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Tips from real people for dealing with Coronavirus
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Tips From Real People Who Dealt With Coronavirus

Coronavirus tips contributed from peoples’ real world experience

This document is actively maintained and will be updated regularly

If you would like to contribute tips and helpful information, please use the form provided in the relevant section


Contents

For others: Caring for someone infected

You are not alone

Medicine supply

Sudafed

Medication diary

Routine

Ice management

Stay positive

Sleep and exercise

A breathing technique for Coronavirus sufferers

For you: Coping with stress and worry

You are not alone

Routine

Limit the news and social media

It’s good to talk

Helping others helps you

Be prepared

Exercise

Fake news does real damage

Find your joy

Live in the moment

Sleep

Reliable Sources of Information

NHS - How to protect yourself

UK Government - Advice for daily live

The World Health Organisation - Daily update by numbers

Volunteer Groups - How to volunteer or to find a volunteer group


Caring For Others

For others: Caring for someone infected

If you would like to share tips, please contribute them here on this form: https://forms.gle/SSZDWs38FHWYsKbh8

You are not alone

When you are stressed or tired it’s easy to forget that you can ask for help. Local volunteer groups, neighbours, friends, and family can be contacted for support.

Medicine supply

When you are down to three days’ supply it is a good idea to start seeking more medicines. It can take time for them to get to you.

Sudafed

Sudafed is a very popular aid for people suffering from colds and flu. Coronavirus is neither a cold nor a flu. Some carers are reporting that Sudafed can worsen the symptoms and should therefore not be given to people suffering from COVID19. The advice from the UK’s NHS is to use paracetamol for treating COVID19 symptoms.

Medication diary

It’s easy to lose track of time or forget things when you are busy and tired. A diary can also help you plan your day around the medications.

Routine

Find a routine for managing the fever. Regularly applying a light cloth soaked in ice water to the head, neck and chest helps but it can take up to an hour to bring a fever down. The sick person should not have hot showers or baths while prone to fever as this can set you back a day.

Ice management

Refill the ice tray as soon as you use it. You will be using a lot of ice and you need the maximum time for the ice to be formed. Pro tip: If you don’t have an ice tray, half-fill an empty plastic bottle with water and freeze that. Do not use glass bottles. Remember that when water turns to ice it expands.

Stay positive

If the person is unlucky enough to become seriously ill from Coronavirus, it can be a very difficult time for both you and the sick person. There will be times when they are delirious and you can both become depressed. Remember that most people survive this disease. Remain positive, dig deep, assure the person that you are caring for that this is temporary even if it seems to be never-ending.

Sleep and exercise

Carers often feel guilt going to sleep, doing chores like cleaning and cooking and doing exercise. You must take care of yourself in order to take care of the sick person. Go for a daily walk, keep your daily routine. Your own physical and mental health is extremely important. Remind yourself that providing effect care requires you to be physically and mentally effective.

A breathing technique for Coronavirus sufferers

A doctor at Queens Hospital describes a potentially life-saving breathing technique for COVID19 sufferers.

Breathing technique on YouTube


Caring For Yourself

For you: Coping with stress and worry

If you would like to share tips, please contribute them here on this form: https://forms.gle/T7FEGfYGXkcRnLR89

You are not alone

Nearly everyone is worried about Coronavirus. Stay connected with people. Use phone calls, social media, messaging and video calls to stay in contact with friends and family.

Routine

Many people report that keeping a routine helps them: Set time for waking up and going to sleep, set meal times and set times for specific activities.

Limit the news and social media

With the news and social media amplifying the negatives, limiting the news and your time on social media helps reduce the amount of stress and anxiety brought into your life. Focus on your day, your routine, the connecting with friends and family.

It’s good to talk

It’s normal to feel helpless, worried or scared in such a situation as we are in. Talk to others about how you feel. Listen to them when they express how they feel. Together we are stronger.

Helping others helps you

Try to think about how you can help those around you. Helping others not only benefits them, it also has benefits for you as you feel more in control of aspects of your life and you feel a part of the community, connected with others.

There are volunteer groups all around the country and in your local area. Why not consider joining one? If you are unable to join a volunteer group, helping out on social media or setting a schedule to keep in contact with neighbours helps ensure that when people’s situations change, they get the assistance that they need.

Remember that all activities should adhere to the official coronavirus guidance to keep everyone safe.

Be prepared

If you have planned for what could come, you feel more in control of the situation.

Think through a normal week. What do you need? What challenges do you see and how can you best address them? Think of the medicines that you have to hand. Know your benefits and employment rights. Review the essentials that you have. Consider how you can obtain what you need, when you need it.

Exercise

Exercise is great for your mind as well as your body. It helps to keep you positive and gives your an advantage should you become ill.

A small amount of daily exercise is better than rare big effort burn-outs. A consistent, reliable daily routine is a great lifestyle choice. Try one of the many home workouts available online or, if you can, do a daily walk, run or bike-ride while keeping a safe 2 meter distance from others (and always subject to the latest official Coronavirus guidelines).

Fake news does real damage

Stick to the facts. Get your Coronavirus news from reliable sources such as the NHS. There is a lot of inaccurate information being circulated along with conspiracy theories and content created to alarm, depress or anger.

Consider limiting your exposure to the news cycle on the disease. Avoid receiving your updates from unverified sources. Avoid circulating unverified information.

Inaccurate, false or emotionally loaded content can cause not only physical harm through bad advice but also mental harm in the form of anxiety or depression. Inaccurate information and emotionally loaded content causes very real physical and mental damage. Try to avoid it and do not distribute it. Where possible, report it to the authorities such as the social media platforms so that it can be removed. Consider reporting accounts and users spreading false information on social media to the social media platforms.

Find your joy

Concern is perfectly normal but some people may experience intense anxiety. Try to focus on things that you can control such as your behaviour, getting exercise and who you speak to. It’s fine to accept that some things are out of your control. Focus on what is in your control.

Focus on an activity that you enjoy such as a hobby, connecting with others or reading a book. If the things that you enjoy are not available to you, think about how you can adapt them or try something new. Many great experiences and opportunities are available that you might enjoy such as online tutorials and courses.

Live in the moment

Focus on the present rather than worrying about the future. Many people find relaxation techniques helpful and a pleasant part of their day. There are techniques available online.

Sleep

Good quality sleep makes a big difference to you both mentally and physically. This is a good opportunity to maintain a regular schedule and get into good sleeping habits such as no screens before bed, regular bed times and cutting back on caffeine and alcohol several hours before going to sleep.


Reliable Sources of Information

It’s good for your health. It is great for your mental health too. It gives you confidence. It empowers you to do the right thing for you and your family.


Reach for reliable, trusted, information from reliable, trusted sources first. Help others by referring them to the real facts, it could save their life.

NHS - How to protect yourself

The NHS has a page full of great information and advice. It can be found here.

Text version: https://www.nhs.uk/conditions/coronavirus-covid-19/

UK Government - Advice for daily live

The British Government has published a very helpful “what you need to do” page. It can be found here.

Text version: https://www.gov.uk/coronavirus

The World Health Organisation - Daily update by numbers

The World Health Organisation publishes a daily update of the infection rates and other measures by country. It can be found here.

Text version: https://www.who.int/emergencies/diseases/novel-coronavirus-2019/situation-reports/

Volunteer Groups - How to volunteer or to find a volunteer group

Undoubtedly the unsung heroes of the Coronavirus pandemic have been the civilians who have volunteered to help others. To all those good people, we offer our heartfelt thanks and deepest respect.

If you would like to take part as a volunteer, create a volunteer group or are seeking help from volunteers, then they can be found online:

Here on FaceBook. Or search for @covid19volunteersupport

Here on Twitter. Or search for @covid19_group