Pulse Oximetry

   What is pulse oximetry?

Pulse oximetry is a test used to measure the oxygen level (oxygen saturation) of the blood.

It is an easy, painless measure of how well oxygen is being sent to parts of your body furthest from your heart, such as the arms and legs. A clip-like device called a probe is placed on a body part, such as a finger or ear lobe. The probe uses light to measure how much oxygen is in the blood. This information helps the healthcare provider decide if a person needs extra oxygen.

What is the normal range for pulse oximetry?

Why might my child need pulse oximetry?

Pulse oximetry may be used to see if there is enough oxygen in the blood. This information is needed in many kinds of situations. It may be used:

Pulse oximetry is also used to check the health of a person with any condition that affects blood oxygen levels, such as: Heart attack, Heart failure, Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), Anemia, Lung cancer, Asthma, Pneumonia

What are the risks of pulse oximetry?

All procedures have some risks. The risks of this procedure may include:

Your risks may vary depending on your general health and other factors. Ask your healthcare provider which risks apply most to you. Talk with him or her about any concerns you have.

How do I get ready for pulse oximetry?

Your healthcare provider will explain the procedure to you. Make sure to ask any questions you have about the procedure. If a finger probe is to be used, you may be asked to remove fingernail polish.