GATEWAY GROUP CURRICULUM OVERVIEW

Content Area:

Visual & Performing Arts

    Grade Level:6

Module Title:

Visual Art

     

LEARNING TARGETS

NJ  STUDENT LEARNING STANDARDS

1.1  The Creative Process:  All students will demonstrate an understanding of the elements and

       principles that govern the creation of works of art in dance, music, theatre, and visual art.

1.2 History of the Arts and Culture: All students will understand the role,

      development, and influence of the arts throughout history and across cultures.

1.3  Performance:  All students will synthesize those skills, media, methods, and technologies

       appropriate to creating, performing, and/or presenting works of art in dance, music, theatre, and

       visual art.

1.4 Aesthetic Responses & Critique Methodologies pertains to all four arts

      disciplines, and is comprised of two strands related to the mode of response: A. Aesthetic

      Responses and B. Critique Methodologies. This standard addresses two ways students may

      respond to the arts, including (1) the study of aesthetics and (2) the application of

      methodologies for critique

Content Statement

CPI#

Cumulative Progress Indicator (CPI)

Art is a universal language. Visual communication through art crosses cultural and language barriers throughout time.

1.1.8.D.1

Describe the intellectual and emotional significance conveyed by the application of the elements of art and principles of design in different historical eras and cultures.

The study of masterworks of art from diverse cultures and different historical eras assists in understanding specific cultures.

1.1.8.D.2

Compare and contrast various masterworks of art from diverse cultures, and identify elements of the works that relate to specific cultural heritages.     

Tracing the histories of dance, music, theatre, and visual art in world cultures provides insight into the lives of people and their values.

1.2.8.A.2

Differentiate past and contemporary works of dance, music, theatre, and visual art that represent important ideas, issues, and events that are chronicled in the histories of diverse cultures

The arts reflect cultural mores and personal aesthetics throughout the ages.

1.2.8.A.3

Analyze the social, historical, and political impact of artists on culture and the impact of culture on the arts.

The creation of art is driven by the principles of balance, harmony, unity, emphasis, proportion, and rhythm/movement.

1.3.8.D.1

Incorporate various art elements and the principles of balance, harmony, unity, emphasis, proportion, and rhythm/movement in the creation of two- and three- dimensional artworks, using a broad array of art media and art mediums to enhance the expression of creative ideas (e.g., perspective, implied space, illusionary depth, value, and pattern).

Themes in art are often communicated through symbolism, allegory, or irony. There are a wide variety of art mediums, each having appropriate tools and processes for the production of artwork. Fluency in these mediums, and the use of the appropriate tools associated with working in these mediums, are components of art-making.

1.3.8.D.2

Apply various art mediaart mediums, technologies, and processes in the creation of allegorical, theme-based, two- and three-dimensional works of art, using tools and technologies that are appropriate to the theme and goals.

The classification of art into various art genres depends on the formal aspects of visual statements (e.g., physical properties, theoretical components, cultural context). Many genres of art are associated with discipline-specific arts terminology.

1.3.8.D.3

Identify genres of art (including realism, abstract/non objective art, and conceptual art) within various contexts using appropriate art vocabulary, and solve hands-on visual problems using a variety of genre styles.

Universal themes exist in art across historical eras and cultures. Art may embrace multiple solutions to a problem.

1.3.8.D.4

Delineate the thematic content of multicultural artworks, and plan, design, and execute multiple solutions to challenging visual arts problems, expressing similar thematic content.

Each of the many genres of art is associated with discipline-specific arts terminology and a stylistic approach to art-making.

1.3.8.D.5

Examine the characteristics, thematic content, and symbolism found in works of art from diverse cultural and historical eras, and use these visual statements as inspiration for original artworks.

The visual possibilities and inherent qualities of traditional and contemporary art materials (including digital media) may inform choices about visual communication and art-making techniques.

1.3.8.D.6

Synthesize the physical properties, processes, and techniques for visual communication in multiple art media (including digital media), and apply this knowledge to the creation of original artworks.

Students will…

  • Differentiate the expressive potential of line as visual communication that includes symbols, calligraphic letters and numbers (e.g., the Lascaux cave paintings, Jean-Michel Basquiat's graffiti art inspired paintings, the paintings of Paul Klee, Robert Smithson's massive earthwork Spiral Jetty extrapolated from ancient symbolism, sky writing, calligraphy, Egyptian hieroglyphics, etc.).  Use line to create ideographic artwork stemming from an examination of symbolic line in diverse cultures.  
  • Classify geometric and organic shapes used in two dimensional masterworks of art from diverse cultures and historical eras and explain ways shape provides measurement and or defines objects creating associations in the natural world (e.g., Elizabeth Murray’s physically shaped canvases broke the traditional two dimensional plane in painting, De Stijl artist Piet Mondrian painted squares, rectangles, and straight lines to emulate scientific precision and perfection etc.).  Create original works of art inspired by shape as the primary element of art.  
  • Identify warm and cool colors used in two and three-dimensional masterworks of art from diverse cultures and historical eras and explain how color application of varied values impacts the emotional and intellectual significance of the work (e.g., bold colors of the Fauvists, Mexican Folk Art, paintings by Ellsworth Kelly, El Greco, Franz Kline, Pablo Picasso from his blue period, sculptures by John Chamberlain, Olafur Eliasson etc.).  Utilize varied approaches to the treatment of color intermediate and monochromatic color for emotional effect and/or means to communicate an intellectual concept.
  • Identify various types of real and implied textural surfaces found in culturally diverse masterworks of art (e.g., Anselm Kiefer’s heavily textured canvases, Ad Reinhardt’s paintings with a uniformed flatness to their surface etc.) and create original works of art utilizing texture as the primary element in art.
  • Generalize how forms (three-dimensional geometric figures) are used in masterworks of art from diverse cultures and historical eras.  Identify and utilizing the illusion of form: cubes, spheres, cylinders and cones as the primary elements in original works of art in art.
  • Compare and contrast symmetrical and asymmetrical balance in masterworks from diverse cultures and historical eras (e.g., David Smith’s Cubi series convey balance through arrangement of geometric shapes, Symmetrical balance of Ansel Adams photographs where shapes are mirrored on either side of an axis.
  • Identify the use of proportion/scale relationships in historical and contemporary art masterworks (e.g., Stonehenge, a prehistoric monument, environmental works by Christo and Jeanne Claude, hyper-realistic self-portraits of Chuck Close, selected works by Do-Ho-Suh such as Public Figures, Claes Oldenburg, Luis Jimenez, Henry Moore etc.).  Create original works of art emphasizing and exaggerating proportions relative to human scale emphasizing realistic facial features.
  • Identify ways that similar shapes are clustered together to create rhythmic, repetitive patterns unifying the design of masterworks from diverse cultures and historical eras (e.g., Aboriginal Art, Op Art, Tara Donovan’s repetitive use of everyday objects in sculptural installations, etc.) and use rhythm as a design element in original artwork.
  • Compare and contrast an element of art making in diverse cultural historical contexts (e.g., Aboriginal Art vs. French Impressionism/pointillism, Minoan Art vs. Russian, Constructivism, Ethnographic Art vs. Folk Art etc.).

EVIDENCE OF LEARNING

 Assessment:  

  • Formative Assessment strategies
  • Rubrics
  • Unit Assessments
  • Performance Assessments

Equipment Needed:

  • Color Wheel poster, or printout  
  • School and town libraries  
  • Various internet websites for art education.
  • ART Supplies

  • Pinterest, Pinterest.com  
  • Artsonia, Artsonia.com  
  • The Getty Institute, getty.edu  
  • WebArt, webart.com  
  • Internet,
  • Virtual Museum Tours
  • Hand-outs  
  • YouTube videos related to art history, artists, or art creation.

Modifications/Accommodations

IEPs

  • Projects are designed so teacher may add or omit criteria based on student needs.
  • Shortened assignments
  • Provide multiple grouping opportunities for students to share their ideas and to encourage work among various backgrounds and cultures (e.g. multiple representation and multimodal experiences)
  • Mnemonic aids/devices
  • Additional time for test preparation
  • Review/testing matched to student pace
  • Test directions read/explained thoroughly
  • Oral, short-answer, modified tests
  • Emphasis on successes
  • Graphic Organizers
  • Student choice of texts, projects, writing prompts, etc.
  • Collaborate with after-school programs or clubs to extend learning opportunities

504s

  • Mnemonic aids/devices
  • Additional time for test preparation
  • Review/testing matched to student pace
  • Test directions read/explained thoroughly
  • Oral, short-answer, modified tests
  • Emphasis on successes
  • Graphic Organizers
  • Student choice of texts, projects, writing prompts, etc.
  • Collaborate with after-school programs or clubs to extend learning opportunities

ELLs

  • Shortened assignments
  • Extended time is allotted for students
  • Visuals/video provided where possible
  • Electronic translators
  • Provide work for completion or understanding to ELL teacher to continue during ELL class

G/T

  • Projects are designed so teacher may extend criteria based on student needs.
  • Structure learning around explaining or solving a social or community-based issue
  • Provide electronic games, lessons, etc to encourage students to expand or move ahead of class learning.

At-Risk Failure

  • Projects designed so teacher may add or omit criteria based on student need
  • Shortened assignments
  • Extended time allotted for students
  • Structure lessons around questions that are authentic, relate to students’ interests, social/family background and knowledge of their communities
  • Collaborate with after-school programs or clubs to extend learning opportunities and support
  • Various online learning opportunities to reinforce skills based on student needs
  • Provide students multiple choices for how they can represent their understandings
  • Additional time for test preparation
  • Directions written and read/explained thoroughly and in chunks
  • Emphasis on successes
  • Graphic organizers and other organizational aides
  • Student Success Team and implementation of RTI Interventions
  • Set goal plan with reachable goals and pathways and collaboration with parents
  • One-on-one conference with teacher to include feedback on work and progress toward meeting goals

21st Century Skills and Themes

Interdisciplinary Connections

Career Ready Practices

9.2 Career Awareness, Exploration, and

      Preparation 

Cite specific textual evidence to support analysis of science and technical texts. (MS-LS1-4),(MS-LS1-5) RST.6-8.1

Determine the central ideas or conclusions of a text; provide an accurate summary of the text distinct from prior knowledge or opinions. (MS-LS1-5) RST.6-8.2

Trace and evaluate the argument and specific claims in a text, distinguishing claims that are supported by reasons and evidence from claims that are not. (MS-LS1-4) RI.6.8

Write arguments focused on discipline content. (MS-LS1-4) WHST.6-8.1

Write informative/explanatory texts to examine a topic and convey ideas, concepts, and information through the selection, organization, and analysis of relevant content. (MS-LS1-5) WHST.6-8.2

Draw evidence from informational texts to support analysis, reflection, and research. (MS-LS1-5) WHST.6-8.9

  • CRP1. Act as a responsible and contributing citizen and employee.
  • CRP2. Apply appropriate academic and technical skills.
  • CRP3. Attend to personal health and financial well-being.
  • CRP4.Communicate clearly and effectively and with reason.
  • CRP5.Consider the environmental, social and economic impacts of decisions.
  • CRP6.Demonstrate creativity and innovation.
  • CRP 7.Employ valid and reliable research strategies.
  • CRP8.Utilize critical thinking to make sense of problems and persevere in solving them.
  • CRP9.Model integrity, ethical leadership and effective management.
  • CRP10. Plan education and career paths aligned to personal goals.
  • CRP11. Use technology to enhance productivity.
  • CRP12.Work productively in teams while using cultural global competence.

By the end of 8th grade,

  • 9.2.8.B.1 Research careers within the 16 Career Clusters and determine attributes of career success.
  • 9.2.8.B.2 Develop a Personalized Student Learning Plan with the assistance of an adult mentor that includes information about career areas of interest, goals and an educational plan.
  • 9.2.8.B.3 Evaluate communication, collaboration, and leadership skills that can be developed through school, home, work, and extracurricular activities for use in a career.
  • 9.2.8.B.4 Evaluate how traditional and nontraditional careers have evolved regionally, nationally, and globally.
  • 9.2.8.B.7 Evaluate the impact of online activities and social media on employer decisions.

Unit 1 Overview In this unit, students will study line and establish how it is the fundamental art element that all other elements and principles rely upon. (3 Weeks)


Students will create line charts exhibiting line types creating using various inspiration and media. They will search the environment for line types and classify them into groups that share similar attributes. Students will speculate how line influences the other art elements and principles. They will view examples of the use of texture in 2D and 3D art, as actual and implied textures. They will understand how lines, line variety, and intensity are essential for the successful creation of realistic texture when drawing. Students will learn two methods of shading: cross-hatching and stippling. Students will discuss the role of texture in helping to establish mood and realism.

In grade 6, students will be able to assimilate the art concept, and then apply it to the creation of gestural drawing. Students will use large sweeping lines to draw a provided organic still life object.

Exit Skills

By the end of Unit 1 6th grade Visual Art Students Should be able to:  

Enduring Understanding

Throughout time, line has been the fundamental foundation of all art, helping to create shape, imply texture, and establish a sense of space, movement and mood.

Essential Questions

•Overarching: The overall “Big Idea”

•Topical: Unit or lesson specific but still promotes inquiry

Learning Objectives

After completing VISUAL ARTS UNIT 1 LINE, students will be able to:  

Unit 2 Overview

In this unit, students will study texture and how it relates to the realistic attributes of a work of art. (3 Weeks)


They will search the environment for textures to draw, and then classify them as either implied or actual textures. They will view examples of the use of texture in 2D and 3D art, as actual and implied textures. They will understand how lines, line variety, and intensity are essential for the successful creation of realistic texture when drawing. Students will learn two methods of shading: cross-hatching and stippling. Students will discuss the role of texture in helping to establish mood and realism.

In grade 6, students will be able to assimilate the art concept, and then apply it to the creation of actual texture. Students will select 6 squares of paper to be altered for a texture study. The students can use tools to transform the smooth surface of the paper to produce a textured result on the surface. Beneath each texture, students will provide a name and description for the variety in the box. When finished, all samples and drawings will be trimmed to size and mounted on project board for comparison.

Exit Skills

By the end of Unit 2, 6th grade Visual Art Students Should be able to:  

Enduring Understanding

The everyday environment is comprised of an endless variety of textures, making texture an essential aspect of artistic creation as seen in textiles, fashion, and home furnishing; as well as an element used by artists to create a sense of emphasis and realism in their work.

Essential Questions

•Overarching: The “Big Idea”:

•Topical:

Learning Objectives

After completing VISUAL ARTS UNIT 2 TEXTURE, students will be able to:  

Unit Overview In this unit, students will study color theory and the fundamentals of the color wheel. (4 Weeks)


 They will search the environment for examples of color families and then classify them as: primary, secondary, tertiary, warm, cool, or complementary. They will view examples of the use of color relationships in art and how color affects the mood of the composition. Students will understand that color relationships influence many art principles and elements of design.

In grade 6, students will be able to assimilate the art concept, and then apply it to the creation of a color wheel. Suggested color wheel activities include modifying each wedge of the wheel to be a repeating shape or word.

Exit Skills

By the end of Unit 3, 6th grade Visual Art Students Should be able to:  

Enduring Understanding

Color dominates the everyday environment creating contrast or harmony, establishing space, and influencing artists and designers to experiment with those concepts and media.

Essential Questions

•Overarching: The “Big Idea”: How do artists use color &/or color relationships to communicate the intention of their art?

•Topical: Unit or lesson specific but promoting inquiry:

Learning Objectives

After completing VISUAL ARTS UNIT 3 COLOR, students will be able to:  

Unit Overview In this unit, students will study value and how it relates to the 3D form. (3 Weeks)


They will create value scales and gray scales to be used throughout the lesson. They will view examples of value changes in black and white images, as well as monochromatic paintings. They will understand how values are made using different media, and will be able to successfully create values for any color on the color wheel. Students will learn two methods of shading: cross-hatching and stippling. Students will discuss values role in helping to establish mood and focal points.

In grade 6, students will learn to draw spheres, cones, triangular prisms, and cubes. Students will practice drawing the shadows of the aforementioned forms using changing light sources. Once mastery of the skill has been learned, students can use the form of their choice in a compositional drawing.

Exit Skills

By the end of Unit 4, 6th grade Visual Art Students Should be able to:  

Enduring Understanding

The everyday environment is comprised of an endless variety of textures, making texture an essential aspect of artistic creation as seen in textiles, fashion, and home furnishing; as well as an element used by artists to create a sense of emphasis and realism in their work.

Essential Questions

•Overarching: The “Big Idea”: How many shades can be made from one color and how do those shades help to establish a sense of space?

•Topical: Unit or lesson specific but promoting inquiry:

Learning Objectives

 After completing VISUAL ARTS UNIT 4 VALUE, students will be able to:  

Unit Overview In this unit, students will study space and the fundamentals of how the illusion of space is achieved in a composition. (3 Weeks)


 They will search the environment for examples of perspective drawings and view artwork that establishes a horizon line, vanishing point, and a sense of space through perspective. Students will study how the size and details of the shapes in a drawing change as they travel closer to the vanishing point.

In grade 6, students will be able to assimilate the art concept, and then apply it to the creation of a 1 pont and 2 point perspective drawings using real or imaginary subjects.

Exit Skills

By the end of Unit 5, 6th grade Visual Art Students Should be able to:  

Enduring Understanding

Artists use space to establish the depth of an environment and create relationships and balance between objects within that environment.

Essential Questions

•Overarching: The “Big Idea”: How do artists use the development of space to communicate the intention of their art?

•Topical: Unit or lesson specific but promoting inquiry:

Learning Objectives

After completing VISUAL ARTS UNIT 5 SPACE, students will be able to:  

Unit 6 Overview In this unit, students will study how artists create shape from line. (3 Weeks)


 They will search the environment for examples of shape types and then classify the shapes into two categories: geometric (mathematically derived) and organic (irregular and nature-inspired). They will view examples of shapes use in art and apply previous knowledge about line to grasp the concept. Students will understand that shape is a fundamental for all drawing and has often been used as the subject of art alone.

In grade 6, students will be able to assimilate the art concept, and then apply it to the creation of a tessellation project wherein they design an abstract shape and use mathematical principles to repeat it in an artistic design.

Exit Skills

By the end of Unit 6, 6th grade Visual Art Students Should be able to:  

Enduring Understanding

Although vastly different, organic and geometric shapes can be used together to create a cohesive composition.

Essential Questions

•Overarching: The “Big Idea”: How do artists marry together ideas and objects that are extremely different from one another and still manage to establish balance and unity?

•Topical: Unit or lesson specific but promoting inquiry:

Learning Objectives

After completing VISUAL ARTS UNIT 6 SHAPE, students will be able to:  

Grade 6