©The Rothwell Group, L. P.  2011.  All rights reserved.

PaleoGIS™ for ArcGIS™

The Rothwell Group, L. P.

PaleoGIS Plate Modeler Manual Version 4.0

Table of Contents

Table of Contents

Building a Plate Model

Before You Get Started

Overview of Steps in the Process:

Your Plate Model File

Detailed Steps

Step 1 - Import Model Spatial Data

Step 2 – Import Rotation Data

Step 3 – Import or Create Timescale Data

Step 4 – Configure the Model Settings Table

Step 5 – Update the PaleoGIS Settings Table

Step 6 – Additional Tables

Congratulations

Plate Modeler Tips & Tricks

Working with Geometries

Multipart Polygons

Check Geometry

Vertices & Performance

Working with Geometry Attributes

Unique IDs

Remove Unnecessary Attributes

Autonumber

Working with Poles of Rotation

Crossovers

Plate Model Checklist

User's Manual

Add Renderer to Plate Model

Plate Model Settings

T_Model_Settings Table

Product Support

Building a Plate Model

This guide provides advanced users with the information required to create, import, and configure plate models for use with PaleoGIS for ArcGIS™. This guide assumes the user already has the spatial component of your plate model in an ESRI-compatible format (usually as a shapefile), and that the non-spatial rotation data are in a format that can be imported into MS Access (usually as a tab, comma, or space-delimited text file). The following instructions will specify how to convert your existing plate model into the PaleoGIS “Plate Model File” format and make this file work within PaleoGIS.

Before You Get Started

There are two important files in this process of creating a plate model for PaleoGIS: the Plate Model File and the PaleoGIS Settings File. Both of these files are Personal Geodatabases and end in the .mdb file extension. This file format is a Microsoft Access Database file format, which is used by ArcGIS to create a Personal Geodatabase. PaleoGIS uses these Personal Geodatabases to store both the spatial and non-spatial plate model data and settings in single mdb files on your system. The easiest way to convert your existing plate model into the PaleoGIS format is to use Plate Model File template as a starting point so you will not need to create the personal geodatabase and all the tables that are needed from scratch.  The template is called Published Plate Model Template, and it can be downloaded from the www.paleogis.com website under the User’s Manual link.  To access the template you will first need to register on www.paleogis.com website.  Once you have successfully created you custom Plate Model File, we will discuss adding a link to the Plate Model File from the PaleoGIS Settings File. The PaleoGIS Settings File contains all the application specific settings and needs to know where the Plate Model Files are located.  Note: the PaleoGIS Settings File is installed by PaleoGIS and you will not need to create a new one.

Once you have a copy of the template Plate Model File you will want to follow the steps outlined below. Each of these steps is discussed in more detail following the overview section below.

Overview of Steps in the Process:

  1. Import your plate polygons into the template Plate Model File using ArcMap or ArcCatalog. You will use the ArcToolbox or the standard “right-click” options in ArcCatalog to do this.
  2. Import your rotation table records into the template Plate Model File using the Microsoft Access import tools or any other MS Access compatible database import tool.
  3. Import your timescale into the template Plate Model File using the Microsoft Access import tools or any other database tool you may have. The template .mdb contains the DNAG 1999 timescale as an example that you can use for your model, or you can create/import your own.
  4. Modify all necessary model settings in the template Plate Model File, so the new plate model can find the new plate polygons and rotation table that were just imported. These settings also define the names of all the required columns in the plate polygon table and rotation table.
  5. Then modify items in the PaleoGIS Settings File so PaleoGIS can find your newly imported plate model. This is very easy and can be done using the Configuration GUI in PaleoGIS.
  6. Finally, it is important that your plate model contain a couple other tables regardless of whether you plan to use then. PaleoGIS will throw an error if these tables do not exist.

Your Plate Model File

The Plate Model File can be placed anywhere on the computer or network and it can be named anything as long as the path and name are referenced correctly in the PaleoGIS Settings File. (This will be explained in detail in a later section of this document.) The Plate Model File, like the PaleoGIS Settings File, is simply a Personal geodatabase file that contains a number of extra tables. Most of these tables, including the ones prefixed with “GDB_” are tables created by ArcGIS in order to make the file operate as a Personal Geodatabase. DON NOT MODIFY THESE TABLES.  This document describes only the process for modifying the tables that are important to importing and configuring Plate Model File(s) in PaleoGIS.  It is easiest to use Microsoft Access in order to open and edit this file, although you can use ArcMap to view and modify it as well.

The Plate Model File contains four important items: 1) the spatial data the makes up the geographic expression of the model, 2) the Rotation Table, 3) a Model Settings Table, and 4) the Timescale table.

Detailed Steps

Step 1 - Import Model Spatial Data

The spatial data associated with a Published Plate Model for the PaleoGIS are stored in the Plate Model File in the form of one or more ESRI Featureclasses. To make your spatial data available to PaleoGIS in the Published Plate Model, simple import all the shape files into the personal geodatabase file that is your “Plate Model File” using the standard ArcToolbox Tools like “FeatureclassToFeatureClass” in the “Conversion Tools” Toolbox.  In the personal geodatabase, these featureclasses will appear as two tables. In the image above, the spatial data for this example Published Plate Model are stored in a single featureclass called “PlatePolygons” that is represented in the personal geodatabase as a table called “PlatePolygons” and another table called “PlatePolygons_Shape_Index”. The plate polygon featureclass can be named anything as long as it is referenced correctly in the Settings Table in this file. Do NOT modify these featureclass tables directly from Microsoft Access; only use ArcCatalog or ArcMap to create and ArcMap to modify featureclasses in a Personal geodatabase.

The absolute minimum amount of spatial data required by the PaleoGIS for a Published Plate Model is a single polygon featureclass, commonly called the “Cookie Cutter” or the “Plate Polygons”.  This featureclass is called the “Cookie Cutter” because it used internally by the PaleoGIS to assign plate numbers and appearance/disappearance ages to external data sets that do not have them using an intersection process.  The “Cookie Cutter” can also be the one and only layer displayed by the PaleoGIS by default to the user, but commonly there are additional layers provided to enhance the model, like coastline layers, city locations, and any other point, line, or polygon data you wish to provide the user.  

The minimum attribute columns for the Cookie Cutter featureclass to function correctly for PaleoGIS are columns that provide the age of plate appearance (Ma), age of plate disappearance (Ma), and the plate number. The Model Settings Table section below allows the names of these columns to be configurable, but they are usually named “APPEARANCE”, “DISAPPEARA”, and “PLATE_CODE”.  During the intersection (or “Cookie Cutter”) process, these attributes are transferred to whatever data does not already contain plate, appearance, and disappearance data.  If any additional columns are present, they will also be transferred.  The most common additional column is a “plate name” column.

Step 2 – Import Rotation Data

The Rotation Table contains records that define the motion history of the plates in the Published Plate Model. This table can be named anything as long as it is referenced properly in the Model Settings Table.  This table must contain columns which are usually named “PLATEID”, “AGE”, “LAT”, “LON”, “ANGLE”, “REF_PLATE”, and “COMMENT”. These names are configurable in the “T_Model_Settings” table, which is described in Step 4.  In addition, the table must contain an auto-numbered “ID” column.  This column MUST be called “ID” (not “OBJECTID”) or it will not work with PaleoGIS.  The task for this step in the process is to simply import your rotation data into the table in MS Access using the built-in “Get external data…” MS Access wizard.  The end result should look something like the table below.

Step 3 – Import or Create Timescale Data

The PaleoGIS assumes that every plate model has one timescale associated with it, to which all the ages are referenced.  This timescale MUST be embedded as a simple MS Access table using the table structure defined below.  A timescale table (DNAG99) exists in the template Plate Model File. You can use it or import your own timescale using this format. The table must include 3 columns: the name of the time interval, a column for the start of the time interval and and a column for the end of the time interval.  The actual names of these columns are configurable in the “T_Model_Settings” table, which is described in Step 4, but they are usually called “NAME”, “OLDER”, and “YOUNGER.  The table may also contain “ID” and/or “OBJECTID” columns but these are not required.

Step 4 – Configure the Model Settings Table

Every Published Plate Model understood by the PaleoGIS must contain a table called “T_Model_Settings”.  This name is hard-wired and is not configurable.  the T_Model_Settings table contains sets of name/value pairs which provide a number of configuration options for your plate model. The plate model will not work correctly unless these values are configured properly.

Settings that end in an underscore and then a number (i.e. APPEARS_COLUMN_1) can actually be added any number of times to the table with a sequential incremented numeric suffix. In other words there would be three valid possible values for the age of appearance column in the plate polygon attribute table if these three settings existed: APPEARS_COLUMN_1, APPEARS_COLUMN_2, and APPEARS_COLUMN_3.

In some of the settings you will notice the string $PGD$. PaleoGIS simply replaces this string with the file system path to the PaleoGIS Settings File itself. This tells the application to look inside this file instead of an external file. It is also acceptable to use any standard operating system environmental variables like %TEMP% or %USERPROFILE% or any environmental variables set by the user. The values of %TEMP% and %USERPROFILE% will be replaced by the system values of “C:\Documents and Settings\<user profile>\Local Settings\Temp” and “C:\Documents and Settings\<user profile>”, respectively.

Many of the settings contain a couple of values separated by a pipe character (“|”). This is often a connection string and table name or a file path and table name. Be especially careful not to introduce typos when modifying these settings. Also, notice that the connection string settings contain a “DataSource” value that often utilizes the environmental variables discussed above. Please see Appendix C in this document for a complete list of Published Plate Model Settings.

Step 5 – Update the PaleoGIS Settings Table

The most common way that a user will make the PaleoGIS aware of a newly prepared Published Plate Model is to use the PaleoGIS “Configuration Window”.  Plate model files can also be added to the PaleoGIS using the Register Model button in the Configuration window, as seen below.

 

Alternatively, a user can manually edit the PaleoGIS Settings File, which stores all PaleoGIS configuration settings and “points” to other resources that may be needed by the application including any number of Plate Model File(s) you have built or purchased. By default, the PaleoGIS Settings File is named “PaleoGIS_settings.mdb” and is placed in the installation directory at C:\Program Files\EIMT\PaleoGIS\PaleoGIS_settings.mdb. This file is installed by PaleoGIS and you will not need to create a new one.

It is easiest to use the Microsoft Access software in order to open and edit this table, although you can use ArcCatalog or ArcMap to view and ArcMap to modify this file as well. When opened, you will see that it contains many of the same tables as the Plate Model File, mostly created by ESRI when the personal geodatabase was created.

Ignore these tables. This guide documents the actions required to make the PaleoGIS aware of a new plate model – it requires the updating of just one table.  This table is called “T_PaleoGIS_Models”.

The PaleoGIS can work with any number of Published Plate Models, as long as they adhere to this standard.  The T_PaleoGIS_Models table contains a list of Plate Model File(s) loaded into the PaleoGIS. The “Name” column is simply a friendly name for the plate model, which appears in many places within PaleoGIS. The “Value” column is a connection string and a table name separated by the pipe (|) character. Just copy and paste an existing connection string and make sure that the table name is in fact the name of the model settings table in the Plate Model File, called “T_MODEL_SETTINGS”, and which was discussed above.

Step 6 – Additional Tables

Finally, you need to have two additional tables present in the Plate Model File. These tables are in the template plate model file and can be imported using MS Access tools if you did not build your plate model from the template. The tables are normally called PLATENAM and DATATYE, but can be named anything as long as the T_Model_Settings table references correctly using the setting values called DATATYPE_NAME_MAPPING and NUMBER_NAME_MAPPING (see section 5 for details). These tables do not need to contain any data, but they must be present.

And

Congratulations

If you have completed all of these steps correctly, you will be able to select your imported plate model from the dropdown list in PaleoGIS and press the “Load” button. If you receive an error message, then you should review the settings again to ensure that everything is configured properly.  Once everything is configured correctly, it is common practice to us the standard Windows File Property dialog box to mark the Published Plate model as ‘read-only”.  This should discourage others from messing up your hard work!

Plate Modeler Tips & Tricks

This section contains tips and tricks for the advanced plate modeler that make plate models run better in PaleoGIS. Common problems that we see with plate models in PaleoGIS are documented as well as suggestions on custom settings to include in your plate model. Please review each of these items before releasing a demo plate model to The Rothwell Group, L.P. or a full plate model to your customers.

Working with Geometries

Multipart Polygons

Try not to create multipart polygons in your plate model unless they are donut hole polygons. Plate Models must contain polygons that only contain 1 exterior ring. Multipart polygons cause problems conceptually and programmatically in plate modeling. Raster reconstructions will fail in PaleoGIS if multipart polygons are encountered. It is fine to include polygons with interior rings (often called donut holes).

You can use the ArcToolbox tool called "Multipart To Singlepart" in order to remove existing multipart polygons. You can also find and remove multipart polygons individually using the editing toolbar. Start the editor and open the "Sketch Properties" window (button on far right of editor toolbar). Then open the attribute table for the plate layer and select a record. When you select a record you will see the Sketch Properties window populate with the vertice information of the feature. You will see multiple "parts" if it is multipart or has donuts. Don't worry about the donuts they are fine. Just fix the multipart (ones with multiple exterior rings).

Check Geometry

Make sure to run the "Check Geometry" and "Repair Geometry" tools from ArcToolbox > Data Management Tools > Features or the Repair Layer tool from the PaleoGIS context menu tools before releasing a new plate model. Bad geometry of any kind can cause problems in plate modeling.

Vertices & Performance

Do not add unnecessary vertices to your plate model polygons or any additional display layers because they will only slow the reconstruction and animation process down in PaleoGIS. You can use the generalization tools in PaleoGIS to perform this task on featureclasses or individual geometries.

Working with Geometry Attributes

Unique IDs

Make sure that the plate model featureclasses contain an OBJECTID field. If it is named something else like OBJECTID_1 (which may happen during some geoprocessing tasks) then PaleoGIS may throw errors for some functionality.

Remove Unnecessary Attributes

Make sure to remove unnecessary attributes from the plate model layers that you distribute. These attributes will slow down tasks in PaleoGIS and confuse your clients.

Autonumber

Make sure that the T_Model_Settings table has a unique autonumber id called "ID", not "OBJECTID". This is a common mistake that keeps the model from working with the Plate Moving Toolbar.

Working with Poles of Rotation

Poles of rotation are handled a bit differently in PaleoGIS than in some other plate modeling software packages. We support storing all plate model information (features and poles of rotation) as records in relational database tables, instead of simple text files. This is an important improvement over the traditional sequence based text file format because it allows for improved performance, workflows, backups, collaboration, etc. All the benefits of storing any type of data in a database are now extended to plate modeling.

Crossovers

A crossover occurs when the reference plate value changes for a given plate record.

There are two ways to represent crossovers in the rotation table that are compatible with PaleoGIS:

1) Make all age values unique, such that the age on the younger side of the crossover is very slightly less than the age on the older side of the crossover. You can carry the age values out to up to 15 decimal places to minimize the age delta.  This method allows your poles of rotation to exist in any order the database rotation table, and the plateid and age columns are then used to a sort the rotations into the correct sequence.  

This method is illustrated in the figure below where there are three crossovers for plate 501 at 83.5, 124, and 132.1 Ma.  The age value of the first record in each crossover set has been changed to be just slightly smaller than the second record by a value by 0.00001. This ensures that all the records for plate 501 will be used in the correct chronological order.  Also, if you needed to add an additional crossover, at say 88 Ma, the new record with an age value of 87.99999 could be added at the end of the table, but it would still be used correctly by PaleoGIS regardless of its position in the table (i.e., its ID value would be irrelevant).

2)  In the second method for handling crossovers, the ages for records before and after the crossover are the same, as shown in the figure below for the crossover at 83 Ma.  However, to ensure that PaleoGIS knows which of the two records belongs on the older side of the crossover and which belongs on the younger side, you must be sure that the numbering in the “ID” column is in the correct sequential order relative to the chronology of each record for a given plate, such that the younger record in a crossover has a lower ID than the older record.  In this case, if a new crossover were added for plate 501, it could not be added at the end of the table.  Instead it would need to be added such that its ID number placed it in the correct chronological location relative to the other records for plate 501.

You can use the following query in your access database to find and fix any crossovers using the above methods. Just change both of the strings "T_Rotations_Table" to what ever your rotation table is called. This query will return all the records for a plateid if there is at least one crossover for that plateid.

SELECT *

FROM T_Rotations_Table AS A

WHERE (((A.PLATEID) In (SELECT A.Plateid

FROM T_Rotations_Table AS A

GROUP BY A.Plateid, A.Age

HAVING COUNT(*)>1

)))

ORDER BY A.PLATEID, A.AGE, A.ID;

Add Symbology to Plate Model Layers

You can save the symbology for your Plate Model layers using the "Plate Model Layer Saver" tool.  This is a custom tool that you install in ArcMap in order to save the equivalent of .lyr files within the plate model geodatabase.  This tool is available for download from the www.paleogis.com website, in the "User’s Manual" section. Once you have downloaded and unzipped the .DLL file, you can add this tool by clicking Customize > Customize Mode... in ArcMap.

Then press "Add from file" button (see below) and point to the DatabaseLayers.dll that you just downloaded and unzipped, and it will say a class was loaded.

Then click the Command tab and scroll down to "Developer Samples". You will now see the new tool on the right called "Save Layer to Geodatabase" so drag that over to an existing toolbar on the map.

Now you can load your model, render it however you like, and then press the new tool. The layer will be saved in the personal geodatabase (plate model) at that moment. There is no confirmation message but it has been saved. Now you can add DISPLAY_LAYERS_1 to the T_Model_Settings table in you plate model .mdb file with a value of something like $PGD$|DISPLAY_LAYERS\MyPlatePolygons. PaleoGIS will now render the featureclass called PlatePolygons using the .lyr file that was saved in the plate model when you click the "Load Model" button in the Configuration window.

Plate Model Settings

T_Model_Settings Table

Setting

Optional

Description

AGE_COLUMN

Yes

Contains name of age column in the rotation table, normally set to “age”

APPEARS_COLUMN_1

Yes

Normally set to “APPEARANCE”

BLACKLIST

Yes

This is a list comma separated plate codes that will be ignored when performing reconstructions

CITATION

Yes

The text in this setting will be displayed as a label at the bottom of each reconstruction window.  This normally contains the copyright notice for the data, if one is required. You can also add some additional values separated by pipe characters to customize the citation format. <Citiation (String)>|<Font Name (string)>|<Font Size (integer)>|<bold (Boolean)>|<Underline (Boolean)>|<Red (integer)>|<Green (integer)>|<Blue (integer)>

Example Value:

UTIG demo|Arial|12|false|false|0|50|200

COOKIE_CUTTER

Yes

This setting value contains a connection string and featureclass name separated by a pipe character. The path to a polygon layer that will be used to intersect features and assign plate codes to them. Then these features can be rotated according to the motion history of the intersected plate. This is almost always set to the path and name of the Plate Polygons featureclass in this file so the value is normally “$PGD$|PlatePolygons”

DATATYPE_NAME_MAPPING

Obsolete but table must exist in the plate model for now (see section 6)

DEFORMATION_COLUMN

Used by deformable plates algorithm and documented elsewhere

DEFORMATION_SEQUENCE_COLUMN

Used by deformable plates algorithm

DISAPPEARS_COLUMN_1

Normally set to “DISAPPEARA”

DISPLAY_LAYER_1

These settings contains a path and featureclass name separated by a pipe character. The path and name correspond to a featureclass that should be loaded when the user presses the “Load” button in the configuration window. This must be set for the Plate Polygons featureclass, but often other settings are added for addition featureclasses of interest. It is also possible to add the “DATABASE_LAYERS” prefix to the featureclass name if you have saved .lyr files in the plate model personal geodatabase for this featureclass (ex. $PGD$|DATABASE_LAYERS\PlatePolygons). If a .lyr is saved in the plate model personal geodatabase and the value is set like the example then the display layer will load using the renderer stored in the .lyr file instead of using random colors. This parameter supports vector based featureclasses only and does not support any raster formats. Below is a list of example values that can be used for this parameter.

Example Values:

$PGD$|DATABASE_LAYERS\MyFeatures

Z:\ShareDrive\MyPersonalGeoDatabase.mdb|MyFeatureclass

C:\ MyFileGeoDatabase.gdb|MyFeatureclass

C:\Documents and Settings\Arwen Vaughan\Application Data\ESRI\ArcCatalog\MySDEInstance.sde|MyFeatureclass

%TEMP%\AnotherGeoDatabase.mdb|MyFeatureclass

MAXIMUM_RECONSTRUCTION_AGE

This is the oldest age that the plate model should be reconstructed to. PaleoGIS will not reconstruct to ages greater than this value. PaleoGIS will also display a message warning the user that this is the case.

MINIMUM_RECONSTRUCTION_AGE

This is the youngest age that the plate model should be reconstructed to. PaleoGIS will not reconstruct to ages greater than this value.

MODEL_ANGLE_COLUMN

Name of angle column, normally set to “angle”.

MODEL_COMMENT_COLUMN

Normally set to “comment”.

MODEL_INACTIVE_COLUMN

No

Name of an optional column in the rotation table.  If this column is present and identified with this name/value pair, then rows in the rotation data can be selectively made active and inactive by changing the Boolean value associated with each row.  By default, a row should be active (inactive set to false), and should be set to true only when the user wants to inactivate that pole for that time.

MODEL_LATITUDE_COLUMN

Normally set to “lat”.

MODEL_LONGITUDE_COLUMN

Normally set to “lon”.

MODEL_METADATA

Path to a website or document on the intranet that contains plate model information, metadata, or company marketing information.  

Example Values:

http://www.mycompany.com/MyPlateModelInfo/

MODEL_PLATE_COLUMN

Normally set to “plateid”.

MODEL_PREFERRED_PROJECTION

This is the path to an ESRI projection file (ex. %ARCGISHOME%\Coordinate Systems\Projected Coordinate Systems\World\Plate Carree (world).prj). We use the ESRI installation directory environmental variable here to start the path.

MODEL_REFPLATE_COLUMN

Normally set to “ref_plate”.

NUMBER_NAME_MAPPING

These settings contains a connection string and table name separated by a pipe character. This table contains a mapping of the plate id numbers to actual names for these plates. You do not need to populate this table but it allows PaleoGIS to present the added information(see section 6).

PLATE_CODE

Normally set to “PLATE_CODE”.

POLE_SOURCE_1

This setting value contains a connection string and table name separated by a pipe character. It points to the Rotation table discussed in step 2. By default, this table exists in the Plate Model File, so it often uses the $PGD$ variable to reference the table ii the same file. You can have multiple pole sources as well. Simply create a copy of the Rotation table and name it something different, then add a POLE_SOURCE_2 setting that points to the new table.

POLE_COLUMN_SELECT_STRING

This allows the user to enter a valid SQL query as a string that will control what records will be selected from the rotation table.  If the rotation table contained an extra column an extra true/false column called “obsolete”, then you might want to change this SQL query to “obsolete = false” which will then use poles from the rotation table where the obsolete flag is set to false.

TIMESCALE_NAME

Normally set to “NAME”.

TIMESCALE_OLDER

Normally set to “OLDER”.

TIMESCALE_PREFERRED

Set to the name of the actual table in the .mdb file”.

TIMESCALE_SOURCE

This setting value contains a connection string and table name separated by a pipe character. The connection string and table name allow you to connect to the timescale in any database, but by default it is right here in the Plate Model File.

TIMESCALE_YOUNGER

Normally set to “YOUNGER”.

VERSION

This is a place for the creator of the plate model to express the relative version of the data.

Product Support

The Rothwell Group, L. P. provides PaleoGIS product support for all users. For any questions concerning PaleoGIS, please contact us:

www.paleogis.com/support

support@rothwellgroup.com 

The Rothwell Group, L.P.        www.paleogis.com