ICS Course Proposal: IDS–Order, Wonder, Love: Reflections on the (True) Origin and End of Philosophy

 

1.        New or Repeat Course:                ◻️ New                ◻️ Repeat

2.        ICS Title: IDS–Order, Wonder, Love: Reflections on the (True) Origin and End of Philosophy

3.        Previous ICS Title:

4.        TST Title:

5.        Previous TST Title:

6.        Level  (ICS):                ◻️ MWS                xMA                        xPhD

7.        Level  (TST):                ◻️ Basic Degree                ◻️ 3000  (Specialized)                

◻️ Advanced Degree        ◻️ 6000  (3000 level upgraded for AD credit)

◻️ 5000  (AD program courses)

8.        Semester & Year:                ◻️ Fall                x Winter        ◻️ Summer        2019____

9.        ICS Cluster(s):

10.         ICS Course Code:  ICS 2400AC W19

11.         TST Course Code:  (New course codes to be assigned by TST Registrar)

12.         TST Department:  (TBD)

13.         Mode(s) of Delivery:

14.         Instructors: Bob Sweetman, Nik Ansell, et al.

15.        Credit Hours:

16.         Course Description: This course will examine the triangulation of wonder, order, and love via reflections on the origin and end of philosophy.  In so doing it picks up on the theme of order and love that became so important in the W 2018 IDS on the Legacy of Seerveld, Hart, and Olthuis, adding to order and love, reflections on wonder both as it functions within contemporary continental thought and within Reformational perspective.

 

17.         Keywords:  (Enter up to 10 keywords which someone looking for a course like this might enter into a search engine) Awe, Blessing, Command, Law, Love, Norm, Order, Philosophy, Wisdom, Wonder

18.         After taking this seminar, students will acquire a critical understanding of... (course content) in order to be able to... (acquired critical skill)  TBD

 

19.         Course Requirements

a)   Total reading (# of pages): approximately 1250 pages

b)   In-seminar leadership: Each JM participant (for credit) will prepare two seminar presentations in the course of the semester.  In addition, each participant will prepare reflections on the required readings for each class.  (Seminar presentations of between 1200-1600 words; weekly reflections of between 300 and 500 words)

c)   Description of course project: Course paper for 4000-6000 words (MA); 5000-7000 (PhD).

d)   Description and weighting of elements to be evaluated:

i.   Class participation:                                20%

ii.   Seminar Presentations:                        20%

iii.   Research Project/Paper:                        60%

 

20.         Required Readings:  (bibliographic listing)

 1 Rubenstein, Mary-Jane, Strange Wonder: The Closure of Metaphysics and the Opening of Awe, New York: Columbia University Press, 2011.

2. Bynum, Caroline Walker, “Presidential Address: Wonder,” American Historical Review 102,1 (1997): 1-26.

3. 1 Corinthians

4. Wolters, Albert, “Creation Order: A Historical Look at Our Heritage,” An Ethos of Compassion and the Integrity of Creation, ed. Brian J. Walsh, Hendrik Hart, and Robert E. Vander Vennen, Lanham MD: University Press of America, 1995, 33-48.

5. Hart, Hendrik, “Notes on Dooyeweerd, Reason, and Order.” In Contemporary Reflections on the Philosophy of Herman Dooyeweerd: A Supplement to the Collected Works of Herman Dooyeweerd, ed. D.F.M. Strauss and Michelle Botting, Lewiston: Edwin Mellen Press, 2000, 125–46

6. Leeuwen, Raymond C., “Liminality and Worldview in Proverbs 1-9,” Semeia 50 (1990): 111-144.

7. Ansell, Nicholas, “For the Love of Wisdom: Scripture, Philosophy, and the Relativisation of Order” The Future of Creation Order. Vol. I, Philosophical, Scientific, and Religious Perspectives on Order and Emergence, ed. Gerrit Glas and Jeroen de Ridder, New York, Springer, 2018, 257-287.

8. Glass, Gerrit and Jeroen de Ridder, “Introduction to the Philosophy of Creation Order, with Special Emphasis on the Philosophy of Herman Dooyeweerd,” The Future of Creation Order. Vol. I, Philosophical, Scientific, and Religious Perspectives on Order and Emergence, ed. Gerrit Glas and Jeroen de Ridder, New York: Springer, 2018, 1-32.

9. Stump, Eleonore, “Natural Law, Metaphysics, and the Creator,” The Future of Creation Order. Vol. I, Philosophical, Scientific, and Religious Perspectives on Order and Emergence, ed. Gerrit Glas and Jeroen de Ridder, New York: Springer, 2018, 33-50.

10. Strauss, Danie, “Is the Idea of Creation Order Still Fruitful?” The Future of Creation Order. Vol. I, Philosophical, Scientific, and Religioius Perspectives on Order and Emergence, ed. Gerrit Glas and Jeroen de Ridder, New York: Springer, 2018, 51-66.

11. Olthuis, James H., “Creatio Ex Amore,” Love's Wisdom: Transforming Philosophy and Religion, ed. Norman Wirzba and Bruce Ellis Benson, Bloomington IN: Indiana University Press, 2008, 155-166.

12. Caputo, John D., “Living By Love: A Quasi-Apostolic carte postale on Love in Itself, If There is Such a Thing,” Love's Wisdom: Transforming Philosophy and Religion, ed. Norman Wirzba and Bruce Ellis Benson, Bloomington IN: Indiana University Press, 2008, 103-120.

13. Gschwandtner, Christina M., “Love as a Declaration of War?: On the Absolute Character of Love in Jean-Luc Marion's Phenomenology of Eros,” Love's Wisdom: Transforming Philosophy and Religion, ed. Norman Wirzba and Bruce Ellis Benson, Bloomington IN: Indiana University Press, 2008, 185-2000.

14. Crapo, Ruthanne S. Pierson, The Genesis of Love: An Irigarayan Reading,” Love's Wisdom: Transforming Philosophy and Religion, ed. Norman Wirzba and Bruce Ellis Bension, Bloomington IN: Indiana University Press, 2008, 227-238.

21.         Recommended Readings:  (bibliographic listing)

To be assembled for first class.

22.         Other Resources:  (non-literary) N/A

23.         Sample Course Outline:

Week One—Introducing Wonder: Bynum, Caroline Walker, “Presidential Address: Wonder,” American Historical Review 102,1 (1997): 1-26 and Rubenstein, Mary-Jane, “Introduction: Wonder and the Birth of Philosophy,” Strange Wonder: The Closure of Metaphysics and the Opening of Awe, New York: Columbia University Press, 2011, 1-24

Week Two—Heidegger and Wonder: Rubenstein, Mary-Jane, “Repetition: Martin Heidegger,” Strange Wonder: The Closure of Metaphysics and the Opening of Awe, New York: Columbia University Press, 2011, 25-60.

Week Three—Levinas and Wonder: Rubenstein, Mary-Jane, “Openness: Emmanuel Levinas,” Strange Wonder: The Closure of Metaphysics and the Opening of Awe, New York: Columbia University Press, 2011, 61-98.

Week Four—Nancy and Wonder: Rubenstein, Mary-Jane, “Relation: Jean-Luc Nancy,” Strange Wonder: The Closure of Metaphysics and the Opening of Awe, New York: Columbia University Press, 2011, 99-132.

Week Five—Derrida and Wonder: Rubenstein, Mary-Jane, “Decision: Jacques Derrida” and “Postlude: Possibility,” Strange Wonder: The Closure of Metaphysics and the Opening of Awe, 2011, 133-196.

Week Six—Introducing Order: Hart, Hendrik, “Notes on Dooyeweerd, Reason, and Order.” In Contemporary Reflections on the Philosophy of Herman Dooyeweerd: A Supplement to the Collected Works of Herman Dooyeweerd, ed. D.F.M. Strauss and Michelle Botting, Lewiston: Edwin Mellen Press, 2000, 125–46 and Glass, Gerrit and Jeroen de Ridder, “Introduction to the Philosophy of Creation Order, with Special Emphasis on the Philosophy of Herman Dooyeweerd,” The Future of Creation Order. Vol. I, Philosophical, Scientific, and Religious Perspectives on Order and Emergence, ed. Gerrit Glas and Jeroen de Ridder, New York: Springer, 2018, 1-32

Week Seven—Natural Law: Reilly, James P. Saint Thomas on Law, Toronto: The Pontifical Institute for Mediaeval Studies, 1988; and Stump, Eleonore, “Natural Law, Metaphysics, and the Creator,” The Future of Creation Order. Vol. I, Philosophical, Scientific, and Religious Perspectives on Order and Emergence, ed. Gerrit Glas and Jeroen de Ridder, New York: Springer, 2018, 33-50.

Week Eight—Creation Order: Wolters, Albert, “Creation Order: A Look at Our Heritage” An Ethos of Compassion and the Integrity of Creation, ed. Brian J. Walsh, Hendrik Hart and Robert E. Vandervennen, Lanham MD: University Press of America, 1995, 32-48, Leeuwen, Raymond C., “Liminality and Worldview in Proverbs 1-9,” Semeia 50 (1990): 111-144; and

10. Strauss, Danie, “Is the Idea of Creation Order Still Fruitful?” The Future of Creation Order. Vol. I, Philosophical, Scientific, and Religioius Perspectives on Order and Emergence, ed. Gerrit Glas and Jeroen de Ridder, New York: Springer, 2018, 51-66.

Week Nine—Re(lati)vising Order: Ansell, Nicholas, “For the Love of Wisdom: Scripture, Philosophy, and the Relativization of Order” The Future of Creation Order. Vol. I, Philosophical, Scientific, and Religious Perspectives on Order and Emergence, ed. Gerrit Glas and Jeroen de Ridder, New York, Springer, 2018, 257-287.

Week Ten—Introducing Love: Olthuis, James H., “Creatio Ex Amore,” Love's Wisdom: Transforming Philosophy and Religion, ed. Norman Wirzba and Bruce Ellis Benson, Bloomington IN: Indiana University Press, 2008, 155-166; Benson, Bruce Ellis, “The Economics of Knowledge and Love in Paul,” Love's Wisdom: Transforming Philosophy and Religion, ed. Norman Wirzba and Bruce Ellis Benson, Bloomington IN: Indiana University Press, 2008, 28-41; and I Corinthians 13.

Week Eleven—Love and Derrida: Caputo, John D., “Living By Love: A Quasi-Apostolic carte postale on Love in Itself, If There is Such a Thing,” Love's Wisdom: Transforming Philosophy and Religion, ed. Norman Wirzba and Bruce Ellis Benson, Bloomington IN: Indiana University Press, 2008, 103-120 and (Derrida TBD

Week Twelve—Love and Jean-Luc Marion: Gschwandtner, Christina M., “Love as a Declaration of War?: On the Absolute Character of Love in Jean-Luc Marion's Phenomenology of Eros,” Love's Wisdom: Transforming Philosophy and Religion, ed. Norman Wirzba and Bruce Ellis Benson, Bloomington IN: Indiana University Press, 2008, 185-2000 and (Marion TBD.

Week Thirteen—Love and Irigaray: Crapo, Ruthanne S. Pierson, The Genesis of Love: An Irigarayan Reading,” Love's Wisdom: Transforming Philosophy and Religion, ed. Norman Wirzba and Bruce Ellis Bension, Bloomington IN: Indiana University Press, 2008, 227-238 and (Irigaray TBD).