Pupil Premium Action Plan 2018 - 2019

1 Summary information

Total number of pupils

206

Mid year Review: March 2019

End of year review:  July 2019

Number of pupils eligible for PP

21

Total PP budget

£26,700

2 Attainment and Progress

Key Stage 2 Disadvantaged PROGRESS SCORE and % reaching Expected in RWM

2018

2017

2016

 

Disadvantaged pupils

(6)

Non-disadvantaged pupils (24) in school

Disadvantaged pupils

National

Disadvantaged pupils

(4)

Non-disadvantaged pupils (25) in school

Disadvantaged pupils

National

Disadvantaged pupils

 (7)

Non-disadvantaged pupils (22) in school

Disadvantaged pupils

National

% at expected standard in R + W + M

33%

(40% with ch removed)

63%

TBC

50%

52%

48%

14%

59%

39%

Progress: Reading

-3.69

(-2.10 with ch removed )

1.31

TBC

0.60

-2.88

-0.7

1.11

2.32

-0.7

Progress: Writing

-1.50

(0.69 with ch removed)

-0.18

TBC

-4.30

TBC

-0.4

-3.18

 -2.40

-0.3

Progress: Maths

-5.16

(-3.86 with ch removed)

0.99

TBC

0.51

-0.43

-0.6

 -0.5

 2.39

-0.4

Key Stage 2 Disadvantaged SCALED SCORES

2018

2017

2016

 

Disadvantaged pupils

(6)

Non-disadvantaged pupils (26)

in school

Disadvantaged pupils

(4)

Non-disadvantaged pupils (25)

in school

Disadvantaged pupils (7)

Non-disadvantaged pupils (22)

in school

Scaled score: Reading

100.4

106.5

103.8

102.6

98.0

105.5

Scaled score: Maths

97.8

105.5

103.3

99.8

97.6

105.8

3   Barriers to future attainment for pupils eligible for PP

In School Barriers

A.         

Poor learning skills e.g. organisation, resilience and being able to work / write for extended periods of time.

B.         

Pupil’s not always being in a secure place mentally or emotionally and therefore not’ ready to learn’.

C.

Pupil Premium children require more carefully targeted, timely support than their peers to enable them to keep up and make good progress (Pupil Premium children have a range of distinct and unique needs which makes it hard to address common issues).

External Barriers

D.

Consistent attendance and punctuality.

E.

Access to life experiences, low aspirations (especially to build science/ STEM capital).

F.

Lack of funds to support trips and residentials.

4 Desired Outcomes

Success criteria

A.         

Children able to organise themselves in lessons and to know what to do if stuck and to be resilient when things change/ new situations arise.

Teacher to have clear rules and routines in place that support all children. Classrooms to have necessary resources to support children in lessons that are well-organised.

School to work with families to show the importance of having a kit /reading diaries etc.

B.         

Pupil Premium children who are struggling socially and emotionally make progress in their specific area of need, according to QCA Behaviour Scales and other relevant measures.

PPG-funded pupils who need social and emotional support receive well-planned and delivered intervention, specific to their area of need, which ensures that they make progress with these and are better able to learn within the classroom.

C.

Pupil Premium children in every year group have priority access to well-taught interventions, both structured and bespoke, including those intended to help them ‘keep up, not catch up’. These are provided in a timely way, based on formative assessment of pupils’ next steps and gaps identified.

Pupil Premium children in all year groups attain in line with their peers in core subjects by the end of the year, and make good progress as seen in books and case studies throughout the year.

D.

PPG -funded attendance to improve.  

Attendance to improve still further.  Focus on improving individual's attendance by working more closely with families.

E.

Pupils are exposed to a wide range of STEM activities to build their ‘Science capital’ and to develop their science related knowledge, skills, experiences and attitudes.

Children to be exposed to a wide range of activities.  Children enthused by science and can see how science is used in the real world at different levels.

F.

Pupil Premium-funded children are supported to access the full range of school activities which are available to their peers, including residential trips, after-school clubs (including those which are free), any which will allow them to excel.

All PPG-funded children to attend Y4 and Y6 residentials.

Any PPG- funded children who need the support of ASC to attend at reduced cost.

PPG-funded children to attend any after-school clubs at reduced cost where appropriate.

5.  Planned expenditure

Academic year

2018/19

Quality First Teaching for all

Desired outcome

Chosen action / approach

What is the evidence and rationale for this choice?

How will you ensure it is implemented well?

Staff lead

Impact

Blue = March review.

Purple = July review

Costing

Pupils are exposed to a wide range of STEM activities to build their ‘Science capital’ and to develop their science related knowledge, skills, experiences and attitudes.

A focus year on STEM learning relating these to real life.

Space week.

Polar Explorer Programme.

Brain awareness week.

STEM fete.

Engineers of tomorrow week.

Invite in parents/ locals to talk to children about their jobs and how they relate to STEM.

Pupil’s horizons will be broadened.

We want to build our children’s science capital at all levels.

Level the playing field for all children.

Provide stimuli for writing opportunities.

After a governor learning walk it was found that there was not enough evidence of science across the school.

HT and STEM lead teachers will work together to plan a programme of activities across the year.

Headteacher and

STEM subject lead.

£3000 to book experiences although a lot will be free from links with other people/ companies e.g. science oxford and to buy resources where needed.

Children able to organise themselves in lessons and to know what to do if stuck and to be resilient when things change/ new situations arise.

Review of class layouts and class resources.  Clear training for all children, teachers and TAs  how to use the marking code and expectations for presentation.  High expectations in class.

Yr R to look at ECERs for the class and outside area.

Sutton Trust Meta-cognition says ‘Self-regulated learners are aware of their strengths and weaknesses, and can motivate themselves to engage in, and improve, their learning.’ Also:

‘Modelling by the teacher is a cornerstone of effective teaching; revealing the thought processes of an expert learner helps to develop pupils’ metacognitive skills.’

We saw an improvement in the children’s progress last year when we in whole class guided reading when we had training on this  approach.

DHT and HT to plan staff meetings.

Teachers work in reflection partners to video lessons and review them to discuss this.  Planned in 3 x a year.

ECERs to be started in Autumn term.

DHT

and SLT

£4000 to release teachers to complete reviews of videos and classroom areas.

Children who are struggling socially and emotionally  and to improve their self management of emotions.

Teachers to use Zones of Regulation across the school to ensure a consistent common approach to discussing emotions.

SENCo to lead in CW for children and staff - every Wed for Autumn term.

The sutton trust says Social and Emotional Learning (SEL) interventions have an identifiable and valuable impact on attitudes to learning and social relationships in school. Improvements appear more likely when SEL approaches are embedded into routine educational practices 

SEL programmes appear to be particularly beneficial for disadvantaged or low-attaining pupils.

SENCo

£750 training.

£250 cover

Total budgeted cost

13300

Targeted Support

Pupil Premium children who are struggling socially and emotionally make progress in their specific area of need, according to QCA Behaviour Scales and other relevant measures.

Emotional Literacy Support Assistants are used across the school to support identified children who need support.

Train an extra ELSA for the upper ks 2 children.

The sutton trust says Social and Emotional Learning (SEL) interventions have an identifiable and valuable impact on attitudes to learning and social relationships in school. I Improvements appear more likely when SEL approaches are embedded into routine educational practices and supported by professional development and training for staff.

Training booked.

SENco to manage ELSA time.

Regular update training in place.

QCA grids completed after children have settled start term 2.  Then end term 4 and term 6.

SENCo and

HT to lead.

£1200 to release SENCo to meet teachers to complete QCA grids.

£5300 for ELSA to support individuals and groups.

PPG -funded attendance to improve.  

Termly meetings with parents of children who have attendance lower than 90-95% to offer support / advice.

PPG funded attendance is lower than non PPG.

HT termly attendance monitoring.

HT

None

Pupil Premium children in every year group have priority access to well-taught interventions, both structured and bespoke, including those intended to help them ‘keep up, not catch up’. These are provided in a timely way, based on formative assessment of pupils’ next steps and gaps identified.

Termly Pupil Progress Meetings to talk about all children and to use this time to identify PPG children’s barriers to learning.  These will then be included in the Class Improvement Plans and reviewed termly.

As an overall group Writing is lower so support will be given to allow time to edit and improve work in class.

Attainment and progress of disadvantaged children fluctuates year on year and not all children have the same areas to develop so regular meetings ensure each child is discussed and appropriate interventions put in place.

Case studies will show progress.

Termly Pupil Progress Meetings

HT

SLT

£1000 to release SLT to run Pupil Progress meetings.

£1500  TA support  / interventions.

Total budgeted cost

£9000

Enrichment and Experiences

Pupil Premium-funded children are supported to access the full range of school activities which are available to their peers, including residential trips, after-school clubs (including those which are free), any which will allow them to excel.

Support families to pay for outdoor residentials (Yenworthy, Youlbury, Inside Out Project, Waddesdon Manor etc.) inline with the charging and remissions policy.

EEF says that Overall, studies of adventure learning interventions consistently show positive benefits on academic learning. On average, pupils who participate in adventure learning interventions make approximately four additional months’ progress over the course of a year. There is also evidence of an impact on non-cognitive outcomes such as self-confidence.

 

 

HT to meet with families where necessary.

HT / SBM

£4400

Total budgeted cost

£4400

Total Proposed Spending:

£26,700