FTM Dance  Handbook (2021-2022)


      FTM Dance  Handbook (2021-2022)        1

      Introduction to FTM Dance        4

Our Aims, Objectives and Values        4

Code of Conduct        5

     Policies and Procedures        6

Induction        6

Disciplinary Policy        8

Dress Code        9

Promoting positive behaviour        10

Supporting individuals with behaviours that challenge        15

Positive Handling        15

Visitors policy        17

Health and Safety        18

Risk Management        21

Infection Prevention and Control        23

Valuing diversity and promoting inclusion and equality        29

Employment        31

Anti-Bribery Policy        33

Safer recruitment        36

Safeguarding children, young people and vulnerable adults        39

Medication Management        48

Whistle blowing code for issues relating to children,

young people and adults        51

Serious incident policy        53

Recording and reporting of accidents, incidents, near misses and written statements        55

First aid policy        57

Confidentiality        59

Quality Assurance Policy        64

Mobile Phone Policy                                                                                                                                      65

Use of personal mobile phones and cameras                                                                           67

Lone Working Policy                                                                                                                                      74

      Training And Development Policy                                                                                                      78                                 

 Staff Risk Management Policy                                                                                                               81

Home Resource Pack Policy        85

Complaints, Suggestions and Compliments Policy        86

Missing Persons Policy        97

Fire Safety Policy                                99

Moving and Handling Policy        109

MCA and DOLS policy         112

Working in service users home policy         139

Personal Care Policy                                                                                                                                    146

Late and missed calls Policy and Procedure                                                                              130

FTM Dance Adverse weather conditions policy                                                                       139

FTM Dance vehicle use in domiciliary care Policy                                                                 141

FTM Dance On-Call Policy and Procedure                                                                                   144

FTM Dance Personal Care policy and procedure                                                                    146                   

FTM Dance staff handbook acknowledgement         152

Introduction to FTM Dance

Our Aims, Objectives and Values

Our Aims

Our service users objectives

Our families objectives

Our staff objectives

Our Values

Code of Conduct

FTM Dance’s values are creative, caring, person centred and always going the extra mile. These values are embedded in the organisation and how we teach and support our service users to participate in the performing and creative arts.

FTM Dance expects full cooperation from employed and self-employed staff to work alongside FTM Dance in achieving their aims and objectives, as stated  above. Our code of conduct has been developed to ensure we all have responsibility to  achieve excellence in our care, support and teaching.

Code of Conduct:

Further guidance:

Skills for Care and Skills for Health (2013) - https://www.skillsforcare.org.uk/Documents/Standards-legislation/Code-of-Conduct/Code-of-Conduct.pdf 

Policies and Procedures

Induction

Policy statement

We provide an induction for all employees, freelance staff and volunteers in order to fully brief them about FTM Dance, the families we serve, our policies and procedures and daily practice.

Procedures

Updated policies system:

Where any policies are added during the year or updated, all staff will receive an email with the attached policy and procedure. The email will be sent and will enable a read-receipt to be required. If a policy is updated, the policy shall be clear in it’s edits and updated, so these are presented clearly to staff. During team meetings, discussions will occur for the team to assess their understanding of the policy. Each year the policy acknowledgement form will be added to and re-sent at the beginning of the year to all staff.

Induction for performing arts teachers:

Induction for support workers:

Competency checks 

FTM Dance staff will have regular competency checks completed in the areas they are trained in. During termly supervisions, there will be the opportunity to discuss training and development, both achieved and any unmet training or CPD. In addition to this, outcomes for the next supervision will be agreed to met by the next supervision. Competency checks will be completed by experienced members of staff. Where appropriate, external agencies will be involved in competency checks. During team meetings, discussions surrounding areas will take place as part of the competency check process, as well as observations of staff during spot checks and quality checks.

This policy was adopted by

FTM Dance

On

February  2021

Date to be reviewed

February  2022

Signed on behalf of the provider

L.Evans

Name of signatory

Leanne Evans

Role of signatory

Director

Disciplinary Policy

Policy statement

FTM Dance takes steps to ensure that there are effective procedures in place to protect children, young people, and adults

Procedures

This policy was adopted by

FTM Dance

On

February  2021

Date to be reviewed

February  2022

Signed on behalf of the provider

L.Evans

Name of signatory

Leanne Evans

Role of signatory (e.g. chair, director or owner)

Director

Dress Code

Contents

1. Dress Code

2. Clothing

3. Other

1. Dress Code

FTM Dance prides itself in having a positive reputation and expects all staff to be seen in a positive manner, this includes in their uniform.

FTM Dance provide a FTM Dance t-shirt to all staff once a year.

For special events or occasions, FTM Dance may provide an alternative t-shirt specifically for an event or occasion (e.g. annual show t-shirt). FTM Dance will state when these should be worn at the time.

2. Clothing

Due to the nature of the work at FTM Dance, there are different dress codes for roles.

When working directly with service users, support workers, teachers and managers should wear an FTM Dance branded t-shirt, with suitable trousers, gym leggings and appropriate footwear (trainers, pumps).

When working in an office environment, staff should wear smart casual clothing.

There may be times staff are requested to wear an alternative uniform, this will be stated at the time of this event or occasion and should be followed.

3. Other

Jewellery - staff should only wear limited jewellery, for example: earrings, engagement band, wedding band etc.

Finger nails - staff should have short and clean finger nails.

Hair - staff with medium-long hair should be tied up. Hair should be clean and tidy.

Due to the nature of  FTM Dance, significant jewellery, long nails and medium-long hair being down, can cause injury to yourself and others. This dress code is to limit, if not prevent any injuries to yourself and others.

Failure to follow the dress code may result in disciplinary action. Please seek ‘disciplinary policy’ for further details.

This policy was adopted by

FTM Dance

On

February  2021

Date to be reviewed

February  2022

Signed on behalf of the provider

L.Evans

Name of signatory

Leanne Evans

Role of signatory

Director

Promoting positive behaviour

Policy statement

We believe that children, young people and adults flourish best when their personal, social and emotional needs are understood, supported and met and where there are clear, fair and developmentally appropriate expectations for their behaviour.

As children, young people and adults develop, they learn about boundaries, the difference between right and wrong, and to consider the views, feelings, needs and rights of others and the impact that their behaviour has on people, places and objects. The development of these skills requires adult guidance to help encourage and model appropriate behaviours and to offer intervention and support when children, young people and adults struggle with conflict and emotional situations. In these types of situations, support workers working 1:1 or 2:1 with these service users can help identify and address triggers for the behaviour and help children, young people and adults to reflect, regulate and manage their actions. We ensure there is a teacher /facilitator on site who also trained in positive handling intervention and a member of FTM Dance management/team leader  on site with Positive Handling Intervention training. There is always a minimum of two members of staff with relevant training where a service user attends that may require Positive Handling Intervention. The teacher /team leader during the briefing will oversee and advise on the team’s responses to challenging behaviour.

Procedures

In order to manage children’s, young people and adults behaviour in an appropriate way we will:

Stepped approach

Step 1

We will be knowledgeable with, and apply the setting’s procedures on Promoting Positive Behaviour;

We will undertake an annual audit of the provision to ensure the environment and practices supports healthy social and emotional development. Findings from the audit are considered by management and relevant adjustments applied.

Ensure that all staff are supported to address issues relating to behaviour including applying initial and focused intervention approaches (see below).

Step 2

We address unwanted behaviours using the agreed and consistently applied initial intervention approach. If the unwanted behaviour does not reoccur or cause concern then normal monitoring will resume.

Behaviours that result in concern for the child, young people or adults will be discussed between the support worker/s supporting the individual, team leaders, teacher and FTM Dance management. During the meeting, the support worker/s will use their knowledge and tapestry reports of the service user to share any known influencing factors (new baby, additional needs, illness etc.) in order to place the behaviour into context. Appropriate adjustments to practice will be agreed and if successful normal monitoring resumed.

If the behaviour continues to reoccur and remains a concern then the support worker/s or teacher should raise their concerns with FTM Dance management who will then liaise with parents/carers to discuss possible reasons for the behaviour and to agree next steps. If relevant and appropriate, the views of the child, young person or adult relating to their behaviour should be sought and considered to help identify a cause. If a cause for the behaviour is not known or only occurs whilst in the setting then the teacher will suggest using a focused intervention approach to identify a trigger for the behaviour. Management will always be informed regarding these conversations had with parents/carers.

If a trigger is identified then the teacher and FTM Dance management will meet with the parents/carers to plan support for the child, young person or adult through developing an action plan. If relevant, recommended actions for dealing with the behaviour at home should be agreed with the parent/s/carers and incorporated into the plan. Other members of the staff team should be informed of the agreed actions in the action plan and help implement the actions. The plan should be monitored and reviewed regularly by the support worker,team leader, teacher and management until improvement is noticed.

All incidents and intervention relating to unwanted and challenging behaviour by children, young people and adults should be clearly and appropriately logged in tapestry care plans, tapestry reports and appropriate forms.

Step 3

If, despite applying the initial intervention and focused intervention approaches, the behaviour continues to occur and/or is of significant concern, then FTM Dance management will invite the parents to a meeting to discuss external referrals and next steps for supporting the child, young person or adult in the setting.

It may be agreed that the Early Help process should begin and that specialist help be sought for the child, young person or adult  – this support may address either developmental or welfare needs. If the child, young person or adults behaviour is part of a range of welfare concerns that also include a concern that the child, young person or adult may be suffering or likely to suffer significant harm, follow the Safeguarding Children and Child Protection Policy and Safeguarding Adults. It may also be agreed that the child, young person or adult should be referred for an Education, Health and Care Plan assessment.

Advice provided by external agencies should be incorporated into the child, young person or adults action plan and regular multi-disciplinary meetings held to review the child, young person or adults progress.

Initial intervention approach

We use an initial problem solving intervention for all situations in which children, young people and adults are distressed in conflict. All FTM Dance staff use this intervention consistently.

This type of approach involves a member of FTM Dance staff approaching the situation calmly, stopping any hurtful actions, acknowledging the feelings of those involved, gathering information, restating the issue to help children, young people and adults reflect, regain control of the situation and resolve the situation themselves.

Focused intervention approach

The reasons for some types of behaviour are not always apparent, despite the knowledge and input from all FTM Dance staff.

Where we have considered all possible reasons, then a focused intervention approach should then be applied.

This approach allows all FTM Dance to observe, reflect, and identify causes and functions of unwanted behaviour in the wider context of other known influences on the child.

We follow the ABC method which uses key observations to identify a) an event or activity (antecedent) that occurred immediately before a particular behaviour, b) what behaviour was observed and recorded at the time of the incident, and c) what the consequences were following the behaviour. Once analysed, the focused intervention should help determine the cause (e.g. ownership of a toy or fear of a situation) and function of the behaviour (to obtain the toy or avoid a situation) and suitable support will be applied.

Use of rewards and sanctions

All children need consistent reminders, clear boundaries and guidance to intrinsically manage their behaviour through self-reflection and control.

Rewards such as excessive praise and stickers may provide an immediate change in the behaviour but will not teach children, young people and adults how to act when a ‘prize’ is not being given or provide the child, young person or adult with the skills to manage situations and their emotions. Instead, service users are taught how to be ‘compliant’ and respond to meet adult’s own expectations in order to obtain a reward (or for fear of a sanction). If used then the type of rewards and their functions must be carefully considered before applying.

Service users should never be labelled, criticised, humiliated, punished, shouted at or isolated by removing them from the group and left alone in ‘time out’ or on a ‘naughty chair’. However, if necessary service users can be accompanied and removed from the group in order to calm down and if appropriate helped to reflect on what has happened.

Use of physical intervention

The term physical intervention is used to describe any forceful physical contact by an adult to a child, young person or adult such as grabbing, pulling, dragging, or any form of restraint of a service user such as holding down. Where a service user is upset or angry, staff will speak to them calmly, encouraging them to vent their frustration in other ways by diverting the service users attention.

Staff who are required to use positive handling techniques, must have appropriate training that is in date and refer to the Positive Handling Policy.

If ‘reasonable force’ has been used for any of the reasons shown above, parents/carers are to be informed on the same day that it occurs. The intervention will be recorded as soon as possible within the service users tapestry, a positive handling form completed within 24 hours which states clearly when and how parents were informed.

Corporal (physical) punishment of any kind should never be used or threatened.

Challenging Behaviour/Aggression by children towards other children

Any aggressive behaviour by service users towards other service users will result in a staff member intervening immediately to challenge and prevent escalation.

If the behaviour has been significant or may potentially have a detrimental effect on the service users, the parents/carers of the service user who has been the victim of behaviour and the parents/carers of the service user who has been the perpetrator should be informed.

FTM Dance management will contact children’s or adults social services if appropriate, i.e., if a service user has been seriously injured, or if there is reason to believe that a service users challenging behaviour is an indication that they themselves are being abused.

FTM Dance staff who were involved in the intervention will make a written record of the incident in the form of tapestry, and other appropriate forms which is kept in the service user’s file; in line with the Safeguarding children, young people and vulnerable adults policy.

FTM Dance staff should complete a risk assessment related to the individual service users challenging behaviour to avoid any further instances.

FTM Dance management should discuss with the parents/carers of the service user who has been affected by the behaviour to advise them of the incident and the setting’s response to the incident.

Relevant health and safety procedures and procedures for dealing with concerns and complaints should be followed.

Parents/carers have access to individual service users behaviour risk assessments put into place for when the service user is at FTM Dance if they wish to view it.  

Bullying

Bullying is a behaviour that both parents/carers and practitioners worry about. Bullying is a deliberate, aggressive and repeated action, which is carried out with intent to cause harm or distress to others. It requires the service user to have ‘theory of mind’ and a higher level of reasoning and thinking, all of which are complex skills.

Children and young people are keen observers and more likely to copy behaviours, which mimic the actions of others, especially the actions of people they have established a relationship with. These are learnt behaviours rather than premeditated behaviours because children this young do not have sufficiently sophisticated cognition to carry out the type of bullying an older child can do. Unless addressed early, this type of pre-bullying behaviour in young children can lead on to bullying behaviour later in childhood. The fear is that by labelling a child as a bully so early in life we risk influencing negative perceptions and expectations of the child which will impact on their self-image, self-esteem and may adversely affect their long term behaviour. This label can stick with the child for the rest of their life.

Challenging unwanted behaviour from adults in the setting

FTM Dance will not tolerate behaviour from an adult which demonstrates a dislike, prejudice and/or discriminatory attitude or action towards any individual or group. This includes negativity towards groups and individuals living outside the UK (xenophobia). This also applies to the same behaviour if directed towards specific groups of people and individuals who are British Citizens residing in the UK.

Allegations of discriminatory remarks or behaviour including xenophobia made at FTM Dance by any adult will be taken seriously. The perpetrator will be asked to stop the behaviour and failure to do so may result in the adult being asked to leave the premises and in the case of a staff member, disciplinary measures being taken.

Where a parent/carer makes discriminatory or prejudiced remarks to FTM Dance staff at any time, or other people while on the premises, this is recorded on the service user’s file and is reported to FTM Dance management. The procedure is explained and the parent/carer is asked to comply while on the premises. An ‘Zero tolerance’ approach will be taken with those who continue to exhibit this behaviour and it  may result in withdrawing the child, young person or adults place at FTM Dance.

Supporting individuals with behaviours that challenge

The first step to supporting any individual with behaviours that challenge, is to be aware of and understand the triggers or signs of escalating behaviour. There may be circumstances where triggers and/or signs of escalating behaviour are not known and thus appropriate caution should be used. Any individual could display behaviours that challenge at any time and they may not be diagnosed with a specific behavioural condition. There is also the possibility of individuals having no identifiable behaviour or triggers

Different approaches that could be used when supporting individuals with behaviours that challenge

Emergency procedure for dealing with behaviours that challenge

In the event of an emergency, staff must be aware of how to call for help, as well as understand how to respond to a call for help.

Examples of when positive handling intervention can be used. This list is not exhaustive and is meant to give examples only.

  1. When a child or young person are fighting with each other
  2. When a child or young person is at risk of harming themselves or others
  3. When a child or young person are damaging high value property that does not belong to /or insured by FTM Dance

Informing parents

Parents will be informed within a 24 hour period of any incidents that have

occurred which involved both verbal de-escalation techniques and

physical interventions. Parents will sign an incident form when physical

intervention has been used, to confirm they were notified of the incident.

Staff protocol for reporting

If an incident occurs whether verbal de-escalation or physical intervention

has needed to occur, staff must report the incident using the recording and reporting policy.

Staff MUST also report this to the team leader/management team as soon as possible,

within a 24 hour period of the incident occurring, via email. Please send a

email to management at management@ftmdance.co.uk.

This policy was adopted by

FTM Dance

 On

February  2021

Date to be reviewed

February  2022

Signed on behalf of the provider

L.Evans

Name of signatory

Leanne Evans

Role of signatory

Director

Visitors policy

Visitors will be encouraged to announce themselves to FTM Dance staff on entry. External professionals  must have photo identification on them if they are visiting a young person at FTM Dance. All visitors must be signed in by a member of FTM Dance management team or team leader using the sign in and sign out system. FTM Dance will only accept visitors by appointment only, appointments can be booked in via FTM Dance management via emailing management@ftmdance.co.uk, sadly any visitors who turn up unannounced will be turned away and asked to book in. FTM Dance management staff are to book appointments using picnic to notify the staff team.

Parents carers and appointed person visitors

Ex service users and their families and ex staff

Ex service users and their families and ex staff must request to access the provision and they will only be allowed to access where the request has been accepted. Ex service users and their families and ex staff must be supervised at all times.

Health and Safety

Review Date:

23rd March 2022

Amended:

N/A

Scheduled or updated:

N/A

Any changes made?

N/A

Summary:

This policy has been changed as part of our reformatting of policies

Relevant legislation:

  • Health and Safety at Work Regulations (1974)
  • Management of Health and Safety at Work Regulations (1999)
  • Provision and Use of Work Equipment Regulations (1998)
  • The Control of Substances Hazardous to Health Regulations (2002)
  • Reporting of Injuries, Diseases and Dangerous Occurrences Regulations (1995)

Guidance used:

Suggested action:

  • Managers to review and update as necessary
  • Staff to be informed of policy and procedures
  • Discuss in team meetings
  • Discuss in supervisions

  1. Definition

1.1: FTM Dance have a strict health and safety policy, which falls in line with the relevant legislation. Health and Safety refers to controlling the risks and hazards to provide a safe working environment.

  1. Purpose

2.1: To ensure FTM Dance take all reasonable practicable steps to safeguard the health, safety and welfare of those using and providing FTM Dance services.

2:2: To ensure that FTM Dance complies with any legal requirements, regulations, guidelines and best practice.

2.3: To meet the legal requirements that FTM Dance must abide by:

  1. Scope

3.1: The following roles whom may be affected by this policy:

3:2: The following people whom may be affected by this policy:

  1. Objectives

4.1: To ensure compliance is maintained within health and safety legislation and regulations.

  1. Policy

5.1: FTM Dance believes the following are important:

5.2: FTM Dance aim to:

5.3: Statutory Duty of FTM Dance

5.4: Statutory Duty of its workers

5.5: Health and Safety

  1. Procedure

6.1:  Staff responsibilities

6.2: How to raise a concern

This policy was adopted by

FTM Dance

On

January 2021

Date to be reviewed

January 2022

Signed on behalf of the provider

Name of signatory

LEANNE EVANS

Role of signatory (e.g. chair, director or owner)

Director

This policy was adopted by

FTM Dance

On

January 2021

Date to be reviewed

January 2022

Signed on behalf of the provider

Name of signatory

LEANNE EVANS

Role of signatory (e.g. chair, director or owner)

Director

Risk Management

Review Date:

16th January  2022

Amended:

N/A

Scheduled or updated:

N/A

Any changes made?

N/A

Summary:

This policy has been changed as part of our reformatting of policies

Relevant legislation:

  • Health and Safety at Work Regulations (1974)

Guidance used:

Suggested action:

  • Managers to review and update as necessary
  • Staff to be informed of policy and procedures
  • Discussions to take place during team meetings

  1. Definition

1.1: FTM Dance have a strict risk management policy, which falls in line with the Health and Safety at Work Regulations (1974). Risk Management is defined as ‘process of evaluating and responding to the risks and hazards to the organisation, their personnel (service users and staff) and members of the public.

  1. Purpose

2.1: To provide all staff with sound knowledge and awareness referencing risk management and to ensure their understanding in raising their concern, or reporting of risks or hazards.

2.2: To meet the legal requirements that FTM Dance must abide by:

  1. Scope

3.1: The following roles whom may be affected by this policy:

3:2: The following people whom may be affected by this policy:

  1. Objectives

4.1: To comply with the Health and Safety at Work Regulations (1974) and other relevant information

  1. Policy

5.1: Health and Safety is paramount for all and is considered a significant area for which FTM Dance maintain through relevant and appropriate risk management processes and systems.

5.2: Risk Assessments

5.3: Record Keeping

5.4: Service users risk assessments

  1. Procedure

6.1: Staff responsibilities

6.2: How to raise a concern

Review Date:

16th January 2022

Amended:

N/A

Scheduled or updated:

N/A

Any changes made?

N/A

Summary:

This policy has been changed as part of our reformatting of policies

Relevant legislation:

  • The Health and Social Care Act 2008 – Code of Practice on the prevention and control of infections and related guidance
  • The Care Act 2014
  • Control of Substances Hazardous to Health Regulations 2002
  • Management of Health and Safety at Work Regulations 1999
  • Mental Capacity Act 2005
  • RIDDOR

Co

Suggested action:

  • Managers to review and update as necessary
  • Staff to be informed of policy and procedures
  • Discuss in team meetings
  • Discuss in supervisions

Infection Prevention and Control

  1. Definition

1.1: FTM Dance have a strict medicine management policy, which falls in line with the relevant legislation. Bribery is defined as ‘the act of offering someone money or something valuable in order to persuade them to do something for you’. Further definitions are identified below.

  1. Purpose

2.1: To provide all staff with sound knowledge and awareness referencing medication management to ensure their understanding in raising their concern, or reporting any acts of poor medication management or errors.

2.2: To meet the legal requirements that FTM Dance must abide by:

RIDDOR

  1. Scope

3.1: The following roles whom may be affected by this policy:

3:2: The following people whom may be affected by this policy:

  1. Objectives

4.1: To ensure compliance is maintained with the Health and Social Care Act 2008 Code of Practice on the prevention and control of infections and related guidance (July 2015), with high consideration of the following criteria:

  1. Policy

5.1: FTM Dance believes the following are important:

5.2: Hand Washing

5.2: Choice of Hand-Washing Agent

Hand washing with liquid soap and water removes dirt and organic material. Liquid soap should be used at all times when stated in 5.1.

Alcohol hand rub is recommended for routine hand decontamination as it:

5.3: Hand-Washing Technique

Lyrics to song: “Wash your hands now, wash your hands now. Front and back, front and back. In between your fingers, in between your fingers. Don’t forget your thumbs, don’t forget your thumbs.”

5.4: Personal Protective Equipment (PPE)

5.5: Use of gloves

5.6: Skin Damage

5.7: Human Bites

5.8: Soiled items

5.9: Cleanliness of Care Equipment

5.10: How to clean

5.11: Staff Sickness

5.12: Service User Sickness

5.13: Reporting

  1. Procedure

6.1:  Staff responsibilities

6.2: How to raise a concern

Valuing diversity and promoting inclusion and equality

Policy statement

FTM Dance is committed to ensuring that our service is fully inclusive in meeting the needs of all children, young people and adults.

We recognise that children, young people and adults and their families/carers come from a wide range of backgrounds with individual needs, beliefs and values.  They may grow up in family structures that include one or two parents of the same or different sex.  Children, young people and adults may have close links or live with extended families of grandparents, aunts, uncles and cousins; while other children may be more removed from close kin, or may live with other relatives or foster carers. Some children, young people and adults come from families who experience social exclusion, severe hardship; discrimination and prejudice because of their ethnicity, disability and/or ability, the languages they speak, their religious or personal beliefs, their sexual orientation and marital status. Some individuals face discrimination linked to their gender and some women are discriminated against because of their pregnancy and maternity status. We understand that all these factors can affect the well-being of children, young people and adults within these families and may adversely impact children, young people and adults learning, development, attainment and life outcomes.

FTM Dance is committed to anti-discriminatory practice to promote equality of opportunity and valuing diversity for all children, young people and adults and families/carers using our service.

We aim to:

Procedures

Admissions

FTM Dance is open and accessible to all members of the community.

Employment

Training

FTM Dance outcomes

The provision offered at FTM Dance encourages children, young people and adults to develop positive attitudes about themselves as well as about people who are different from themselves. It encourages development of confidence and self esteem, empathy, critical thinking and reflection.

We ensure that our practice is fully inclusive by:

We will ensure that our environment is as accessible as possible for all visitors and service users. We do this by:

Valuing diversity in families

Food

Meetings

Monitoring and reviewing

Public Sector Equality Duty

Legal framework

The Equality Act (2010)

Children Act (1989) & (2004)

Children and Families Act (2014)

Special Educational Needs and Disabilities Code of Practice (2014)

This policy was adopted by

FTM Dance

On

January 2021

Date to be reviewed

January 2022

Signed on behalf of the provider

Name of signatory

LEANNE EVANS

Role of signatory (e.g. chair, director or owner)

Director

Anti-Bribery Policy

Review Date:

16th January 2022

Amended:

N/A

Scheduled or updated:

N/A

Any changes made?

N/A

Summary:

This policy has been changed as part of our reformatting of policies

Relevant legislation:

❖ The Bribery Act (2010)

Guidance used:

 Ministry of Justice (2011) The Bribery Act 2010 Quick Start Guide. [Online] Available from: https://www.justice.gov.uk/downloads/legislation/bribery-act-2010-quick-start-guide.pdf [Accessed: 21st March 2018]

Suggested action:

❖ Managers to review and update as necessary

❖ Staff to be informed of policy and procedures

Contents

  1. Definition
  2. Purpose
  3. Scope
  4. Objectives
  5. Policy
  6. Procedure

1. Definition

1.1: FTM Dance has a strict anti-bribery and corruption policy, which falls in line with the Bribery Act (2010). Bribery is defined as ‘the act of offering someone money or something valuable in order to persuade them to do something for you’. Further definitions are identified below.

 Active bribery: refers to the act of promising or giving the bribe,

 Passive bribery: refers to the act of receiving a bribe,

 Bribery of a foreign public official: refers to the act of obtaining or retaining business or an advantage in the conduct of business,

 Corruption: refers to the abuse of entrusted power for private gain.

 

2. Purpose:

2.1: To provide all staff with sound knowledge and awareness referencing anti-bribery or corruption acts and to ensure their understanding in raising their concern, or reporting the receiving of a gift

 

2.2: To meet the legal requirements that FTM Dance must abide by:

 The Bribery Act 2010

 

3. Scope:

3.1: The following roles whom may be affected by this policy:

 Staff (teachers and support workers etc.)

3.2: The following people whom may be affected by this policy:

 Service Users parents/carers/guardians or immediate family

 

4. Objectives

4.1: To comply with the Bribery Act (2010) and other relevant information

 

5. Policy:

5.1: Acts of bribery or acts of corruption will be considered as gross misconduct. Where an investigation finds any person or persons acting in breach of this anti-bribery and corruption policy, the person or persons may find themselves subjected to the disciplinary policy, this may include disciplinary action, such as dismissal.

 

5.2: Receiving and giving gifts:

  1. It is not made with the intention of influencing any party or parties to who it is being given or received, to obtain or reward the retention of a business or business advantage, or as an explicit or implicit exchange for favours or benefits.

  1. The giving or receiving of a gift is not made with the suggestion that a return favour is expected.

  1. It does not include cash or cash equivalents (e.g. a voucher or gift certificate).

4. It is appropriate for the circumstances (e.g. receiving small gifts around Christmas time, as a small thank you to a company for helping with a large project upon completion, end of term e.g. thank you teacher).

5. It is not given or received secretly and is given or received openly

5.3: Record Keeping:

 FTM Dance will keep detailed and accurate reports in relation to bribery or corruption. FTM Dance will keep a written and/or computerised record of the amount and reason for hospitality of gifts accepted and/or given. This is to ensure FTM Dance are providing an effective procedure in preventing acts of bribery or acts of corruption.

 

6. Procedure:

6.1: Staff responsibilities:

 Staff – staff have the responsibility to raise their concern, where they believe an act of anti-bribery or an act of corruption is occurring or has occurred, as soon as practicable possible. Information to raise a concern is written below. Staff must also report any gift giving or gift receiving as soon as practicable possible to a manager. Where possible, staff should report gift giving or gift receiving to a manager before receiving from or giving a gift to another person.

 

6.2: How to raise a concern:

 Staff will be aware of FTM Dance’s whistleblowing procedures, so staff can vocalise their concerns swiftly and confidentially

Safer recruitment

Policy statement

FTM Dance ensures that our staff and volunteers are appropriately qualified, and we carry out checks for criminal and other records through the Disclosure and Barring Service (DBS) in accordance with statutory requirements.

Procedures

Vetting and staff selection

Training and staff development

Induction

We provide our staff with induction training in the first two weeks of being part of FTM Dance. This includes introduction to our:

Staff taking medication/other substances

Managing staff absences and contingency plans for emergencies

- We have qualified, DBS checked staff that can cover.

This policy was adopted by:

FTM Dance

On:

January 2021

Date to be reviewed:

January 2022

Signed on behalf of the provider:

Name of signatory:

Leanne Evans

Role of signatory:

Director

Other useful publications

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Safeguarding children, young people and vulnerable adults

Policy statement

FTM Dance will work with children, young people, adults, parents/carers and the community to ensure the rights and safety of children, young people and vulnerable adults.

Procedures

Key commitment 1

We are committed to building a 'culture of safety' in which children, young people and vulnerable adults are protected from abuse and harm in all areas of our service delivery.

Our designated staff who coordinate child, young person and vulnerable adult protection issues are:

Libby Fox, Ellie Gorski, Leanne Evans, Kelly Hutt

…………………………………………………………………………………………

 Leanne Evans and Kelly Hutt

…………………………………………………………………………..

Key commitment 2

We are committed to responding promptly and appropriately to all incidents, allegations or concerns of abuse that may occur and to work with statutory agencies in accordance with the procedures that are set down in 'What to do if you’re worried a child is being abused' (HMG, 2015) and the Care Act 2014.

Responding to suspicions of abuse

Recording suspicions of abuse and disclosures

Making a referral to the local authority children's or adults social care team,

Adults- https://www.llradultsafeguarding.co.uk/stage-1-alert/

Childrens: https://llrscb.proceduresonline.com/p_report_concerns.html 

Escalation process

Informing parents

Liaison with other agencies

Allegations against staff

Adults

For Leicester City, Leicestershire and Rutland: 0116 255 1606

Safeguarding (referrals)

Leicester City: 0116 454 1004

Leicestershire: 0116 305 0004

Leicestershire Safeguarding Team Duty: 0116 3054933

Rutland: 01572 758 341

Safeguarding Adults Board Managers

Leicester City: 0116 454 6270

Leicestershire and Rutland: 0116 305 7130

Children and Young People

Child Protection Referrals

Leicester City: 0116 454 1004

Leicestershire: 0116 305 0005

Rutland: 01572 758 407

Safeguarding Children Boards

Leicester City: 0116 454 6520

Leicestershire and Rutland: 0116 305 7130

Police 101

Nottinghamshire County Council

The Multi-Agency Safeguarding Hub (MASH) is the single point of contact for all professionals to report safeguarding concerns.

You can contact the MASH team in one of the following ways:

Opening hours:

Telephone queues are generally shorter in the morning, so you may wish to call then.

In an emergency outside of these hours, contact the Emergency Duty Team on 0300 456 4546.

Please note, in the last 30 minutes of these opening hours each day, the MASH can only address urgent safeguarding concerns that require a Social Worker to visit the child or adult that evening. If the concern is not urgent, you will be asked to call back the next working day or send an email which will be reviewed the next working day. This is because of the hand-over to the Emergency Duty Team.

Disciplinary action

Where a member of FTM Dance staff or volunteer has been dismissed due to engaging in activities that caused concern for the safeguarding of children or vulnerable adults, we will notify the Disclosure and Barring Service of relevant information, so that individuals who pose a threat to children and vulnerable groups can be identified and barred from working with these groups.

Key commitment 3

We are committed to promoting awareness of child and adult abuse issues throughout our training and learning programmes for adults.

Training

Planning

Confidentiality

Support to families

Legal framework and further guidance - relevant UK legislations

*A ‘young person’ is defined as 16 to 18 years old – in Our setting they may be a student, worker, volunteer or parent.

This policy was adopted by

FTM Dance

On

January 2021

Date to be reviewed

January 2022

Signed on behalf of the provider

Name of signatory

Leanne Evans

Role of signatory (e.g. chair, director or owner)

Director

Medication Management

Review Date:

16th January 2022

Amended:

N/A

Scheduled or updated:

N/A

Any changes made?

N/A

Summary:

This policy has been changed as part of our reformatting of policies

Relevant legislation:

  • The Care Act 2014
  • The Controlled Drugs (Supervision of Management and Use) Regulations 2013
  • Medical Act 1983
  • Medicines Act 1968
  • The Human Medicines Regulations 2012
  • Mental Health Capacity Act 2005
  • Misuse of Drugs Act 1971
  • The Misuse of Drugs (Safe Custody) Regulations 1973
  • The Misuse of Drugs and Misuse of Drugs (Safe Custody) (Amendment) Regulations 2007

Guidance used:

Suggested action:

  • Managers to review and update as necessary
  • Staff to be informed of policy and procedures
  • Discuss in team meetings
  • Discuss in supervisions

  1. Definition

1.1: FTM Dance have a strict medicine management policy, which falls in line with the relevant legislation. Bribery is defined as ‘the act of offering someone money or something valuable in order to persuade them to do something for you’. Further definitions are identified below.

  1. Purpose

2.1: To provide all staff with sound knowledge and awareness referencing medication management to ensure their understanding in raising their concern, or reporting any acts of poor medication management or errors.

2.2: To meet the legal requirements that FTM Dance must abide by:

  1. Scope

3.1: The following roles whom may be affected by this policy:

3:2: The following people whom may be affected by this policy:

  1. Objectives

4.1: All staff involved in administering medication are to diligently observe the “6 rights of administration”:

4.2: To ensure all staff provide appropriate help and encouragement to service users to manage their own medication as independently as possible when assessed that this is required.

4.3: To reduce the risk of medication errors and incidents and to help to prevent unnecessary admissions to hospital.

  1. Policy

5.1: General Statement

5.2: Medication Administration Principles

  1. Procedure

6.1: Administering medication

1. Staff are to complete the appropriate PPE procedures (e.g. gloves, aprons etc.) when administering medication, where possible. For example, if time is of the essence it is more important to administer the medication.

2. Staff are to follow the protocols as directed on FTM Dance Service Users protocols as signed off by their doctor/GP/paediatrician and other relevant professionals. Where a service user has emergency medication, the emergency medication and protocol must be accessible immediately to administer. An ambulance must be called as soon as practicable possible, where emergency medication has been administered and they must be informed of all the relevant information.

3. Where emergency medication has been administered, management must be informed as soon as practicable possible. FTM Dance Service Users parent or guardian also must be informed that emergency medication has been administered as soon as practicable possible.

4. Where a mistake or error has occurred, or you have witnessed another member of staff make a mistake or error, management must be informed as soon as practicable possible.

6.2: Staff responsibilities

6.2: How to raise a concern

Whistle blowing code for issues relating to children, young people and adults

Whistleblowing Policy and Procedure

At FTM Dance, our staff members views, feelings and opinions are respected and taken seriously in every situation. We are, as a company, committed to tackling any malpractice or wrong doing and deal with these disclosures with immediate effect. This policy is for all staff, students and volunteers (although volunteers are NOT covered by the Public Disclosure Act 1988) who currently work for FTM Dance or have previously worked for FTM Dance. All concerns will be dealt with as soon as practically possible, ensuring the needs of the business and the safety of our children, young people and adults are always maintained. Members of the public, including individuals in community settings can whistleblow also.

Whistleblowing is the term used when someone who works for or with an organisation, wishes to raise concerns about malpractice in the organisation (for example, crimes, civil offences, miscarriages of justice, dangers to health and safety or the environment), and the cover up of any of these.

Whistleblowing is very different from a complaint or a grievance. It only applies when you have no vested interest and are acting as a witness to misconduct or malpractice that you have observed.

A complaint is more personal in that in most circumstances you or someone close to you, will have been affected by the issue concerned and you are seeking redress or justice for yourself. In these circumstances, because you have an interest in the outcome of the complaint, you would be expected to be able to prove your case.

A grievance is when an employee has a dispute about their own employment position. If you are an employee with a grievance, we recommend that you refer to your local procedures.

The Public Interest Disclosure Act (PIDA) 1998, also known as the whistle blowing acts intended to promote internal and regulatory disclosures and encourage workplace accountability and self-regulation. The act protects public interest by providing a remedy for individuals who suffer workplace reprisal for raising a general concern, whether it is a concern about child or adult safeguarding and welfare systems, financial malpractice, danger illegality or other wrongdoing. The concern may relate to something that is happening or has happened in the past. Staff are protected from reprisal if their concern is genuine and honest however you must be acting in the public interest and not for personal gain to be allowed this protection.

For more information on the Public Interest Disclosure Act (PIDA) 1998 please see www.pcaw.co.uk/law/uklegislation.htm 

What should you do if you have a concern about safeguarding failures or other wrong doing in a setting?

Confidentiality

All questions, concerns, requests for information, suggestions, complaints or grievances, will be treated with confidentiality in mind and only staff members that have relevance to the situation will be informed. The senior team at FTM Dance will need to be made aware to maintain a consistent approach and to allow them the smooth running of the team and service FTM Dance provides. This will be assessed on each individual case.

All outside agencies will have their own policies and procedures in relation to whistleblowing and will have reference to confidentiality within them. If requested, these organisations should be willing to share their policies with you.

Adults

For Leicester City, Leicestershire and Rutland: 0116 255 1606

Safeguarding (referrals)

Leicester City: 0116 454 1004

Leicestershire: 0116 305 0004

Leicestershire Safeguarding Team Duty: 0116 3054933

Rutland: 01572 758 341

Safeguarding Adults Board Managers

Leicester City: 0116 454 6270

Leicestershire and Rutland: 0116 305 7130

Children and Young People

Child Protection Referrals

Leicester City: 0116 454 1004

Leicestershire: 0116 305 0005

Rutland: 01572 758 407

Safeguarding Children Boards

Leicester City: 0116 454 6520

Leicestershire and Rutland: 0116 305 7130

Police 101

This policy was adopted by

FTM Dance

On

January 2021

Date to be reviewed

January 2022

Signed on behalf of the provider

Name of signatory

Role of signatory (e.g. chair, director or owner)

Director

Serious incident policy

Review Date:

16th January 2022

Amended:

N/A

Scheduled or updated:

N/A

Any changes made?

N/A

Summary:

This policy has been changed as part of our reformatting of policies

Relevant legislation:

  • Health and Safety at Work (1974)
  • Health and Social Care Act 2008

Guidance used:

Suggested action:

  • Managers to review and update as necessary
  • Staff to be informed of policy and procedures

  1. Definition

1.1: FTM Dance have a strict serious incident policy. A serious incident is defined as where one or more service users, staff, visitors or members of the public experience serious or permanent harm, alleged abuse, or otherwise identified as ‘serious’. There is no definitive list identifying all incidents deemed as ‘serious’ to ensure consistency and high levels of management of incidents.

  1. Purpose

2.1: To provide all staff with sound knowledge and awareness referencing serious incidents and to ensure their understanding in raising their concern, or reporting serious incidents.

2.2: To meet the legal requirements that FTM Dance must abide by:

  1. Scope

3.1: The following roles whom may be affected by this policy:

3:2: The following people whom may be affected by this policy:

  1. Objectives

4.1: To comply with the relevant legislation relating to serious incidents.

  1. Policy

5.1: FTM Dance have a duty to report serious incidents to the relevant organisations within 24 hours of occurrence.

5.2: A serious incident is a notifiable accident under Health and Safety legislation.

  1. Procedure

6.1: FTM Dance procedure involves the following steps:

1. Report the serious incident to the Director of FTM Dance.

2. The Director of FTM Dance will investigate the serious incident.

3. Upon investigating the serious incident, the Director of FTM Dance will report this to the relevant organisations. If appropriate, the Director of FTM Dance will complete the form: https://www.hse.gov.uk/forms/incident/index.htm for the Health and Safety Executive. The form will be copied and filed and the original document will be sent to the local HSE office.

4. A debriefing will occur for all those involved in the serious incident. Where necessary or appropriate, all staff will be debriefed.

6.2: Staff responsibilities

6.3: How to raise a concern

Recording and reporting of accidents, incidents, near misses and written statements

Policy statement

We follow the guidelines of the Reporting of Injuries, Diseases and Dangerous Occurrences Regulations (RIDDOR) for the reporting of accidents, incidents and near misses at FTM Dance. Behavioural incidents between children, young people and adults are regarded as an incident. Near misses are also to be recorded and has an appropriate form to complete.

Procedures

Our accident log:

Reporting accidents, incidents and near misses

Common Inspection Framework

Legal framework

Further guidance

This policy was adopted by

FTM Dance

On

January 2021

Date to be reviewed

January 2022

Signed on behalf of the provider

Name of signatory

Leanne Evans

Role of signatory (e.g. chair, director or owner)

Director

First aid policy

Policy statement

We are able to take action to apply first aid treatment in the event of an accident involving a child, young person or adult. At least one adult with a current first aid certificate is on the premises, or on an outing, at any one time. Performing arts teachers and support staff on site will have a basic life support certificate. The first aid qualification includes first aid training for infants and young children. We have evidence of due diligence when choosing first aid training and ensure that it is relevant to adults caring for children, young people and adults.

Procedures

The first aid kit

Our first aid kit is accessible at all times and contains the following items:

In addition, the following equipment is kept near to the first aid box:

Management will be responsible for checking and replenishing the first aid box contents. Where a first aid box is supplied by the building we are using, they will be responsible for checking and restocking their first aid box supplies.

Legal framework

Further guidance

This policy was adopted by

FTM Dance

On

January 2021

Date to be reviewed

January 2022

Signed on behalf of the provider

Leanne Evans

Name of signatory

Leanne Evans

Role of signatory (e.g. chair, director or owner)

Director

Confidentiality

Policy statement

‘Share with informed consent where appropriate and, where possible, respect the wishes of those who do not consent to share confidential information. You may still share information without consent if, in your judgement, there is good reason to do so, such as where safety may be at risk. You will need to base your judgement on the facts of the case.’

Information sharing: Advice for practitioners providing safeguarding services to children, young people, parents and carers (HMG 2015)

At FTM Dance, staff and management can be said to have a ‘confidential relationship’ with families. It is FTM Dance’s intention to respect the privacy of children, young people and adults and their parents and carers, while ensuring that they access high quality performing arts provision at FTM Dance. We aim to ensure that all parents and carers can share their information in the confidence that it will only be used to enhance the welfare of their children, young people and adults. FTM Dance have record keeping systems in place that meet legal requirements; the means that we use to store and share that information takes place within the framework of the General Data Protection Regulations (2018) and the Human Rights Act (1998). These record keeping systems are in the form of Tapestry where individual log in’s to access this information is required from FTM Dance management. Any paper confidential information is stored in a locked cabinet in the FTM Dance office.

Confidentiality procedures

Most things that happen between the family, the child, young person or adult and the setting are confidential to FTM Dance. In exceptional circumstances information is shared, for example with other professionals or possibly social care or the police.

Information shared with other agencies is done in line with the FTM Dance Information Sharing Policy.

We always check whether parents and/or carers regard the information they share with FTM Dance to be confidential or not.

Some parents/carers may share information about themselves with other parents/carers as well as with FTM Dance staff; we cannot be held responsible if information is shared by those parents/carers whom the person has ‘confided’ in.

Information shared between parents/carers in a discussion or training group is usually bound by a shared agreement that the information is confidential to the group and not discussed outside of it. FTM Dance is not responsible should that confidentiality be breached by participants.

FTM Dance inform parents when we need to record confidential information beyond the general personal information we keep (see our Privacy Notice) - for example with regard to any injuries, concerns or changes in relation to the child, young person or adult or the family/carers, any discussions with parents/carers on sensitive matters, any records we are obliged to keep regarding action taken in respect of child protection and any contact and correspondence with external agencies in relation to their child, young person or adult.

FTM Dance keep all records securely (see our Privacy Notice).

Information is kept in a manual file (which is stored in a locked cabinet at the FTM Dance office), or electronically (password protected documents). FTM Dance may also use a computer to type reports, or letters. Where this is the case, the typed document is stored on an FTM Dance electronic product or access has to be granted by FTM Dance management with a secure log in.

FTM Dance staff discuss children, young people and adults general progress and well being together in meetings, but more sensitive information is restricted to management and is shared with other staff on a need to know basis.

We do not discuss children, young people and adults with staff who are not involved in the child, young person or adults care, nor with other parents/carers or anyone else outside of the setting. Where it is recognised FTM Dance staff are breaching confidentiality, they will be subject to disciplinary/dismissal action.

FTM Dance discussions with other professionals take place within a professional framework and not on an informal or ad-hoc basis.

Where third parties share information about an individual; our practitioners and managers check if it is confidential, both in terms of the party sharing the information and of the person whom the information concerns.

FTM Dance provide work emails, tapestry log ins, work mobile phones, encrypted WhatsApp conversations, Google Docs linked to work email addresses, Google Sheets linked to work email addresses, Google Forms linked to work email addresses, Private Facebook group with only FTM Dance staff members included. These forms of communication and confidential information are regularly checked by FTM Dance management to ensure FTM Dance staff members are not breaching the confidentiality policy. This information is also password protected.

Until publicly announced, information regarding performing opportunities remain confidential between members of FTM Dance staff.

When accessing confidential information, it is expected that FTM Dance staff are accessing this safely and securely and ONLY FTM Dance members of staff are accessing this information. Where it is recognised that none FTM Dance members of staff have had access to this confidential information, the member of staff will be subject to disciplinary/dismissal action.

Client access to records procedures

Parents/carers may request access to any confidential records FTM Dance hold on their child, young person and adult and family/carers following the procedure below:

The parent/carer is the ‘subject’ of the file in the case where a child or young person is too young to give ‘informed consent’ and has a right to see information that our setting has compiled on them.

The appointed person is the ‘subject’ of the file in the case where an adult lacks capacity to give ‘informed consent’ and has a right to see information that our setting has compiled on them. Where an adult is deemed to lack capacity, a member of FTM Dance staff with Mental Capacity Act training will determine whether the FTM Dance service user has the capacity or the appointed person needs to be contacted to gain consent.

Any request to see the child, young person or adults personal file by a parent or person with parental responsibility must be made in writing to FTM Dance management via e-gress email.

FTM Dance acknowledge the request in writing via e-gress email, informing the parent/carer that an arrangement will be made for him/her to see the file contents, subject to third party consent.

Our written acknowledgement allows one month for the file to be made ready and available. FTM Dance will be able to extend this by a further two months where requests are complex or numerous. If this is the case, FTM Dance will inform you within one month of the receipt of the request and explain why the extension is necessary.

A fee may be charged for repeated requests, or where a request requires excessive administration to fulfil.

FTM Dance management informs the Director Leanne Evans and legal advice may be sought before sharing a file/FTM Dance may seek legal advice before sharing a file.

Our manager goes through the file with their line manager and ensures that all documents have been filed correctly, that entries are in date order and that there are no missing pages. FTM Dance note any information, entry or correspondence or other document which mentions a third party.

FTM Dance write to each of those individuals explaining that the subject has requested sight of the file, which contains a reference to them, stating what this is.

They are asked to reply in writing via e-gress email to FTM Dance management giving or refusing consent for disclosure of that material.

FTM Dance keep copies of these letters and their replies on the child, young person or adults file.

‘Third parties’ include each family member noted on their file; so where there are separate entries pertaining to each parent, step parent, grandparent etc. FTM Dance will write to each of them to request third party consent.

Third parties also include workers from any other agency, including children’s/adults social care and the health authority for example. Agencies will normally refuse consent to share information, preferring instead for the parent/carer to be redirected to those agencies for a request to see their file held by that agency.

Members of FTM Dance staff should also be written to, but FTM Dance management reserve the right under the legislation to override a refusal for consent or to just delete the name of the staff member and not the information. FTM Dance management may grant refusal if the member of staff has provided information that could be considered ‘sensitive’ and the staff member may be in danger if that information is disclosed; or if that information is the basis of a police investigation. However, if the information is not sensitive, then it is not in FTM Dance’s interest to withhold that information from a parent. In each case this should be discussed with members of staff and decisions recorded.

When FTM Dance management have received all the consents/refusals, FTM Dance management will hold a copy of the complete file. On the copy of the file, FTM Dance management any information that a third party has refused consent for FTM Dance to disclose and blank out any references to the third party, and any information they have added to the file.

The copy file is then checked by FTM Dance management and legal advisors to verify that the file has been prepared appropriately.

What remains is the information recorded by the setting, detailing the work initiated and followed by them in relation to confidential matters. This is called the ‘clean copy’.

FTM Dance will send the parent/carer a copy of the ‘clean copy’.

FTM Dance management inform the parent that the file is now ready and has been sent securely via e-gress email.

Where required, FTM Dance management will meet with the parent/carer to go through the file, explaining the process as well as what the content of the file records about the child, young person or adult and the work that has been done. Only the person(s) with parental responsibility or the appointed person can attend that meeting, or the parent’s/carers legal representative or interpreter.

The parent/carer may take a copy of the prepared file away; but, to ensure it is properly explained to and understood by the parent/carer, FTM Dance never hand it over without discussion.

It is an offence to remove material that is controversial or to rewrite records to make them more acceptable. FTM Dance’s recording procedures and guidelines ensure that the material reflects an accurate and non-judgemental account of the work FTM Dance have done with the family.

If a parent/carer feels aggrieved about any entry in the file, or the resulting outcome, then FTM Dance refer the parent to FTM Dance’s complaints procedure.

The law requires that the information FTM Dance hold must be held for a legitimate reason and must be accurate (see our Privacy Notice). If a parent/carer says that the information FTM Dance hold is inaccurate, then the parent/carer has a right to request for it to be changed. However, this only pertains to factual inaccuracies. Where the disputed entry is a matter of opinion, professional judgement, or represents a different view of the matter than that held by the parent/carer, FTM Dance retain the right not to change that entry, but FTM Dance can record the parent’s/carers view of the matter. In most cases, FTM Dance would have given a parent/carer the opportunity at the time to state their side of the matter, and it would have been recorded there and then.

If there are any controversial aspects of the content of a child, young person or adults file, FTM Dance must seek legal advice. This might be where there is a court case between parents/carers, where social care or the police may be considering legal action, or where a case has already completed and an appeal process is underway.

FTM Dance never ‘under-record’ for fear of the parent seeing, nor do FTM Dance make ‘personal notes’ elsewhere.

Telephone advice regarding general queries may be made to The Information Commissioner’s Office Helpline 0303 123 1113.

All the undertakings above are subject to the paramount commitment of FTM Dance, which is to the safety and well-being of the child, young person or adult. Please see also FTM Dance’s policy on Safeguarding Children and Child Protection and Safeguarding Adults.

Legal framework

General Data Protection Regulations (GDPR) (2018)

Human Rights Act (1998)

Further guidance

Information sharing: Advice for practitioners providing safeguarding services to children, young people, parents and carers (HM Government 2015).

This policy was adopted by                FTM Dance        

On                                                         January 2021        

Date to be reviewed                        January 2022        

Signed on behalf of the provider                

Name of signatory                                 Leanne Evans (Director)        

FTM Dance Quality Assurance Policy

Policy statement

FTM Dance are passionate about developing and improving our services through quality assurance systems. We endeavour to ensure the care and provision of services is provided to the highest standards.

As part of the quality assurance process, FTM Dance service users and their representatives (their family) and staff will be invited to provide feedback via questionnaires and/or interviews or consultations. The feedback received will be collated and evaluated and the results will be published onto our website. Where anyone is unable to access the published document via the website, a hard copy can be provided upon request.

Quality Assurance Reports will be completed annually for our children and adults sessions, including weekend sessions, holiday clubs and week day sessions.

Procedures

FTM Dance will follow the below procedure:

This policy was adopted by

FTM Dance

On

9th April  2021

Date to be reviewed

9th April  2022

Signed on behalf of the provider

Name of signatory

LEANNE EVANS

Role of signatory (e.g. chair, director or owner)

Director

Mobile Phone Policy

Mobile Phone Policy Contents

1. Company Mobile Phones

1.1 Use of a Mobile Phone Whilst Driving

1.2 Lost or Stolen Mobiles

1.3 Support

1.4 Monitoring of Usage and Costs

1.5 Mobile Phone Use Abroad

2. Personal Mobiles

3. Anti-Harassment

4. Policy Review

1. Company Mobile Phones

Where a mobile phone has been issued by the company, it is for business use only and at all times will remain the property of the Company. The user(s) will be responsible for its safekeeping, proper use, condition and eventual return to the Company. The user will also be responsible for any cost of repair or replacement other than fair wear and tear. If a replacement is required the Company will organise this.

A mobile phone is provided primarily to enable the user to do their job, i.e. to keep the Company informed at the earliest opportunity of matters which it needs to know about and to be similarly contactable by the Company, or to contact customer/client/emergency services when working away from base.Therefore, it is the user’s

responsibility to ensure that the mobile phone is kept charged and switched on whilst on duty.

The SIM card from Company mobiles should not be placed into any other mobile, unless to another Company issued mobile phone.

The Company recognises that users may, on occasion, have to make personal calls or send personal text messages during working hours, or outside normal working hours. Where it is deemed that an unreasonable amount of personal calls/text messages have been made using the mobile phone, the Company reserves the right to deduct those costs, either through deduction from pay, or otherwise. The Company may, after formal investigation, take action under the Disciplinary Procedure if such use is excessive or unauthorised. Users will be expected to make payment for private calls made beyond reasonable usage.

If it is found, following investigation, that there has been excessive personal data use, then the user will be asked to reimburse the company for the cost of this and action may be taken under the Disciplinary Procedure.

The user agrees that upon termination of employment, should they not return the allocated mobile phone, or should the mobile phone be returned in an unsatisfactory condition, the cost of replacement, or a proportional amount of this as decided by the Company, will be deducted from any final monies owing, or the user will otherwise reimburse the Company.

1.1 Use of a Mobile Phone Whilst Driving

The user must ensure they have full control of any vehicle that they are driving at all times.

It is an offence to use hand held mobile phones whilst driving or whilst the engine is turned on. The user will be liable for prosecution if they are holding a mobile phone, or any other type of hand held device to send or receive any sort of data, be it voice, text or pictorial images. The user will be regarded to be driving if they are in charge of a vehicle with its engine running on a public road, even if the vehicle is stationary. It is therefore strictly forbidden for the user to use a hand held mobile phone whilst driving.

A mobile phone may only be used where there is an in-coming call or an out-going voice activated call through a hands free device that is activated without a need to hold the phone at any time, in which case the call should be kept to the shortest possible time and only to effect essential communications. When the phone needs to be operated to make or deal with a call through the hands free device for longer than receiving or giving a short communication, before doing so the user must stop and park the vehicle where it is safe and lawful to do so and with the engine switched off. Whilst driving they must not use the text message facility on the mobile phone, or if available through such a phone, an image facility or internet access.

Individuals are personally responsible for the payment of any fine or fixed penalty (including any externally raised admin charges) incurred whilst in charge of the vehicle. Any conviction for driving offences, any driving endorsements and any fines incurred must be reported immediately to line management as this may affect the Company’s insurance.

It should be noted carefully that a breach of the Company’s rules on the use of a mobile phone whilst driving may render the user liable to action under the Disciplinary Procedure.

1.2 Lost or Stolen Mobiles 

The user is responsible at all times for the security of the mobile phone and it should never be left unattended up. If the phone is lost or stolen, this must be reported to Leanne Evans immediately (if during working hours), or if out of hours phone 02 to ensure that the account is stopped and there is no unauthorised usage.

In the event of theft of a mobile phone, the incident must also be reported to the police and an incident number obtained (please provide this number when reporting the loss to Leanne Evans).

The Company reserves the right to claim reimbursement for the cost of the phone, or excess usage charges should the correct procedures not be followed, a user reports repeated loss of their mobile, it is deemed that the user has not taken appropriate measures to safeguard the equipment, or reported the loss thereof (which will be investigated by the Company and judged at its absolute discretion).

1.3 Support

Should there be any queries on the use of the company mobile, please contact Leanne Evans to speak to the appropriate person.

 1.4 Monitoring of Usage and Costs

The Company receives itemised billing for all Company mobile phones and this is monitored on a monthly basis. The billing system identifies all calls, texts and data usage (if appropriate) and the costs related to this, by user, destination, duration, frequency, etc. High or clear personal usage will be reported to line management for investigation (high usage is defined as usage which falls outside of the normal usage pattern for the individual, or outside of the usage pattern in comparison to other similar users).

This monitoring will allow the Company to identify any areas of potential misuse or training that may be required,

 or to negotiate with suppliers any necessary changes in tariffs to ensure cost efficiency.

If it is found the mobile has been misused, the Company may, after formal investigation, take action under the Disciplinary Procedure.

1.5 Mobile Phone Use Abroad

All Company mobile phones are barred from being used abroad unless the network provider has been specifically instructed by the Company. In the event that a bar needs to be lifted, please contact Head Office in order that this may be considered.

It is particularly important on Smartphones to ensure that “data roaming” is switched off for any times other than checking Company emails. “Data roaming” charges from abroad (which includes the Isle of Man and Channel Islands) can result in very high level charges, and if it is found that these have been incurred due to personal use or negligence on the part of the user, then the charges may be passed on to the user.

 2. Personal Mobiles 

Due to the nature of the work environment, personal mobile phones must be kept on silent and not answered, unless in a case of emergency.

3. Anti-Harassment 

Staff must be aware that certain operations that may be performed on mobile phones may breach Company rules and procedures. The sending of text messages or digital images that are or could be deemed offensive is strictly prohibited.

The photographing or filming of fellow employees, residents, visitors or any member of the public without their consent may breach an individual’s right to privacy and could, in certain circumstances, constitute harassment. This is therefore strictly forbidden.

It is against the principles of this Company for any person to be harassed in such a way, and will not be tolerated. Any instance that comes to the Company’s attention will be investigated. Should a staff member be found to have used a mobile phone in such a way they may be subject to the Disciplinary Procedure, which could include dismissal.

If an individual feels they have been a victim of this form of harassment, they should bring this to the attention of line management immediately.

The use of this phone is to ensure you all have all of your clients numbers for emergency contact, please also give them your number to contact you directly in case of emergency.

Do not answer or use your phone when not working fro FTM Dance.

Please put a security lock on the phone, Leanne will message you the security lock which must be used. Please keep a copy of all text messages for evidence.

4. Policy Review

This policy will be reviewed every 12 months from x DATE x

Use of personal mobile phones and cameras

Policy statement

FTM Dance takes steps to ensure that there are effective procedures in place to protect children, young people, and adults from the unacceptable use of personal mobile phones and cameras in the setting.

Procedures

Personal mobile phones

Cameras and videos

This policy was adopted by

FTM Dance

On

January 2021

Date to be reviewed

January 2022

Signed on behalf of the provider

Leanne Evans

Name of signatory

Leanne Evans

Role of signatory (e.g. chair, director or owner)

Director

Lone Working Policy

Policy statement

FTM Dance takes steps to ensure the organisation complies with the Health and Safety at Work Act (1974) and the Management of Health and Safety at Work (1999) where lone working occurs. Both individuals and the organisation have a duty to assess the risk and reduce any risks which result from lone working.

This policy was created to alert staff to the risks presented when lone working, which identifies the responsibilities of individuals when lone working and the procedures to minimise any presented risks.

Scope 

This policy relates to all staff (whether self-employed freelancers and employed) who may be working alone, at any time for long periods of time.

Definition

Lone working is where an individual (e.g. member of staff) performs an activity or task, which is carried out in isolation from other individuals, without close or direct supervision. When lone working, individuals may therefore be exposed to risk due to there not being another individual to complete the task with them.

Procedures

Personal safety:

Individuals should have access to a phone to ensure regular contact is made with their line manager or manager, as part of risk reducing processes, when:

Individuals should actively complete the following when lone working and during their working day surrounded by others:

Staying in contact:

At all times when lone working, individuals should have access to a phone or mobile phone. The individual is responsible for:

to ensure the phone can be used in the event of recording and reporting requirements and where an emergency arises.

Individuals are responsible for informing their line manager or manager, when they will be lone working, including communicating the following accurate information:

This includes where a member of staff is going home after a visit, instead of returning to their place of work (e.g. office, onsite etc).

Where individuals transport service users, they will be supervised by the appropriate persons (e.g. line manager, manager or other appropriate person/s) for an sufficient amount of time to determine they are competent and safe, before they can begin transporting when acting as a lone worker.

Assessment of risk

The assessment of risks for lone working or lone workers should include the following, where it is appropriate to consider:

All available information should be taken into consideration and reviewed or updated as necessary

Where there is reasonable doubt regarding the safety of a lone worker in any situation, a consideration relating to sending a second worker or other arrangements should be made to complete the task.

All tasks where lone working occurs should be risk assessed and individuals should record and report where updates are required.

Reporting 

Specific known risks to FTM Dance roles

There may be times where an individual may be involved in an accident or become injured, when lone working, though a risk assessment will have been created to reduce this risk.

 

There may be times where an individual will lone work with a service user for a short period of time, or bouts of time over the day and for long periods of time (thorough the day), where there is a risk of allegations.

There may be times where an individual will lone work with a service user for a short period of time, or bouts of time over the day and for long periods of time (thorough the day), where there is a risk of abuse.

There may be times where an individual will lone work with a service user for a short period of time, or bouts of time over the day and for long periods of time (thorough the day), where there is a risk of behaviours that challenge.

Every effort will be made to ensure another individual is in close proximity to individuals lone working with service users with behaviours that challenge, unless it is risk assessed that a second person is not required. Service users with known significant behaviours that challenge, will be supported by a 2 staff to 1 service user (2:1), where their care needs are assessed as this.

There may be times where an individual will lone work with a service user for a short period of time, or bouts of time over the day and for long periods of time (thorough the day), where there is a risk of a medical incident. A medical incident could relate to a service user having a seizures (non-prolonged and prolonged), requiring administration of emergency medication. Every effort will be made to ensure another individual is in close proximity to individuals lone working, unless it is risk assessed that a second person is not required.

Please see the “general lone worker risk assessment” for further information on general risks and more information surrounding control measures for the specific risks or hazards to FTM Dance roles.

Training and Supervision

Organisational contacts:

Leanne Evans (Director) - 07543068872 or leanne@ftmdance.co.uk 

Kelly Hutt (Performing Arts Manager) - 07703745104 or kelly@ftmdance.co.uk 

Libby Fox (Performing Arts Teacher) - 07703745103 or libby@ftmdance.co.uk

Ellie Gorski (Performing Arts Teacher) – 07710394544 or ellie.g@ftmdance.co.uk 

Monitoring and Review

FTM Dance Training and Development Policy

 

Principles

FTM Dance believes that its employees are one of its greatest assets. By providing opportunities, facilities and financial support for training FTM Dance aims to ensure that all team members possess the knowledge, skills and experience necessary to perform their jobs to the highest standard.

FTM Dance is committed to functioning as a learning organisation, providing all its team members with the opportunity for training in accordance with their own needs and those of our service users.

FTM Dance works to the following principles concerning staff training.

·       Training can be defined as the process of developing staff to an agreed standard of competency so that they have the knowledge and skills to carry out their role and tasks.

·       A planned programme for the training and development of staff is essential to ensure good practice and the provision of a quality service for service users.  

·       Without a skilled, committed and well-trained staff team FTM Dance succeeds in its aim to provide high-quality care.

·       We believe our staff team is the most significant of our investments in achieving our purpose. Once we have recruited competent, experienced and qualified staff it is also essential to keep their skills up to date.

·       Training should not only motivate staff, but also encourage their co-operation, imagination and personal development. Without being stimulated by new learning, staff can become bored, take shortcuts, lapse into bad habits or feel undervalued.

Policy Statement

FTM Dance staff development and training programme is aimed at ensuring compliance with the Essential Standards of Quality and Safety, which require staff working in any care service to be trained and competent to do their jobs.

FTM Dance induction training programme, all staff complete their induction training before starting work with FTM Dance.

All staff receive appropriate training to equip them to meet the assessed needs of the service users in this care and support service, as defined in their individual plan of care. All training is regularly updated and staff receive refresher training so that their working practices are kept up to date.

Staff are enabled to take part in all the training that is essential to perform their roles effectively and competently. This includes full-time, part-time and temporary staff.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Training is provided to comply with statutory requirements in respect of:

·       safe working practices to ensure that the health, safety and welfare of service users and staff are promoted and protected; this includes moving and handling, fire safety, first aid, safeguarding and infection control

·       enabling staff to achieve relevant qualifications in health and social care

·       all aspects of abuse and protection of vulnerable people

·       Risk assessments and management of risk.

Key Features

In FTM Dance the following applies:

·       A training matrix has all information relating to staff training.

·       All new members of staff receive induction training to make sure they can carry out their jobs competently.

·       All care staff receive refresher training. These training sessions cover the mandatory training undertaken annually in the areas of:

            Health and Safety

            First Aid

            Epilepsy Awareness

            Infection Control

            Hand Hygiene

            Fire Safety

            Safeguarding of children

            Safeguarding of adults

            Autism Spectrum

            Professional Boundaries

            Equally, Diversity and inclusion

            Prevent extremism

 

·       Staff are expected to be as flexible as possible with training as this may also be provided outside of the normal working hours throughout the year.

·       Staff wishing to attend external training sessions should discuss this with their team Manager.

·       All employed staff have an annual appraisal in which the outcomes from any training the staff member has had and their future needs are discussed and evaluated.

·       Senior staffs receive training to keep them up to date with changes in the care industry.

·       The Staff team receive supervisions every 3 months. Staff can request supervision at any time if they feel thy require additional support.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Training Personnel

The Management team are responsible for the organisation of induction programmes for new staff, for the planning and organisation of in-house training.

 

Training Needs Assessments

Staff can expect their individual training needs to be discussed in their supervision sessions and annual appraisal.

The service also carries out training reviews, which is made the responsibility of the management team.  This takes the form of post training evaluation which every member of staff is requested to complete on the training they have received and their recommendations for future training.

These evaluations form part of the FTM Dance quality assurance strategy. Individual staff personal development plans make a major contribution to the planning of the next annual training programme.

 

This policy was adopted by

FTM Dance

On

1st September  2021

Date to be reviewed

1st September  2022

Signed on behalf of the provider

Name of signatory

LEANNE EVANS

Role of signatory (e.g. chair, director or owner)

Director

 

FTM Dance Risk Management Policy

This policy is in line, with the requirements to provide person-centred care that is outlined in the Health and Social care act 2008 (regulated activities 2014). The guidance describes how to assess and manage risk.

FTM dance promotes appropriate risk taking, service users will not be denied or discouraged from taking reasonable risks. As part of the care planning FTM dance recognises its duty of care to protect service users from harm and injury, risks are assessed for every proposed activity and the risks are weighed against the possible negative outcomes before making an informed and measured decision on how to manage the risk appropriately.  The identified risks are documented on the care plan with all strategies to manage the risks.

An initial Risk assessment will be conducted before the service users is permitted to engage with the services. Risk assessments are reviewed and updated regularly to reflect any changes to risk that have been identified and a general review of the assessment will be carried out every 3 months.

FTM team are expected to:

Be aware of identified risks to the safety of services users

Follow the strategies documented on the risk assessment and care plan

Receive training and supervision so they are able to manage and assess risk

Be aware of support available and how to access support when needed in situations that threaten their own safety, the safety of service users and staff.

Safeguard services users and others where possible using agreed procedures where service users are at risk of causing harm to themselves or others

Staff to ensure their actions do not increase risk to services users/staff safety

Areas of Risks to be assessed:

Area of risk                                           Identified Risk                                  Risk Management

Risk from falls or other injury due to mobility

Routine falls and mobility risk assessments are undertaken.

Strategies to reduce the risk of falls and injury are documented in the risk assessed care plan.

Risk from environment

Risks to service user safety in the environment are assessed and monitored daily and recorded.

Individual care plans identify risks from environment due to service user needs. The risks are managed by individual care plan.

In the community/Outside site activities

Regular checks are made to ensure the safety of the environment and all hazardous/High risk areas are managed appropriately.

Person centred individual care plan including identified risks and management strategy.

Self-harm or aggressive/challenging behaviour/Any behaviours that could be a risk to service user or staff

Assess risks to ensure safety of service users.  Any behaviour that could be a risk to service users or others is identified.

Risk management plan in place to manage identified risks.

Protection from neglect or abuse

As Service users who have been identified as higher risk of abuse/ vulnerable is assessed in line with FTM Safeguarding policy/procedure.

 Risk management plan is in place that is in line with FTM safeguarding policy and procedures.

Medication

Medication to be administered as directed by medical professionals. Staff trained to administer medication as directed.

Plan to administer and monitor medication and record and store medication safely.

Risk due to health or medical diagnosis

 Risk assessment identify specific risks.

Risk management plan to manage risk effectively.

Positive risk taking

Assessments on an individual basis considering risk to service users. Mental, social and physical capacity will play a significant role in the risk management planning.

Plan and actions to reduce risk

Health

Assessment to identify risks to physical and mental health.  

Plan and procedures in place to ensure risk is minimised.

Allegations

Assessment to identify risks, history or risk.  Strategies to reduce risk to be put in place.

Risk management plan and actions to minimise risk to service user and staff.

Transport

Risks to service user during transport to be identified and strategies in place to managed and reduce risk.

Risk management plan in place and updated regularly to ensure safety of staff and service user during transport.

 

When a risk is identified it is assessed and management plans are completed from the outcome of the assessment. All risk management plans are reviewed regularly and updated.

Training

All staff have induction which includes training in managing risk, further training in assessment and management of risk for staff where role and responsibility requires them to conduct assessments.

This policy was adopted by

FTM Dance

On

2nd January  2021

Date to be reviewed

2nd January  2022

Signed on behalf of the provider

Name of signatory

LEANNE EVANS

Role of signatory (e.g. chair, director or owner)

Director

Professional boundaries policy  

 

Policy statement  

The relationship between a support worker and a service user may seem to be like a friendship or other relationship, but it is a professional relationship with a purpose, and that is to promote the wellbeing of the person using the service. The social care professional is responsible for establishing and maintaining an effective professional relationship with the service user.  The relationship will be based on an understanding of their individual needs and preferences in relating to others.

• FTM Dance recognises that the needs and well-being of the individual should be paramount. This includes providing opportunities for individuals to make active contributions to their lives, their        relationships and their care and support.

• FTM Dance Professional boundaries apply to all forms of communication between social care professionals and individuals. This includes any use of social media.

• FTM Dance staff are responsible for seeking support and taking sensitive action where an individual misreads or becomes confused about their relationship.

• Where it is not appropriate for a staff member to provide, or continue to provide, care and support due to blurring or crossing of professional boundaries, alternative support staff will be allocated to the service user.

• FTM Dance staff will be supported to reflect on and understand the impact of caring on their own emotional wellbeing.  

• FTM Dance management will apply professional boundaries with fairness, clarity, consistency and transparency.

 

• FTM Dance will ensure workers are familiar with the Code of conduct.  

 

• FTM Dance will actively promote a culture where workers regularly have the opportunity to discuss good practice, raise concerns and issues and to learn from mistakes through regular staff meetings and supervision.  

• FTM Dance will ensure that job descriptions clearly outline roles and responsibilities; establish and maintain clear processes for person-centred assessment, risk assessment, care and support planning.

• FTM Dance will ensure individuals have an up-to-date care and support plan that reflects their unique, strengths, needs and desired outcomes, and that workers understand the plan and their        role within it.

 

 

Support workers to maintain boundaries  

 

• FTM Dance will provide support and guidance through supervision with workers to explore and reflect on the nature and quality of their relationships with individuals.  

• FTM will manage the behaviours and actions of workers which could potentially cross professional boundaries, ensuring that actions are transparent, collectively agreed and recorded.  

• FTM Dance will implement changes to systems, procedures or practice where there are identified areas for improvement.

• FTM Staff are required to report any previous or existing relationships they have with an individual outside work who is a service user, family, carer or friend of the service user.  This may not necessarily prevent their professional involvement but will allow any potential issues to be managed.

•FTM staff are required to report any relationship they have with an individual outside work, including through social media who are a service user or family, carer or friend of a service user. This may not necessarily prevent their professional involvement but will allow any potential issues to be managed.  

•FTM staff are not permitted to use personal accounts on social media sites or applications to contact service users/family or carers of service users.

• FTM Dance will ensure that staff are clear about their responsibilities to report concerns and issues about their own or others’ professional boundaries.

• FTM Dance will ensure that individuals using the service and their families/carers have information about our philosophy, aims and objectives and the roles and responsibilities of staff and management.

• FTM Dance will ensure family members and others close to the service user know the appropriate channels to communicate with the service and that workers know how to respond to comments, concerns and complaints.

 

 

Whilst we cannot provide a complete and detailed list, unacceptable practices include:  

• Sexual contact with an individual using the service.

• Causing physical harm or injury to individuals using the service.

• Making aggressive or insulting comments, gestures or suggestions.

 • Seeking information on personal history where it is neither necessary nor relevant.

 • Watching an individual undress where it is unnecessary.

• Sharing your own private or intimate information where it is unnecessary.

• Inappropriate touching, hugging or caressing.

• Concealing information about individuals from colleagues, for example, not reporting incidents and concerns, safeguarding issues, not completing records, colluding with criminal acts.

• Acceptance of gifts and hospitality in return for better treatment.

• Spreading rumours or hearsay about an individual or others close to them.

• Misusing an individual’s money or property.

• Encouraging individuals to become dependent or reliant for the worker’s own gain.  

• Giving special privileges to ‘favourite’ individuals, for example spending excessive time with someone, becoming over-involved, or using influence to benefit one individual more than others.

• Providing forms of care that will not achieve the planned outcome.

• Providing specialist advice or counselling where the worker is not qualified to do this.

 • Failing to provide agreed care and support for or rejecting an individual, for example, due to negative feelings about an individual.

• Trying to impose own religious, moral or political beliefs on an individual.

• Failing to promote dignity and respect  

• Any practices specifically prohibited in relevant legislation, statutory regulations, standards and guidance.

The consent of the individual is never a defence for any of these practices. 

This policy was adopted by

FTM Dance

On

18th September  2021

Date to be reviewed

18th September  2022

Signed on behalf of the provider

Name of signatory

LEANNE EVANS

Role of signatory (e.g. chair, director or owner)

Director

FTM Dance Home Resource Pack Policy

In response to COVID-19,FTM Dance will be providing FTM Dance students with the resources needed for them to access FTM Dance content in the comfort of their own home. The resource packs are the  responsibility of the teachers, the expectation will remain that these packs are of high quality and will be full of useful props to use at home.

FTM Dance teachers will be responsible for ordering the resource pack content using FTM Dance amazon account, please contact Jamie for the log in details. FTM Dance teachers will create a wish list and this will be checked over once completed via FTM Dance management team before ordering. The items may be delivered to FTM office or FTM Dance teachers home.

FTM Dance teachers will prepare the resources packs in a safe and clean environment, ideally at FTM Dance headquarters, but where this is not possible they will be prepared in a clean and hygienic space. FTM Dance teachers must ensure the space where the resource packs are created has been anti bacterial clean beforehand, must not be stored or prepared in a space which is dirty or smells of smoke or pets. FTM Dance teachers must ensure good hand hygiene is practiced at all times and gloves must be worn for each individual pack to avoid cross contamination. Where possible please use antibacterial spray to clean items before putting them in the boxes.

FTM Dance expects each resource pack to include person centered resources for each individual that are accompanied by a set of instructions on how to use the resources effectively relating to online live sessions and pre recorded content where possible. It is important that the resource packs are labelled appropriately so when they are being delivered this is clearly marked for the delivery driver, appropriate initials of the child must be clearly labelled on the outside of the box.

Those students who identify as benefiting from access to a resource pack or those families and Carers that selected this option on the services they wished to receive by FTM Dance during Covid-19 as our emergency response during this time, has been documented on a spreadsheet titled “Covid-19 Emergency Rota 2020”. A tab has been created titled “emergency student support” where all students who receive a commissioned service or use direct payments to access FTM Dance are listed stating what services they wish to receive during this pandemic. Those students identified as benefiting from a resource pack, under the column “prop bucket” the box will be highlighted in orange. Once resource packs have been created for these students and delivered, this column is to be changed to green to reflect it has been completed.

This policy was adopted by

FTM Dance

On

19th May 2020

Date to be reviewed

18th May 2021

Signed on behalf of the provider

Name of signatory

LEANNE EVANS

Role of signatory (e.g. chair, director or owner)

Director

Complaints, suggestions and compliments

FTM Dance is committed to providing a high level of service across the organisation. We welcome complaints, suggestions and compliments in order to ensure that we understand the views of those who use our services, we are able to address and resolve any issues that may arise and that we are able to continuously improve our working practices and in turn the service that we provide.

We are committed to ensuring:

● Complaints are dealt with efficiently,

● Complaints are properly investigated,

● Complainants are treated with dignity, respect and courtesy,

● Complainants receive, so far as is reasonably practical, assistance to enable them to

understand the procedure in relation to complaints, or advice on where they may obtain

such assistance,

● Complainants receive a timely and appropriate response,

● Complainants are told the outcome of the investigation of their complaint, action is taken,

if necessary, in the light of the outcome of a complaint,

● Learning is identified from complaints and action formulated and applied to ensure that

service delivery is improved.

General Policy

A copy of this complaints procedure will be made available to everyone who accesses our services. In all cases complaints and concerns shall be treated seriously in a sensitive and confidential manner. Complaints and suggestions must be handled in such a way as to first of all reach a satisfactory outcome with the complainant, and then to turn the situation into a source of quality improvement.

All formal or serious complaints will be investigated by a person not related to the immediate source of the complaint. The recording of complaints will not be confined to serious or substantial complaints but to all reported issues. The existence of records for complaints of an apparently minor nature is an indication of the effectiveness of the procedures, the openness of the culture of the organisation and its employees, and their vigilance in the area of safeguarding and identifying potential abuse.

Complaints will be recorded centrally in order to identify any pattern of complaints relating to an individual staff member or an issue with a certain company policy or procedure. The central information, with regards to complaints, suggestions and compliments will be regularly reviewed and analysed. The summary will be regularly considered by the management team for quality assurance purposes.

Compliments will be recorded centrally and made available for all parties to read, also on the personnel file of any member of staff individually complimented.

Staff members who are the subject of a complaint should not communicate directly with the complainant unless accompanied by a senior member of staff, unless requested directly to do so by the complainant.

Regular surveys and feedback requests are issued to all workers, clients, service users and families that the organisation works with in order to actively seek feedback, comments and suggestions.

 Methods of Complaint

In the first instance, a person making a complaint is entitled to do so verbally (in person or over the phone), in writing (by letter/fax) or electronically (by email or on line).

Communication with the complainant may only be sent electronically where the complainant has consented to this in writing or electronically and has not withdrawn the consent.

Time Limits on Making a Complaint

A person making a complaint must do so within 12 months from the date on which the matter which is complained about occurred or the date on which the matter complained about came to the notice of the complainant.

Complaints made outside of this period do not have to be considered. However, the 12 month time limit need not apply if the organisation is satisfied that the complainant had good reasons for not making the complaint within that time limit, notwithstanding the delay it is still possible to investigate the complaint. This decision rests with the company Complaints Manager.

Who May Complain?

A complaint may be made by a person (or a representative acting on their behalf) where that person

● uses or receives, or, has used or received any services provided by the company; or

● is affected by, or is likely to be affected by, the action, omission or decisions taken by the

company.

A complaint may be made by a representative acting on behalf of a person who has, or had, a right to complain and where this person

● has died;

● is a child and there are reasonable grounds for the complaint being made by the

representative instead of the child;

● is unable to make the complaint themselves because of physical incapacity or lack of

capacity within the meaning of the Mental Capacity Act 2005;

● has requested the representative to act on their behalf.

Where a representative makes a complaint on behalf of a child (i.e. an individual under the age of 18); the organisation must not consider the complaint unless it is satisfied that there are reasonable grounds for the complaint being made by a representative instead of the child. Where a representative makes a complaint on behalf of a person who lacks either the physical or mental capacity to represent herself/himself, the organisation will not consider, or further consider, the complaint under this complaints procedure unless it is satisfied that the representative is conducting the complaint in the best interests of the person on whose behalf the complaint is made.

In forming this view, account should be taken of any recorded wishes of the individual, made before their loss of capacity; or in the event of a representation of someone who has died, any recorded wishes made prior to their death. Particular attention should be paid in those cases in which more than one person could be said to be/have significant in the life of the individual and thus be deemed their representative.

Consent to proceed with a complaint from a representative is always required where the person with the right to complain does not lack capacity. This includes those circumstances in which the person is said to be too distressed or otherwise unable to make the complaint on their own behalf or is said not to recognize what another person considers to be a cause for complaint. In such cases, where consent in not forthcoming, the Complaints Manager, in consultation with the appropriate service manager, will decide whether the matters complained about indicate there is a need for an internal management review or investigation, outside of the complaints procedure. The decision as to whether a complaint can be made by a representative will be made by the Complaints Manager in consultation with the Team Manager. Where it is decided that the complaint cannot be dealt with under the complaints procedure, the representative must be notified as soon as possible in writing, with the reasons for the decision stated.

Anonymous Complaints

Anonymous complaints must always be recorded and referred to the Complaints Manager who, in consultation with the Team Manager, will decide whether the matters raised within the complaint indicate the need for an internal management review or investigation, outside this procedure or any other procedure, such as Safeguarding.

Matters Excluded from the Procedures

The following complaints are not required to be dealt with under this policy:

● a complaint by an employee, worker or other staff member about any matter relating to

their contract or employment;

● a complaint made by an individual / organisation in respect of their business

arrangements with the organisation, e.g. contractual arrangements;

● a complaint which is the same as a complaint already resolved locally, for example, a

complaint or concern which is made verbally and is resolved to the complainants

satisfaction no later than the next working day after the day on which it was made;

● a complaint that has already been investigated and closed under this policy;

● decisions made by organisations or professionals outside of FTM Dance;

● a complaint that is in relation to a matter that is in court proceedings.

Withdrawing Complaints

A complaint may be withdrawn verbally or in writing at any time by the complainant or their representative. Where this occurs the company will write to the complainant confirming the withdrawal. The Complaints Manager in consultation with the Team Manager will decide whether the seriousness of the issues raised in the complaint indicates that an internal management review or investigation should taken place.

Unreasonable / Persistent Complaints

It is recognised that, despite the organisations best efforts, there may be occasions when the behaviour of a person making a complaint may become unreasonable or even aggressive. Where behaviour is so extreme that it threatens the safety and welfare of staff it is advised that the appropriate manager will consider options such as:

● explain that the company will not accept contact that is abusive;

● making sure that contact is overseen by a manager;

 ● providing a single point of contact with a named member of staff and making clear that other staff are not available to assist them;

● asking that contact is made in one form, appropriate to the complainants needs; telephone, email etc

● placing a time limit on any contact;

● refusing to receive repeat complaints;

● only acknowledging receipt of correspondence (offer no response);

● returning any irrelevant or abusive documentation (retain a copy); rd​

● only accepting contact through a 3​ party / advocate;

● setting up a contract to define how the complainant will behave in the future if s/he wants

a response.

Any action must be proportionate to the behaviour. In certain circumstances it may be necessary to report the matter to the police and / or take legal advice. In all cases, other than where to do so might jeopardise legal proceedings or place an individual at risk, the manager making the decision about any action should inform the complainant of the decision and the reasons, in writing.

In some cases abusive, threatening or other unreasonable behaviour may be a feature of the complainant’s condition. In these cases consideration should be give to the need for an assessment under the Mental Health Act.

Support for Complainants

We recognise that people may need support to make a complaint.

● Legal Representatives: There is no restriction on a complainant obtaining the services of a legal advisor; solicitor or barrister, should s/he so wish. However, any costs in terms of legal fees, are the responsibility of the complainant.

● Friends and advisors: The complainant must be offered the opportunity to bring a friend / support person / advisor with her/him to any meetings held under these procedures. Where such a person attends a meeting the person facilitating the meeting should remind the friend/ advisor of the need to maintain confidentiality.

● Advocates: There is no duty on the company to provide an advocacy service to complainants. The company will, where possible, facilitate the provision of independent advocacy services to complainants. It will provide information and identify sources of advice including from relevant local voluntary organisations and community or self-help groups or specialist teams for those with special needs.

Support for Staff

The company recognises that being involved in responding to complaints can be a stressful experience. Staff who are named in complaints, or whose evidence may be required as part of an investigation, should receive support through the line management structure. Anyone interviewed as part of a complaints investigation is entitled to have a support person with them. The Complaints Manager is available to give advice and support to all staff named in complaints and can assist in the following ways:

 ● working together to establish the most effective way of responding to a specific complaint;

● facilitating face to face meetings with the complainant;

● offering guidance regarding written responses;

● talking through practice issues raised by complainants;

● team briefing sessions on the complaints procedure;

● training on effective responses to complaints;

● training on complaints handling.

Compliments, Suggestions and Complaints

The processes and procedures outlined within this policy are to be followed when dealing with

● Compliments

● Suggestions or Comments

● Complaints

All incidents in which a person expresses a view about the action or inaction of the company or a representative of the company must be assessed, categorised and dealt with as one of the following:

Compliment: A commendation for something well done. An expression of thanks to a named worker, staff member, group or team made by someone who has been directly affected by the service provided or their representative.

Suggestions or Comment: An expression of views mad by any member of the public about either an area that they would like to see change or improve, or a general comment about the company which does not have a resolution. This may trigger some internal consideration / investigation.

Complaint: An expression of dissatisfaction about an area of the business or service received as it affects a named individual which by its nature and seriousness to the complainant and/or the organisation requires a level of consideration / investigation.

Making and Handling Compliments – Expressions of Satisfaction

A person may make a compliment, commendation or express their general satisfaction with the contact they have received either informally to their local team or formally in writing by either email or post to:

Email: ftmdance@gmail.com

Post: PERA business park nottingham road Melton Mowbray LE13 0PB The person receiving the compliment should:

● Record the compliment locally to include details of who made the compliment and which service area or team it relates to.

● Inform the relevant manager who will ensure that the relevant staff member(s) is informed.

● Forward a copy of the record to the Complaints Manager who will log all compliments centrally.

 Making and Handling Suggestions and Comments – Expressions of Views about Policies / Procedures

A person may make a suggestion or comment either informally to their local team or formally in writing to by either email or post to:

Email: ftmdance@gmail.com

Post: PERA business park nottingham road Melton Mowbray LE13 0PB

The person receiving the suggestion or comment should pass this to the relevant local manager who will:

● Ensure that it is recorded locally;

● assess how and at what level a response should be given;

● pass the matter to the appropriate manager for acknowledgement and response;

● send a copy of the record and response to the Complaints Manager who will log all

comments and compliments centrally.

Where the matter commented upon relates to policies or procedures it should be brought to the attention of the Operations Manager who will decide whether to:

● Commission an internal management review of the policy / procedure;

● Delegate the matter for an acknowledgement and / or response.

Making and Handling Complaints

A person may make a complaint either informally to their local team or formally in writing to by either email or post to:

Email: ftmdance@gmail.com

Post: PERA business park Nottingham Road LE13 0PB

Where a person contacts the company with an expression of dissatisfaction, the person receiving this must assess whether this is to be handled as a concern or a complaint:

● Concerns are expressions of dissatisfaction which can be dealt with within 1 working day.

● Complaints are expressions of dissatisfaction which require consideration.

If the contact is verbal and the resolution is agreed locally in no longer than one working day on which it was received, it is dealt with as a concern. It will not always be possible to complete certain actions agreed to resolve the matter within the period of 1 working day, however all reasonable endeavours should be made.

Care must always be taken to ensure that the person is aware of his/her right to use the complaints procedure and that it is recorded that they have declined this option.

A record of the issue, the agreed means of resolution and the conclusion must be made on the relevant case record. It is not necessary to report concerns to the Complaints Manager unless this is deemed necessary by the relevant Manager. Records should however be available for the Complaints Manager if required.

If an expression of dissatisfaction is seen to require consideration this should be referred to the relevant Team Manager and the process outlined below should follow:

 ● The Team Manager should acknowledge the complaint in writing within 2 working days and should notify the Complaints Manager that a complaint has been received.

● The Team Manager should offer to discuss the matter with the complainant at a mutually convenient time.

In circumstances where the complainant is unable to explain the nature of their complaint, either due to the fact that they have a disability which would affect their ability to do this or they are so distressed as to make this difficult / impossible, it may be necessary to arrange to visit the person at a mutually convenient time, to take a full record of the complaint. This should be done as soon as is reasonably practicable, allowing time to arrange for the appointment of an advocate or an interpreter where necessary and agreed by the complainant.

The following will take place within 10 working days of the date of the acknowledgement:

The Complaints Manager in conjunction with the Team Manager will decide on the eligibility of the complaint to be considered under this procedure and will consider whether the complaint should be handled under other procedures; Safeguarding, Employee Grievance etc. and if so, whether the complaints procedure should be put on hold.

The Complaints Manager in conjunction with the Team Manager will decide on the eligibility of the person to complaint, either in their own right or as the representative of another person.

The Complaints Manager in conjunction with the Team Manager will assess the nature of the complaint in order to determine its seriousness and any potential risk to the individual or the organisation. The level of seriousness will inform the appropriate method of complaints handling.

The Complaints Manager will then decide on the appropriate level at which a response should be made. In most cases the response will be made by the Team Manager. Complaints which warrant an investigation will be usually responded to by a Senior Manager.

The Complaints Manager and the manager identified as giving the response will consult on:

○ The feasibility of a proposed resolution, including a reasonable timescale;

○ The necessity to invoke alternative / additional procedures.

The manager identified to respond to the complaint shall contact the complainant to offer to discuss the complaint in further detail and the desired outcome. This may be done by telephone or face to face, as appropriate, and should be at a time agreed with the complainant. The discussion will cover:

○ The manner in which the complaint is to be handled

○ The response period within which the consideration / investigation of the

complaint is likely to be completed and the date by which the response is likely to be sent to the complainant.

complainant does not accept the offer of a discussion the Complaints Manager will: Determine the response period

 ● Notify the complainant in writing of that period

● Complete a complaint action plan and notify the complainant, the manager making the

response and the relevant Senior Manager of the agreement reached for resolution

● Commission a fact finding report or an investigation, if appropriate.

At the end of this 10 day period, the company has a further 10 working days in which a final response and resolution should be provided to the complainant.

In certain circumstances a resolution may not be possible within this period depending on the seriousness of the complaint and the level of response required in order to resolve the complaint and any resource implications.

Timescales may be renegotiated but should not normally exceed 6 months. Where possible, renegotiation of timescales should only be done with the agreement of the complainant and must be recorded and confirmed with the complainant. It is the responsibility of the Complaints Manager to monitor timescales and to ensure that the complainant is kept informed of the progress of the complaint.

In all cases any action taken or planned to resolve a complaint must be put in writing to the complainant with a copy sent to the Complaints Manager.

A written response to the complainant must explain:

● The way in which the complainant has been considered;

● The conclusions reached in relation to each element of the complaint;

● Whether any remedial action is needed and how this will be achieved;

● A response to any desired outcomes specified by the complainant;

● Confirmation as to whether the company is satisfied that any action needed in

consequence of the complaint has been taken or is proposed to be taken.

The complainant must be:

● Given the option to comment on the outcome and any decision reached;

● Informed that s/he should let the Complaints Manager know within 10 working days if the

complaint, or any element of the complaint, remains unresolved;

● Informed that, after the set period, provided that the complainant has not indicated that

the matter remains unresolved, it will be concluded.

Where a meeting is offered as part of the response, the purpose of a meeting will be to:

● Discuss a report resulting from the findings of any investigations and also any

recommendations;

● Consider any amendments (factual inaccuracies / 3​ party information / comments or

additional information from the complainant)

● Consider the response given by the company and any action to be taken to:

○ Resolve the complaint

○ Improve practice.

Every effort must be made to work towards a resolution of the complaint taking into account the need for any response to be proportionate to the seriousness of the issues raised by the complainant. Effective remedies are those which:

● are appropriate and proportionate to the injustice;

● take account of the complainants views and desired outcomes;

● take account of the complainants own actions as they affect the case;

● seek to put the complainant in the position s/he would have been in had the injustice not occurred.

This could include any combination of the following:

● the offer of a meeting with the complainant;

● a full apology where the company is at fault;

● a reassessment of needs;

● a change to any service arrangements;

● a review of practice;

● repaying of expenses incurred in bringing the complaint;

● payment of monies owed but not paid at the time;

● the waiving of fees – where the method of billing is incorrect;

● the writing off of fees – where the method of charging is correct, but it is decided by the

manager with responsibility for the relevant budget that this is an appropriate resolution in the circumstances; e.g. in response to a poor standard of service, significant delay in billing etc.

Improving Practice

FTM Dance is committed to facilitating practice changes and organisational learning as a result of complaints resolutions. In all cases, even where the complainant is satisfied with the response or has made no further contact about the matter, it is the responsibility of the responding manager to:

● ensure that any agreed action to resolve the complaint and to improve outcomes in the future has taken place and within the agreed timesheets

● to notify the Complaints Manager of:

○ the general lessons learned from complaints

○ any changes to practice made as a direct result of complaints received

It is the responsibility of the Complaints Manager to review all concluded complaints with the purpose of collating and reporting on outcomes and lessons learned from their resolution. Where the Complaints Manager has evidence that a particular complaint, or a trend in complaints, suggests the need to take action to improve services this will be brought to the attention of the relevant local manager. Where it is a matter of organisational improvement it will be brought to the attention of a relevant senior manager.

External Regulators

If an individual feels that a complaint has not been resolved satisfactorily or in line with this process you can escalate the complaint to the company Operations Manager at:

Email: ftmdance@gmail.com

Post: PERA Business Park Nottingham Road LE13 0PB

If the Operations Manager feels that the complaints process is being correctly adhered to and this has not been fully completed they may refer the individual back to the relevant manager and Complaints Manager until the process is complete. If at this point the complainant still feels that their complaint has not been resolved the Operations Manager may instigate an internal investigation and work to resolve the outstanding complaint.

You are entitled at any point to raise any concerns and complaints with the company’s external regulatory bodies.

How we share our complaints, comments and suggestions policy and procedure

FTM Dance will ensure that the Complaints, Comments and Suggestions Policy and Procedure is shared termly (January-April, May-June, July-August and September-December) to our social media pages (e.g. Facebook), as well as, during FTM Dance staff supervisions and meetings termly. Service users and our parents will receive a regular reminder via email each term also.

This policy was adopted by

FTM Dance

On

03rd  June 2020

Date to be reviewed

02nd June 2021

Signed on behalf of the provider

Name of signatory

LEANNE EVANS

Role of signatory (e.g. chair, director or owner)

Director

FTM Dance Missing Person Policy

 

Policy statement

This policy sets out the values, principles and policies underpinning FTM Dance approach to the discovery that a service user is missing.

Through its policy and procedures FTM Dance seeks to comply with the requirements to report serious instances through the Care Quality commissioner notification procedures and the local Adults/Children’s Safeguarding Board’s procedures and take the appropriate actions in the event of accidents or in the event of a service user going missing whilst under the care of FTM Dance.

It is common for some of the service users to be limited in their mobility. Some service users may be confused or easily disoriented due to their mental capacity therefore become easily lost.  It is accepted that there will be many service users who value their mobility and independence but the need for close supervision must always be balanced against their rights to make their own decisions regarding their movements and whereabouts whilst under the care of FTM Dance.

 

 

Raising the Alarm

 

Staff should raise the alarm immediately if they suspect that a service user may be missing by informing a senior member of staff or manager.

Situations where a missing persons report should be made include the following:

•Where a service user cannot be found on site and no arrangements have been made for the service user to be collected

•A service user has run away from staff during community exercise and staff have lost sight of the service user

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Preventing Missing Persons Incidents

Staff must remain vigilant at all times and to be aware of exactly where service users are at any given time.  Service users who are prone to wandering, or who may be at risk of getting lost due to mental capacity will have this identified during risk assessment and measures to reduce risk will be made in their care plan. Such service users are kept under observation as appropriate to the level of risk identified.

Action taken to avoid false alarms includes the simple precaution of ensuring service users are collected by parents in a managed way with a register and guardian sign in and out procedure.   Staff are aware and record when service users are collected and this is communicated with staff on site.

 

 

Procedure in the Event of a Service user Being Reported as Missing

When it becomes clear that a service user is missing it is vital that all the members of staff work as a team and follow a clearly defined procedure. Upon receiving a missing person alert the person in charge or manager should carry out the following procedure.

 

Check that the service user has not been collected by parent or authorised carer.  Confirm the register entries with staff on site.

Ascertain who saw the service user last and arrange a thorough search of the site and grounds.

Call 999 and report service user as missing and prepare all relevant information including a photograph of the service user.

Contact social services and service user parent or carer to inform them that a missing alert has been made.

Complete incident form ensuring that all information is accurate.

Once service user has been located ensure all professionals and carers that were informed are updated that the service user is no longer missing.

If at any stage the person in charge or manager is unsure of what to do then the company director should be contacted as soon as possible for advice.  

 

 

 

 

Procedure to follow after a missing person incident

Staff must record any significant incident on the service users care plan, risk assessment and the accident/incident records, which should be made available for inspection. The recording should include the times the person went missing and time they were found.

Review the incident and discuss measures to reduce risk of reoccurrence of the incident.

If the service user was injured or harmed or was seriously at risk of being harmed as a result of going missing the management team will notify social services and the relevant Local Authority Safeguarding Unit, who might wish to investigate further depending on the circumstances.

If a complaint is made against a staff member as a result of a service user going missing, the matter will be investigated through the complaints procedure. The investigation will include any possible misconduct by the support staff responsible as a result of the person going missing through its established disciplinary procedures.

All staff are made aware of the possible consequences of a service user whom they are supervising going missing.

Training

All staff are trained in the missing persons procedure and to know their role in the event of a search.

 

This policy was adopted by

FTM Dance

On

26th June 2020

Date to be reviewed

25th June 2021

Signed on behalf of the provider

Name of signatory

LEANNE EVANS

Role of signatory (e.g. chair, director or owner)

Director

FTM Dance Fire Safety Policy

  The following roles may be affected by this policy:

 All staff

The following Service Users may be affected by this policy:

 Service Users

The following stakeholders may be affected by this policy:

Commissioners

 Local Authority

Visitors

 

To ensure that staff understand that fire prevention is an important obligation for all organisations, including Forward Thinking Movement And Dance CIC, and that fire has the potential to present significant risks to health and safety.

 

  Forward Thinking Movement And Dance CIC will ensure that there are robust mechanisms in place to minimise the risk of fire and undertakes to do the following:

Ensure that Forward Thinking Movement And Dance CIC has a named individual responsible for reviewing and implementing its fire policy, procedure and strategy

Assess the risks of fire at all of the premises of Forward Thinking Movement And Dance CIC and implement appropriate control measures

 Ensure good housekeeping to minimise the risk of fire

Provide means of detection and early warning in the case of fire

 Ensure that those who would not be aware of the alarm being raised have such provisions as may be required, i.e: a pendant, vibrating pillow, flashing beacon that would alert them of danger (this should form part of their PEEPs)

 Inspect and/or test fire safety equipment at appropriate intervals

  Provide and maintain a safe means of escaping from the premises in the event of a fire

 Maintain all equipment and installations intended for fire detection and firefighting

 Implement a procedure for the action to be taken in the event of a fire

 Train and instruct staff in fire safety including the carrying out of fire drills, the use of evacuation chairs, sledges, etc.

 Keep records of all fire safety matters (see 'Records' in the Procedure section)

 Ensure that all visitors are made aware of the fire precautions and emergency arrangements

 Identify people with any disability or impairment who may require assistance in the event of a fire

 Comply with the requirements of The Regulatory Reform (Fire Safety) Order 2005

 

 

 

 Fire Safety Responsibilities within Forward Thinking Movement And Dance CIC

An appropriate senior manager will be nominated by Forward Thinking Movement And Dance CIC to assume the role of Fire Safety Manager who will be responsible for the development of an effective fire safety management strategy which enables:

 The preparation and upkeep of the organisation’s Fire Safety Policy which should include being able to provide advice and guidance on fire safety

 The provision of reports and recommendations which enables Forward Thinking Movement And Dance CIC to consider the removal or reduction of identified risks to an acceptable level within Forward Thinking Movement And Dance CIC

 Adequate means for quickly detecting and raising the alarm in case of fire within Forward Thinking Movement And Dance CIC

 Means for ensuring emergency evacuation procedures for all areas, at all times when premises are occupied, without reliance on external services wherever possible

Staff to receive fire safety training appropriate to the level of risk and the duties they may be required to perform as well as in the use of any special measures, i.e. use of evacuation chairs or sledges

The reporting of fire-related incidents to appropriate organisations

The development of partnership initiatives with other bodies and agencies involved in the provision of fire safety

 Fire Risk Assessments

Step 1 Identify the hazards within the premises - Forward Thinking Movement And Dance CIC will need to identify:

Sources of ignition such as naked flames, heaters

  Sources of fuel such as built-up waste, display materials, textiles or overstocked products

 Sources of oxygen such as air conditioning or oxygen supplies

Step 2 – Identify people at risk - Forward Thinking Movement And Dance CIC will need to identify those people who may be especially at risk such as:

  People working near to fire dangers

  People working alone or in isolated areas (such as in roof spaces or storerooms)

  Children, or parents with babies

  The elderly or frail and people who are disabled

Step 3 – Evaluate, remove, reduce and protect from risk - Evaluate the level of risk in the premises

 Replace highly flammable materials with less flammable ones

 Make sure that flammable materials are separated from sources of ignition

  Have a Safe Smoking Policy

When the risks have been reduced as far as possible, an assessment of any remaining risks should be undertaken and a decision should be made on whether there are any further measures that need to be taken to make sure that a reasonable level of fire safety is provided.

 General Fire Responsibilities within Forward Thinking Movement And Dance CIC

Forward Thinking Movement And Dance CIC must:

 Ensure that the establishment can be evacuated safely in the dark or in the event of a power failure

 Display fire evacuation notices, photoluminescent directional signage (EN7010:2012 + A7:2017) and ensure that all escape routes and exits are adequately signed

  Where buildings are above 11 metres, ensure Wayfinding signage is displayed to assist fire crews

  Ensure that all escape routes and exits are free from obstruction

 Ensure that all firefighting facilities are appropriate and readily available

 Maintain fire detection warning systems and installations or if the premises are not owned, ensure that the landlord undertakes this activity

 

 Train staff, carry out fire drills and keep records

 Ensure that all passenger lifts have signage to say "In the event of fire DO NOT USE" unless they are specially designed as fire lifts

  Evacuation Procedures within Forward Thinking Movement And Dance CIC Actions Required Prior to Evacuation

 In the absence of Leanne Evans, the person in charge is to assess the need for evacuation ensuring the safety of visitors and staff

The evacuation plan is reviewed taking into account the evacuation procedures for individuals

 Staff to be briefed on the reason, method, route and onward plan prior to evacuation

Actions Required During Evacuation

  The person who identifies the fire should summon emergency help by calling 999 and activate the fire alarm

 The person in charge should ensure that, at all times, a list is available of the people who have been evacuated and those still in the building

 The staff and visitors' register to be held by the person in charge

 Designated personnel should be allocated to the external doors in the case of fire alarm activation ensuring that no inappropriate persons are allowed to enter the premises

  In the event that the Emergency Services are involved, the lead will be taken by the senior officer on site

Actions Required After Evacuation

  The person in charge should collate all information regarding the whereabouts of staff

  In the event of a full evacuation of the premises, a designated person is to ensure the security of the building during this time

  Staff who were not in the office at the time should be notified of what their location of work will be until it is declared safe to return to the building

 Notify Social Services and other organisations of temporary working arrangements as necessary

Actions Required Prior to any Return to the Premises

 The person in charge should confirm that the premises are safe to return to having taken instruction from the Emergency Services personnel involved

 Any transport to return staff to the premises should be arranged

 All areas of the premises to be checked for safety and cleanliness prior to any return

Contact to be made with Social Services and other organisations advising of the return to premises

Arson

Arson is a serious threat to all buildings at risk. Much of the arson is associated with vandalism and burglaries. If small fires have been started on the premises of Forward Thinking Movement And Dance CIC or neighbouring premises, they should be taken seriously and the Police and Fire Brigade notified.

A risk assessment should be undertaken to ensure that control measures are in place as far as possible.

Security to Reduce the Risk of Arson

                            Where possible, keep the number of entry points to a minimum. However, there must still be an adequate number    of escape routes in the event that a fire breaks out

 Perimeter fences, walls and gates need to be strong and high enough to keep out intruders

  Doors and windows must be in a state of good repair and locked when not in use

                             Locks and padlocks must be of good quality

 Keys must be distributed only to a restricted number of people

 Gaps under doors must be kept small (less than 3mm if a fire door)

 Letterboxes should have metal containers fitted on the inside

  Stored material of any kind should be kept away from perimeter walls or fences where it could be set alight

Advice for Employees

 

 Warn staff about the threat from arson

 Staff should challenge anyone who should not be on the premises and report any suspicious activities

  Be mindful of tailgating at security access points by unauthorised personnel

  Manage contractors on the premises

 Ensure that visitors sign the visitors' book so that it is clear who is on the premises at all times

         Common Causes of Fire and How to Guard Against Them - Electricity

Neglect and misuse of electrical wiring, fittings and equipment can easily cause fires in the workplace. Overheating of electrical circuits, poor wiring connections, use of unauthorised electrical appliances, multi- point adaptors and problems with the use of extension leads are all hazards which frequently result in fires starting. Therefore:

Ensure that all electrical circuits and equipment in the workplace are inspected and tested on a regular basis. (Remember, there is a requirement to do this under the Electricity at Work (Amendments) Regulations 2018)

Ensure that any faults in wiring or fittings in Forward Thinking Movement And Dance CIC are repaired promptly by a qualified electrician (18th Edition)

 Switch off electrical equipment when it is not in use and particularly at the end of the day’s work

Remember to unplug laptops, mobile phones and any other devices when not needed and NEVER leave them plugged in over night

Consider a safe holding area for devices, or request that staff do not leave laptops in the building overnight to reduce the risk of fire

Do not allow staff to plug in their own electrical items unless they have been PAT (Portable Appliance Testing) tested. This includes but is not limited to phone chargers, hair appliances, etc.

             Common Causes of Fire and How to Guard Against Them - Rubbish and waste     materials

Rubbish and waste materials that are left to accumulate can easily contribute to the spread of fire; they are also a place for malicious fires to be started

 Ensure that all waste materials are removed from the workplace on a regular basis and placed in a suitable container located in a safe position outside the building. Ideally, this container will be of metal construction and fitted with a lockable lid. Arrange for the container to be emptied regularly

 Do not burn rubbish on bonfires, even if it is thought safe to do so. Bonfires can easily get out of control and spread fire to nearby buildings or structures

                     Common Causes of Fire and How to Guard Against them - Smoking

In accordance with the Health Act 2006, there should be a "No Smoking" policy in the establishment. However, where possible, outdoor provisions for those who wish to smoke should be made. This outdoor area will be a safe distance away from the main building and not cause obstruction to the main entrance to the building or the exit from the building. Attention to fire safety will include the provision of suitable equipment being placed in the area to facilitate safe disposal of lighted cigarettes, i.e. a metal bucket filled with sand.

 E-cigarettes should not be left unattended while being charged and never overnight when the premises isempty

Products should be purchased from reputable sources

Care Workers should be mindful that if they use hand sanitiser, to minimize the risk of fire, they should rub their hands until dry, which indicates that the flammable alcohol has evaporated prior to igniting a cigarette

Flammable creams and ointments such as petroleum jelly or essential oils, increase the chance of a fire starting. Care Workers should wash their hands thoroughly after using creams, ointments or essential oils

               Common Causes of Fire and How to Guard Against Them - Cooking

 Toasters and microwave ovens should not be sited in office areas but they should only be available in kitchens. Ensure that they are regularly cleaned and be particularly aware of toast crumbs which can stick to the heating elements

 Electrical kitchen items should be PAT tested and all kitchen equipment should be maintained in line

 

with the manufacturers' instructions

Common Causes of Fire and How to Guard Against Them - Heating appliances

Portable heaters can often be hazardous, especially if placed too close to combustible furniture, fittings or materials. Convector heaters are safer than radiant fires. If heaters have to be used:

  Ensure that they are securely guarded and properly fixed to prevent them from being knocked over

  Place them well away from any materials which could easily ignite

  Never stand papers or books on them or drape clothing over them

  Do not allow ventilation grilles to become obstructed

  Clean portable heaters on a regular basis

Gas emergency cut offs must be linked to the main fire alarm system and isolate immediately the fire alarm is activated. They must be located on exit routes and clearly signed

Common Causes of Fire and How to Guard Against Them - Combustible materials

If combustible items, such as packing materials, are used or stored in the workplace, it is recommended that:

  The amounts brought into the premises should be kept to a minimum and sufficient for the day’s work only

  Any bulk supplies of such materials should be in a secure store, preferably outside the main premises

 Fire Drills

Staff may not follow appropriate action in an emergency if they have never experienced that action. Fire drills should be carried out to check that staff understand and are familiar with the operation of the emergency fire action plan, to evaluate effectiveness and identify any weaknesses in the plan.

The frequency of drills for each building should reflect the level of risk. Fire drills should take place at least twice a year. Each member of staff should participate at least once a year. During drills, fire scenarios should be introduced to reflect what could occur in a fire and the types of problems that staff may be faced with, such as an unusable escape route due to fire

During drills, a member of staff who is told of the supposed outbreak should operate the fire alarm and the staff should then rehearse the routine as fully as possible

 Where there is the possibility that someone may misinterpret the fire drill and call the Fire and Rescue Service, it will be appropriate to inform the Fire and Rescue Service prior to the commencement and on conclusion of a drill in order to prevent its unnecessary attendance

 If the fire warning system is connected to a remote alarm receiving centre, the receiving centre should be informed (to prevent the Fire and Rescue Service being called) and then advised when the drill is terminated

When carrying out a fire drill it may prove helpful to:

Inform visitors if they are present

 Nominate observers to assess the appropriateness of actions and identify problems such as communication difficulties, the use of a frequently used route instead of the most appropriate escape route and difficulties with door fastenings

 REMEMBER - fires are more likely to occur at night so night staff also need to be involved in night time fire drills

 Records

To ensure compliance with the regulations:

 Forward Thinking Movement And Dance CIC is required to maintain accurate and up-to-date records of all fire drills undertaken

The training statistics must be updated for all office-based staff to ensure that fire safety training has been undertaken and a plan of ongoing training and drills is formulated

Fire equipment should be regularly checked with the dates of such checks and any actions recorded

 End-of-Day Checks

Ensure that:

The building is secured by a named individual at the end of each working day

 

Doors and windows are secure

No combustible material is left lying around

 No unauthorised people are on the premises

 Alarms are switched on

External lighting is switched on

Cookers must be monitored for at least 1 hour after all cooking is completed to ensure that all heat exchanges are reduced with just the standard fridges/freezers operating

 

 Fire Risk Assessment

As a requirement of fire safety legislation in England, there is a need to have a Fire Risk Assessment

 This document assesses the people, buildings and other risks associated with your work environment and considers measures to make it safe and manageable

 Compartmentalisation

Sections of a building have fire breaks or shields which prevent the spread of fire for a given period of time

 Each compartmentalised area will have at least one fire door

Personal Emergency Evacuation Plan - PEEP

Staff who have medical, mobility or mental health considerations have individual risk assessments to assess their specific needs in the event of a fire. This is periodically reviewed to reflect changes in the work environment and/or their general wellbeing

Directional Signage

 These are signs which assist in leading people to a place of safety in the event of an evacuation

 Fire Drill

A practice drill to emulate a real situation

Ensures that all staff and residents are familiar with what to do in the event of a real fire situation

                                     Ensures that the fire plan works and establishes if improvements are needed

Fire Extinguishers

 Used to put out SMALL fires if safe to do so and if staff have been trained in their safe use

 Wayfinding Signage

Signage used to identify the floor level and direction of rooms within a building. These should meet the requirements of BS9991 (Fire Safety in the design, management and use of residential Buildings). Signage is to assist fire crews in locating individuals trapped in a building

 

Professionals providing this service should be aware of the following:

 Managers of Forward Thinking Movement And Dance CIC will have access to all emergency contact details and phone numbers and will ensure that these are kept up to date

 All staff of Forward Thinking Movement And Dance CIC should know where the Fire Risk Assessment is located and their responsibility in implementing it

 All staff of Forward Thinking Movement And Dance CIC should be aware of any suspicious activities which pose a fire risk and escalate these to Leanne Evans or their line manager immediately

 

 

 

People affected by this service should be aware of the following:

 Forward Thinking Movement And Dance CIC will ensure that it has good procedures in place to make sure that you receive your Care as planned and that you know how to contact Forward Thinking Movement And Dance CIC

 

 To meet the legal requirements of the regulated activities that Forward Thinking Movement And Dance CIC is registered to provide:

 The Fire and Rescue Services Act 2004

  The Care Act 2014

  Equality Act 2010

  The Health and Social Care Act 2008 (Regulated Activities) Regulations 2014

 Health and Social Care Act 2008 (Registration and Regulated Activities) (Amendment) Regulations 2015

  Health and Safety at Work etc. Act 1974

  Human Rights Act 1998

 Management of Health and Safety at Work Regulations 1999

  Mental Capacity Act 2005

 Mental Capacity Act Code of Practice

 

 The following roles may be affected by this policy:

  All staff

 The following Service Users may be affected by this policy:

 Service Users

 The following stakeholders may be affected by this policy:

 Family

 Representatives

 Commissioners

Fire and Rescue Service

 

 

  To ensure that staff understand that fire prevention is an important obligation for all organisations, including Forward Thinking Movement And Dance CIC, and that fire has the potential to present significant risks to health and safety.

 To ensure that Service Users receive support to live safely in their own homes.

 To ensure that where fire safety risks exist within Service Users' own homes that suitable support and advice is provided by Forward Thinking Movement And Dance CIC.

 

 This policy ensures that staff and Service Users are safeguarded from fire as far as is practically possible and Forward Thinking Movement And Dance CIC will do so by:

 Training Care Workers on fire safety

Completing risk assessments in Service Users' homes before service commences, on a regular basis and in response to any near misses, incidents or accidents

 Encouraging Care Workers to raise concerns about fire safety issues within the Service User's accommodation

 Encouraging Care Workers to be aware of, and to report, any fire safety concerns during the journey from, or to, theService User's accommodation, especially when accommodation is within a block of flats with communal areas and fire safety arrangements

 Making referrals to the Fire Service where there are concerns about fire risks in Service Users' homes

 Not permitting Care Workers to provide a service if there is a significant risk of fire

 Supporting Service Users to check smoke and carbon monoxide alarms and referring them to the Fire Brigade, where required, to ensure that the Service Users' safety is maintained

 

 

 Smoking

Forward Thinking Movement And Dance CIC must consider the risk posed by carelessly or accidentally discarded smoking materials, particularly if Service Users have limited mobility. This follows advice from coroners after inquests into the deaths of high-risk smokers with mobility problems who acquired burn injuries as a result of matches or cigarettes dropping on to clothing or bedding.

  Electronic Cigarettes

There have been incidents, including a fatal fire, where e-cigarettes were found to have contributed to the incident. Specifically, electronic cigarettes have a charging pack which can overheat, and they also use a heating element to vaporise the liquid content prior to inhalation. This element is an ignition source and will pose a risk near to any oxygen supply. Forward Thinking Movement And Dance CIC must:

Treat e-cigarettes similarly to standard cigarettes when Service Users are on medical oxygen or in a potentially oxygen-enriched environment

 Encourage Service Users not to leave their e-cigarettes unattended whilst on charge and never overnight when they are asleep

  Encourage Service Users to purchase products from reputable sources

  Highlight the fire risks of e-cigarettes to Service Users and document the risks in the risk assessment

  Combustible Materials

Consideration must also be given to those Service Users who may use hand sanitiser. Prior to igniting a cigarette, in order to minimise the risk of fire, alcohol rub users are instructed to rub their hands until dry, which indicates that the flammable alcohol has evaporated.

Flammable creams and ointments, such as petroleum jelly, increase the chance of a fire starting if

a Service User accidentally drops a cigarette or a match. Dropping cigarettes or matches on to clothing is dangerous, but when flammable creams are involved, this really increases the chance of a fire starting and becoming much more intense.

Essential oils are also flammable and if used in massage, a risk assessment must be conducted.

 Air, Foam, Fluid, or Gel-Filled Mattresses

Dynamic air flow pressure-relieving mattresses (and overlays placed on top of standard mattresses) are designed to prevent and help treat pressure ulcers for Service Users who spend extended periods in bed. They are commonly used in hospitals, hospices and care homes but are also provided for home use and are filled with air by a pump. There have been several fatal fires attributed to the use of such mattresses in the home. Forward Thinking Movement And Dance CIC should:

 Undertake a full assessment, which must include fire safety

Consider the differences between a home environment and that in a hospital or residential care setting (where the beds might usually be used). For example, patients are not allowed to smoke in hospital but can choose to do so at home; candles or some electrical equipment with a potential fire risk would not usually be present in hospitals and staff are usually on hand at these premises to provide immediate assistance if a fire occurs

 If there is a fire, and it is safe to do so, turn off the air pump

  Fire Risk Assessments

Risk assessments must consider the Service User’s environment, behaviours and the risk they pose to others, not just themselves

 When caring for Service Users with limited mobility, consider the provision of interlinked smoke alarms connected into a Telecare, Carecall or Lifeline type system

The difference between a hospital, residential care setting and a domestic household must be considered when using any medical devices or equipment

 If there is a heightened risk from fire (e.g. the Service User has dementia), make a referral to the Fire and Rescue Service as they provide advice and support to reduce risk and improve fire safety awareness in the home

 Discourage smoking in, or on any bed. If a Service User is insistent on smoking, they should smoke away from their bed and mattress and ideally only when someone else is with them to offer immediate

 

 

 

 Forward Thinking Movement And Dance CIC recognises that older people, people with disabilities, people with visual and hearing impairments, and people who are vulnerable for other reasons, all need careful consideration when it comes to fire safety. These are the main reasons why:

 They may not be able respond to a fire as quickly

They may not be able to escape a fire

They may be more at risk due to lifestyle factors

They may use healthcare equipment such as oxygen or emollient creams that are flammable

4.2  All Service Users will be assessed as to whether they:

l  Understand the dangers of fire

l  Understand the evacuation procedures

l  Require assistance with evacuation from their premises

Where assistance is required, a plan will be developed to specify how the Service User is to be assisted in the event of the need for evacuation. Service Users will be encouraged and supported to seek advice and guidance from the local Fire Brigade who

can conduct a home fire safety visit. This plan will be communicated to Care Workers with consent from the Service User. 

 

 

 Forward Thinking Movement And Dance CIC needs to consider the type of home a Service User is living in. The types of property may be a flat in a converted older building, a bungalow or a house, a purpose-built flat or maisonette. Service Users may also live in a multi-occupancy premises where there is a warden.

 Service Users will be supported to contact the local Fire Brigade to undertake a free Home Fire Safety Check. The firefighters and community fire safety staff will visit domestic properties to provide home fire safety advice and will supply and install a smoke alarm free of charge. These checks are the cornerstone of the proactive role that the Fire Service is now adopting in its drive to reduce the deaths and injuries that are caused by accidental fires.

 Escape plans for Service Users living in a purpose-built flat, bedsit or maisonette, are not the same as for a house. The local Fire Brigade Home Safety Team will be able to provide free advice regarding the safest approach.

Where the Service User lives in a type of sheltered accommodation, consideration must be given to how the alarm system links to the individual’s smoke detector. The landlord of the accommodation must share the evacuation plan for the housing organisation and for the Service User with Forward Thinking Movement And Dance CIC.

         Service Users with Hearing Impairments

If a Service User has a hearing impairment, they will be provided with support to get a smoke alarm which uses a strobe light and vibrating pads.

In the event of a fire, if it is difficult for them to call 999 themselves, then an arrangement will be put in place for a neighbour to do it for them.

If the Service User has specialist equipment, such as a text phone or minicom, they can contact the Emergency Services on 18000.

         Mobility Difficulties

If it is difficult for a Service User to test their alarm, Forward Thinking Movement And Dance CIC must signpost them to someone who can assist.

If they have trouble moving around, Forward Thinking Movement And Dance CIC will signpost to support the Service User to consider fitting a community alarm or telecare device, which will allow them to alert someone else in the event of an emergency.

         Visual Impairments

A person with a visual impairment cannot see smoke, so a working smoke detector and escape plans are particularly important, as is the need for clear escape routes.

Service Users will be supported to put a coloured sticker on their smoke alarm if they have trouble seeing it to test it, or they can ask their local Fire Service if they can provide one for them.

Electrical leads will be checked regularly by touch. If they are frayed or faulty, they must not be plugged in or switched on. If electrics are giving off a burning smell, they will be turned off and unplugged immediately.

        Service Users living with Dementia

Some of the specific risks and vulnerabilities to fire that living with dementia creates are:

 Leaving cooking unattended or putting things on cookers or in microwaves that must not be there

 Not understanding the sound of the smoke detector in the event of a fire and taking appropriate action

 Not recognising the property that they live in can inhibit their ability to exit in a safe and timely manner in the event of afire

Forward Thinking Movement And Dance CIC will seek evacuation advice from the local Fire Brigade who can conduct a Fire Home Safety check.

        Activity/Behavioural Risk Assessments

Behaviours and activities, such as the use of alcohol and drugs or smoking, may require a more detailed, activity-specific assessment and management plan. This is particularly important where individuals with limited mobility smoke.

  Mental Capacity

Where a Service User is identified as being vulnerable and at risk from fire, Forward Thinking Movement And Dance CIC will need to obtain the Service User's consent to refer them to the local Fire Brigade Home Safety Team. There will be instances where the Service User either lacks capacity or has capacity but makes unwise decisions. When a person lacks capacity to make decisions about their fire safety, Forward Thinking Movement And Dance CIC will request a multi-agency meeting, with the Fire Brigade invited to

 

discuss and agree best interest decisions. When a person has capacity to make decisions about their fire safety, but refuses to consent to a fire safety visit, Forward Thinking Movement And Dance CIC will record this in the Service User's records.

 Fire Evacuation Plans and Hoarders

Forward Thinking Movement And Dance CIC needs to ensure that a risk assessment is undertaken

for Service Users who hoard. The risk assessment must consider that hoarded materials can easily catch alight if they come into contact with heat sources such as overloaded extension leads, the kitchen hob or naked flames like candles or cigarettes. Because of the number of possessions, fires will also spread much faster, exit routes can become blocked, making safe evacuation more difficult. Fires can also spread much faster where there are flammable items such as newspapers or cardboard. Hoarding also affects the fire fighters' ability to tackle the fire because it makes the fire more intense and makes it more difficult to effect a rescue. Forward Thinking Movement And Dance CIC can support a Service User who hoards to live more safely by:

Encouraging them to not light candles or tea lights of any kind

Ensuring that they have appropriate heating so that they are not using portable heaters, candles or gas hobs to heat the home

Suggesting, where possible, if they can make sure that they smoke outside if they are a smoker

 Contacting Leicestershire to discuss options for support to clear some of the clutter

Working with them to develop an escape plan

 Booking a home fire safety visit free of charge with the local Fire Brigade

assistance if required

 Fire retardant covers, bedding, or clothing for at-risk smokers must always be considered, particularly if they are confined by immobility (crib 5 rated)

Keep all ignition sources away from bedding and dynamic airflow mattresses and do not use dynamic airflow mattresses with electric blankets

 Do not burn candles in the room of a Service User as this could result in a heightened risk from fire

Do not overload plug sockets and ensure that electrical items are maintained and switched off and unplugged when not in use

 Consider evacuation routes, particularly if the Service User has limited mobility

 Procedure in the Event of a Fire

 Shout to alert any others in the Service User's home

Call 999 – Request the Fire Service

 Do not put yourself or others in danger of fire by trying to tackle a fire

Evacuate the building taking the Service User if possible

 Where possible, close the doors behind you as this will help to slow down the fire

If you need to access a room through an evacuation route, then check the warmth of the door with the back of the hand. If it is warm do not open and find an alternative route

 If it is not possible to evacuate the Service User, leave them sitting on the floor with a damp towel held over their mouth and nose to reduce smoke inhalation. Close all doors and windows and cover the door well with a damp towel if possible

 If there is smoke in a room keep low and cover your mouth with a damp cloth

 Do not re-enter the building under any circumstances

 Wait for the Fire Service to attend

Do not re-enter the building until the fire officer advises it is safe to do so

 If there are any combustible materials such as Oxygen, inform the Fire Brigade

This policy was adopted by

FTM Dance

On

18th September  2020

Date to be reviewed

18th September  2021

Signed on behalf of the provider

Name of signatory

LEANNE EVANS

Role of signatory (e.g. chair, director or owner)

Director

FTM Dance – MCA and DOLS Policy

 To meet the legal requirements of the regulated activities that Forward Thinking Movement And Dance CIC is registered to provide:

The Care Act 2014

The Health and Social Care Act 2008 (Regulated Activities) Regulations 2014

Human Rights Act 1998

 Mental Capacity Act 2005

 Mental Capacity Act Code of Practice

 

 The following roles may be affected by this policy:

Registered Manager

 Other management

 All workers delivering support or care

 The following Service Users may be affected by this policy:

 All adult (16+) Service Users who might lack mental capacity as defined under the Act in England and Wales

The following stakeholders may be affected by this policy:

The family and friends of Service Users who might lack mental capacity as defined under the Act in England andWales

 

 To ensure adherence to the statutory framework of the MCA, including the five principles, to empower and protect vulnerable people who may lack capacity always to make their own decisions; to support them to plan ahead, if they wish, for a time when they may lose capacity.

 To ensure that those working with an adult who lacks capacity will make specific decisions that are in the person's best interests as explained in the MCA and its code of practice, and the least restrictive of their rights that can be identified as meeting their needs.

To build confidence among staff regarding how and when to assess someone's mental capacity, and how to make best interests decisions when necessary, whilst also ensuring that staff are aware of their responsibilities and are legally protected through following the principles of the MCA.

 

 To ensure staff at Forward Thinking Movement And Dance CIC know, and work within the Act's underpinning principles:

  The presumption of capacity – every adult has the right to make his or her own decisions and must be assumed to have the capacity to do so unless it is proved otherwise

Individuals must be supported to make their own decisions – people must be given all appropriate help before anyone concludes that they cannot make their own decisions

 Individuals must be able to make what might be seen as eccentric or unwise decisions, without this being used as the sole reason to say they lack capacity

 Best interests – anything done for, or on behalf of people who lack capacity must be in their best interests

 Least restrictive option - before any act is done or a decision is made, staff must consider if they have found the option that, while meeting the need, is the least restrictive possible of the person's basic rights and freedoms

 To ensure that staff at Forward Thinking Movement And Dance CIC understand the importance of helping people to make their own decisions:

Staff know how to present the right information in the right way, including using easy-read or pictures where suitable, and being clear about all the available options

Staff actively look for the best ways to communicate with an individual, by checking that their vision and hearing are as good as they can be, or querying if an interpreter might be needed

 Staff put the Service User at ease, whether by choosing the right time of day to explain about a decision to the person, or asking whether they would like a relative or friend present

Staff allow time for the Service User to ponder on the decision, or go away and discuss it with trusted relatives or friends

 When a person lacks the mental capacity to make a particular decision, everything that is done for, or on behalf of that person is in the person’s best interests and restricts their rights as little as possible. In working out what is in someone’s best interests, staff apply the mandatory checklist of factors laid out in the Mental Capacity Act.

Staff know how the Mental Capacity Act defines restraint. They know that it is lawful to

restrain someone who lacks mental capacity in the person's best interests, when the person lacks the mental capacity to consent to what staff want to do, but only if they reasonably believe, not only that the person does lack capacity and what is proposed is in their best interests, but also that the restraint is both:

  Necessary to prevent harm to the person, and also

 That it is a proportionate response to the likelihood and seriousness of that harm

 They know that any necessary and proportionate restraint must be used for the shortest possible time. They seek to learn from incidents of restraint to find ways to avoid or minimise its use in the future.

 Staff know that if restraint of a person lacking capacity to consent amounts to a deprivation of liberty, it must be specially authorised, in order to protect the human rights of the Service User by allowing them to challenge the restrictions in the Court of Protection.

 Staff know that the Mental Capacity Act does not allow a person to be deprived of their liberty in community settings such as domiciliary care, supported living, extra-care housing or shared lives, unless this receives direct authorisation from the Court of Protection.

  Staff in a community setting know that, if a Service User is deprived of their liberty, the provider must ask the Commissioner or Local Authority to apply directly to the Court of Protection for authorisation.  The authorisation process is described in the Deprivation of Liberty in Community Settings Policy and Procedure at Forward Thinking Movement And Dance CIC.

Procedure 

 

 

Staff at Forward Thinking Movement And Dance CIC know and work within the Mental Capacity Act principles and codes of practice, including how to recognise the deprivation of liberty of someone lacking mental capacity, and how then to proceed.

 All staff of Forward Thinking Movement And Dance CIC are given training in the Mental Capacity Act. References to training resources can be found in the Underpinning Knowledge/References section of  this policy.

 Forward Thinking Movement And Dance CIC makes available to staff, documents and resources about the Act, including training resources, which are available under 'Useful Documents' in your QCS system.

 Any assessment of a Service User's mental capacity is decision specific and time specific to decide whether they can make a particular decision at the time it needs to be made. There must never be a generalised statement that someone lacks mental capacity. It is never enough to say that the Service User lacks mental capacity because of a diagnosis (such as dementia), or because of their age, or because of their appearance.

 Some people lack mental capacity over a long period of time for many kinds of decisions, and it is not necessary to carry out repeated formal capacity assessments. However, capacity must always be reviewed whenever a Service User's Care Plan is being developed or reviewed, or there appears to be some change in their capacity to make decisions, or when they lack capacity for a major decision

that needs to be made, for example, about where to live, or whether to have serious medical treatment.

There is no requirement in the Mental Capacity Act 2005 to complete any specific documentation regarding assessments of capacity and subsequent decisions made on their basis. However, paid staff only receive protection from liability when they can prove that they have come to 'reasonable' decisions about capacity and best interests, and some form of documentation is essential evidence of that process.

 For day-to-day decisions, Care Workers always work to a Care Plan which is clearly based on assessments of capacity and best interests. For more important decisions, it is certainly good practice for capacity assessments and best interests decisions to be recorded. This can be done by completing the forms accompanying this policy with the Service User.

 Remember that, when assessing a Service User's capacity, the person does not have to prove to you that they have capacity to make a certain decision. It is up to the person who will make decisions on behalf of the Service User to prove that, on the balance of probabilities, the Service User lacks the mental capacity to make this decision.

 Do not set out to 'fail' someone; give Service Users all the help you can to enable them to make their own decisions. Take your time: a good capacity assessment is a conversation and must not be rushed. For some people, having a Care Worker or a family member to sit with them during the assessment process may be reassuring and help them relax and feel comfortable.

 Make sure that the record of the assessment is completed fully, that it is signed by the assessor and that it is dated. This form must be kept with the Care Plan so it is readily available and can be revisited in the future when reviewing aspects of the Service User's care.

If it is determined that the Service User does not have the mental capacity to make a particular decision at the time it needs to be made, any action taken or any decision made must be in his or her best interests.

 If there is a dispute about best interests, firstly ensure that you have followed the mandatory best interests checklist, and tried, in particular, to make a decision that is in alignment with what the Service User wants. The following must be considered:

Family and friends will not always agree about what is in the best interests of an individual. However, they usually have greater knowledge than Care Workers of what this Service User would have wanted, and sometimes of what the Service User now wants

If you are the decision-maker, you will need to clearly demonstrate in your record keeping that you have made a decision based on all available evidence and taken into account all conflicting views. You will take particular care to look for the option that is the least restrictive of the Service User's rights

 If there is a dispute, the following things might assist you in determining what is in the Service User’s best interests:

Involve an advocate who can represent the Service User who lacks mental capacity for this decision, to help their wishes and feelings to be central to the decision-making

 

 In some situations, a best interests meeting is a good idea, to identify all the possible options and explore the pros and cons of each

 Go to mediation

An application could be made to the Court of Protection for a ruling. This would normally be undertaken by the relevant Local Authority or NHS Trust when a complex and serious decision is to be made. If relatives/friends are not permitted to see or speak to the Service User alone, or sometimes even not allowed to visit, it is essential to resolve the dispute with relatives or friends, or ask the Local Authority urgently to request the Court to make a best interests decision for this person

 You must ensure that all documents you complete are both signed and dated

  In making a decision in someone's best interests, the following must be taken into account (except in an emergency, when there is no time). The following checklist is a mandatory requirement under the Mental Capacity Act of matters to consider by a decision-maker:

 Is the person likely to regain the mental capacity to make this decision and, if so, can this decision wait until then?

  Do everything possible to encourage the person to take part in the making of the decision, even though they lack the capacity to make the decision

 Give great weight to the person’s past and present wishes and feelings (in particular if they have been written down)

 Identify any beliefs and values (e.g. religious, cultural or moral) that would be likely to influence the decision in question

 Include any other factors that would be relevant and important to this person if they were able to make their own decision

 Be sure that you are not making assumptions about this person's best interests simply based upon the person's age, appearance, condition or behaviour

 As far as possible, the decision-maker must consult other people who might have views on the person's best interests and what they would have wanted when they had mental capacity, especially the following people:

 Anyone previously named by the person lacking capacity as someone to be consulted

 Carers, close relatives, friends or anyone else interested in the person’s welfare

Any attorney appointed under a Lasting Power of Attorney

  Any deputy appointed by the Court of Protection to make decisions for the person

 

 

 

 

  To meet the legal requirements of the regulated activities that Forward Thinking Movement And Dance CIC is registered to provide:

Coroners and Justice Act 2009

  The Care Act 2014

 Care Quality Commission (Registration) Regulations 2009

 Human Rights Act 1998

  Mental Capacity Act 2005

 Mental Capacity Act Code of Practice

 

 

The following roles may be affected by this policy:

 Registered Manager

Other management

Administrator

Care staff

 The following Service Users may be affected by this policy:

 All Service Users aged 16 and over who may lack mental capacity to consent to arrangements needed to give them necessary care or treatment in their own home, supported living, or shared lives schemes

 The following stakeholders may be affected by this policy:

Family

 Advocates

Representatives

  Commissioners

 External health professionals

  Local Authority

 NHS

 

 Before any Service User is deprived of their liberty, all practical efforts are made to avoid deprivation of liberty.

 Service Users are not restrained except where this is necessary and proportionate and are not deprived of their liberty without lawful authority.

 Authorisations by the Court of Protection to deprive Service Users of their liberty, including their duration and any conditions, are incorporated into Care Plans, and full information is given to the Service User and their relatives or friends who are interested in their welfare.

 If a person might lack capacity to consent, all Care interventions are carried out in accordance with the wider Mental Capacity Act (MCA), using the least restrictive options that can be found.

 Forward Thinking Movement and Dance CIC and Forward Thinking Movement And Dance CIC understand the MCA definition of restraint, minimise its use in a person-centred way, and record why it is in the person's best interests, as well as being both:

Necessary to prevent harm to the person, and

 Proportionate to the likelihood of harm as well as the seriousness of that harm

  Care Workers work within the framework of the Mental Capacity Act 2005, including around restraint and deprivation of liberty.

 

 

 In community services, such as supported living, shared lives schemes, extra-care housing and domiciliary care services, providing services to people aged 16 and over, who lack capacity to consent to arrangements for giving them necessary care or treatment, when those arrangements may amount to a deprivation of liberty:

 The service follows guidance about what amounts to deprivation of liberty given in the 'Cheshire

West' Supreme Court judgement P (by his litigation friend the Official Solicitor) v Cheshire West and Chester Council & Anor [2014] UKSC 19 (See Underpinning Knowledge)

 In community services such as supported living, shared lives schemes, extra-care housing and domiciliary care, or in any service where Service Users are aged 16 or 17:

  The service follows Supreme Court guidance (see 4.1 above) and understands how to support commissioners to seek lawful authority from the Court of Protection, for deprivation of liberty, where no less restrictive option can be found to deliver the required care and support

 Forward Thinking Movement And Dance CIC works within the Mental Capacity Act 2005 and its Code of Practice.

 Forward Thinking Movement And Dance CIC can demonstrate that it uses every practicable means to maximise the mental capacity of Service Users to make their own decisions in accordance with the Mental Capacity Act 2005 and its code of practice.

 Forward Thinking Movement And Dance CIC can demonstrate its commitment to the reduction of restraint and avoidance of deprivation of liberty wherever possible.

 

 

  All service providers working with people aged 16 and above who might lack mental capacity to consent to health or care interventions, work within the Mental Capacity Act.

 If deprivation of liberty is authorised by the Court of Protection:

 Ensure that the Service User and their relatives understand what restrictions have been authorised, and how they can challenge any aspect of the authorisation with the help of an IMCA (Independent Mental Capacity Advocate)

  Record the end date set by the Court of Protection and arrange at least a month earlier to convene discussions with commissioners or local authority about whether a new authorisation will be needed

 Notify the Care Quality Commission of the Court of Protection application and its outcome

 Record any conditions and ensure that they are incorporated into the Care Plan

  If deprivation of liberty appears necessary and proportionate, and unavoidable, notify the Commissioners and request them to amend the Care Plan to avoid deprivation of liberty if possible, and, where this is not possible, ask them to to apply appropriately and in a timely way to the Court of Protection for authorisation.

For services such as supported living, extra care housing or shared lives schemes, or for Service Users aged 16 or 17, the Deprivation of Liberty Scheme is not available. It must be recognised

that authorisation can only be given by the Court of Protection, and that application is made by the commissioning local authority or NHS authority (CCG).

Keep full records of assessments, applications, discussions with the Service User and their relatives or friends, about deprivation of liberty, and actions taken to minimise its use.

 Be prepared for Court of Protection Appointed Assessors to visit the service. They will interview the person, view records, and may interview staff.

  Provide services within the framework of the MCA statutory principles (see the MCA Code of Practice).

 Know when and how to assess decision-specific and time-specific capacity, and who should carry out the assessment; record capacity assessments including efforts made to enable the Service User to make the decision for themselves.

  Know when and how to make best interests decisions on behalf of Service Users who lack mental capacity at the time a decision needs to be made. Record who was consulted and, in particular, the wishes and feelings of the person.

  Recognise, record and minimise the use of restraint.

 If deprivation of liberty is suspected:

 Recognise, record and minimise the use of deprivation of liberty (as clarified by the Supreme Court ruling [2014] UKSC 19 and in CQC Briefing on Deprivation of Liberty)

 

 

  Deprivation of Liberty 'Acid Test'

                                  The Supreme Court 'Acid Test' clarifies that a person is deprived of their liberty if they:

 Lack capacity to consent to the arrangements needed to give them necessary care or treatment

 Are not free to leave (they may be allowed to go out with staff, or even alone, with permission, but may not go to live somewhere else, or without staff permission) and

  Are subject to continuous (or continual) supervision and control. (A way to think about this is, do staff know all the time where someone is and what they are doing, and do staff provide and control their access to other people, activities, and the community?)

 Court of Protection Authorisation Conditions

There are not always conditions attached to an Authorisation, but where they are imposed, the intention is to lessen the deprivation of liberty in some way, for example by saying the Provider must arrange taking the person out into the community regularly, or do their best to make it possible for relatives or friends to visit the person and, where possible and safe, take them out

 Conditions are part of the legal authorisation so must be complied with. If a Provider cannot comply with any condition, they should urgently contact the Commissioners of the service, to discuss the best way  to proceed

 Restraint

The MCA defines restraint as the use, or threat, of force to make someone lacking mental capacity do something they are resisting, or restricting the freedom of movement of someone lacking mental capacity, whether the person resists this or not

l  Restraint is only lawful if it is in the person's best interests: except in an emergency, best interests are worked out in accordance with the statutory checklist in MCA Section 4. (See MCA Code of Practice Chapter 5). But restraint must also meet two extra conditions (see MCA Code of Practice 6.40 and following)

l  The restraint must be necessary to prevent harm to the person, and a proportionate response to the likelihood and seriousness of that harm; its intensity and duration must be as minimal as possible

  Restraint is considered part of a deprivation of liberty, but individual restraints

                     do not themselves constitute a deprivation of liberty, since deprivation of liberty is defined by reference to the entire Care               Plan, and how it meets the 'Acid Test' (see 6.1 above)

 IMCA

The Mental Capacity Act 2005 introduced the role of the Independent Mental Capacity Advocate (IMCA). IMCAs are a legal safeguard for people who lack the capacity to make specific important decisions: including making decisions about where they live and about serious medical treatment options, but also including the support of people who are deprived of their liberty. IMCAs are mainly instructed to represent people where there is no one independent of services, such as a family member or friend, who is able to represent the person

 

 

 

             Mental Capacity Act

 The Mental Capacity Act 2005, covering England and Wales, lays out a legal framework for people who lack capacity to make decisions for themselves, or who have capacity and want to make preparations for a time when they might lack capacity in the future

 It sets out who can take decisions, in what situations, and how they should go about this

 Most of the MCA applies to people from the age of 16 upwards

 Certain parts, such as the right to make an advance decision to refuse treatment or appoint attorneys under a Lasting Power of Attorney, only relate to people aged 18 and over

           Test for Capacity

 The Act sets out a two-stage test for assessing whether a person lacks capacity to take a particular decision at the time it needs to be made. It is a 'decision-specific and time-specific' test, and must be recorded in a way that explains why you have reached the conclusions to answer these questions:

  Firstly, is this person facing a decision that they are unable to make, even with all help that can be given?

 Secondly, is this inability BECAUSE OF some impairment or disturbance in their mind or brain, whether short-term or permanent?

 The person has capacity for this decision if they can do all of the following:

 Understand appropriately presented information about the decision to be made

 Retain that information for long enough to use or weigh that information as part of the decision- making process

 Use or weigh that information as part of the decision-making process

 Communicate their decision (by talking, sign language or any other means)

Best Interests

Everything that is done to, or on behalf of a person who lacks capacity must be in that person’s best interests. The Mental Capacity Act does not define best interests, but lays out how best interests decisions must be made. The Act provides a checklist of factors that decision-makers must work through, except in an emergency, in deciding what is in a person’s best interests. A person can put his/her wishes and feelings into a written statement if they so wish, which the person making the decision must consider

Lasting Power of Attorney (LPA)

  The Act allows a person aged 18 and over, who has capacity to make this decision, to appoint attorneys to act on their behalf if they should lose capacity in the future. There are two types of LPA, one to make health and welfare decisions, and the other to make finance and property decisions. The provision replaces the previous role of Enduring Power of Attorney (EPA)

  Staff should be aware of any LPA in place for Service Users in their care; they should know which individuals have been given powers to make which specific types of decisions

 Court Appointed Deputies

The Act provides for a system of court appointed deputies to replace the previous system of receivership in the Court of Protection. Deputies are able to take decisions on welfare, healthcare and financial matters as authorised by the Court but are not able to refuse consent to life-sustaining treatment

 They are only appointed if the Court cannot make a one-off decision to resolve the issues, and if the person has already lost capacity to make these decisions. Staff should be aware of any Court appointed deputies in place for Service Users in their care, and of what decisions any deputy is authorised to make

Court of Protection

 The Court of Protection has jurisdiction relating to the whole Act and is the final arbiter for capacity matters. It has its own procedures and nominated judges

 Advance Decision to Refuse Treatment (ADRT)

 

  The Act creates ways for people aged 18 and over to make a decision in advance to refuse medical treatment if they should lose capacity in the future. This is called an advance decision to refuse treatment.

  An advance decision to refuse treatment that is not life-sustaining does not need to be in writing, but the person must ensure that professionals know what treatment(s) the person is refusing

 A person who is refusing in advance, life-sustaining treatment, must make sure that their advance decision meets certain requirements. These are that the decision must be in writing, signed and witnessed, with a clear statement of which treatment or treatments the person is refusing. In addition, there must be an express statement that the person understands that this may put their life at risk but that the decision stands even if it does so

 A person can only refuse specified medical treatments; they cannot insist on any particular treatment

  Carers must be clear

  Whether an advance decision to refuse treatment exists

  What is in it, and

  Where it is to be found

Any doctor or paramedic needs to know if treatment they might suggest would be lawful or whether the person has refused it in advance.

  Independent Mental Capacity Advocate (IMCA)

An IMCA is a specific kind of 'non-instructed' advocate, who can only be appointed by a Local Authority or NHS body, in certain circumstances, to support a person who lacks capacity but has no one except paid carers interested in their welfare

The IMCA makes representations about the person’s wishes, feelings, beliefs and values, whilst bringing to the attention of the decision-maker all factors that are relevant to the decision. The decision-maker must consider the views of the IMCA but is not bound by them

 Carers need to know if an IMCA is going to visit the person, to receive them as a colleague after checking their identity; the IMCA has the right to speak with the Service User alone if they wish, and the right to see notes relevant to the decision that is to be made

 Restraint

The Mental Capacity Act defines restraint of a person lacking mental capacity to consent to the action for which restraint is needed as:

 The use, or threat of use, of force to make someone do something they are resisting, or

The restriction of a person's freedom of movement, whether they are resisting this or not

 Protection from Liability

 The Mental Capacity Act allows carers, healthcare and social care staff to carry out certain tasks for, or on behalf of people whom they reasonably believe to lack capacity to consent to these actions, without fear of liability

For actions to receive protection from liability, the worker must

 Reasonably believe the person lacks capacity to consent to or refuse the proposed actions

 Reasonably believe the actions they propose are in the person's best interests, and

  Reasonably believe they have found the least restrictive option to meet the identified need   Note that two extra conditions apply for the use of restraint. Any action intended to restrain a person

who lacks capacity will not attract protection from liability unless the following two conditions are also

met:

 The person taking action must reasonably believe that restraint is necessary to prevent harm to the person,and

The amount or type or restraint must be a proportionate response to the likelihood and seriousness of that harm

Deprivation of Liberty

A person who lacks capacity to consent to or refuse the Care Plan that keeps them safe is deprived of their liberty if this Care Plan shows that they are: Under complete and effective supervision and control by staff (this may not always be 'line of sight' supervision, but staff prevent the person from acting in a way that would cause them harm, and

 

know at all times pretty well what they are doing) and they are

Not free to leave the place where they are being cared for (in the sense of leaving to go and live somewhere else if  they choose, or go away on a trip without permission from others)

              Authorisation of Deprivation of Liberty

 In community settings such as when receiving care in their own home, supported living, extra-care housing or shared lives schemes, a person aged 16 or older who is deprived of their liberty to give them necessary care or treatment must have their rights protected by having the situation authorised by the Court of Protection. This is arranged by the commissioner of the service or, for self-funders, the Local Authority. If Forward Thinking Movement And Dance CIC suspects that

a Service User is deprived of their liberty they must notify the Commissioner or Local Authority

 

This policy was adopted by

FTM Dance

On

18th September  2020

Date to be reviewed

18th September  2021

Signed on behalf of the provider

Name of signatory

LEANNE EVANS

Role of signatory (e.g. chair, director or owner)

Director

FTM Dance – Moving And Handling Policy

 Forward Thinking Movement And Dance CIC will comply with the Health and Safety at Work Act (1974) which requires Forward Thinking Movement And Dance CIC to provide “such information, instruction, training and supervision as is necessary to ensure so far as is reasonably practicable, the health and safety at work of his employees”.

Forward Thinking Movement And Dance CIC will ensure that its employees will “take reasonable care for his or her own safety and the health and safety of other people who may be affected by his or her acts or omissions”.

 As an employer, Forward Thinking Movement And Dance CIC understands that it has a responsibility to:

l  Avoid hazardous manual handling operations as far as is reasonably practicable

Make a suitable and sufficient assessment of any hazardous manual handling operations that cannot be avoided and taking account of all factors:

Task

Individual capacity

 Load

 Environment, and

 Other

Reduce the risk of injury from these operations as far as is reasonably practicable and using an ergonomic approach

Forward Thinking Movement And Dance CIC employees have a responsibility to:

                         Co-operate with safe systems of work and follow Health and Safety instructions

 Participate in training

Report any near misses, incidents or accidents

Report any hazards or defects

                          Report any changes or concerns in the Service User's condition or environment that impacts on manual handling

 

 

 

 Manual Handling Risk Assessments Are Undertaken When:

 A handling task is unavoidable

 A new handling task has to be carried out

                            An accident or incident occurs involving a handling activity

 New equipment is introduced

 A handling task has to be carried out in a new environment, (e.g. assisting someone in a wheelchair to go outside instead of just pushing the wheelchair over smoother internal flooring) or there are changes in the environment (e.g. new carpet is fitted or new furniture installed etc.)

A member of staff complains of shoulder, arm, neck or back pain or any other pain/injury attributed to handling activities at work

 New staff are appointed

 New staff are appointed who are under 18 years of age

A member of staff informs you that she is pregnant or is returning to work following a pregnancy of at least 6 months

                            A member of staff returns to work following lengthy absence

A handling task becomes too difficult

 Assessing Manual Handling Risks

Legislation requires that all manual handling operations, that may present a risk of injury, must be the subject of a risk assessment carried out by a competent person and using an ergonomic approach. The purpose of a risk assessment is to:

  Identify all hazardous moving and handling tasks carried out at work and determine the likelihood and severity of any injury or harm arising from these tasks and to whom

  Assess all factors, including existing control measures, involved in the hazard using the TILEO analysis

  Identify control measures that will reduce the risk of injury to acceptable levels

 Identify all employees who may be at risk of injury from moving and handling tasks in the performance of their duties

 TILEO Assessment

One way to assess manual handling activities is to look at four specific areas – Task, Individual, Load and Environment (easily remembered by the acronym TILEO).

 T (Task) – does the task involve:

Twisting or stooping

Strenuous pushing or pulling

Excessive lifting or lowering

Handling at a distance from the trunk

 High task frequency without adequate rest periods

 I (Individual movers) – do the people carrying out the tasks require:

 Specialised training

  Unusual strength or ability

 A uniform or personal protective equipment

Consideration during impaired ability – for example, if pregnant

  L (Load) – is the person or object being moved:

  Heavy or large

  Unwieldy or difficult to grasp

 Unpredictable or unstable

 Vulnerable to injury or fragile

  Sharp, hot or hazardous in any other way

 

 

(Environment) – does the area in which work is carried out have:

Restricted space

Slippery or uneven floors

 Slopes, ramps or steps

Adequate levels of heat, light and ventilation

 O (Other) – Final things to consider:

 Is the movement or posture hindered by personal protective equipment, or

 Is there an absence of the correct PPE for the task?

 Is equipment involved, if so is it clean, serviced, available and well maintained?

 Types of Risk Assessment

The three different types of risk assessment are:

Generic Risk Assessment - covering the whole office or work activities together with any locations visited by staff outside these sites as part of their duties. A generic assessment must be completed at least annually and more frequently if significant changes in equipment, workplace or staffing occur. The risk assessment is used to identify manual handling hazards and required control measures using the

TILEO assessment.

Individual Risk Assessment - to be competed for any member of staff whose capacity for moving and handling at work may be impaired. This would include staff who are pregnant, young workers or those with ill health or disabilities.

Service User Risk Assessment - in respect of Service User risk assessment and handling plans, it is recognised that a specific assessment for each Service User is required. All these areas form the basis for both the assessment and the control measures that can be put in place to minimise risk and enable safe systems of work. The Service User Risk Assessment must be reviewed at least annually, or when circumstances change.

 Basic Principles of Manual Handling

There are some basic principles that everyone must observe prior to carrying out a manual handling operation:

Ensure that the object is light enough to lift, is stable and unlikely to shift or move

Heavy or awkward loads must be moved using a handling aid

 Make sure the route is clear of obstructions

 Make sure there is somewhere to put the load down wherever it is to be moved to

Stand as close to the load as possible, and spread your feet to shoulder width

 Bend your knees and try and keep the back's natural, upright posture

Grasp the load firmly as close to the body as you can

 Use the legs to lift the load in a smooth motion as this offers more leverage reducing the strain on your back

Carry the load close to the body with the elbows tucked into the body

 Avoid twisting the body as much as possible by turning your feet to position yourself with the load

 Lifting and Handling in Teams

 Team lifting needs to be co-ordinated properly. Try and make sure that those lifting are around the same height and build, make sure one person is responsible for giving instructions, etc. Make sure that everyone lifts, moves off, stops and places the load down at the same time

  Lifting in teams does not mean that the weight of the load can be doubled for each extra person in the team

  For example, for a lifting team of two people the load must only be increased by two thirds the sums of their individual capabilities

 More detailed information on team manual handling can be found on the Health and Safety Executive website

        Training

  All staff must receive, as part of their training, safer handling and back care from someone

 

suitably trained and competent and agreed by Forward Thinking Movement And Dance CIC before commencing any assignments

Leanne Evans is responsible for ensuring that all staff complete training as required in order to meet the requirements of Health and Safety Legislation, policies/procedures at Forward Thinking Movement And Dance CIC and those of theRegulator

Leanne Evans must ensure that all staff undertaking manual handling activities as part of their role attend annual manual handling refresher training. All course content, including duration, must comply with the guidelines laid down in the Training Plan at Forward Thinking Movement And Dance CIC

Records must be maintained of staff training including sessions attended, who the trainer was, staff signing-in sheet with names printed alongside signatures, course material covered, and equipment used in the training session

There must be evidence of an annual staff training and update programme

All staff who have successfully attended safer handling and back care training must receive a certificate of attendance for their records

 Leanne Evans must make sure that training equipment and facilities are available

 The Registered Manager must ensure that their staff receive sufficient notice and detail of forthcoming training requirements, including the wearing of appropriate clothing and footwear when attending practical training sessions

            Manual Handling Aids

Mechanical handling aids can reduce the risk of injury when used correctly. Even simple aids such as trolleys, sack trucks and wheelbarrows can be used to move items and reduce the likelihood of injury

It is better to push rather than pull, and to use body weight and leg muscles to do the work. Make sure the load is kept under control, particularly on slopes

                                    In some cases, more sophisticated manual handling aids may be required, for example, hoists

It must be remembered that, although the handling aids will eliminate many of the manual handling risks, their use will introduce others and these risks must be assessed

 Any aids used will need to be regularly checked that they are safe to use. Some equipment, such as a hoist will need to be maintained by someone competent to do so and have regular services carried out

                          Monitoring of Manual Handling Accidents, Incidents or Near Misses

Any manual handling injury or incident that occurs at work must be recorded and reported as soon as possible

 Any required remedial action to prevent a similar injury or incident must be undertaken immediately

The Accident Form must be completed in all cases and sent to Leanne Evans

 If the accident is deemed to be reportable under the Reporting of Injuries, Diseases and Dangerous Occurrence Regulations 2013 (RIDDOR), Leanne Evans will submit the report

 Following any such incident, Risk Assessments and work procedures including any Care Plans will be reviewed to ensure the continued safety of all staff members

 Accidents, incidents and near misses will be reviewed as part of continuous improvement at Forward Thinking Movement And Dance CIC and to understand any lessons learnt

                      Record Keeping

All current health and safety related records must be retained locally at:

Pera Business Park Nottingham Road Melton Mowbray LE13 0PB

When records have been replaced or are no longer valid, they can either be held locally or sent to archive.

  Records of risk assessments, training and other health and safety documents will be retained, either in paper or electronic format

  Those kept in an electronic format will be stored with suitable backup systems to safeguard against computer/systems failure

  Training records, risk assessments and health and safety policies and procedures must be retained in line with the Archiving, Disposal and Storing of Records Policy and Procedure and relevant legislation.

This policy was adopted by

FTM Dance

On

18th September 2020

Date to be reviewed

18thh September 2021

Signed on behalf of the provider

Name of signatory

LEANNE EVANS

Role of signatory (e.g. chair, director or owner)

Director

FTM Dance Working in service users home policy

Policy statement

The aim of the policy is to ensure that service users are protected and are safe and secure in their homes. Increasingly, care is provided within people’s homes by Personal Assistants (PAs), care agency staff or local authority homecare services.

The risks to both those being cared for and those providing the care, will vary greatly according to the individual’s needs, the environment where care is provided, the type of care being provided and the competence of the carer.

The most common causes of injury and ill health to carers arise from moving and handling, and dealing with challenging behaviour.

Where HSWA applies, any significant risks to both the carer and service user must be adequately assessed.  So far as is reasonably practicable, safe working procedures and appropriate equipment should be provided, and carers should be suitably competent/appropriately trained to carry out the tasks safely.

Policy

Care and support workers should ensure the security and safety of the home and the service user at all times when providing personal care.

1.        During the initial assessment, when care is planned, the security of the home should be discussed and an agreement reached about how the home care worker will effect entrance to the service user’s home. This should be entered in the service user plan.

2.        Home care staff should:

a.        always carry their identification badge and show it to the service user on entry

b.        always encourage service users to adopt safe home security practices wherever possible, including using door safety chains, even when they know that it is the home care worker at the door, and requesting identification.

3.        Staff should never:

a.        agree to leave a key outside a house, in a safe place or on string by the letterbox

b.        attempt to effect forced entry to the home.

4.        If it is decided that the home care worker should hold a copy of the service user’s key, the permission of the service user or their relatives should be made in writing and a suitable entry made to the service user plan. Key holding should never be embarked upon without the express permission of the home care worker’s line manager or supervisor or without an entry being made to the service user plan.

5.        Staff who hold keys for service users should:

a.        label the key with a code, never with the name and address of the service user, in case the key gets lost

b.        be careful that they keep the key in a safe place at all times

c.        inform their line manager immediately in cases of the loss or theft of keys.

 

Protocol for Entering a Service User’s Home

Home care staff should:

a.        knock or ring the doorbell or call out before entry, even if they hold a key and can let themselves in

b.        always show their identification badge on entry

c.        offer to check that windows and doors are secure before leaving a premises

d.        always check that the door is secure as they leave.

Identity Card

FTM Dance identity cards are provided for all care and support staff entering the homes of service users. FTM Dance identity cards are required to have the following information:

a.         a photograph of the member of staff

b.        the name of the person and the company name in large print

c.        display the contact number of the FTM Dance head office

d.        display a date of issue and an expiry date, which should not exceed 36 months from the date of issue

e.        be available in large print for people with visual disabilities

f.        be laminated

g.        be renewed and replaced within at least 36 months from the date of issue

h.        be returned to the organisation when employment ceases.

Procedures in the Event of Inability to Gain Access

The following procedure should be followed in cases where the home care worker attends premises but cannot get in or receive an answer from the service user.

1.        The home care worker should check in their diary that they have the right day/time/address.

2.        The care worker should then knock several times and try to raise the service user by calling through the letterbox.

3.        If there is still no answer the care worker should try phoning the service user or their relatives, or getting the agency office to do so.

4.        If the problem is not resolved by phone the home care worker should report the situation to their line manager or supervisor, who will continue to attempt to contact the service user and/or their relatives.

5.        If there is cause for concern as to the service user’s wellbeing, the care worker should report this to the head office and their line manager and/or supervisor, and the police should be contacted, either by the office or by the home care worker themselves.

6.        On no account should the home care worker attempt to effect forced entry to the home. In the case of an emergency they should always contact the police or an ambulance and wait for them.

7.        If the person appears not to be answering or is out deliberately to avoid receiving the arranged service, this could indicate a need for a review of the service agreement and care plan.

This care service ensures, so far as is reasonably practicable, the health, safety and welfare of its employees and the health and safety of other persons who may be affected by its activities.

Both the staff and management will work in partnership to ensure that its statutory duties with regard to safety are met at all times.

The service will comply with all applicable legal and regulatory requirements and guidance relating to the safety of staff and service users.

Key regulatory requirements include:

•        the Health and Social Care Act 2008 (Regulated Activities) Regulations 2014.

Key guidance includes:

•        Guidance for Providers on Meeting the Health and Social Care Act 2008 (Regulated Activities) Regulations 2014

•        How CQC Monitors, Inspects and Regulates Adult Social Care Services

•        HSG220 Health and Safety in Care Homes, published by the Health and Safety Executive.

Approach to Health and Safety

FTM Dance will:

•        provide adequate control of the health and safety risks arising from our work activities at all times

•        consult with our employees on matters affecting their health and safety

•        provide and maintain safe equipment at all times

•        ensure the safe handling and use of substances

•        provide information, instruction, training and supervision as required

•        ensure that all employees and contractors are competent to do their tasks, and to give them adequate training

•        act to prevent accidents and cases of work-related ill health

•        ensure that the use, handling, storage and transport of items and substances is carried out safely and that risks to health are controlled

•        provide, manage and maintain our workplaces, grounds, properties and working conditions so that they are, so far as reasonably practicable, safe and that risks to health are controlled

•        provide the necessary organisation, expertise and resource — including communication and consultation, planning, monitoring, inspection and auditing procedures — to ensure that there is effective management of health and safety throughout the care service

•        review and revise this policy, and all associated health and safety policies, as necessary at regular intervals and inform our staff of any changes.

The Organisation of Health and Safety

The overall and final responsibility for health and safety in this care service is that of: The FTM management team

Day-to-day responsibility for ensuring this policy is implemented is that of: The FTM management team

To ensure that adequate health and safety standards are maintained and improved, the FTM Dance management team review polices at least once a year and ensure all staff are trained and are aware of any changes to the policy.

FTM Dance’s Responsibilities

The organisation will ensure that:

•        all processes and systems of work are designed to take account of health and safety and are properly supervised at all times

•        a member of senior management maintains specific responsibility for health and safety

•        competent people are appointed to assist us in meeting our statutory duties including, where appropriate, specialists from outside of the organisation

•        all employees are consulted on matters relating to health, safety and welfare

•        adequate facilities and arrangements will be maintained to enable employees to raise issues of health and safety

•        each employee will be given such information, instruction and training as is necessary to enable the safe performance of work activities

•        all arrangements are brought to employees’ attention and are monitored and reviewed to ensure that they are effective.

Employees’ Responsibilities

Employees must ensure that they:

•        co-operate with management to enable all statutory duties to be complied with

•        take reasonable care of their own health and safety, and the health and safety of others who may be affected by their acts or omissions

•        familiarise themselves with the health and safety arrangements that apply to them and their work functions.

Specific Arrangements for Health and Safety

Risk assessments

FTM Dance care service understands the need for regular risk assessments to ensure that risks and hazards are identified and suitable controls put in place to eliminate hazards and reduce those risks.

In this care service, FTM Dance is responsible for performing regular risk assessments of the workplace. The findings of the risk assessments will be reported to social services and action to remove or control risks will be the responsibility of service users(where applicable) carers , FTM dance support staff . Records will be kept of all risk assessments and regular reviews performed to ensure that all actions have been completed.

Emergency procedures — fire and evacuation

This care service understands how dangerous a fire can be. The organisation will, therefore, take all reasonable action to ensure that fire is prevented, both in the organisation’s offices and in service users’ homes where care staff are placed, and that in the event of a fire staff, service users and visitors can be safely evacuated.

Fire risks in service users’ homes will be identified during the initial service user assessment and addressed in collaboration with the service user and other relevant parties. All care staff placed in service users’ homes will be trained in fire safety procedures.

and order repairs or replacement as appropriate. Full procurement, servicing and maintenance records will be kept.

Safe handling of hazardous substances (COSHH)

FTM Dance understands the need to ensure that staff and service users are protected from potentially hazardous substances.

Lone working

This FTM Dance recognises that lone working constitutes a significant area of risk in a domiciliary care service where a number of staff work alone in people’s homes. FTM Dance will complete a risk assessment of all lone working and keep this under review. Care workers will be supplied with a mobile phone to enable them to contact management offices which will be fully staffed during work hours. Tracking technology will be employed to enable staff whereabouts to be known and for staff to report any accidents, incidents or receive guidance for any issues they may have.

FTM Dance understands the need to ensure that all accidents and incidents are reported and adequate records kept and reviewed so that trends and patterns can be identified and action taken.

The FTM Dance management team is responsible for ensuring that accident records are kept and monitored and that any appropriate actions resulting from reviews are put into action.

The FTM Dance management team is responsible for investigating accidents and for reporting accidents, diseases and dangerous occurrences to the enforcing authority if required.

Home care staff will be given essential first-aid information and issued with a mobile first-aid kit. All home care staff who work alone will be issued with a mobile phone in case of an emergency.

Training

Providing adequate health and safety training to ensure employees are competent to do their work is the responsibility of the FTM Dance management team.

Training will commence on the first day of employment so that employees are familiar with basic procedures once they are at their place of work. All new staff will be expected to attend induction, which will include the provision of statutory information designed to ensure safety at work. Following induction, a programme of health and safety refresher training will be agreed with staff.

A requirement to attend any of the courses will be agreed with each member of staff during their annual appraisal. The need to attend a specific course will then be added to their personal training plan.

This policy was adopted by

FTM Dance

On

18th September  2020

Date to be reviewed

18th September  2021

Signed on behalf of the provider

Name of signatory

LEANNE EVANS

Role of signatory (e.g. chair, director or owner)

Director

FTM DANCE Late and Missed Visits Policy and Procedure

 

                             Scope

To ensure that all staff at Forward Thinking Movement And Dance CIC understand the negative impact late or missed calls have on Service Users and to ensure that there are effective mechanisms in place so that they do not arise. Where they do, lessons learnt must be applied and contractual notifications made.

Policy

Procedure

 Procedure for Responding to Late or Missed Calls

Forward Thinking Movement And Dance CIC will ensure that they have a plan in place for responding to missed or late visits and that it includes:

Forward Thinking Movement And Dance CIC will recognise that Service Users living alone or those who have cognitive impairment may be particularly vulnerable if visits are late or missed. Forward Thinking Movement And Dance CIC will therefore make it a high priority for back-up plans to be actioned as soon as possible for these specific groups.

Forward Thinking Movement And Dance CIC will assess the potential benefits of introducing electronic call monitoring, if they do not have it already, and make a decision as to its implementation.

Forward Thinking Movement And Dance CIC will check arrangements to ensure that services operating outside of office hours and at weekends are consistent with the levels of service operated during weekdays. Regular reviews of procedures for out-of-hours services will be undertaken to ensure that a robust system is in place to identify and respond to missed or late calls.

Where service levels may be influenced by commissioning practise, Leicestershire must be contacted to discuss reasons for the late and missed calls and potential solutions.

 Late Visits

Care Workers who realise that they are going to be late for a visit must immediately contact Forward Thinking Movement And Dance CIC to inform them of the fact and the reasons for it.

Irrespective of the method of notification of a late visit or the likelihood of a late visit of more than 15 minutes, the Service User will be contacted immediately to inform them of the late visit, and also of the expected time of arrival of the Care Worker.

Forward Thinking Movement And Dance CIC will immediately make any arrangements necessary to reduce the lateness of the visit to a minimum, including allocating other Care Workers to the visit or other visits.

Leanne Evans will be informed of all occurrences of late visits. The staff member may choose to inform Leanne Evans, while off duty, if the reason for the late visit indicates problems which may recur and affect other visits, which are due on that or immediately upcoming shifts. Forward Thinking Movement And Dance CIC will have an escalation plan in place for out of hours so that staff know who to contact.

A Late Visit Record Sheet can be found in the Forms section of this policy.

in order to identify trend information for action and lessons learnt.

 Missed Visits

Care Workers who realise that they are going to miss a visit must immediately contact Forward Thinking Movement And Dance CIC to inform them of the fact and the reasons for it.

Irrespective of the method of notification of a missed visit, the Service User will be contacted immediately to inform them that the booked visit will not occur, enquire as to what support the Service User requires, and arrange for that support to be delivered, including allocating other Care Workers to the visit.

Leanne Evans will be informed of all occurrences of missed visits. All missed calls will be logged as part of the incident reporting procedures at Forward Thinking Movement And Dance CIC. Following an investigation and root cause analysis, lessons learned will be applied and any corrective action required will be taken to prevent reoccurrences. Staff at Forward Thinking Movement And Dance CIC will need to understand that where 6 missed or late calls arise, if the investigation highlights that the incident was a failure to follow agreed procedure and it resulted in harm of any kind to the Service User, it may result in disciplinary action being taken.

Forward Thinking Movement And Dance CIC must implement an incident review schedule to audit the number of missed or late visits (and the reasons for these) occurring over a minimum period of four weeks and review practice to reduce them.

in order to identify trend information for action.

 Duty of Candour

Leanne Evans will apologise to Service Users who experience late or missed visits. The apology will be face to face in the event of repeated occurrences, with a clear explanation of the arrangements being made to remedy the contractual breach.

Where required by Leicestershire or other commissioning organisations to supply contract information, late and missed visits will be reported to them in accordance with the contract. Multiple missed or late calls will be classed as a safeguarding issue and reported via the safeguarding reporting channels at Leicestershire and to the CQC.

Where disciplinary action is taken that leads to dismissal of a Care Worker or member of staff who is required to have an enhanced disclosure because of the nature of their role, a referral to DBS will also be made.

 Shortened and Extended Visits

The duration of an allocated visit to a Service User may be shortened or extended as a result of a variety of reasons. Care Workers who find that the duration of a Service User's allocated visit no longer meets the Service User's needs, must report this immediately to Forward Thinking Movement And Dance CIC. Leanne Evans will investigate the reasons and where it is found that the duration of an allocated visit for the Service User is no longer sufficient and requires an increase or decrease in allocated time, Leanne Evans will liaise with the Leicestershire or the Service User (for private contracts), to review the care

package.

Upon agreement of a new care package, a full Care Plan review will also take place, as per the Service User Care Planning Policy and Procedure at Forward Thinking Movement And Dance CIC and Care Workers will be advised of any changes that have occurred.

Where it is apparent that a Care Worker is shortening or extending the visit without adequate reason, the suite of HR policies and procedures at Forward Thinking Movement And Dance CIC will be followed and disciplinary action taken where necessary.

Definitions

 Late Call

 Missed Call

 Root Cause Analysis (RCA)

 Shortened Visit

 Extended Visit

Professionals providing this service should be aware of the following:

 To ensure that all staff at Forward Thinking Movement And Dance CIC understand the negative impact late or missed calls have on Service Users and to ensure that there are effective mechanisms in place so that they do not arise. Where they do, lessons learnt must be applied and contractual notifications made.

 Procedure for Responding to Late or Missed Calls

Forward Thinking Movement And Dance CIC will ensure that they have a plan in place for responding to missed or late visits and that it includes:

Forward Thinking Movement And Dance CIC will recognise that Service Users living alone or those who have cognitive impairment may be particularly vulnerable if visits are late or missed. Forward Thinking Movement And Dance CIC will therefore make it a high priority for back-up plans to be actioned as soon as possible for these specific groups.

Forward Thinking Movement And Dance CIC will assess the potential benefits of introducing electronic call monitoring, if they do not have it already, and make a decision as to its implementation.

Forward Thinking Movement And Dance CIC will check arrangements to ensure that services operating outside of office hours and at weekends are consistent with the levels of service operated during weekdays. Regular reviews of procedures for out-of-hours services will be undertaken to ensure that a robust system is in place to identify and respond to missed or late calls.

Where service levels may be influenced by commissioning practise, Leicestershire must be contacted to discuss reasons for the late and missed calls and potential solutions.

 Late Visits

Care Workers who realise that they are going to be late for a visit must immediately contact Forward Thinking Movement And Dance CIC to inform them of the fact and the reasons for it.

Irrespective of the method of notification of a late visit or the likelihood of a late visit of more than 15 minutes, the Service User will be contacted immediately to inform them of the late visit, and also of the expected time of arrival of the Care Worker.

Forward Thinking Movement And Dance CIC will immediately make any arrangements necessary to reduce the lateness of the visit to a minimum, including allocating other Care Workers to the visit or other visits.

Leanne Evans will be informed of all occurrences of late visits. The staff member may choose to inform Leanne Evans, while off duty, if the reason for the late visit indicates problems which may recur and affect other visits, which are due on that or immediately upcoming shifts. Forward Thinking Movement And Dance CIC will have an escalation plan in place for out of hours so that staff know who to contact.

A Late Visit Record Sheet can be found in the Forms section of this policy.

in order to identify trend information for action and lessons learnt.

 Missed Visits

Care Workers who realise that they are going to miss a visit must immediately contact Forward Thinking Movement And Dance CIC to inform them of the fact and the reasons for it.

Irrespective of the method of notification of a missed visit, the Service User will be contacted immediately to inform them that the booked visit will not occur, enquire as to what support the Service User requires, and arrange for that support to be delivered, including allocating other Care Workers to the visit.

Leanne Evans will be informed of all occurrences of missed visits. All missed calls will be logged as part of the incident reporting procedures at Forward Thinking Movement And Dance CIC. Following an investigation and root cause analysis, lessons learned will be applied and any corrective action required will be taken to prevent reoccurrences. Staff at Forward Thinking Movement And Dance CIC will need to understand that where 6 missed or late calls arise, if the investigation highlights that the incident was a failure to follow agreed procedure and it resulted in harm of any kind to the Service User, it may result in disciplinary action being taken.

Forward Thinking Movement And Dance CIC must implement an incident review schedule to audit the number of missed or late visits (and the reasons for these) occurring over a minimum period of four weeks and review practice to reduce them.

in order to identify trend information for action.

 Duty of Candour

Leanne Evans will apologise to Service Users who experience late or missed visits. The apology will be face to face in the event of repeated occurrences, with a clear explanation of the arrangements being made to remedy the contractual breach.

Where required by Leicestershire or other commissioning organisations to supply contract information, late and missed visits will be reported to them in accordance with the contract. Multiple missed or late calls will be classed as a safeguarding issue and reported via the safeguarding reporting channels at Leicestershire and to the CQC.

Where disciplinary action is taken that leads to dismissal of a Care Worker or member of staff who is required to have an enhanced disclosure because of the nature of their role, a referral to DBS will also be made.

 Shortened and Extended Visits

The duration of an allocated visit to a Service User may be shortened or extended as a result of a variety of reasons. Care Workers who find that the duration of a Service User's allocated visit no longer meets the Service User's needs, must report this immediately to Forward Thinking Movement And Dance CIC. Leanne Evans will investigate the reasons and where it is found that the duration of an allocated visit for the Service User is no longer sufficient and requires an increase or decrease in allocated time, Leanne Evans will liaise with the Leicestershire or the Service User (for private contracts), to review the care package.

Upon agreement of a new care package, a full Care Plan review will also take place, as per the Service User Care Planning Policy and Procedure at Forward Thinking Movement And Dance CIC and Care Workers will be advised of any changes that have occurred.

Where it is apparent that a Care Worker is shortening or extending the visit without adequate reason, the suite of HR policies and procedures at Forward Thinking Movement And Dance CIC will be followed and disciplinary action taken where necessary.

Definitions 

 Late Call

 Missed Call

 Root Cause Analysis (RCA)

 Shortened Visit

 Extended Visit

Professionals providing this service should be aware of the following:

 

 

 

                   

This policy was adopted by

FTM Dance

On

18th September 2020

Date to be reviewed

18th September  2021

Signed on behalf of the provider

Name of signatory

LEANNE EVANS

Role of signatory (e.g. chair, director or owner)

Director

                  FTM Dance Adverse weather conditions policy             

 

 Forward Thinking Movement And Dance CIC recognises that we have a general duty under the Health and Safety at Work Act 1974 to ensure, so far as is reasonably practicable, the health, safety and welfare of our staff at work. We also understand the importance of the need to safely deliver care and support, including during adverse weather conditions. We expect, however, that our staff will make every effort to attend work during adverse weather conditions without putting their personal safety at risk.

  This policy aims to ensure that equal and fair treatment is applied, as far as possible, to staff of  Forward Thinking Movement And Dance CIC who are unable to attend work, or who have to work a shorter day than normal due to inclement weather. While accepting that staff should not take unreasonable risks in attempting to get to work in difficult conditions, there will not be a disincentive to staff who do try. The decisions to be made in the event of severe inclement weather will be a balance between the following:

Ensuring that Service User care or service delivery is not compromised

 Ensuring that the safety of staff at work is not compromised

Forward Thinking Movement And Dance CIC will have robust business continuity plans in place and we will work closely with local partners, including Leicestershire, to ensure that continuity of care is

maintained and that both Service Users and staff remain safe.

 Leanne Evans will communicate the Unable to Attend Workplace Policy and Procedure to all staff and will monitor the effectiveness of this policy by auditing unplanned absences. To ensure the safety of Service Users during adverse weather, Leanne Evans will ensure that staff have read and understood the Supporting Service Users During Adverse Weather Policy and Procedure.

 

  Responsibilities – Leanne Evans Winter Preparedness

Leanne Evans will review and update the Business Continuity Plan for Forward Thinking Movement And Dance CIC to ensure that weather-related issues are included within the plan. The impact on continuity of care if the transport infrastructure is affected and staff are unable to travel in their usual way must be included, with solutions to overcome any transport issues documented clearly.

Leanne Evans will discuss with the staff their transport arrangements and review how they will get to work.

  During adverse weather, Leanne Evans will keep up to date with weather alerts to ensure that robust business continuity plans are in place. Information can be accessed via www.metoffice.gov.uk and local radio stations. As part of winter preparedness, Forward Thinking Movement And Dance CIC will put in place procedures for monitoring and cascading weather alerts to staff in a timely manner. Forward Thinking Movement And Dance CIC will ensure that any communications comply with the Data Protection Act.

 Where vehicles are provided for staff, Forward Thinking Movement And Dance CIC will ensure that the vehicles are serviced and safe for winter use.

 Response During Adverse Weather

 Ensure that dynamic risk assessments are undertaken as the weather situation develops to ensure the safety of staff. Factors to consider will include the risks of slips, trips and falls as well as driving safety

 Review capacity as well as the need for, and the availability of, staff, especially if the weather is forecast to last for a prolonged period in order to ensure continuity of care for all Service Users

 Liaise with local partners including Leicestershire to maximise resources

 Ensure that access to the premises of Forward Thinking Movement And Dance CIC is safe. The building will need to be accessible and safe whatever the adverse weather conditions. This may mean that Leanne Evans must plan for severe weather conditions by having equipment and resources, which may include shovels, salt, matting or additional heating or lighting to manage severe weather

Responsibilities - Staff

 It is expected that staff will make every reasonable effort to reach Forward Thinking Movement And Dance CIC. However, staff are not expected to, and should not put themselves or others at risk

 Staff who live in areas where they have had difficulties in getting to work during periods of adverse weather should be prepared to make appropriate arrangements in relation to attendance at work

 Staff living within reasonable walking distance will be expected to make every effort to get to work on foot, where it is possible and safe for them to do so

 Staff should plan and consider that their usual route may be disrupted by bad weather. Staff must plan their route in advance and allow longer for their journey than usual

 If a member of staff anticipates travel problems or is unable to reach their normal place of work, then they must telephone their line manager as soon as possible to explain their circumstances. If their immediate line manager is unavailable, an alternative ‘senior’ member of staff must be contacted. This must be done as soon as possible to ensure minimal disruption to Service Users

 Staff must prove they have made all possible efforts to get to work, i.e. that a genuine attempt was made. In this respect, it would not be enough for the member of staff to claim that just their normal method of travel was unavailable. Staff would be expected to have explored all reasonable alternatives

Staff are reminded of their duty to take reasonable care for their own health and safety and that of other persons who may be affected by their acts or omissions. This includes taking extra care when travelling to and from work and accessing the home

 Staff must consider their health needs and contact their GP to discuss access to the annual flu vaccine

Staff must ensure that they wear shoes with good grips, avoid taking shortcuts across wet grass or slippery paths and, wherever possible, remain on the main path to minimise the risk of slips, trips and falls

 It is recognised that adverse weather may also impact on staff who themselves may have been able to get work but who may need to take urgent carers’ leave because of the weather-related closure of

other organisations such as schools. In these circumstances, the carers' leave provisions set out in the Leave Policies at Forward Thinking Movement And Dance CIC shall apply (e.g. Parental Leave Policy and Procedure)

 

Adverse Weather

 Adverse Weather is unfavourable or potentially harmful. In the context of this policy, it means snow, ice, winds, storms, floods or any other weather extreme

  Meteorological Office

 

The Meteorological Office provides weather and climate services

 It is part of the Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy (BEIS)

 It is recognised as one of the world's most accurate forecasters, using more than 10 million weather observations a day

 Business Continuity

 Business continuity encompasses planning and preparation to ensure that an organisation can continue to operate in the case of serious incidents or disasters and is able to recover to an operational state within a reasonably short period

This policy was adopted by

FTM Dance

On

18th September 2020

Date to be reviewed

18thh September 2021

Signed on behalf of the provider

Name of signatory

LEANNE EVANS

Role of signatory (e.g. chair, director or owner)

Director

                                                   

                                       

                                           FTM Dance vehicle use in domiciliary care Policy

Policy Statement

Domiciliary care services are registered with the Care Quality Commission usually under the category of personal care and/or as a nursing agency registered under treatment of disease, disorder or injury. These regulated activities involve agency employees as care workers or registered nurses providing physical assistance to people in their own homes in respect of such daily activities as eating and drinking, using the toilet, washing and bathing, dressing, mouth care, hair care and some skin and nail care, and, where applicable, nursing care.

Personal care can also involve care workers’ prompting and supervising people to complete such tasks where the person receiving the care is unable to take decisions for themselves in respect of those tasks (but who do not necessarily require physical assistance).

A domiciliary care service might also provide a range of other non-regulated services to support a person to live independently in their own home such as cleaning, gardening, shopping and general household maintenance, which might be combined with personal care or as separate services. How the different services are combined will be specified in the contract with the service user and/or any service commissioners involved and the person’s care plan, if one is required for the receipt of personal or nursing care.

In some cases, a service contract might include agency employees escorting a service user to take part in activities and events outside of their home, for example, to go shopping, to go to a social event or keep a medical appointment. The role of escort is a legitimate one for care workers, which could be seen as integral to the provision of personal care for some users, but not in every case. It can be carried out on foot or in connection with another mode of transport, including by car driven by the care worker, which could be their own car or a car owned and driven by the service user.

The act of driving does not itself fall within any definition of personal care. If care workers are to act as drivers or escorts to service users driving their own car, it is as a discretionary service and they should be permitted to do so only under certain conditions and circumstances, and following a full risk assessment.

Procedures

Where a care worker is used as a driver of their own or the service user’s car or as an escort to the user as driver, the following arrangements and procedures apply.

Principles to be followed

Roles and responsibilities

Children as passengers

All car seats should be correctly fitted, and be age and stage appropriate for the children using them. The children will be correctly strapped into them. The law requires all children travelling in cars to use a suitable child restraint until they are either 135cm in height or the age of 12 (whichever they reach first). After this, they must use an adult seatbelt. It is advised that babies be transported in the rear of the vehicle, but where a baby is carried in the front then the baby seat must be suitable for that purpose and the passenger vehicle airbag disabled. Children should normally travel in the rear of a car. Children must only be carried in baby seats that meet the required stage/group for that child’s age or weight. It is the driver‘s responsibility to ensure that children under the age of 14 years are restrained correctly. Child restraints (baby seats, child seats, booster seats and booster cushions) must conform to current regulations. Child safety locks should always be in use.

Manager’s checklist

To form an agreement for care workers/nurses, acting as escorts/drivers, the following questions will be answered.

  1. Is it clear what the purpose of the driving/escorting is in relation to the service user’s plan of care/service agreement?
  2. Is the driver (service user/carer) of the vehicle to be used fully licensed to drive the vehicle?
  3. Is the vehicle being used fully taxed and insured and safe to drive with an up-to-date MOT where required?
  4. Has the nominated driver any history of unsafe driving that would put anyone in the vehicle at risk?
  5. Are the duties involved written into the care workers’ job descriptions and contracts?
  6. Have the care workers/nurses involved given their consent to driving the service user/being driven by the service user?
  7. Are all parties comfortable with the proposed arrangements?
  8. Who in the care service will be monitoring and reviewing the arrangements?
  9. Are all the necessary safeguards in place to ensure all involved will be safe?
  10. Is the care service satisfied that it has exercised its duty of care to both service users and to its employees involved in these arrangements?

Review

This policy will be reviewed on an annual basis.

   

This policy was adopted by

FTM Dance

On

18th September 2020

Date to be reviewed

18thh September 2021

Signed on behalf of the provider

Name of signatory

LEANNE EVANS

Role of signatory (e.g. chair, director or owner)

Director

FTM Dance Personal Care Policy

               FTM Dance On-Call Policy and Procedure

Forward Thinking Movement And Dance CIC recognises that the health and wellbeing of Service Users are paramount, and that the quality of care and support being provided should not be lessened during evenings, weekends and other times when there may be a reduced management presence.

 Forward Thinking Movement And Dance CIC recognises that this policy should not prevent emergency services being contacted if appropriate. The first call in any critical emergency situation should be to the most appropriate emergency service (fire, ambulance or police).

 The person providing on-call support should always be suitably experienced and knowledgeable about the services provided by Forward Thinking Movement And Dance CIC.

 The person providing on-call support should have a good level of understanding about the specific issues that may result in the need for on-call support.

 For the purposes of this policy, on-call support means providing telephone support, but if deemed necessary, physical presence should be provided.

 Forward Thinking Movement And Dance CIC will provide guidance and information for the people designated to be on-call to ensure that they are aware of their responsibilities and the actions to take in the event of being contacted.

 Staff working for Forward Thinking Movement And Dance CIC will be made aware of the purpose of on- call coverage and will be provided with guidance on the situations where the on-call person should be contacted.

 When staff are lone working there is an increased risk of the need for support, especially outside of core working hours. The on-call facility should be provided to ensure that lone workers have consistent access to additional support and advice as required.

 Payment for staff for providing on-call support will be agreed and provided separately from this policy, but will always meet the requirements detailed within the Minimum Wage Policy and Procedure, specifically compliance with the National Minimum Wage Regulations and Working Time Regulations.

Forward Thinking Movement And Dance CIC is aware of the Employment Appeal Tribunal handed down judgment in the joint case between Royal Mencap Society v Tomlinson-Blake and Shannon v Rampersad and the Court of Appeal Ruling in July 2018 and will be monitoring any progress and changes that may be required to this policy and procedure.

  Staff providing on-call support should have the ability to mobilise resources to support staff working out of hours.

  This policy does not form part of an employee's contract of employment and may be amended at any time.

 

 

 Forward Thinking Movement And Dance CIC will produce an on-call rota that provides the named person and their contact details.

 The rota produced will cover 24-hour periods to ensure that all staff know who is on-call at any given time.

  The rota will be appropriately displayed, and staff will be made aware of the person on-call and their contact details.

  On-call support should not be used as a replacement for contacting the emergency services. If the situation merits rapid response, then the emergency services should be called. Then, if no senior management staff are available at the time, the person on-call should be contacted to inform them of the situation and the action taken.

 Staff will assess the need to contact the person on-call. The following are some situations that may necessitate action through the use of on-call support (this list is not extensive):

 When there are no suitable management or senior staff available (this will predominantly be in the evenings and at weekends, but there may be situations during normal working hours when on-call support may be used)

 When any form of abuse is alleged, witnessed or reported

 When there is any serious injury to Service Users

  When there is any behaviour by a Service User that the Care Plan does not provide a course of action for, or which has not been appropriately risk assessed

 When staffing levels are below the minimum required due to non-attendance of staff on duty

 When there are health and safety concerns for staff or people using services

 Any situation that is effecting the running of the service e.g. lift failure, heating breakdown, flood

 Any serious concern raised by a Service User, or their representative, that requires an immediate response from management

 Any outbreak of infectious disease

 When official confirmation for a course of action is required e.g. sourcing and provision of additional staff

This list is not comprehensive and other situations may arise. Staff should use their skills, knowledge and understanding to assess the need for on-call support

Definition: On-Call Support

 A person who is available to be contacted to provide a professional service when not officially on duty

This policy was adopted by

FTM Dance

On

18th September 2021

Date to be reviewed

18thh September 2022

Signed on behalf of the provider

Name of signatory

LEANNE EVANS

Role of signatory (e.g. chair, director or owner)

Director

FTM Dance Personal Care policy and procedure (Day service and Domiciliary care)

To meet the legal requirements of the regulated activities that Forward Thinking Movement and Dance CIC is registered to provide:

The following roles may be affected by this policy:

The following Service Users may be affected by this policy:

The following stakeholders may be affected by this policy:

Objectives

Service Users to remain as independent as possible, whilst staff at Forward Thinking Movement And Dance CIC support them to promote their independence wherever possible.

Decisions about provision of personal care support are made either with the agreement of the Service User or in compliance with the Mental Capacity Act 2005 and the Care Act 2014.

Policy

Service Users are given all possible help to maintain their independence in self-care and personal hygiene.

A Service User's right to dignity and privacy will be respected by staff at all times.

Where Service Users might lack the mental capacity to consent to support with personal hygiene, Forward Thinking Movement And Dance CIC will ensure decisions and actions are made in accordance with the Mental Capacity Act 2005.

Forward Thinking Movement And Dance CIC recognizes its responsibility to ensure that all Service Users bathe and shower as safely as possible in their own home and this will be clearly identified in the Service User's Care Plan.

Where Service Users are aged 16 and above, Forward Thinking Movement And Dance CIC staff will work within the five statutory principles of the Mental Capacity Act at all times.

Care Plans and Risk Assessments

Care Plans must outline ways to enable Service Users to manage their own personal hygiene as far as possible; this includes ensuring the availability of walking aids, good lighting for toilets and washing facilities, and giving tactful reminders when appropriate.

Care Plans are updated when necessary to provide up to date guidance on Service Users needs for assistance to maintain adequate personal hygiene.

Similarly, any areas (including medical conditions) that pose a potential risk of harm to the Service User, such as scalding or burning, will be clearly documented within the Service User's risk assessment and it will include how the risk will be managed.

Care Plans at Forward Thinking Movement And Dance CIC will:

Be updated when necessary to provide up-to-date guidance on the assistance required to maintain adequate personal hygiene for each Service User

Evidence how staff have sought to align support with the personal wishes, preferences and the cultural background of each Service User

Evidence up-to-date assessments of relevant specific needs regarding skin integrity or health problems such as diabetes or skin disorders, with information about how these are to be managed

Ensure that evidence is available where a specific Service User lacks the capacity to consent to or refuse personal care when this is necessary for health purposes. This will include evidence, where appropriate, of efforts that have been made to improve their capacity for these decisions

Good practice to ensure maximum possible privacy and dignity for Service Users when providing personal care and intimate personal care is to encourage one-to-one support as much as possible. Where additional support is required for moving and handling or to ensure safety, this must be for as short a duration as possible as determined in the Service User's risk assessment.

Where Service Users lack the mental capacity to consent to personal care, including intimate personal care, decisions must be made in accordance with the Mental Capacity Act 2005.

Male Service Users must not be made to be clean-shaven when this is not what they want. In particular, restraint is never to be used to achieve a 'cosmetic' aim such as a clean-shaven face.

Where behaviours that may challenge present while supporting Service Users who lack the capacity to understand with bathing or showering, Restraint will not be considered unless as part of a recorded multidisciplinary decision

The care planning process will identify is one or two carers will be needed to carry out the tasks.

Bathing and Showering Procedure

Where a Service User requires support with bathing or showering, Care Workers at Forward Thinking Movement And Dance CIC must:

Review the Care Plan and risk assessments to ascertain what level of support the Service User requires

Take the time to discuss with the Service User whether they would like a shower or bath (as described in the Care Plan), ensuring that verbal consent is obtained

Prepare everything that is needed for the bath or shower, including:

Gathering the Service User's specified toiletries and towels required for the completion of the task

Ensuring that the room and bath or shower is clean before use

Ensuring that the bathroom is at a comfortable room temperature

Where space permits, a chair must be available for the Service User to sit on whilst undressing or drying themselves to prevent the risk of falling

Where a bath mat is supplied, this must be positioned safely to help reduce the risk of a slip, trip or fall. The Care Worker must not leave the Service User unattended in the bath or shower at any  time - unless this is specifically requested as part of the Care Plan and a full risk assessment has been undertaken

The Service User must be given the opportunity to use the toilet or commode before bathing or showering

A Bath Must be Filled in the Following Way:

The cold tap must be run first before turning on the hot tap and mixing the water

The water temperature must be checked, ideally with a bath thermometer. If this is not available, the Care Worker must check the temperature of the water with their forearm or elbow before the Service User enters the bath

Where possible, allow the Service User to test the temperature of the water. Care needs to be taken if the Service User suffers from circulatory problems, in particular diabetic neuropathy or any condition involving loss of sensation in any limbs

The water temperature for a bath must not exceed 44°C

The Service User must be positioned facing the taps

Additional hot water must not be added while the Service User is in the bath

The Care Worker must ensure that privacy and dignity are maintained at all times

A Shower Must be Operated in the Following Way:

Run the shower to establish a constant temperature

The water temperature for a shower must not exceed 44°C

The temperature of a shower must be checked, ideally using an integral or scoop thermometer. If these are not available, the Care Worker must check the temperature of the water using their forearm or elbow before the Service User enters the shower

The temperature of a shower must not be increased while the Service User is in the shower

Care Workers must be aware of the potential for sudden water flow and temperature fluctuations of a shower - as such, supervision of the water temperature will be required

The Care Worker must ensure that privacy and dignity are maintained at all times

Assisting with Bathing or Showering:

Whilst assisting with bathing or showering, the Care Worker will observe the condition of the Service User's skin for any abnormalities. Any redness, rashes, bruises, sores, or bumps will be noted and reported to Forward Thinking Movement And Dance CIC and recorded in the Care Worker communication notes

The Care Worker must assist the Service User with their personal hygiene requirements as per their Care Plan

Where possible, clean and fresh towels must be available to dry the Service User following their bath or shower

The skin, especially in the creased areas, must be dried carefully after bathing or showering

The Care Worker must assist the Service User in and out of the bath or shower using mechanical lifting aids, where appropriate, and according to the manufacturer’s instructions. Where these are not available, the moving and handling processes of Forward Thinking Movement And Dance CIC must be followed

The bath and shower area will be cleaned after each use to prevent any cross infection

Manual handling must be undertaken in accordance with the requirements of the Moving and Handling Policy and Procedure at Forward Thinking Movement And Dance CIC and where ‘moving or handling’ is required. This will only be undertaken by Care Workers who have received suitable and sufficient training and updates

Equipment

Where a Service User may need equipment to aid them with maintaining personal hygiene, Forward Thinking Movement And Dance CIC will liaise with Leicestershire and other necessary healthcare professionals to ensure a specialist assessment is carried out. An assessment might be in relation to equipment that will aid a Service User in and out of a bath or shower or may be in relation to temperature monitoring but this is not an exhaustive list. All equipment must be clearly documented in the Service User's Care Plan and routinely serviced, where applicable, to ensure

it remains fit for purpose. When a hoist is used, moving and handling training must be achieved and 2 people will be required to safely manage the risk.  

Additional Safety Measures Slips, Trips and Falls

All bath and shower facilities must, where possible, have either non-slip surfaces or an appropriate substitute (e.g. bath mat). Where baths or showers have non-slip mats, they must be checked before use to ensure they are clean and well maintained. Care Worker must ensure that all equipment is clean and tidied away to the Service User's preference when finished.Where possible, the appropriate lifting devices will be used to help Service Users both into and out of the bath.

Risk of Drowning or Burns

Service Users identified at assessment as being at risk of drowning or burns, must not be left unaccompanied in the bath or shower, unless they have full capacity to make this decision and are fully informed of the risks associated with bathing or showering alone and consent to accept this risk. This will need to be evidenced within a risk assessment and clear guidelines recorded within the Service user's Care Plan as to how the risks can be further reduced, whilst staff are not present.

Training and Education

Staff at Forward Thinking Movement And Dance CIC will be provided with training to support Service Users with personal care and regular training updates will be provided to ensure they maintain their knowledge in line with regulatory standards.Regular supervisions and spot checks will also be undertaken by Forward Thinking Movement And Dance CIC to ensure that staff are supporting Service Users as per the requirements of their Care Plan.

Personal Care

Any help with dressing, bathing or showering, brushing, washing or cutting of hair, trimming of nails, and removal of unwanted hair

Intimate Personal Care

This refers specifically to care given when a person is incontinent of urine or faeces, and refers to the cleansing required to enable Service Users to be comfortable and socially acceptable, while  protecting skin from the risk of breakdown

Mental Capacity

Capacity is decision-specific and time-specific. For example, can a person make a particular decision, such as whether to consent to help with their personal care, at the time the decision needs to be made.

A person must not be assessed as lacking capacity for a decision until all practicable attempts have been made to enable them to make that decision

Best Interests

When a Service User lacks capacity to consent to personal care or intimate personal care, this can only be given if it is in their best interests

The MCA Code of Practice Chapter 5 outlines how to make a best interests decision

Restraint

The MCA defines restraint as 'the use or threat of use of force, to make someone do something they are resisting, or restricting their freedom of movement whether they are resisting it or not'. Hence restraint is often used when providing personal care to someone who lacks capacity to consent to it

Restraint is lawful under the MCA provided that:

The person lacks capacity to consent to this intervention

The intervention is in the persons best interests and Any restraint is necessary to prevent harm to the person and a proportionate response to the likelihood and seriousness of that harm

Professionals providing this service should be aware of the following:

Personal care, including intimate personal care, can only be given either with the consent of an individual Service User or in accordance with the MCA

Any care intervention in the absence of capacity must be decided by following the MCA best interests decision-making process

Where a Service User lacks capacity to consent to personal care, and restraint is needed for its administration, this is lawful provided it meets the best interest's requirements together with two extra conditions: it must be necessary to prevent harm to the person and be a proportionate response to the likelihood and seriousness of that harm

Preferences, wishes, support and needs will be agreed with a Care Plan that staff will follow and review as needs or wishes change

It is vital that privacy and dignity is respected at all times, whilst balancing it with the risks that are associated with bathing and showering

All Service Users need to be supported to be as independent as possible

                   

This policy was adopted by

FTM Dance

On

18th September 2021

Date to be reviewed

18th September  2022

Signed on behalf of the provider

Name of signatory

LEANNE EVANS

Role of signatory (e.g. chair, director or owner)

Director

FTM Dance staff handbook acknowledgement

I acknowledge that I have received a copy of the FTM Dance Staff Handbook dated 2020 - 2021. I understand that this staff handbook replaces any and all prior verbal and written communications regarding FTM Dance working conditions, policies, procedures, role profiles and expectations.

I understand that the working conditions, policies, procedures, role profiles and expectations described in this handbook are confidential and may not be distributed in any way nor discussed with anyone who is not a member of staff at FTM Dance.

Policies and Procedures included in the FTM Dance Staff Handbook

I have read and understood the contents of this handbook and will act in accordance with these policies and procedures as a condition of my role within FTM Dance.

I have been given information on where to access additional FTM Dance policies and procedures that are additional to the mandatory policies and procedures stated in the FTM Dance staff handbook.

 

I have read and understood the Code of Conduct expected by FTM Dance and I agree to act in accord with the Code of Conduct as a condition of my role within FTM Dance.

I understand that if I have any questions or concerns at any time about the handbook or the Code of Conduct, I will consult the performing arts teacher, member of management or the director of FTM Dance.

Finally, I understand that the contents of this staff handbook are simply policies and guidelines, not a contract or implied contract with members of FTM Dance staff. The contents of the staff handbook may change at any time.

     FTM Dance Staff Member Signature             _________________________________________

                            Date                                         _________________________________________

FTM Dance Staff Member Name (Please Print) _________________________________________