SUNY CORTLAND MOTOR DEVELOPMENT LAB

PED 201 – Professor Yang

Locomotor Lab Part A:  Lab Two

Name: Ryan Snyder                                 Date: September 27th, 2011                   Lab Group Day and #: Monday Lab 2 - Athletic Alliance

Tasks

A. To observe the interaction between Cortland students and St. Mary’s students while playing the pre-planned games with an Olympic Theme:

B. Locomotor Tasks Part A Worksheet.

TASK A – OBSERVATION/REFLECTION

Observe the interaction between St. Mary’s students and Cortland students.

1. Observe the St. Mary’s student(s) as they participate in the activities.  Describe the variability of the movement patterns you observed in your students.  Be sure to note with whom you worked , what grade they were in, and any differences in age, gender, or ability.  

        The two students we were asked to observe in Lab 2 were "Kyle" and "Ashley". The boy is in kindergarten and the girl is currently in the first grade. To better understand locomotor skills in young children the Cortland students observed two St. Mary's students, while he/she had to run, gallop, and hop during the opening activities. For the most part, all of the performance criteria for the skills were completed by both genders. There was not much difference in age as the boy is five years of age and the girl is six years old. With the ages being close in years, the ability for both to perform the three locomotor skills should represent similar findings. From the observations the findings were similar as the only difference was the boy could perform all of the aspects of the locomotor skills, while the girl could perform everything except for one technique of the hop. If there was a bigger difference in age the Cortland students may have saw the older student have more proper and refined technique in the three locomotor skills. "Kyle's" movements did look smoother as he did not stumble as much as the girl. "Ashley" was frequently unstable and looked as if she almost was going to fall a few times. Both had the ability to demonstrate correct form for most of the skills, but had trouble with the coordination involved with each skill. When "Ashley" attempted to hop on her less dominate foot she would try and then return to the opposite leg or begin to run.

2. Describe the effective “teaching strategies” that you observed.  What were they and on whom did you use them?  How were they used?  What was the effect?  Were there any strategies that were more effective than others?  If so, why?

        The different "teaching strategies" I did observe was checking for understanding (CFU), teaching by invitation, and modifications of games. Checking for understanding was used throughout all of the activities the students were involved in. Most of the CFU occurred before the activity began because it is important the teacher knows what is expected of the students. The students need to be aware of how to properly play the game and checking for understanding reassures the game's criteria. Every time the teacher asked a question to the students they were very responsive on providing input on the correct way the game should be played. I observed teaching by invitation in my group with the oldest students during the game "The Sea is Storming". It is similar to sharks and minnows, but when played with crabs the students who were trying to tag his/her classmates were asked to crabwalk. For many of the St. Mary's students it was challenging for him/her to effectively perform a crabwalk, so the teacher at the time decided the students in the middle could run resembling seaweed. This proved to be a more promising approach as the children in the middle enjoyed the game more and were not complaining. A modification was used in one of the group games as it was intended to increase the difficulty of the task. During the hula hoop activity the students were split into two even groups where they would later link arms. The hula hoop had to go from one end of the line to the other without the link of hands separating. After the game ended, the students were asked to create a circle within their group in hopes to make the activity more challenging. The most effective strategy was definitely checking for understanding because it tells the teacher his/her students understand how to properly participate in the activity. Without checking for understanding students would be running around with no knowledge of what tasks to perform causing the activity to become disorganized and chaotic.


MOTOR DEVELOPMENT LAB- Locomotor Skills Part A

TGMD-2: Test for Gross Motor Development- Second Edition- Revised

Name of Students (first names only): "Kyle"/ "Ashley"                Grades: Kindergarten / 1st Grade                        Ages: 5 / 6

Gender:  Boy / Girl

Locomotor Skills- (Lab 2) Part A

Skill

Materials

Directions

Performance Criteria

Child 1

Child 2

1. Run

Use a clear space

During a game or activity, watch a student run. They may not run as fast as they can or for a long period of time due to space but do your best.

  1. Brief period where both feet are off the ground.

Yes

Yes

  1. Arms in opposition to legs, elbow bent.

Yes

Yes

  1. Foot placement near or on a line (not flat footed).

Yes

Yes

  1. Nonsupport leg bent approximately 90 degrees (close to buttocks).

Yes

Yes

2. Gallop

Use a clear space

During a game or activity, watch a student gallop. Tell the student to gallop leading with one foot and then the other.

  1. A step forward with the lead foot followed by a step with the trailing foot to a position adjacent to or behind the lead foot.

Yes

Yes

  1. Brief period where both feet are off the ground.

Yes

Yes

  1. Arms bent and lifted to waist level.

Yes

Yes

  1. Able to lead with the right and left foot.

Yes

Yes

3. Hop

Use a clear space

During a game or activity, watch a student hop. Ask the student to hop first on one foot and then on the other foot.

  1. Foot for nonsupport leg is bent and carried in back of the body.

Yes

Yes

  1. Nonsupport leg swings in pendulum fashion to produce force.

Yes

Yes

  1. Arms bent at elbows and swing forward on take off.

Yes

Yes

 4.   Able to hop on the right and left foot.

Yes

No