SUNY CORTLAND MOTOR DEVELOPMENT LAB

Fall 2010

 Lab Three – Dr Walkuski

 9/28/10

 Tuesday

Tim Crosby

Name:             __________________________________     __  Lab Day __________________                 Date:       _________

Tasks

A. To reflect on the characteristics of Dryden students.

B. Object control (manipulative) Tasks.

C. Group game/activity.

Instructions:

For the first overhand throwing task, be consistent in terms of the distance that the students throw to you.  For the assessment, one or two of your group members can work with the children while the other(s) can record the data.  Be sure to collect all required data (i.e., first names, age, grade level, etc,).  Allow the children to “practice” throwing a few times, then begin the assessment.

After you have recorded the data, you can begin to alter the task by using a variety of the “awareness” concepts found in chapter 23 of the text. You can also provide some basic instruction on throwing form.

In the second assessment, you will be using a version of the TGMD-2 (Test for Gross Motor Development- Second Edition- Revised).  This particular assessment is a checklist that asks you to check off whether the student has met four performance criteria for the overhand throw and for catching.

Look to your text to find games or activities for the two manipulative skills utilized for the lab.  You may also find activities off of the internet (please check my links page on our WebCT classroom).  Plan for additional activities such as tag games, etc, keeping in mind the more variety you have, the better.

We will finish lab with a group game/activity.

TASK A – OBSERVATION/REFLECTION -  Observe the skills of the Dryden students.

1.As you observe the Dryden students during the lab, think about the types of fundamental movement skills and sports related skills that they are able to do.  Do you observe any differences between and even within children?  Based on what we have discussed in class, why might you observe differences between and within children?

Yes, there are differences between children. I have noticed differences in movement between children due to a few different things.  Some of the children had mature bodies but didn’t have the experience when it came to throwing.  Some of the children just had much more experience than the other children.

2.What types of strategies do you feel you need to do to better interact and communicate with the children?

Some strategies that I could use to better interact and communicate with the children would be to try to make whatever I am doing fun.  I need to keep more than one game in mind when playing games because the children get bored so easily.


Lab Two - PED 201

Josh

Overhand Throw Checklist

9/28/10

Child’s Name:_____________________________________________        Date: _________________

Your task for this station is to qualitatively assess the student’s ability to perform the overhand throw using the following criteria based on Gallahue (1998).  Have the throw performed in the same way for both tasks (i.e., distance to you) – only vary the object thrown.

A. Initial stage.                                                                

l. Action  mainly from elbow.        

2. Elbow remains in front of body; a push.

3. Follow-through - forward and downward.

4. Feet remain stationary.

B. Elementary stage.

1. Arm is swung forward, high over shoulder.

2. Shoulders rotate toward throwing side.

3. Trunk flexes forward with forward motion of arm.

4. Definite forward shift of body weight.

5. Steps forward with leg on same side as throwing arm.

C. Mature stage.

1. Arm is swung backward in preparation.

2. Opposite elbow is raised for balance as a

preparatory action in the throwing arm.

3. Definite rotation through hips, legs, spine, and shoulders during throw.

4. As weight is shifted, there is a step with opposite foot.

Task one – have the students throw a tennis ball to you, record three observations of their throw.  You should only have only one “X” in each column.

   Observation number

      1

      2

      3

4

 

Initial Stage

Elementary Stage

X

X

Mature Stage

X

X

Task two – have the students throw a foam ball to you, record three observations of their throw.  You should only have only one “X” in each column.

   Observation number

      1

      2

      3

4

Initial Stage

Elementary Stage

Mature Stage

X

X

X

X

Reflection questions

1.Was there a difference in the level of the throw between the tennis ball and foam ball conditions?  Why or why not?

No, there was no difference in the level of throws between tennis ball and foam ball.  Josh was already used to throwing with each of the balls.

2.What do these two “types” of throwing activities demonstrate (think of the triangle we discussed in class).

These two “types” of throwing activities demonstrate a difference in task.  Changing the type of ball is what is changing, the environment and individual are kept the same.


MOTOR DEVELOPMENT LAB- Overhand throw and catching assessment

TGMD-2: Test for Gross Motor Development- Second Edition- Revised

11

6

Jessica

Name of Student:____________________________________                Grade:__________                Age: ___________

X        

Check if male _______ or female_______

(note: indicate all of the criteria you observe for each trial by placing an “X” in the appropriate box.)

Object Control Skills- Part A

Skill

Materials

Directions

Performance Criteria

Trial 1

Trial 2

1. Overhand Throw

Use a clear space, you can use a variety of yarnballs, tennis balls, etc.

During a game or activity, watch a student throw. Tell the student to throw the ball as best as they can.

  1. A downward arc of the throwing arm initiates the windup.

X

X

  1. Rotation of hip and shoulder to a point where non-dominant side faces an imaginary target.

X

X

  1. Weight is transferred by stepping with the foot opposite the throwing hand.

X

X

  1. Follow-through beyond ball release diagonally across body toward side opposite throwing arm.

X

2. Catch

Use a clear space, you can use a sponge ball or something soft depending on the individual.

During a game or activity, watch a student catch a ball.

Try tossing the ball underhand directly to the student with a slight arc and tell him/her to catch it with their hands. Only count those tosses that are between the student’s shoulders and waist.

  1. Preparation phase where elbows are flexed and hands are in front of the body.

X

X

  1. Arms extend in preparation for ball contact.

  1. Ball is caught and controlled by hands only.

  1. Elbows bend to absorb force.