International Coastal Cleanup Singapore (ICCS)

and Year-Round Coastal Cleanups (YRCC)

I - The annual data-collecting international coastal cleanup (ICCS)

We are a group of volunteers who coordinate the Singapore chapter of an annual data-collecting cleanup conducted around the world called the International Coastal Cleanup. This is conducted in September, but preparations for the event begin in the first-quarter of the year.  

We work with Organisers who are allocated a site, and learn about logistics, safety, recce, data-collection methods, as well as marine life and marine trash pollution to better inform their volunteers. Organisers that we advise are able to lead their groups safely and efficiently in their first outing and thus, contribute to this national event.

The approximate calendar is:

  • Feb-Mar - Registration & Allocation of Sites
  • Jul - Workshop & Recces
  • Aug - The ICCS Lecture
  • Sep - International Coastal Cleanup

Organisers are encouraged to commit at least three years to a specific site and get more experienced working each year. We help commited Organisers by conducting small group workshops and meet with them during the ICCS Lecture.

Otherwise, advice and guidelines for Organisers are available online:

http://coastalcleanup.nus.edu.sg/organiserspage.html

To participate, join the mailing list in order to be kept informed. The link is on the front page of the web site: http://coastalcleanup.nus.edu.sg or email iccs-subscribe@yahoogroups.com

II - The Year-Round Coastal Cleanups (YRCC)

Year-round coastal cleanups can be conducted at any time by any group, who organise independently. These cleanup sessions i) do not require data collection, ii) allows greater flexibility with timing and location choices for the cleanup, and iii) still allows participants to contribute to marine life protection.

Prepare yourself - you are an Organiser

While we will point you in the right direction but just as in the ICCS programme, it is up to you, the Organiser, to prepare yourself adequately by reading relevant material on the Organisers Page, securing your own stores like gloves and trash bags and conducting a recce of your cleanup site.  

A site recce is critical

A site recce is critical not just for operational preparedness but also to prepare risk assessment. As an Organiser, you are accountable for your participants’ safety.  See these pointers for a site recce.

Pick your site carefully

The choice of site would depend on your preparedness and participant enthusiasm. Suggestions are listed below. Refer to the ICCS Map for location details.

Arrange for your trash pickup with DPC

You MUST arrange with NEA’s Department of Public Cleanliness about trash disposal location at least two weeks before your event. Their contact details are at SGDi.  If you fail to do this, your trash may be lying around for a long time!

A. Recreational beach (safe, easy, sites are very large, near recreational facilities)

Beaches visited by the public. They are actually already cleaned up daily but there is still trash at these sites. Some of it is small and some of it is exposed at bery low tides. The cleanups there are a good eye opener and the sites listed below can take up to 200 volunteers.

These are suitable for first- time organisers. There are two ways to conduct a cleanup at these beaches:

  1. Apply through NEA' Seashore Life Programme; please see: http://tinyurl.com/nea-seashorelifeprog  
  2. Or write to NParks: NPARKS_MAILBOX@NPARKS.GOV.SG or visit their Contact Us page.

Suggestions:

  1. Changi Beach [map] [recce report]
  2. East Coast Beach [map] [recce report]
  3. Tanah Merah Site 6 [map] [recce report]

Although these are well visited sites, a recce is still important in case there are works in the area or if the beach is closed for works.

 

B. Non-receational beach (requires recce, meaningful, sites are large)

These sites are State Land sites which are not used by the public and are usually out of sight and without public facilities. Infrequently cleared, the marine life there will benefit from a coastal cleanup. The sites can take between 40-120 volunteers but will require a lot more preparation. Note that:

  1. We will need to arrange for permission for access from Singapore Land Authority.
  2. You will need to conduct a recce prior to the cleanup to be aware of safety procedures and plan your event.
  3. You will need to provide your own gloves and trash bags.
  4. We will answer your detailed queries (if any) after you have conducted a recce. You can arrange to meet at NUS for a consultation.

Site suggestions (check tide level for your preferred date):

  1. Pasir Ris Site 6 (tide level must be below 1.0m) [map link] [recce report]
  2. Lim Chu Kang beach (road end) [map link]
  3. Selimang Beach (road end) [map link]
  4. Tanah Merah 7 [map link] - permission required for recce too. We will apply to SLA for permission who will inform police.

Check tidal levels as you have to conduct the cleanup during a low tide. See Mobile Geographics: Sembawang Tides:

  1. Select the date of your cleanup.
  2. Examine the tide level - a low tide should be below 1.0m.
  3. Dates near the full moon or new moon tend to be suitable.
  4. Ensure the tide does not rise above 2.0 metres in two hours.

C. Pulau Ubin beaches (transport costly, meaningful, interesting location)

Pulau Ubin is a unique place to hold a cleanup and needs the help. It will require more preparation and will cost more for transport. The island is worth a post-cleanup tour and has a rustic atmosphere.

  1. Cost per head = $9 for two-way bum-boat from Changi Point Ferry Terminal ($5) and van transport on Ubin to the site and back ($4).
  2. You will need to conduct a recce and provide your own gloves and trash bags.
  3. You can write to NParks to request for a specific site.
  4. We will answer your detailed queries (if any) after the recce.

Site suggestions:

  1. Ketam beach
  2. Sungei Ubin
  3. Chek Jawa

Check tidal levels as you have to conduct the cleanup during a low tide. See Mobile Geographics: Sembawang Tides:

  1. Select the date of your cleanup.
  2. Examine the tide level - a low tide should be below 1.0m.
  3. Dates near the full moon or new moon tend to be suitable.
  4. Ensure the tide does not rise above 2.0 metres in two hours.

D. Mangrove  (tough, eco warriors, lot of preparation, long-term commitment)

Suitable for experienced or determined Organisers and the type of sites will depend on the skill, motivation, commitment and size of the group.  Small groups are most suitable for work on these sites as the habitat needs to be treated sensitively. Appropriate footwear required.

We will advise groups interested in pursuing mangrove cleanups for the long-term. Consultation will be available at NUS.

Site suggestions:

  1. Lim Chu Kang mangrove (medium-level difficulty)
  2. Lim Chu Kang East mangrove (medium)
  3. Sungei Pandan mangrove (medium)
  4. Chek Jawa South (medium)

Check tidal levels as you have to conduct the cleanup during a low tide. See Mobile Geographics: Sembawang Tides:

  1. Select the date of your cleanup.
  2. Examine the tide level - a low tide should be below 1.0m.
  3. Dates near the full moon or new moon tend to be suitable.
  4. Ensure the tide does not rise above 2.0 metres in two hours.