Speaking III         5 units  Course Outline NEW
  8. ESL 914 Reading-Listening/Speaking IV        5 units   Course Outline NEW

 

 Courses deleted
  1. ESL 821 Grammar I
  2. ESL 822 Grammar II  
  3. ESL 823 Grammar III
  4. ESL 824 Grammar IV
  5. ESL 831 Listening/Speaking I
  6. ESL 832 Listening/Speaking II
  7. ESL 833 Listening/Speaking III
  8. ESL 834 Listening/Speaking IV
  9. ESL 841 Writing I
  10. ESL 842 Writing II
  11. ESL 843 Writing III
  12. ESL 844 Writing IV
  13. ESL 861 Reading I
  14. ESL 862 Reading II
  15. ESL 863 Reading III
  16. ESL 864 Reading IV

Learning Communities

 

CERTIFICATES

  ACE Language Award form for students to complete Download 

  PASS Language Certificate form for students to complete.98k Download 

  EFW Language  Award form for students to complete.doc – 96k Download 

        

  1. If external accreditation or certification is required, please state the certifying agency and status of the program.

        N/A

  1. Describe how your program is articulated with similar departments within SMCCD, the Sequoia High School District and/or other four year institutions. (Include articulation agreements, common course numbering etc.)

Cañada is offering ESL classes at Sequoia Adult School to create a pathway for ESL students. 

Jenny Castello, ESL faculty, and Barbara Hooper, ESL Coordinator of Sequoia Adult School

Students at Sequoia Adult School receiving information about ESL classes

        

ECE and CBET Collaboration

In furtherance of the program goals to provide English language instruction, academic guidance and free childcare to parents and community members who pledge to tutor a school-age child in the Redwood City School District, the CBET program builds a career pathway for parents/adults by offering learning communities, or pairs of courses in ECE and ESL, which will serve future childcare workers and parents alike. The program accomplished everything that was initially proposed in the request for funding, as described below.

REVIEW OF PROGRESS TOWARDS INITIAL WORKPLAN/TIMELINE

  1. January 2010: set up course offerings for Fall 2010 and assign faculty

The following courses were set up and assigned to the following faculty members:

February-May 2010: create course plans for integrating the ECE and ESL courses, recruit for classes, share plans with collaborators.

Recruitment of students for the courses and the sharing of plans with our collaborating partners was an easy task to accomplish, as we were able to recruit primarily within the hundreds of students already enrolled in the CBET program.

Summer 2010:  Faculty members meet to coordinate and integrate instruction plans.  Curriculum for all courses already exists, so it is mainly a matter of aligning the material.

After connecting via email over the summer, the ECE professor began a dialogue journal with the ESL professor, which documents the rich discussion of how students were responding to the course material and assignments.  The ESL professor used this information to plan her lessons; the content that was taught in Spanish in the ECE course was reinforced in English in her ESL course.

Fall 2010:  Offer 1 section of family literacy to be paired with an Early Childhood Education course in a learning community format at Families Forward/John Gill School.  Assess student retention and success rates.

One learning community was offered at Families Forward/John Gill School but instead of offering a family literacy course in ESL, we offered a new vocational ESL course called “Language Skills for the Workplace 1”, which is a flexible course that would pair more effectively with a content area course and would also, more importantly, give them credit towards a vocational ESL certificate.

Spring 2010: Offer 1 or 2 sections of family literacy courses, 1 -2 to be paired with an Early Childhood Education course in a learning community format, funding permitted. Assess student retention and success rates.  Plan for future expansion of offerings. 

Another learning community is currently being offered as planned at Families Forward/John Gill School and enrollment is above twenty students, though not yet finalized as it has just begun.  The courses currently offered are:

Initially, we had scheduled another section of ESL 901, but we encountered a major problem with this option as students tried to enroll and were blocked by the system from adding the ESL course.  Because ESL 901 is a course offered with other learning communities and it is not repeatable, students who had taken it before paired with other courses (like computers), were not allowed to repeat it even though it was going to be paired with ECE, a different subject matter.  In November, we changed the course from ESL 901 to ESL 880, a temporary number with the same title, so that we could enroll all interested students while we figured out how to prevent this problem in the future.  

This problem of which ESL course to pair with ECE will continue to be an obstacle until we figure out which courses to permanently pair with each of the ECE courses offered in Spanish:

ECE 201 Child Development

ECE 210 Early Childhood Principles

ECE 211 Early Childhood Curriculum

ECE 212 Child, Family and Community

ECE 313 Health and Safety for Young Children

As of now, we do not have five separate vocational or CBET ESL courses to pair with each of these courses.  We need to have some collaborative discussions both within the ESL department to figure out what curriculum development is needed and then also with the ECE department to study more about their course offerings and how to best pair them with ESL.  The ESL courses progress by level but the ECE courses do not have any required progression, so this complicates our plan to match courses. Since ECE students can take courses in any order they wish, we cannot use ESL courses in this learning community that are leveled otherwise students would end up jumping back and forth between levels of ESL classes.  Clearly, there is work to be done so that we can sort out our offerings and if needed, create courses that will match appropriately with the ECE courses.

ECE/ESL Learning Community/John Gill School

Fall 2010

Professor Mauricio Palma, Early Childhood Education

Professor Patricia Gallagher, English as a Second Language

Final Student Data

Total Enrollment in Both Classes: 24 students (22 female, 2 male)

Final Grades-English as a Second Language (ESL)

Grade

Percentage

Number of Students

A

63%

15

B

13%

3

C

17%

4

D

4%

1

F

0%

0

W

3.00%

1

Success Rate:

96%

Retention Rate:

96%

Final Grades- Early Childhood Education (ECE)

Grade

Percentage

Number of Students

A

75%

18

B

17%

4

C

4%

1

D

0%

0

W

4%

1

Success Rate:

100%

Retention Rate:

96%

.  

CONCLUSIONS

The major conclusions are the following:

The enrollments and data and student feedback tell us that this learning community has been successful.  

No funds have been spent on childcare because has not been needed.

For that reason, in the next request for funding, we will not ask for childcare funds.

In order to create a clear pathway for ECE/ESL learning communities, it is critical that we fix the course alignment problem explained above.  For that reason, in the next request for funding, we are asking for one unit of coordination time for the CBET coordinator to lead both departments in a study to identify all obstacles, study the course pairing options, and find a solution, creating new curriculum, if necessary.

  1. Discuss plans for future curricular development and/or program modification.

        Analyze data

        Base changes on student needs

PART C: Student Outcomes

  1. Please attach all Bi-Annual State of the Department reports from the past six years.

        

Data Gathering and Analysis

 

The ESL Department had a goal of gathering and analyzing data. The department identified questions for which data is necessary, including query on some the following questions:

The department collects data concerning student demographics within the CBET program and also evaluates program events concerning whether the event accomplished the objectives originally established for the event. Other related data concerning our students as well as the community is also collected as needed for the grants received by the Department. This data is collected with multiple tools that are not integrated with other data tools. Additionally, the Office of Planning, Research, and Student Success has provided some data on these questions and the department has discussed them. However, the ESL Department would like to have easier, morecomprehensive, and integrated access to data.

 

Collaboration

An important aspect of the previous self-study was to develop collaborative activities with other departments and divisions. Significant efforts were made to expand and deepen this collaboration. For example, Transfer Parade involves collaboration with disciplines across the campus. Additionally, the Department collaborated with the Chemistry Department to provide a hands-on activity for students. Deep collaborations have occurred during the development of including the learning communities with CBOT, ECE.  The Faculty Inquiry Network with Math has offered another opportunity for collaboration. However, additional collaborative efforts are necessary.  This is repeated information

 

Incorporating Technology Previously mentioned

Successfully developing academic and career pathways for ESL students is at the center of the ESL Mission. In reviewing previous goals, building the technological goals of ESL students was central to achieving this Mission. There is one computerized classroom on campus, 13-11; ESL faculty members utilize the classroom to teach email skills and other technology skills that support classroom work. An additional classroom is needed. The off-campus ESL classes in the CBET Program have access to the computer labs in the elementary school campuses in Redwood City School District. The labs are primarily used by the CBOT (Computer Business Office Technology) courses, but they are also used by the ESL 901 Language Skills for the Workforce I and ESL 921 Grammar & Writing classes on an as needed basis. In these classes, students learn to use a computer, email, Internet, Microsoft Word, Excel, PowerPoint as well as how to type.

Curriculum Adaptation and Refining to Suit Current Needs

Over the past year, ESL instructors have experienced increased difficulty in covering all the course content in their respective course outlines as a direct result of the decrease in units/hours allotted to each course. We have made an initial attempt to pare down the content of each course somewhat; however, to address the problem adequately, one of two things must happen: 1) additional and more significant reductions in the content of all courses must take place or 2) units must be added back into the core program
.

  1. Update any analysis to include a summary of all years. Attach student learning outcomes here.

        ESL Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs) – ALL Courses (2011) see below for 2011 and 2012

Program Level Outcomes:

  1. Students can produce and interpret oral and written English at an advanced level in order to successfully enter academic or career pathways.
  2. Students can use academic skills and study skills to succeed at the transfer level.
  3. Students can use technology skills and information competency skills to succeed at the transfer level.


Being discussed as possible Program Level Outcome:

1. Students will develop a Student Educational Plan by identifying and assessing educational opportunities at Cañada College.

Assessment:

  1. Within ESL 400, students will be able to write a well-developed essay with a clear thesis statement.
  2. Within ESL 400, students will be able to research, create and deliver a well-organized oral presentation.

ESL 400  The students will be able to…Craft a clear thesis statement with a definite point of view or claim. Assessment: Professor assesses the thesis statement in a final writing assignment using a scale of 1-4 in which 1 needs much work and 4 is excellent.

ESL 836 English Pronunciation-  The students will be able to...

  1. Use falling intonation at the end of affirmative statements.
  2. Use rising intonation at the end of yes/no questions.
  3. Recognize and produce stressed schwa sound.

ESL 837 Intermediate Academic Vocabulary-The students will be able to...

ESL 839  Advanced Academic Vocabulary-students will be able to...

…………………………………………………………………………………………………………

SLOs for Fall 2011-2012

LEVEL 1 – The student will be able to…

ESL 911

1. Analyze, evaluate and interpret course texts and lectures through small group and class discussions and presentations at the high-beginning level.

2. Analyze, evaluate and interpret course texts and lectures through a variety of written assignments at the high-beginning level.

3. Apply and evaluate public-speaking skills in at least one presentation of two to three minutes.

4. Utilize academic resources and study skills to support ESL academic coursework.

ESL 921

1. Identify, compare, and contrast the rules governing the grammar structures listed in the course content.

2. Compose simple and compound sentences at the high-beginning level.

3. Apply editing skills at the high-beginning level to student writing.

4. Recognize, differentiate, and employ the grammar and composition terms listed in the course content.

5. Utilize academic resources and study skills to support ESL academic course work.

LEVEL 2 – The student will be able to…

ESL 912

1. Analyze, evaluate and interpret course texts and lectures through small group and class discussions and presentations at the low-intermediate level.

2. Analyze, evaluate and interpret course texts and lectures through a variety of written assignments at the low-intermediate level.

3. Apply and evaluate public-speaking skills in at least one presentation of three to five minutes.

4. Utilize academic resources and study skills to support ESL academic coursework.

ESL 922

1. Identify, compare, and contrast the rules governing the grammar structures listed in the course content.

2. Compose simple and compound sentences and basic paragraphs at the low-intermediate level.

3. Apply editing skills at the low-intermediate level to student writing.

4. Recognize, differentiate, and employ the grammar and composition terms listed in the course content.

5. Utilize academic resources and study skills to support ESL academic course work.

LEVEL 3 – The student will be able to…

ESL 913

1. Analyze, evaluate and interpret course texts and lectures through small group and class discussions and presentations at the high-intermediate level.

2. Analyze, evaluate and interpret course texts and lectures through a variety of written assignments at the high-intermediate level.

3. Apply and evaluate public-speaking skills in at least one presentation of three to five  minutes.

4. Utilize academic resources and study skills to support ESL academic coursework.

ESL 923

1. Identify, compare, and contrast the rules governing the grammar structures listed in the course content.

2. Compose complex sentences, extended paragraphs and basic essays at the high-intermediate level which employ the grammatical structures and rhetorical modes listed in the course content.

3. Apply editing skills at the high-intermediate level to student writing.

4. Recognize, differentiate, and employ the grammar and composition terms listed in the course content.

5. Utilize academic resources and study skills to support ESL academic course work.

LEVEL 4 – The student will be able to…

ESL 914

1. Analyze, evaluate and interpret course texts and lectures through small group and class discussions and presentations at the low-advanced level.

2. Analyze, evaluate and interpret course texts and lectures through a variety of written assignments at the low-advanced level.

3. Apply and evaluate public-speaking skills in at least one presentation of three to five minutes.

4. Utilize academic resources and study skills to support ESL academic coursework.

ESL 924

1. Identify, compare, and contrast the rules governing the grammar structures listed in the course content.

2. Compose complex sentences, extended paragraphs and essays at the low-advanced level which employ the grammatical structures and rhetorical modes listed in the course content.

3. Apply editing skills at the low-advanced level to student writing.

4. Recognize, differentiate, and employ the grammar and composition terms listed in the course content.

5. Utilize academic resources and study skills to support ESL academic course work.


PART D: Faculty and Staff

  1. List current faculty and staff members in the program, areas of expertise, and how positions contribute to the program success.

Alicia C. Aguirre

Alicia C. Aguirre is in her 23rd year as a professor in ESL and Spanish at Cañada College. She holds an M.A. in Education and has done doctoral studies at the Universidad Iberoamericana.

Currently serving as Curriculum Committee Chair, Basic Skills Advisory Committee, Honors Advisory Committee, Instructional Planning Council, and Academic Senate.

 

As an active community member, she has served on numerous boards in San Mateo County.

Jeanne Gross

Jeanne Gross, M.A. English with a concentration English as a Second Language, San Francisco State University and M.A., Religion and Society, Pacific School of Religion, Berkeley, California. She has 14 years of ESL classroom instruction as well as work in learning resources and student services. Jeanne has extensive experience with grant writing and reporting.   She currently serves on the Curriculum and Basic Skills Committees and the ESL Math Faculty Inquiry Group. She has also served on Accreditation Steering, Presidential Search, Scholarship, and District Shared Governance.  

Liz Schuler

Liz Schuler is currently an English Instructor and Program Coordinator in the "CBET", Community-Based English Tutoring" Program in the ESL Department at Cañada College in Redwood City where she coordinates the new VESL “Vocational English as a Second Language” Program.  Liz has also taught ESL in the ESL Department in Cañada College and ESL Literacy and Citizenship at Sequoia Adult School in Redwood City. Prior to returning to her teaching career, Liz worked in the nonprofit sector as Program Manager at the Center for Excellence in Nonprofits (www.cen.org) where she was responsible for the day-to-day program delivery, including for CEN's technology planning program, Wired for Good. Liz was a Project Manager at Vesper Society where she developed curriculum and provided training for nonprofit organizations domestically and internationally on technology planning, Internet skills, and online leadership. She also served for two years in the Peace Corps as a high school English teacher in Gabon, Central Africa. In addition to her nonprofit and teaching experience, Liz worked as an Associate Producer at CNET's Download.com. She holds a B.A. in English from Cal State Fullerton and a M.A. in English with an emphasis in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (TESOL) from San Francisco State University. Liz currently lives with her husband and two children in Redwood City.

Jacque Phillips

Jacque Phillips has worked in ESL in student education, teacher education and VESL with an emphasis on training management level employees in communication skills.  Most recently, she developed a vocational skills course of study for at-risk, new-enrollees at Canada College in collaboration with the math and counseling departments. 

Also, in 1994, she developed the Canada College Off-Campus Site at Peninsula Works in Menlo Park, establishing an ESL program that served as a bridge for at-risk students who  enrolled in Canada College.  At that time, she developed the first collaborative program between with the Redwood City  Adult School and Canada College.

Jacque Phillips has FSA’s in English, ESL, Speech, Reading and Linguistics.  She is currently teaching ESL and English courses at Canada College.   

Membership

Curriculum Committee, Academic Senate Vice-President, Academic Senate President, Tenure Review Committees, Committees for Peer Review of Adjunct Faculty. Interim EI Coordinator, 1994-1995

Katie Schertle

Katie Schertle: MA TESOL, San Jose State University; BA English and American Literature, UC San Diego; California Single Subject Teaching Credential in English, San Jose State University; Humanities and Social Sciences Division Curriculum Committee Representative; General Education Sub-Committee; Association of American Colleges & Universities; Academic Senate Governing Council Secretary and Division Representative; ASGC Constitution and By-Laws Sub-Committee; Academic Integrity Committee; Tenure Review Committees; Peer Review Committees; 15 years classroom teaching experience in California universities, community colleges, and high schools.

Marina Brodskaya

Marina Brodskaya, MA TESOL, SJSU; MA Russian and Eastern European Area Studies, Hunter College, NYC; BA Film Studies, BS Economics, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia.

Marina Brodskaya has participated in four Learning Communities (ESL and Business Technology; ESL 400 and Latino History). She was @One Carnegie Scholar and presented her research findings at a state-wide administrative conference. In addition, she has presented at a number of other conferences, including CATESOL, AATSEEL, ALTA, and Digital Stream. A Judicial Council of California Certified Interpreter, she has worked on a variety of court cases at the local and Federal levels. She is a member of the Santa Clara Bar Association.  Outside the courtroom, she completed Advanced Mediation Training and has been mediating cases in the SF Bay Area through Alternative Dispute Resolution (ADR) programs. She is an Emmy-nominated researcher, published photographer, author, and translator, and an intermediate tennis player.

Anniqua Rana

Ed. D International and Multicultural Education.  MA English (San Jose State University), TESOL Certificate UC Berkeley.  MA Linguistics (University of the Punjab)

Coordinator, ESL Department (2009-2011) Coordinator, Center for Innovation and Excellence in  Teaching and Learning (2010-2011) Member Basic Skill Committee and Curriculum committee

Presentations: Student Success Conference, California:

Student Success: Language Tests, Placement Policies, and the Generation 1.5 Student (2010)

 “The Basic Skills Initiative: 2009 and Beyond”  (2009)

Crossing Borders and Kababayan: Increasing Student Success through Learning Communities” (2008)

 “Unveiling the Myth of the Muslim Woman”-IAIE http://www.iaie.org/, Verona, Italy, 2005

Publications

Effective Practices for Promoting the Transition of High School Students to College: A Review of Literature with Implications for California Community College Practitioners (Editor) January 2009

Promising Practices for Transitioning Students from Adult Education to Postsecondary Education A Review of Literature with Implications for California Community College Practitioners(Editor) January 2009

The Impact of Technology on Women in Higher Education in Pakistan

Jenny Castello

Jenny Castello, MA in English with a Concentration in Teaching English as a Second Language from San Francisco State University, has taught in the San Mateo County Community College District for 37 years, starting as an Instructional Aide in ESL classes for 2 years, then as an adjunct ESL faculty for 23 years, as Interim Dean of Humanities and Social Sciences for 2 years, and as a fulltime faculty for 10 years, including 2 years as the ESL Department Coordinator.  She has been involved in Curriculum for the past 10 years as a member of the Curriculum Committee, Curriculum Chair, and District Curriculum Chair and attends the Curriculum Institute regularly.  She is currently on the Steering Committee of ALLIES, Alliance for Language Learners’ Integration, Empowerment, and Success.  She is a member of the 2011 Redwood City Leadership class.

        

 

  1. List major professional development activities completed by faculty and staff in this program in the last six years and state what development is needed or proposed by faculty in this program.

Anniqua Rana

As the basic skills network coordinator for the Bay Area, Anniqua Rana has attended and presented at conferences and workshops across the state focusing on program planning, evaluation, and assessment as well as teaching techniques including the use of technology in ESL classes.

Katie Schertle

Katie Schertle has attended workshops focusing on the use of technology in the classroom and is currently learning how to develop a WebAccess site for each of her ESL classes. Additionally, she has become a member of AAC&U and recently attended their conference in San Francisco on Globalized Learning. She is also a member of the Curriculum Committee, which enables her to stay up to date and involved in matters related to curriculum development, general education, technology and information competence, SLOs and assessment, and distance/online education.

Jeanne Gross

Jeanne Gross recently added an ESL certificate from Notre Dame de Namur, Belmont, California to complement her M.A. in ESL. She attends CATESOL and Basic Skills conferences regularly and has applied for a National Endowment for the Humanities workshop on Landmarks in Immigration. She appreciates ongoing professional development in instructional technology.

Linda Martinez Haley

Linda Martinez Haley has a Masters Degree in Teaching English to Speakers of other Languages (TESOL), a Bachelors degree in Spanish Language and a minor degree in Education. She also has a multiple subject teaching credential with authorization in Spanish.  After teaching in San Francisco Unified School District and at San Francisco State University, Linda came to Canada College in 2001 as the ESL instructor/coordinator of the Community-Based English Tutoring (CBET) Program, a collaboration with Redwood City School District (RCSD) and Sequoia Union School District (SUHSD) which provides beginning level ESL courses with free childcare at various elementary schools in the community.  Linda also teaches Reading on campus and in the Early College Program at the East Palo Alto Academy through our concurrent enrollment program.   Her most recent initiative is the creation of learning communities for the Early Childhood Education department and grant-writing as related to both this initiative and the development of the new vocational ESL program within the CBET program. 

On Campus Activities:

Phi Theta Kappa Advisor, 2003-present
Budget Committee Member, 2009
Humanities and Social Sciences Division Awards Ceremony Committee, 2011

Alicia Aguirre

Alicia Aguirre has attended statewide conferences including CATESOL, TESOL, Foreign Language Association and American Association of Colleges and Universities conferences, and the Statewide Academic Senate Curriculum Institute.

Jenny Castello

Jenny Castello is working this semester to develop the Neighborhood College Bayside and Coastside initiative. She is currently taking 2 @one online teaching courses.  She attends the State Academic Senate Curriculum Institute regularly.

  1. Describe the departmental orientation process for new full-time and adjunct faculty and staff (please include student workers such as tutors and aides).

New full-time ESL faculty members are typically mentored by another full-time faculty member in the department; however, all full-time faculty members take the initiative to help newly-hired full-time teachers learn the policies and procedures of the department. Additionally, the full-time teachers in the department work as a team to provide guidance to new adjunct members through department meetings, phone consultations, first-day instruction packets, and ongoing email communication.

The ESL Department maintains ongoing collaboration with the Director of the Learning Center regarding ESL Tutoring services. These tutors are students who have demonstrated excellent skills in the various levels of the ESL curriculum; they are identified each academic year by the faculty members of the department, and they are provided an orientation to their tutoring duties by the Learning Center staff.

        

PART E: Facilities, Equipment, Materials and Maintenance

  1. Discuss the quality and accessibility of the facilities, equipment, equipment maintenance, and materials available to the program. List projected needs.

On Campus:

In the community:

Estimates for Updating Computers in 13-11

Cost

Quantity

 Cost

OptiPlex 380 DT *

676.06

31

$20,957.86

Dell 5330dn Workgroup Laser Printer **

1,184.09

1

$1,184.09

RP-HTX7-W1 Stereo Headphone

26.69

30

$800.70

TOTAL

$22,942.65

* OptiPlex includes:

OptiPlex 380 Desktop for Standard PSU 

Genuine Windows® 7 Home Premium, with Media, 32-bit English [Included in Price]

Intel® Pentium® Dual Core Processor E5800 (3.2GHz,2M,800Hz FSB) [Included in Price]

4GB DDR3 Non-ECC SDRAM,1333MHz, (1 DIMM) [Included in Price]

Integrated Video, Intel® GMA 4500, VGA [Included in Price]

Dell USB Entry Keyboard [Included in Price

Documentation, English, with 125V Power Cord [Included in Price]

250GB 7,200 RPM 3.5" SATA, 3.0Gb/s Hard Drive with NCQ and 8MB Cache [Included in Price]

16X DVD+/-RW SATA, Roxio Creator™ CyberlinkPowerDVD™ [Included in Price]

Dell Energy Smart Power Management Settings Enabled [Included in Price]

Dell MS111 USB Optical Mouse [Included in Price]

Dell Professional P1911 19in HAS Wide Monitor, VGA/ DVI [Included in Price]

3 Year Basic Limited Warranty and 3 Year NBD Onsite Service [Included in Price]

** Dell 5330dn Workgroup Laser Printer

Dell 5330dn Workgroup Laser Printer [Included in Price]

4 Year Basic Limited Warranty and 4 Year NBD Onsite Service [Included in Price]

  1. Describe the use and currency of technology. List projected needs.

For the past 10 years, the ESL department has taken a lead in incorporating technology in the ESL classes, including both hardware and software appropriate for teaching ESL effectively. The faculty is aware that many students are unfamiliar with basic technology requirements to be successful in the college setting. To accommodate this need, the faculty has worked closely with the CBOT department to offer learning communities for students to acquire both language and technology skills.

The VESL program, which started in 2010, has proved extremely successful for classes offered in the community. Building on this success, ESL classes on campus have been scheduled to make it easier for students in lower-level classes to take basic keyboarding and computer courses.

In Level III and Level IV, the faculty has incorporated a variety of programs, including the use of Google Docs to support academic language needs.

The curriculum for all ESL classes has been adjusted to include web-assisted learning to support TBA requirements. Along with requiring TBA workshops, the department guides students to use online resources, software available in the Learning Center, and websites related to the textbooks to fulfill their TBA requirements.

The ESL faculty has received training in using the hardware and software described above. This semester the ESL department will also receive training on the use of WebAccess to prepare students for courses in this as well as other departments.

To support the innovation and use of technology in language acquisition, the ESL department will need updated computer hardware in assigned classroom 13-11. With the increased use of technology in classes throughout the program, it is also anticipated that the department will need a designated computerized classroom to ensure effective use of technology. Many of the students in this department do not own their own computers, which makes it even more important that they receive hands on training and guidance in using the software and hardware required to be successful in their classes.

Details of the suggested computerized classroom are attached to this document.

  1. If applicable, describe the support the program receives from industry. If the support is not adequate, what is necessary to improve that support?

        

PART F: Budget Request

  1. What faculty positions will be needed in the next six years in order to maintain or build the department?

Currently the ESL department has seven full-time faculty members. Many of them have minimum qualifications to teach in other departments, including English, Spanish, and Reading. From time to time, these full-time faculty members have also received release time for coordination and other projects. For 2010 and 2011, the department does not anticipate the need for full-time faculty. However, depending on retirement or other changes to the department, college, or district, the ESL department will need to fill full-time positions at some point in the future.

In terms of the interdepartmental and community collaborations ESL has been developing, the department might also need positions fulfilling specialized language acquisition requirements.

        

  1. What staff positions will be needed in the next six years in order to maintain or build the department? (Staff, facilities, equipment and/or supplies)

        Students transitioning from the community to classes on campus require guidance which is specific to the needs of immigrant populations. To meet this need, the department will need to hire a full-time support staff to provide wraparound services supporting the needs of first-time college attendees. For those students who have a high level of academic learning from the countries of origin, this kind of service is not needed. However, for students who are new to the language and the culture needed to succeed in the college environment, it is important that the college provide bilingual support on a regular basis.

  1. What equipment will be needed in the next six years in order to maintain or build the department?

        On Campus:

In the community:

  1. What facilities will be needed in the next six years in order to maintain or build the department?

See  #3

PART G:  Additional Information

  1. Describe any other pertinent information about the program that these questions did not address?

For the last six years, the ESL department has been collaborating with universities and colleges to research placement strategies, website teaching strategies, and success strategies for ESL students. These collaborations include a report compiled by UC Santa Cruz and the Basic Skills Initiative. By participating in these studies, the ESL department has been able to understand the needs of ESL students in both academic and vocational settings. More recently, the ESL department has been requested to participate in a study organized by the coordinator of City College San Francisco to analyze the use of computerized labs for ESL classes. Historically, the ESL department has also collaborated with other universities to support students working on their Master’s program. San Jose State University and San Francisco State University are two key collaborators in requesting student teachers to work with ESL faculty at Cañada College

        

Jenny Castello and Anniqua Rana worked with the Alliance for Language Learners Integration, Empowerment and Success (ALLIES) and received a planning grant through the Silicon Valley Community Foundation. This grant provided the means to establish a steering committee whose aim was the following: Create a plan to establish a network of community colleges and adult schools in San Mateo and Santa Clara counties dedicated to implementing coordinated and leveraged strategies to increase students’ access to and success in high quality English language acquisition programs. The intention is to develop a broad ongoing network in which all the Adult ESL providers in the counties of San Mateo and Santa Clara will participate, including community colleges, adult schools and community-based organizations. This steering committee represents a unique regional collaboration of adult schools and community colleges. The members are from four community colleges (Cañada College, De Anza College, Evergreen Valley College, and Gavilan College) and two adult schools (Palo Alto Adult School and Sequoia Adult School). The broad goals of the network, as preliminarily defined in the grant are:

The first meeting of the steering committee took place on February 11 at Gavilan College.


CAÑADA COLLEGE

Evaluation of the
Comprehensive Program Review Process

To improve the Program Review process your help and suggestions are instrumental. We ask that all parties responsible for preparation of this review have input into the evaluation. After completion of the Program Review process, please take a few moments to complete and return this evaluation to the chair of the Curriculum Committee.

Program Name: English as a Second Language

Estimate the total number of hours to complete your Program Review:

Forty hours (The program has been greatly changed and, therefore, more time was required to document and assess these changes.  Also, identifying data to help assess the changes required lengthy discussions.)

Was the time frame for completion of Program Review adequate? If not, explain.

        

In general, yes.

Was the instrument clear and understandable? Was it easy to use? If not, explain and offer suggestions for improvement.

We all feel this program review instrument contains redundant sections throughout. A much simpler and more streamlined instrument could be drafted which would make it far more efficient, in terms of both filling it out and assessing it when it is submitted. What would work best would be a simple bullet point list provided by each program of the following: 1) Strengths/Accomplishments, 2) Areas for Improvement, and 3) Requests for Materials/Facilities/Other to Support the Program (including projected costs and other necessary requisition information). Such a document could be as brief or detailed as each respective program/department feels is necessary.

        

Were the questions relevant? If not, please explain and offer specific suggestions.

Yes. This process enables us to have a comprehensive overview of who we are and what we want to become all in one document. It is a valuable reference tool during the year when other program-related activities are taking place. It also helps us step back and remember what we have accomplished, and it forces us to stay on track with our program mission.

        

Did you find the Program Review process to have value? If not, please explain and offer suggestions.

 

Yes.  The process for program review has been helpful to assess the recent changes in the department.  It has clarified the effort to create pathways, contextualize and integrate language learning.  

        

Was the data you received from administration complete and presented in a clear format? Would you like additional data?

Additional data needed is the number of former ESL students who earn certificates, degrees and/or transfer.        

        

Please offer any comments that could improve and/or streamline Program Review!

        

A process building on the annual plans in such a way that the annual reflections build incrementally to culminate in the six-year plan in one document (space) would help.  This will reduce redundancy such as listing of faculty backgrounds etc. and will help clarify to newcomers how this document builds on previous discussions and plans Each area would have links to specific resource areas like the SLOs, curriculum, and data, etc..  It could be an on-line portfolio that is built over six years.





ESL Department



CAÑADA COLLEGE


Comprehensive Program Review Executive Summary
(2 page maximum)


Short Summary of Findings


Type your summary here:

The ESL Department has undergone dramatic changes in the past year. We have reconfigured our course offerings, changed content and unit values of courses, and created learning communities and related connections with other programs to enable ESL students to take non-ESL courses. Additionally, we have strengthened our presence in the community through liaisons with adult education and our continued development of the CBET program. Unhappily, we have also suffered the elimination of a majority of our adjunct positions due to budgetary demands.

The programmatic changes we have made are a reflection of our intent to improve the retention, success, and persistence rates of the students in our program. In addition, we feel these changes may provide more of our students with the ability to obtain certificates and degrees and to transfer to four-year institutions.

We also recognize the need for improvements to our program in the form of increased faculty training in technology, new or improved computer/language lab facilities, new or updated equipment (including laptops and a document camera), and support personnel for our students (specifically recruitment and retention specialists).

Overall, we hope that, despite some potential disruptive side effects of the fundamental changes to our program, our students will find themselves better served by and more satisfied with the ESL program at Cañada College and based on their needs follow the pathways to transfer and workforce.

Three Strengths of the Program


Three Suggestions for Improvement




13-210 computerized classroom for language skills


March 6, 2012

Need

Successfully developing academic and career pathways for ESL students is the center of the English as a Second Language department mission. In reviewing previous goals, building the technological goals of ESL students was central to achieving this mission. There is one computerized classroom on campus, 13-11; which is used to teach email skills, and other technology skills that support classroom work (ESL Dept. Comprehensive Program Plan 2011). However, at this time, there is a need for a second classroom in order to accommodate more of the classes so that we can more successfully meet our goals of building the students' technological skills.

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Teacher’s computer-facing students

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whiteboard

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Floor plan for 13-210 computerized classroom for language skills

 6 Student computers

6 students

Group seating

6 students

Group seating

6 students

Group seating

6 students

Group seating

 6 Student computers

  6 Student computers

door

door



CAÑADA COLLEGE

Comprehensive Program Review Checklist

        Comprehensive Program Review Self-Study Document

        All Bi-Annual State of the Department Documents since last Program         Review

        Executive Summary

        Completed Evaluation of the Comprehensive Program Review Process         Form

        Additional data as necessary

Date:

Program Name:

Review Committee Chair:

Review Committee Members:


CAÑADA COLLEGE

Program Review
Institutional Response Sheet

Program Name:                

Thank you for your time and effort in preparing this Program Review. Your Executive Summary, with recommendations, has been sent to the Planning/Budget Committee and the Board of Trustees.

#1. Division Dean

       

                                                                                      Signature  

  Comments:

#2. Curriculum Committee Chair

 

                                                                                      Signature  

  Comments:

#3. College Vice President

       

                                                                                      Signature  

  Comments:

English as a Second Language Comprehensive Program Review Packet                March 30, 2011

13-210 computerized classroom for language skills                2011