SUNY CORTLAND MOTOR DEVELOPMENT LAB

PED 201 – Professor Yang

Locomotor Skills Part B:  Lab Three

Name: Name:       Stephanie Paulsen                            Date:      10/19/2011                             Lab Group Day and #:    Wednesday, Lab #3      

Tasks

A. To observe the interaction between Cortland students and St. Mary’s students.

B. Locomotor Skills Part B Worksheet.

TASK A – OBSERVATION/REFLECTION

Observe the interaction between St. Mary’s students and Cortland students.

1. Observe the St. Mary’s student(s) as they participate in the activities.  Describe the variability of the movement patterns you observed.  Be sure to note with whom you worked, what grade they were in, and any differences in age, gender, or ability.

        During lab number 3 I observed several locomotor skills including a leap, a horizontal jump, and a slide. I observed two first grade students performing these skills, a 6-year old boy and a 7-year old girl. The students were very similar in their ability level of performing these skills. For example, in leaping both of the children were capable of taking off on one foot and landing on the opposite foot neither were able to successfully leap with their feet off of the ground for a period of time longer than running. I do not believe gender or age had any role in the level of ability these students had of performing a leap simply because their abilities were quite the same.

        The same went for observing the two students while they were performing their horizontal jumps. Their age and gender did not play a key factor in their ability to perform the skill as they both had the same abilities. Neither could successfully use proper, full flexion of both arms and knees. Also, their arms did not reach full extension above the head while jumping. On the other hand, both were fully capable of taking off and landing on both feet simultaneously  and their arms were in a downward motion during the landing phase.

        The only locomotor skill in which the boy and girl differentiated was the slide. During this observation I noticed that the 6-year old boy was more capable of turning his body completely sideways to the desired direction of travel while the 7-year old girl was more in a forward, straight position causing her to not slide as smoothly as the boy. Also, while the girl was sliding both her feet did not have a period off of the ground opposed to the boy whose feet were completely off the ground each sliding motion.

        Throughout this lab I was able to successfully observe the two students performing these skills and determined that despite the one year age difference and gender difference they both performed these three loco-motor skills fairly the same and had very similar loco-motor abilities.

2. Describe “teaching strategies” that YOU used today towards connecting with the children.  What were they?  How did YOU   use them?  What was the effect?  Were there any strategies that were more effective than others?  If so, why?

        Today I used several teaching strategies and they were all successful. After observing the first graders I got to work closely with the Pre-K children. I used several teaching techniques such as keeping the group controlled and highly engaged, and also giving the children clear goals for their physical activity.

        The first activity I did with the Pre-K students as a group was read a book to them. The book was a Dr. Seuss ABC’s book so I kept having the children recite the letters and tell me animals or objects that started with specific letters. The students were highly engaged and very concentrated on the book, making it easy to keep them controlled. The highlight of their engagement for the activity was the last page of the book when I had everyone say aloud the full abc’s.

        Another effective teaching strategy I used during lab #3 was giving them clear goals for their physical activity. When giving them directions I made the goal of the activity very clear and kept the directions short and direct, lessening a chance of confusion. My group and I also used designated spot with pictures to clearly indicate where their goals were suppose to be completed. Another way that I used to enforce this strategy was that I performed the tasks with the students to fully ensure that they were clear on the objectives of the activity. This teaching strategy was highly successful and effective.

 

3. After being at St. Mary’s for these past weeks and observing and working with the students, can you briefly describe an effective strategy (or strategies) that you used to capture the children’s attention and keep them on task for your activity.

        With this being the third week working and observing at St. Mary’s I have seen several effective and some noneffective strategies that have captured the children’s attention and keep them on task for an activity. One very effective strategy that I have used to keep the attention of the children and keep them on task for my activity was using very direct, clear goals and tasks. While keeping the students engaged with demonstrations and checking for understanding, giving them clear goals is an easy way to ensure the students will know what their task is. No matter what age group I am working with these strategy seems to always be successful, effective, and work efficiently.

MOTOR DEVELOPMENT LAB-Locomotor Skills Part B 

TGMD-2: Test for Gross Motor Development- Second Edition- Revised

Name of Students (first names only):       Matthew  /  Sarah                         Grades:       1  /    1                    Ages:       6  /   7    

Gender:  __Boy__/_  Girl___

Locomotor Skills- (Lab 3) Part 2

Skill

Materials

Directions

Performance Criteria

Child 1

Boy

Child 2

Girl

1. Leap

Use a clear space

During a game or activity, watch a student leap. Tell the student to take large steps leaping from one foot to the other foot.

1.     Take off on one foot and land on the opposite foot.

Yes

Yes

  1.     A period where both feet are off the ground (longer    

        than running).

No

No

3.     Forward reach with arm opposite the lead foot.

No

No

2. Horizontal Jump

Use a clear space

During a game or activity, watch a student jump. Tell the student to jump as far as they can.  

  1.     Preparatory movement includes flexion of both arms

        and knees with arms extended behind the body.

No

No

  1.     Arms extend forcefully forward and upward, reaching

        full extension above the head.

No

No

3.     Take off and land on both feet simultaneously.

Yes

Yes

4.     Arms are brought downward during landing.

Yes

Yes

3. Slide

Use a clear space

During a game or activity, watch a student slide. Ask the student to slide facing the same direction.  

1.     Body turned sideways to desired direction of travel.

Yes

No

  1.     A step sideways followed by a slide of the trailing foot

        to a point next to the lead foot.

Yes

Yes

3.     A short period where both feet are off the floor.

Yes

No

4.     Able to slide to the right and to the left side.

Yes

Yes