LEADERSHIP, ORGANIZING, & ACTION: LEADING CHANGE

FEBRUARY 4TH 2019 – MAY 20TH 2019

FACULTY INSTRUCTOR

Marshall Ganz marshall_ganz@harvard.edu

FACULTY ASSISTANT Heather Adelman heather_adelman@hks.harvard.edu

TECHNOLOGY SUPPORT James Brockman James_Brockman@hks.harvard.edu

Melissa Pagonis Melissa_Pagonis@hks.harvard.edu

HEAD TEACHING FELLOW Sachiko Osawa sachiko@sosawa.com

TEACHING FELLOWS

Celine Lebrun c-linelebrun@hotmail.fr

Jennie Pirkl jennie@mainepeoplesalliance.org

Kris Cox cox.kris.y@gmail.com

Lucy Collier lucy.collier@qld.alp.org.au

Marina Pavlic marina.pavlic@srbijaupokretu.org

Mustafa Monir mustafakatry1@gmail.com

Rupinder Bhalla Rupinderbhalla@gmail.com

“In democratic countries, knowledge of how to combine is the mother of all other forms of knowledge; on its progress depends that of all the others.” — Alexis de Tocqueville

A. OBJECTIVES

Fulfilling the democratic promise of equity, accountability, and effectiveness requires the participation of an “organized” citizenry able to formulate, articulate, and assert its shared interests. Organizing, in turn, requires leadership: accepting responsibility for enabling others to achieve shared purpose in the face of uncertainty. Organizers begin by asking three questions: who are my people, what challenges do they face, and how can they turn their resources into the power they need to meet these challenges? Organizers identify, recruit, 1

and develop leadership; build community around that leadership; and build power from the resources of that community.

In this course, each student learns to practice leadership by organizing a leadership team to work with him or her to mobilize members of a “constituency” in order to work together to achieve real outcomes in pursuit of a shared purpose by the end of the semester. Students learn five core leadership practices: building public relationships; turning values into a capacity for agency through public narrative; turning resources into power by strategizing; turning intentions into effective action; and structuring organization in order to develop leadership, engage constituents, and achieve goals. Students learn to coach others and receive coaching. Students also learn to distinguish “mobilizing” from “organizing” and why it takes organizing to make mobilizing count.

B. PARTICIPANTS

This course is for students interested in learning to create social change through collective action. There are no pre-requisites. Students with and without “real world” experience find the class equally useful. Students with a strong commitment to their community, organization, or values will be most successful. Because this is a course in practice, it will require you to try new things, to risk failure, and to step outside your comfort zone. As reflective practitioners, students will learn through critical reflection on their experience, through feedback, and through coaching. If you are not prepared for this kind of challenge, then this class is not for you.

C. PROJECTS

Participants base their class work on their experience in leading an "organizing campaign" of their own choosing or design. An “organizing campaign” requires building a leadership team who mobilize members of a constituency to achieve a clear outcome in pursuit of a shared purpose by the end of the course. You may choose a project you are currently working on, or initiate a new one.

D. PEDAGOGY

People learn organizing from the experience of conceptualizing it, seeing it, doing it, debriefing their experience, and then trying again.

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This requires leading an organizing project, reading background material, participating in lecture, writing reflection papers, completing skill practice assignments, taking part in section meetings, receiving coaching from your Teaching Fellow, and coaching each other. Students are expected to invest an average of 10 hours per week doing all of the above, although the amount of time required varies from week to week.

The course is organized into nine modules. Each module focuses on specific “Learning Objectives.” Each module also specifies an “Action Objective”—a particular skill to be practiced with members of the constituency. Each module builds on the previous learning and action objectives.

E. COURSE FLOW

2-WEEK MODULES

Week 1

DAY STUDENT TASKS ESTIMATED TIME Monday Complete readings 3h

Tuesday Participate in lecture 1.5h

Thursday Participate in Section 1.5h

TOTAL 6h

Week 2

DAY STUDENT TASKS ESTIMATED TIME Tuesday Prepare & Submit SPA 2.5h

Thursday (After section) Submit Reflection Paper 3h

TOTAL 5.5h

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1-WEEK MODULES

DAY STUDENT TASKS ESTIMATED TIME Monday Complete readings 3h

Tuesday Participate in lecture 1.5h

Thursday Participate in Section 1.5h

Thursday (After section) Submit Reflection Paper 3h

TOTAL 9h

F. GETTING STARTED

STEP 1: SET UP YOUR COMPUTER Tuesday, Feb 5

9:00-11:00am ET OR Wednesday, Feb 6 2:00-4:00pm ET

Students are required to visit the LOA Technology Testing Room and confirm that they are able to use Zoom technology to transmit and receive the audio and video required for participation in class and section. Follow the instructions on the “Getting Started” tab of the course website. Students should always participate from the same stable internet connection. Please make sure you have a working microphone, headphones, and webcam connected to your computer in a quiet space.

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STEP 2: MEET WITH YOUR TF Scheduled by TF Students are required to meet their Teaching Fellow and receive coaching on their project. The Teaching Fellow will request a 20-minute Zoom one-on-one at a scheduled time prior to the first section meeting. Students will also meet with their TF one-on-one at mid-term. STEP 3: MEET YOUR SECTION Thursday, Feb 7 Students are required to attend an introductory meeting with their designated section. At the section meeting, students will be introduced to their section members, set team norms, learn the technology, and receive clarification regarding the pedagogy. Students will be informed of the exact timing a week prior to launch on the course website and via e-mail. STEP 4: ACQUIRE READINGS The required readings, videos, and other materials can be found on the course website. Students will be required to read the material for Module 1 prior to the first lecture.

G. SCHEDULE AND REQUIREMENTS

1. Organizing Campaign: Students base class work on what they learn from their experience leading an "organizing campaign" of their own choosing or design. Practicing leadership means organizing a leadership team to organize members of your “constituency” to work together in order to achieve specific outcomes in the pursuit of a shared purpose by the end of the course.

2. Readings: Readings provide valuable background for class discussions. An introductory paragraph places each week’s readings in context. Priority readings are designated with . “Organizing Notes” explain our framework, contextualize the readings, and explain the charts. Should students wish to pursue a topic more deeply, optional readings are provided. Training materials are also available for students to use with their team.

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3. Live Lecture Discussions: Students use a conceptual framework to integrate lectures and readings with critical reflection on their experience of their project. The sessions alternate between discussion of concepts and analysis of projects. Live lectures (1.5 hours long) led by Professor Marshall Ganz will be held on Tuesdays from 10:00am-11:30am ET. Students are required to attend all classes, do all the readings, and take an active part in the discussion. Students must “show up” for class at 9:45am ET to trouble-shoot any technological problems before lecture begins.

Live Lecture Dates:

Feb Feb Mar Mar Apr Apr Apr May May 12th 19th 5th 19th 2nd 16th 23rd 7th 14th

4. Special Sessions (optional): Throughout the course, students will have the opportunity to attend special sessions with guest speakers who will present community organizing case studies on issues ranging from health care, to immigration reform, to workers’ rights.

Join us for a special session on organizing and strategizing within the health care sector with guest speaker Kate Hilton, Director of “Re-Think Health.”

Mar 27th 9:30-11am ET Organizing for Health with Kate Hilton

Additional special sessions may be added. Dates, times and other details will be announced to students via e-mail during the course.

5. Section Meetings: Section meetings provide students with the opportunity to consolidate their learning in each module by discussing their projects and practicing skills. Section meetings will be a 1.5-hour meeting and will be held on Thursdays in each module following the lecture. Please ensure you have a stable Internet connection in a quiet space. Students can find their assigned section and meeting time on the course website.

Section Meeting Dates:

Feb Feb Feb Mar Mar Apr Apr April May 7th 14th 21st 7th 21st 4th 18th 25th 9th

6. Reflection Papers: Students are required to submit weekly reflection papers of no more than 2 pages (double-spaced, in 12 pt. font with 1” margins) in which they 6

analyze their own experience of their organizing project. Questions will be posted weekly on the course website to stimulate reflection.

Papers are due at 11:59pm ET each Thursday following lecture and section meeting. Late papers and papers that are more than 2 pages (double-spaced) will be downgraded. Submit your reflection paper by uploading it to the Canvas website (you will be instructed on how to do this). The papers will be returned with feedback from the teaching fellow by 11pm ET on the following Sunday. Assignments submitted more than two weeks late will not be accepted and you will no longer be eligible to receive a certificate for completion of the course.

Students will also be required to submit one final 4-page paper that is due on Monday, May 20th at 6:00pm ET.

Reflection papers will be graded based on the following scale and criteria:

Check Plus – Student demonstrates strong understanding of the week’s material by diving deep in the concepts. Paper provides specific examples and moments from the project, with personal reflections on why the student is doing what they are doing, and/or what they can do better. Shares ah-ha moments, key learning and next steps.

Check – Student demonstrates good understanding of the week’s material by touching on key points, but doesn’t dive deep or ask him/herself difficult questions. Does provide concrete examples and a general reflection.

Check Minus - Student does not demonstrate an understanding of the week’s material, instead providing either updates with no reflection, or reflections on the theory only with no specifics on the project. Evident that little effort and time was put into the paper.

Reflection Paper Due Dates:

Feb Feb Mar Mar Apr Apr May May May 14th 28th 14th 28th 11th 18th 2nd 9th 20th

7. Skill Practice Assignments: Skill practice assignments are due during 2-week modules, and they offer students the opportunity to practice key organizing skills with assigned “learning partners” from their section. Students will set a regular meeting time with their “learning partners” to complete the Skill Practice Assignment together online. Students will schedule their meeting times according to the instructions given by their Teaching Fellow, who will provide them with a Zoom link for their meeting. The meetings must be recorded so that your Teaching Fellow can provide you with feedback (you will receive instructions on how to do this). Assignments will be posted on the website.

Assignments are due at 6:00pm ET on the second Tuesdays of 2-week modules (i.e. the week without a lecture and section meeting). One member of your team will 7

upload the Skill Practice Assignment worksheet to the course website. Teaching Fellows will provide feedback by 9:00pm ET Thursday of that same week. Assignments submitted more than 2 weeks late will not be accepted and you will no longer be eligible for a certificate.

Though students complete the skill practice assignments as a team, each student will be graded separately, based on the following scale and criteria:

Check Plus – Student demonstrates a strong understanding of the framework by practicing the skill well and provides meaningful coaching to their learning buddy. They work well together as a team, coming in prepared, holding each other accountable, and following the agenda accordingly.

Check – Student demonstrates some understanding of the framework by practicing the skills relatively well, though some aspects may be missing. Student provides light coaching or general feedback. They work well as a team.

Check-Minus – Student lacks understanding of the framework and/or is not invested in their learning. Student is not practicing the skills required for the module. Student gives their learning buddy their opinion, with little to no coaching. They do not work together as a team

Practice Assignment Due Dates:

Feb Mar Mar Apr Apr 26th 12th 26th 9th 30th

8. Office Hours (optional). Office hours provide students the opportunity to discuss their learning and projects, as well as to receive coaching from Professor Ganz. Students will not have to book a time for Professor Ganz’s office hours; office hours are on a first-come, first-served basis. Teaching Fellows will also be available for one-to-ones with students throughout the course.

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H. CERTIFICATE REQUIREMENTS

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We expect an appropriately high level of commitment from participants. To earn a course certificate, students must complete all of the following on time:

● Attend and participate in all of the 9 course lectures and 9 section meetings on time! Participants who arrive later than 15 minutes or leave earlier than 15 minutes will be marked as absent for the lecture or section meeting.

● Submit all of the 9 reflection papers and 5 practice assignments on time.

● Assignments submitted more than two weeks late will make you ineligible for a certificate.

● Hold an introductory and mid-term 1:1 with your Teaching Fellow

● Submit course pre-, mid- and final evaluations

Make-Up Policy. In case of a work or family emergency that cannot be rescheduled without putting jobs/health in jeopardy, students may miss up to two scheduled sessions (lecture or sections). There are three requirements to make up the missed session:

● Explain your absence to your TF in advance

● Watch the recorded session video (available on the course website)

● Within 2 weeks after a missed session, submit a half-page written evaluation of the video (takeaways, pluses, and deltas) to your TF

Papers will also be due by the set deadline. In case of an emergency, students who cannot submit the assignments by the deadline must inform their Teaching Fellow in advance. Students have a maximum of two weeks to submit the late assignment or they will no longer be eligible for a certificate.

I. COURSE OUTLINE

The following is the breakdown for each module. Please note, some modules are one week in duration (Module 1, Module 6, Module 8, Module 9) and are indicated with one asterisk * while other modules are two weeks in duration (Module 2, Module 3, Module 4, Module 5, Module 7) and are indicated with two asterisks **.

Letters to the right of each reading assignment indicate whether the focus is theoretical (T), practical (P), or historical (H). As described above, readings designated with ► are particularly important to focus on for class discussion.

PRE-COURSEWORK | SECTION LAUNCH

Welcome! This week we will get acquainted with our section, review course requirements, and discuss how we will work together. We will also discuss what to expect from one another for the remainder of the course.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES

● Learn how to set team norms

● Learn how to build relationships with section members

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● Understand the course flow and course requirements

REQUIRED ACTION FOR THE MODULE

Confirm your commitment to meet the requirements of the course

Complete the initial draft of your organizing project

SECTION DISCUSSION

Thursday February 7th (See course website for meeting times)

MODULE 1* | COURSE OVERVIEW: LEADERSHIP, ORGANIZING, & ACTION

[ONE WEEK MODULE] Welcome. Today we get acquainted and discuss our course goals, our strategy for achieving them, and our course requirements. “What is Organizing” introduces our learning framework, explained more fully in "Leading Change: Leadership, Organization, and Social Movements.” The practice of organizing itself is rooted in ancient traditions – in the West, for example, in faith, civic, and popular traditions. Organizers empower constituents to act collectively on their own behalf. It is not about providing services to clients or marketing products to customers. As argued by McKnight, Giridharadas, and McAlevey, organizers create tension, they do not avoid it. This is because conflict, challenge, and change are required to make democracy work. Because it is a practice, learning organizing requires doing it, a point Kierkegaard makes. To learn new ways, we have to let go of old ways – a point on which Thich Nhat Hanh offers a wise parable and Langer offers wise advice. Dweck reminds us that failure in the service of learning is evidence of effort, not lack of talent, urging us to adapt what she calls a “growth mindset” as opposed to a “fixed mindset.” Sitkin argues that short-term failure is often required for success, while fear of failure can ensure it. The “Organizing in Action” readings are snapshots of some recent examples of different ways in which organizing influences public life.

DAY ONLINE INDIVIDUAL WORK ASSIGNMENTS Tuesday Live lecture

10:00-11:30am ET

Complete readings Work on reflection paper Wednesday Work on reflection

paper Thursday *Section will be scheduled for

Thursday; set time depends on your section (see course website)

Thursday (After section)

Submit reflection paper by 11:59pm ET

Receive feedback from TFs on reflection papers by Sunday 11:00 pm ET

LEARNING OBJECTIVES

● Welcome, review norms, set goals

● Learn how leadership, organizing and change work

● Define organizing project: differentiate from advocacy, service, or awareness

● Learn how to coach

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REQUIRED ACTION FOR THE MODULE

● Reflect on your leadership experiences. What type of leader are you? What has worked? What have you found challenging? Set your personal leadership goals. Reflect further on whether your project is an organizing, service or mobilizing project.

READING

REQUIRED READING

● ►Marshall Ganz. Organizing Notes: “What is organizing?” 2018. (T)

● ►The Bible, Exodus, Chapter 18 (H)

● ►John McKnight, "Services are Bad for People," (pp.41-44). (T)

● ►Jane McAlevey, “Table 1.1, Advocacy, Mobilizing, and Organizing”, No Short Cuts: Organizing for Power in the New Gilded Age, (2016), (pp.9-12) (T)

● Zeynep Tufekci, “Twitter and Tear Gas: The power and fragility of networked protest,” (forthcoming 2017), “Preface” (ix-xx).

● ►Marshall Ganz, Organizing Notes: “Learning to Organize: Notes, Questions, and Helpful Hint #1” 2014. (T)

● ►M.S. Kierkegaard, “When the Knower Has to Apply Knowledge” from “Thoughts on Crucial Situations in Human Life”, in Parables of Kierkegaard, T.C. Oden, Editor. (P)

● ►Thich Nhat Hanh, Thundering Silence: Sutra on Knowing the Better Way to Catch a Snake, "The Raft is Not the Shore," (pp.30-33). 2001 (T)

● ► Ellen Langer, “Mindful Learning”, Current Directions in Psychological Science, Vol. 9, Number 6, (December 2000), (pp.220-223). (T)

● ►Carol Dweck, Chapter 1, “The Mindsets” from Mindset: The New Psychology of Success (2006), (pp.1-10) (P)

● ►Coaching as Leadership Practice, adapted from the work of Ruth Wageman, Marshall Ganz (2014). (P)

● ►Organizer’s Journey Handout, Jonah Evans, 2012. (P)

Marshall Ganz, Tamara Kay, and Jason Spicer, “Social Enterprise is not Social Change” (2018). (T)

ORGANIZING TOOLS:

● “Coaching” Organizing Participation Guide, (pp. 18-25) (pp. 106-107), 2016.

OPTIONAL - ORGANIZING IN ACTION: The following are not required readings, but provide recent examples of organizing at work in diverse settings.

● Amy Dean, How Domestic Workers Won Their Rights: Five Big Lessons, Yes Magazine!, October 9, 2013.

● Charlotte Rotman, The Apprentices: Parisian members of the group En Marche (“On the March”) tell how and why they followed Macron,”Les Jours, January 24, 2017.

● Shane Greene, Magic Number 770 Could be an Environmental Game Changer in Victorian Election, The Age, October 26, 2014.

● Peter Dreir, Black Lives Matter joins a long line of protest movements..., Salon, Aug.15, 2015.

● Hahrie Han, Want Gun Control? Learn From the N.R.A., The New York Times, Oct. 4, 2017.

● Doran Schrantz, Building power, Building Health, 2016.

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OPTIONAL - FOR FURTHER READING:

● Aristotle, Politica, Book 1, Chapter 1-2 (pp.1127-1130). (T)

● Robert Middlekauff, The Glorious Cause, Chapter 11, “Resolution,” (pp.221-239). (H)

● Louis Fischer, The Life of Mahatma Gandhi, Chapter 31, “Drama at the Seashore,” (pp.263 -275). (H)

● Saul Alinsky, Reveille for Radicals, Chapter 1, (October 1989), (pp.3-23). (P)

● Erica Chenoweth and Maria J. Stephan, Why Civil Resistance Works: The Strategic Logic of Nonviolent Conflict, Chapters 1-3 (pp.1-82) (T/H)

● David Walls, Community Organizing (Polity 2015), “Chapter 2: Saul Alinsky and the Industrial Areas Foundation” (pp.20 – 54); “Chapter 5: New Networks Innovate” (pp.92-113) (P)

● Howard Spodek, “The Self-Employed Women’s Association (SEWA) in India: Feminist, Ghandhian Power in Development”, Economic Development and Cultural Change 43 (1), Oct 1994, (pp.193-202). (T)

● Sim Sitkin, “Learning through Failure: The Strategy of Small Losses,” Research in Organizational Behavior, Vol.14, 1992, (pp.231-256). (T)

Ellen Langer, Mindfulness, Chapter 3, "The Roots of Mindlessness," (pp.19-35); Chapter 4, "The Costs of Mindlessness," (pp.43-55); Chapter 5, "The Nature of Mindfulness," (pp.61-77); Chapter 7, "Creative Uncertainty," (pp.115-129). (P)

ASSIGNMENTS

● Reflection Paper #1 - due by 11:59pm ET on Thursday, February 14th

SECTION DISCUSSION

● Thursday, February 14th (See course website for time)

MODULE 2** | PEOPLE, POWER, & CHANGE: MY PROJECT

[TWO WEEK MODULE] Organizers start by asking three questions: who are my people, what is their problem, and how can they begin to use their resources to solve the problem? Who are your people? Who is your constituency whose values are at risk? What urgent challenge do they face? How could they turn resources they have into the power they need to solve the problem? How could you design a campaign to achieve an outcome that would help solve this problem within the next 12 weeks? This week, you will think through a “first draft” of your organizing campaign.

What does organizing look like? How is it different from mobilizing? How is it different from marketing? We introduce elements of an organizing campaign in the context of the Montgomery Bus Boycott, a campaign that launched the American Civil Rights Movement of the 1960s. We ask three questions: who are the actors, what was their problem, and what is their theory of change? Alinsky and Miller help us consider reactions we may have to the words that we need to use to explain organizing, especially “power.” Loomer argues that understanding power requires looking at it relationally, sometimes in collaboration with others (power with) and sometimes in conflict with others (power over). Gaventa shows how to make invisible power visible. Gersick draws attention to timing: why we organize through 12

campaigns, elaborated upon by Hirschorn and May. Han makes a very important distinction between “mobilizing” and “organizing.” Thucydides considers the links between might and right. DAY ONLINE INDIVIDUAL WORK ASSIGNMENTS

Tuesday Live lecture

10:00-11:30am ET

WEEK 1 Complete readings

Wednesday Prepare for section Thursday Section Friday Work on skill practice assignment

WEEK 2 Monday Work on skill practice assignment Tuesdays Wednesday Work on reflection paper Thursday Work on reflection paper

Complete next week’s readings

Receive feedback on skill practice assignment by 9:00pm ET Submit reflection paper by 11:59pm ET Friday Complete next week’s

readings Receive feedback from TFs on reflection papers by Sunday 11:00 pm ET

LEARNING OBJECTIVES

● Learn to identify your constituency and its values, resources and interests

● Learn to define the challenge your constituency faces

● Learn how they can get the power to meet the challenge

● Learn to focus on a strategic goal they can achieve over the course of the semester

● Learn how to design a 12-week campaign to achieve that change

REQUIRED ACTION FOR THE MODULE

Develop your strategy and define it in the following “organizing statement” Part I:

PART I: We are organizing (who) to pursue (purpose) by (theory of change) to achieve (strategic goal) by (when). PART II: We will use the following (TACTICS) to achieve (OUTCOME) by May 15th.

READING REQUIRED READING:

Marshall Ganz, “People, Power and Change: Notes, Charts, and Questions,” 2018.(T)

● ► Marshall Ganz, “Speaking of Power”, Gettysburg Project, (2014), pp. 1-5. (T)

"The Campaign Approach to Change," Hirschhorn and May, Change Magazine http://www.grantcraft.org/pdfs/campaignapproach.pdf (P)

Marshall Ganz, “Introduction to Montgomery Bus Boycott,” 2010. [11 pages] (H)

● ►Saul Alinsky, Rules for Radicals, “A Word About Words,” (pp.48-62). (P)

● ►Saul Alinsky, Rules for Radicals, Tactics, (pp. 126-136, 148-155, 158-161). (P)

Taylor Branch, Parting the Waters, Chapter 4, “First Trombone” (pp.120-142), Chapter 5, “The Montgomery Bus Boycott,” (pp.143 -205) (H)

● Jean Baker Miller, Women’s Growth in Connection: Writings from the Stone Center, Chapter 11, “Women and Power,” (pp.197-205). (T)

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ORGANIZING TOOLS:

● “Strategy I” Organizing Participation Guide, (pp. 66-77), 2016.

OPTIONAL - FOR FURTHER READING:

● Thucydides, The Peloponnesian Wars, Book V, Chapter 7, “The Sixteenth Year – the Melian Dialogue,” (pp.400-408). (H)

● John Gaventa, Power and Powerlessness: Quiescence and Rebellion in an Appalachian Valley, Introduction, (pp.3-32). (T) 30 p

● Bernard M. Loomer, “Two Kinds of Power,” The D.R. Sharpe Lecture on Social Ethics, October 29, 1975, Criterion, Vol. 15, No.1, 1976 (pp.10-29). (T)

● Connie Gersick, "Pacing Strategic Change: The Case of a New Venture," Academy of Management Journal, February 1994 (pp.36-42). (T)

● David Walls, Community Organizing (Polity 2015), “Chapter 3: An Organizing World View” (pp.55 -69). (T)

● Hahrie Han, How Organizations Develop Activists, Chapter One, “Introduction” (pp. 1-28). (T)

ASSIGNMENTS

● Skill Practice Assignment #1 – due by 6:00 pm EST on Tuesday, February 26th

● Reflection Paper #2 – due by 11:59 pm ET on Thursday, February 28th

SECTION DISCUSSION

● Thursday, February 21st

MODULE 3 ** | PUBLIC NARRATIVE: TELLING YOUR STORY

[TWO WEEK MODULE] Leadership requires enabling your people to respond to challenges that confront their shared values with purposeful action, as opposed to reaction. Public narrative can be a way to access the emotional resources required: mobilizing hope over fear, empathy over alienation, and self-worth over self-doubt. You may communicate an urgent challenge as a “story of now,” shared values as a “story of us,” and why you care enough to accept the responsibility of leadership as a “story of self.” It is not public speaking, messaging, or image making. As Jayanti Ravi, MPA/MC 07 said, it can enable you to bring out their “glow” from inside as opposed to applying a “gloss” from outside. In “What Is Public Narrative” and “Why Stories Matter,” I explain our approach. Bruner grounds our work in cultural psychology. Marcus explains both the neuroscience of anxiety—or why we pay attention—and that of response. Nussbaum helps us to understand how we experience value through the language of emotion, which is essential for making choices. Bruner explains how we use narrative to construct our “selves.” We will view the James Croft video in class. More examples are accessible through the class webpage as indicated below.

This week, we ask you to reflect: what calls you to leadership on the mission you have chosen? Please complete your “Public Narrative Worksheet” BEFORE Tuesday’s lecture. You will find this on Canvas.

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DAY ONLINE INDIVIDUAL WORK ASSIGNMENTS

Tuesday Live lecture

10:00-11:30am ET

WEEK 1 Complete readings

Wednesday Prepare for section Thursday Section Friday Work on skill practice assignment

WEEK 2 Monday Work on skill practice assignment Tuesdays Submit skill practice assignment

by 6:00pm ET Wednesday Work on reflection paper Thursday Work on reflection paper

Complete next week’s readings

Receive feedback on skill practice assignment by 9:00pm ET Submit reflection paper by 11:59pm ET Friday Complete next week’s

readings Receive feedback from TFs on reflection papers by Sunday 11:00 pm ET

LEARNING OBJECTIVES

Learn why leadership requires mastery of public narrative: self, us and now

Learn how public narrative works: values, emotion & story structure

Learn to tell your story of self and to coach others in telling their narrative

REQUIRED ACTION FOR THE MODULE

Write and develop your campaign’s public narrative

Start sharing your public narrative in your organizing work to recruit others

If you have a team, train them on how to develop their story of self

READING REQUIRED READING:

Marshall Ganz, Organizing Notes: “What Is Public Narrative?” Charts, Questions. 2018.

Jerome Bruner, “Two Modes of Thought”, Chapter 2 in Actual Minds, Possible Worlds (Cambridge: Harvard University Press, 1986), (pp.11–25). (T)

Marshall Ganz, Why Stories Matter, Sojourners.com, March 2009. (T)

Linked Public Narrative: James Croft, 6.2 Minutes, Public Narrative Class, 2010.

Story of Self: Amal Bedyoun, Dearborn, Michigan.

Story of Us: Susan Christopher, Camp Obama, Los Angeles, 2007.

Story of Now: “Gaiety Theatre Talk”, Johannesburg, SA, Mohandas Karamchand Gandhi, March 1, 1907.

Linked Public Narrative: Maung Nyeu, Fall 2011.

ORGANIZING TOOLS:

REQUIRED: Public Narrative Worksheet (on Canvas) - **Please complete before Tues lecture**

a. Resistance School. “Coaching: Dos & Don’ts.” Vimeo, commentary by Anjali

Rodrigues, Anita Krishnan and Sarah El-Raheb, Fall 2017, https://vimeo.com/236661693/b690be127d

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b. “Public Narrative and Story of Self”, Organizing Participation Guide, (pp. 27-37),

2016. c. “Story of Us”, Organizing Participation Guide, (pp. 57-64), 2016. d. “Story of Now and Pulling It Together”, Strategy I” Organizing Participation

Guide, (pp. 95-105), 2016.

OPTIONAL - FOR FURTHER READING:

● George Marcus, “Becoming Reacquainted with Emotion,” Chapter 4, The Sentimental Citizen: Emotion in Democratic Politics, (University Park: Penn State University Press, 2002), (pp.49-78). (T)

● Marshall Ganz, “Public Narrative, Collective Action, and Power”, Chapter 18, Accountability through Public Opinion: From Inertia to Public Action, World Bank, 2011. (T)

● Martha Nussbaum, “Emotions and Judgments of Value”, Chapter 1, Upheavals of Thought: The Intelligence of Emotions, (New York: Cambridge University Press, 2001), (pp. 19-33). (T)

OPTIONAL - FOR FURTHER VIEWING:

a. Public Narrative; Jacquinette Brown, GSE, 2014 b. Public Narrative, HKS, Jordan Ward, HKS, 2014 c. Public Narrative, HKS, Daniela Jozic, HKS, 2017 d. Coaching Story of Self, Madonna Ramp. Ed.L.D. Workshop, August 2014.

ASSIGNMENTS

● Skill Practice Assignment #2 – due by 6:00pm ET on Tuesday, March 12th

● Reflection Paper #3 – due by 11:59pm ET on Thursday, March 14th

SECTION DISCUSSION

● Thursday, March 7th

MODULE 4** | BUILDING RELATIONSHIPS

[TWO WEEK MODULE] Organizers build relationships among members of a constituency to create commitment to a shared purpose. Through relationships, we can come to understand common interests and develop the resources to act on them. Gladwell reports on the power of relational networks in everyday life – with people “like us” and people “not like us.” Simmons and Rosin describe relationship-building in action. The workshop material offers ways to teach relationship-building in practice. The two video clips describe the role of “house meetings” in the 2007-2008 Obama campaign. In optional readings, Putnam shows relationships can become a resource as “social capital”; McKenna and Han show how central relational work was to the Obama campaign grassroots effort.

This week, we ask you to reflect on whom you want to recruit to your leadership team and to practice conducting one-to-ones.

DAY ONLINE INDIVIDUAL WORK ASSIGNMENTS

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WEEK 1 Tuesday Live lecture

Complete readings 10:00-11:30am ET Wednesday Prepare for section Thursday Section Friday Work on skill practice assignment

WEEK 2 Monday Work on skill practice assignment Tuesdays Submit skill practice assignment

by 6:00pm ET Wednesday Work on reflection paper Thursday Work on reflection paper

Complete next week’s readings

Receive feedback on skill practice assignment by 9:00pm ET Submit reflection paper by 11:59pm ET Friday Complete next week’s

readings Receive feedback from TFs on reflection papers by Sunday 11:00 pm ET

LEARNING OBJECTIVES

● Learn why relationships are the foundation of organizing

● Learn to build public relationships

● Learn the skills necessary to conduct a successful one-to-one

REQUIRED ACTION FOR THE MODULE

● Create your relational strategy: Make a list of 20 people who could be candidates for your leadership team and plan how you will approach them

● Hold one-to-ones with potential team members and ask them to join your team, if applicable

● Reflect on your experience of holding one-to-ones and on your relational strategy

READING REQUIRED READING:

Marshall Ganz, “Relationships: Notes, Charts, and Questions,” 2015. (T)

Malcolm Gladwell, “Six Degrees of Lois Weisberg,” The New Yorker, January 11, 1999, (pp.52-63). (T) (T)

Ian Simmons, “On One-to-Ones,” The Next Steps of Organizing: Putting Theory into Action, Sociology 91r Seminar, 1998, (pp.12-15). (P)

Reflections on how “one to one” meetings can turn into “house meetings” and what they are from the 2007 Obama primary campaign in South Carolina, organizer Jeremy Bird and local leader Grace Cusack. (H)

a. Obama Campaign, South Carolina House Meeting Video, July 2007

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iF5jqtM-EkI (P) b. Obama Campaign, Reflections on a House Meeting Video, July 2007

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Zuj3kMYA8ys (P)

Elizabeth McKenna and Hahrie Han, Groundbreakers: How Obama’s 2.2 Million Volunteers Transformed Campaigning in America, Chapter 4, “Building in-Depth by Investing in Relationships,”p.89-129. (T)

● Kris Rondeau and Gladys McKenzie, “A Woman’s Way of Organizing,” Labor Research Review #18, (pp. 45-59). (H/P)

ORGANIZING TOOLS:

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● Organizing Participation Guide, (pp. 39-45), 2016.

OPTIONAL - FOR FURTHER READING:

● Jim Rooney, Organizing the South Bronx, Chapter 6, “Relational Organizing: Launching South Bronx Churches,” (pp. 105-118). (H)

Robert Putnam, Making Democracy Work, “Social Capital and Institutional Success,” Chapter 6, (pp.163-185). (T)

● Malcolm Gladwell, “Small Change: Why the Revolution will not be Tweeted”, The New Yorker, October 4, 2010. (T)

● Ben Brandzell, “What Malcolm Gladwell Missed About Online Organizing and Creating Big Change,” The Nation, November 15, 2010. (T)

ASSIGNMENTS

● Skill Practice Assignment #3 – due by 6:00pm ET on Tuesday March 26th

● Reflection Paper #4 – due by 11:59pm ET on Thursday, March 28th

SECTION DISCUSSION

● Thursday, March 21st

MODULE 5** | CREATING STRUCTURE: YOUR LEADERSHIP TEAM [TWO WEEK MODULE] What is leadership? A position? A person? Or a practice? We argue it is a practice that we can structure in different ways. How can we structure leadership so that it enables a constituency to achieve its goals, and not only achieve the personal goals of whoever is in charge? The selection from Exodus shows the question of leadership structure and how to avoid “being a dot.” We build on Burns’ view of leadership as relational and Heifetz’s emphasis on adaptive work. Freeman, Alinsky, and King challenge assumptions that get in our way. Alinsky argues leadership must be drawn from among the constituency itself. Hackman and Wageman argue that teams can be a more effective way to structure leadership than relying on a single individual, and they show how to coach them. Exley describes the role volunteer “native” leadership teams played in the 2008 Obama campaign. The optional Orpheus Chamber Orchestra Video is one of the foundational case studies: this orchestra, without a conductor, demonstrates the effectiveness of team leadership.

DAY ONLINE INDIVIDUAL WORK ASSIGNMENTS

Tuesday Live lecture

10:00-11:30am ET

WEEK 1 Complete readings

Wednesday Prepare for section Thursday Section Friday Work on skill practice

assignment WEEK 2 Monday Work on skill practice

assignment Tuesdays Submit skill practice assignment

by 6:00pm ET

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Wednesday Work on reflection paper Thursday Work on reflection paper

Complete next week’s readings

Receive feedback on skill practice assignment by 9:00pm ET Submit reflection paper by 11:59pm ET Friday Complete next week’s

readings Receive feedback from TFs on reflection papers by Sunday 11:00 pm ET

LEARNING OBJECTIVES

● Learn how to structure a leadership team

● Practice how to launch a team

REQUIRED ACTION FOR THE MODULE

● Strengthen the structure of your leadership team

o Set regular leadership team meetings o Establish your team’s shared purpose, norms, and roles

READINGS REQUIRED READING:

Marshall Ganz. “Structuring Leadership Teams: Notes, Charts, and Questions,” 2015. (T)

Dr. M.L. King, Jr. A Testament of Hope, “The Drum Major Instinct,” (p.259-67). http://vimeo.com/77261262 (5:44) (P)

Jo Freeman, “The Tyranny of Structurelessness,” Berkeley Journal of Sociology, 1970, (pp. 1-8). (P) http://www.jofreeman.com/joreen/tyranny.htm

Ronald Heifetz, Leadership Without Easy Answers, "Values in Leadership," Chapter 1, (pp. 13-27). (T/P)

● Saul Alinsky, Reveille for Radicals, Chapter 5, "Native Leadership," (pp.64-75). (T/P)

J. Richard Hackman and Ruth Wageman, “A Theory of Team Coaching”, Academy of Management Review, Vol. 30, No 2 (Apr. 2005), pp. 269 – 287. (T)

● Resistance School, “Session Three: How to Structure and Build Capacity for Action,” Vimeo, commentary by Marshall Ganz, Spring 2017, https://www.resistanceschool.com/new-session-three (roleplays and debriefs of shared purpose, norms and roles beginning at 50:00 on). (P)

Story of Us: Susan Christopher, Camp Obama, Los Angeles, 2007.

ORGANIZING TOOLS:

● Organizing Participation Guide, (pp. 47-55), 2016.

OPTIONAL - FOR FURTHER READING:

● James McGregor Burns, Leadership, Chapter 1, "The Power of Leadership," (p.9-28), Chapter 2, “The Structure of Moral Leadership” (pp.29-46). (T)

● “No one on the Podium, Lessons on Leadership from the Orpheus Chamber Orchestra,”(http://dl.dropbox.com/u/9372663/orpheum.mov) (P)

● Bruce Miroff, “Entrepreneurship and Leadership,” Studies in American Political Development, 17 (Fall 2003), 204 – 211. (T)

● Barbara Ransby, “Ella Taught Me: Shattering the Myth of the Leaderless Movement,” Colorlines, June 12, 2015. (H)

● Zack Exley, “The New Organizers, What’s Really Behind the Obama Ground Game,” Huffington Post, October 8, 2008. (H)

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● Liz McKenna and Hahrie Han, Groundbreakers: How Obama’s 2.2 million Volunteers Transformed Campaigning in America, Chapter 5, “Creating a Structure to Share Responsibility” (p.130 – 152). (T)

ASSIGNMENTS

● Skill practice assignment #4 – due by 6:00pm ET on Tuesday, April 9th

● Reflection Paper #5 – due by 11:59pm ET on Thursday, April 11th

SECTION DISCUSSION

● Thursday, April 4th

MODULE 6* | STRATEGIZING: TURNING RESOURCES INTO THE POWER TO ACHIEVE PURPOSE [ONE WEEK MODULE] Strategy is how we turn what we have into what we need in order to get what we want. It is both analytic and imaginative, figuring out how we can use our resources to achieve the goals to which we aspire. We reflect on a “classic” tale of strategy recounted in the Book of Samuel: The Story of David and Goliath, a tale that argues resourcefulness can compensate for lack of resources by developing “strategic capacity.” Kahn describes one way to look at the role of strategy in organizing. We will look at how strategy developed, changed, and refocused in the “Orange Hats of Fairlawn” case.

When you designed your project at the beginning of our class, you began to strategize. Since then, you have learned a great deal about your people, the change you seek, and your sources of power. Strategy is a verb – so now it’s time to re-strategize! What has worked, what hasn’t, what has changed, what has not? And where do you go from here? We will explore how resources were utilized in the “Orange Hats of Fairlawn.” Alinsky, Bobo, and Sharp offer some how-to’s for organizing, strategy, and tactics. Mintzberg’s view that strategy is a verb is drawn from business, while Kahn’s view comes from organizing. “Resources and Resourcefulness” shows how the resource-poor UFW bested its resource-rich opponents. In the optional readings, Nikolayenko uses similar tools to analyze the strategy of the Serbian youth movement, Otpor, in bringing down a dictator.

DAY ONLINE INDIVIDUAL WORK ASSIGNMENTS Tuesday Live lecture

10:00-11:30am ET

Complete readings Work on reflection paper Wednesday Work on reflection

paper Thursday *Section will be scheduled for

Thursday; set time depends on your section (see course website)

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Thursday (After section)

Submit reflection paper by 11:59pm ET

Receive feedback from TFs on reflection papers by Sunday 11:00 pm ET

LEARNING OBJECTIVES

● Learn how to re-strategize

● Learn to set tactics that build the campaign’s strategic capacity

● Develop your campaign chart and peaks

REQUIRED ACTION FOR THE MODULE

● Conduct a strategic “check-in” with your leadership team. Are you on track? What has worked? What hasn’t? What changes do you need to make? How will you use your remaining time together?

● Conduct a mid-term one-to-one with your teaching fellow.

READING REQUIRED READING:

Marshall Ganz. “Strategy: Notes, Charts, and Questions” 2015. (T)

● ►Henry Mintzberg, “Crafting Strategy,” Harvard Business Review, July 1987, (pp. 66-74). (T)

The Bible, Book of Samuel, Chapter 17, Verses 4-49. (H) https://www.biblegateway.com/passage/?search=1+Samuel+17

Si Kahn, Organizing, Chapter 8 “Strategy,” (pp.155-174). (P)

Kennedy School Case C16-91-1034, “Orange Hats of Fairlawn: A Washington DC Neighborhood Battles Drugs,” (pp.1-18). (H)*

● ►Kennedy School Case 2070.1: Six Minutes: Community Organizing in Amman, Jordan, (2016) (H)

● ►Gene Sharp. “198 Methods of nonviolent Protest and Persuasion”, The Politics of Nonviolent Action, (Boston: Porter Sargent Publishers, 1973). (P)

o http://www.everydayrebellion.net/198-methods-of-nonviolent-action/

● ►Kim Bobo, Organizing for Social Change, Chapter 4 “Developing a Strategy” (pp.20-32), Chapter 5, “A Guide to Tactics,” (pp.34-41). (P)

►Jane McAlevey, Chapter 4 “Round One” in Raising Expectations (and Raising Hell): My Decade Fighting for the Labor Movement, Verso, 2012, p. 110-141. (H)

ORGANIZING TOOLS:

● Strategy II Organizing Participation Guide, (pp. 80-82), 2016.

OPTIONAL - FOR FURTHER READING:

● Marshall Ganz. “Resources and Resourcefulness: Strategic Capacity in the Unionization of California Agriculture, 1959-1966”, American Journal of Sociology, January 2000, (pp.1003-1005; 1019-1044). (T/H)

Olena Nikolayenko, “Origins of the Movement’s Strategy: The Case of Serbia’s Otpor (pp. 1 -19), International Political Science Review, October 31, 2012. (T/H)

● The “New Tactics in Human Rights” organization makes a very useful website of both online and offline tactical ideas available at https://www.newtactics.org/toolkit/strategy-toolkit (P)

● Steven Greenhouse, In Florida Tomato Fields, A Penny Buys Progress, New York Times, April 24, 2014. (H)

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Peter Dreier, The Way Over Wages, City by City, The Huffington Post, October 1, 2014. (H)

ASSIGNMENT

● Reflection Paper #6 – due by 11:59pm ET on Thursday, April 18th

SECTION DISCUSSION

● Thursday, April 18th

MODULE 7** | ACTION: MOBILIZING & DEPLOYING RESOURCES

[TWO WEEK MODULE] Organizers mobilize and deploy resources to take action based on commitments they secure from others. As Oliver and Marwell argue, the way we mobilize resources influences how we can deploy them and vice-versa. But whatever the constraints, acting requires mobilizing others to commit time, money, energy, and often, courage. Action also usually takes the form of tactics we deploy to achieve strategic goals, a topic which Bobo explores and the 2007 Obama rally illustrates. Action can also take far more subtle forms – especially in the case of “power with” campaigns, as the Chavez house meeting illustrates. The “Marriage Plot” points to the relational component of effective mobilization. Action also often involves media tactics, a topic Karpf explores, along with challenges of new forms of digital mobilization. Bobo offers ideas on how to combine mobilizing people and money. Bond and Exley show how the Sanders campaign created a small donor funding base. Finally, Hackman argues that the way we organize the action can itself enhance our capacity for further action — or the opposite. In further readings, McKenna and Han discuss the role of metrics in action, critical not only for accountability, but also for motivation and for learning.

DAY ONLINE INDIVIDUAL WORK ASSIGNMENTS

Tuesday Live lecture

10:00-11:30am ET

WEEK 1 Complete readings

Wednesday Prepare for section Thursday Section Friday Work on skill practice

assignment WEEK 2 Monday Work on skill practice

assignment Tuesdays Submit skill practice assignment

by 6:00pm ET Wednesday Work on reflection paper Thursday Work on reflection paper

Complete next week’s readings

Receive feedback on skill practice assignment by 9:00pm ET Submit reflection paper by 11:59pm ET Friday Complete next week’s

readings Receive feedback from TFs on reflection papers by Sunday 11:00 pm ET

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LEARNING OBJECTIVES

● Learn how to design action that generates the motivation for more action

● Understand the linkage between mobilizing and deploying resources and the centrality of commitment to both

● Learn and practice how to ask for a commitment

REQUIRED ACTION FOR THE MODULE

● Analyze a volunteer action task and mold it to be more motivational

● Ask 5 people to commit to your upcoming peak

● Reflect on how you have been getting people’s commitment. What has worked? What could have been done differently?

READING REQUIRED READING:

Marshall Ganz. Organizing Notes: “Notes on Action”, Charts and Questions, 2015. (T)

Columbia, SC Rally, “Barack Obama and Oprah Winfrey Rally” Video, 2007. (H)

Canvassing Video, “The Marriage Plot: Inside This Year’s Epic Campaign for Gay Equality”, the Atlantic, December 11, 2012. (H)

Jacques Levy, Cesar Chavez, Prologue, (pp. xxi-xxv). (H)

Kim Bobo, Organizing for Social Change, Chapter 7 “Designing Actions,” (pp.70-79), [6 pages] Chapter 21 “Grassroots Fundraising.” (P)

Becky Bond and Zack Exley, “Rule 7: The Revolution Will Be Funded - by Small Donations”, Rules for Revolutionaries: How Big Organizing Can Change Everything, (2017), pp 63 – 71.

Richard Hackman, “Designing Work for Individuals and for Groups”, adapted from J.R. Hackman, Work Design in J.R. Hackman & J.L. Suttle (Eds.) Improving Life at Work: Behavioral science approaches to organizational change. Santa Monica: Goodyear Publishing Company, 1977. (pp.242-255). Please take special note of pages 242-244, and 248-250 and the Job Characteristics Model and how to use it. (T)

Story of Now: “Gaiety Theatre Talk”, Johannesburg, SA, Mohandas Karamchand Gandhi, March 1, 1907.

ORGANIZING TOOLS:

● Task Design, Leadership Development Project, Sierra Club, 2007.

● “Action” Organizing Participation Guide, (pp. 84-93), 2016.

OPTIONAL - FOR FURTHER READING:

● Liz McKenna and Hahrie Han, Groundbreakers: How Obama’s 2.2 Million Volunteers Transformed Campaigning in America, Chapter 6, “Using Metrics to Get to Scale” p.153 – 182. (T)

● Pamela Oliver and Gerald Marwell, Frontiers in Social Movement Theory, Chapter 11, “Mobilizing Technologies for Collective Action,” (pp 251-271). (T)

● David Karpf, Chapter 1, “Will the Revolution be A/B-Tested?”, Analytic Activism: Digital Listening and the New Political Strategy (2016), (pp. 1-26). (T)

ASSIGNMENTS

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● Skill Practice Assignment #5 – due by 6:00pm ET on Tuesday, April 30th

● Reflection Paper #7 – due by 11:59pm ET on Thursday, May 2nd

SECTION DISCUSSION

● Thursday, April 25th

MODULE 8* | COMMUNITIES IN ACTION: ORGANIZATION

[ONE WEEK MODULE] Successful campaigns can create organizations. Creating organizations that respond, change, and adapt requires managing dilemmas of unity and diversity, inclusion and exclusion, responsibility and participation, and parts and wholes. Smith and Berg show why these dilemmas must be managed, but not “resolved.” Janis points to the danger that “too much” unity can suppress needed dissent. Kahn focuses on the nuts and bolts of organization. Warren focuses on the challenge of building organizations across racial, religious and economic lines.

DAY ONLINE INDIVIDUAL WORK ASSIGNMENTS Tuesday Live lecture

10:00-11:30am ET

Complete readings Work on reflection paper Wednesday Work on reflection

paper Thursday *Section will be scheduled for

Thursday; set time depends on your section (see course website)

Thursday (After section)

Submit reflection paper by 11:59pm ET

Receive feedback from TFs on reflection papers by Sunday 11:00 pm ET

LEARNING OBJECTIVES

● Understand how to deal with organizational tension

● Learn how to develop organizations that are responsive and adaptive

REQUIRED ACTION FOR THE MODULE

● Reflect on how your organization manages dilemmas of unity and diversity, inclusion and exclusion, responsibility and participation, and parts and wholes

READING REQUIRED READING:

a. ►Marshall Ganz. Organizing Notes: “Organizations” Notes, Charts, and Questions”

2011. (P) b. ►Kenwyn Smith and David Berg, "A Paradoxical Conception of Group Dynamics",

Human Relations, Vol. 40:10, 1987, (pp. 633-654). (T) c. Irving Janis, "Groupthink", in Psychology Today, November 1971, (pp. 43-44, 46,

74-76). (T)

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d. ►Si Kahn, Organizing, Chapter 3, "Organizations," (pp. 55-77). (P)

OPTIONAL - FOR FURTHER READING:

a. Mark Warren, Dry Bones Rattling, from “Four, Bridging Communities Across Racial Lines” (98-100; 114-123) and “Five, Deepening Multiracial Collaboration,” (pp. 124-132; 152-155). (H) b. Marion McCollom, Groups in Context: A New Perspective on Group Dynamics, edited

by Marion McCollum and Jonathon Gillette. Chapter 2, “Group Formation: Boundaries, Leadership and Culture” in, Lanham MD: University Press of America, (1995), (pp.34-48). (T)

ASSIGNMENTS

● Reflection Paper #8 – due by 11:59pm ET on Thursday, May 9th

SECTION DISCUSSION

● Thursday, May 9th

MODULE 9* | WRAP UP: ORGANIZERS, ORGANIZATIONS, & THE FUTURE

[ONE WEEK MODULE] This week we reflect on organizing as a craft, art, and vocation: why do it, what can make a person good at it, what about the rest of our lives, and how can we continue to grow? Organizing requires learning to manage real organizational tensions, as described in my “Organizing Notes.” It also requires learning to manage the personal tensions, addressed by Heifetz when he urges us to learn to “get on the balcony.” And it requires meeting the challenge of actually making the difference we claim we want to make--getting to scale--a challenge Weir and I address in our piece, and that Peter Murray addresses in his. Bond and Exley describe their experiment of getting to scale in the Sanders campaign.

We will also hear from everyone about what they have learned from their participation in the course. What have we learned about ourselves as organizers? What have we learned about organizing? And to what extent did we meet the goals we set at the beginning of the semester? What's next? In this week’s readings, Heifetz poses challenges of accepting responsibility for leadership. Weir and I argue that there is a need for greater participation.

DAY ONLINE INDIVIDUAL WORK ASSIGNMENTS Tuesday Final live lecture

10:00-11:30am ET

Complete readings Work on final paper

Wednesday Work on final paper Thursday Work on final paper Friday Work on final paper

Monday

Submit final reflection paper (4-pages double-spaced) by 6:00pm ET

LEARNING OBJECTIVES

● Reflect on organizing as a craft, art, and vocation

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● Reflect on the role of organizing in your work: examine the big picture

● How to deal with tensions that arise in organizing

REQUIRED ACTION FOR THE MODULE

● Reflect on your leadership experience as an organizer, learner and leader

● Evaluate the course

● Articulate what’s next

● Celebrate!

READINGS REQUIRED READING:

● ►Ronald Heifetz, Leadership without Easy Answers, Chapter 11, “The Personal Challenge,” (pp.250-276). (P)*

● ►Ellen Langer, Mindfulness, Chapter 8, “Mindfulness on the Job,” (pp.133-148). (P)

►Margaret Weir and Marshall Ganz, The New Majority: Toward a Popular Progressive Politics, “Reconnecting People and Politics,” (pp. 149-171). (T)

►Peter Murray, “The Secret of Scale”, Stanford Social Innovation Review, Fall, 2013, (p.32-39)

● ►Eias Isquith, “Neoliberalism Poisons Everything: How Free Market Mania Threatens Education and Democracy: Wendy Brown’s Undoing the Demos”, Salon, June 15, 2015.

● ►Becky Bond and Zack Exley, “Rule 8: Barnstorm”, Rules for Revolutionaries: How Big Organizing Can Change Everything, (2017), pp, 71-81.

OPTIONAL - FOR FURTHER READING:

● Cesar Chavez, “The Organizer's Tale,” Ramparts Magazine, July 1966, (pp.43-50). (P)

● Saul Alinsky, Rules for Radicals, “The Education of the Organizer,” (pp.63-80). Nelson Mandela, Long Walk to Freedom: The Autobiography of Nelson Mandela, Chapter 14, (pp. 121-140). (H)

● Charles M. Payne, I’ve Got the Light of Freedom, “Chapter 8: Slow and Respectful Work” (pp.236-264). (H)

● Michael Hobbs, “The Myth of the Ethical Shopper”, Huffington Post, July 15, 2015.

ASSIGNMENTS

● Reflection Paper #9– Final paper due by 6:00pm ET on Monday, May 20th

This final reflection paper should be four pages, 12-point font, double-spaced.

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