GATEWAY GROUP CURRICULUM UNIT PLAN OVERVIEW

Content Area:

AP US History II

  Grade Level:

10

Unit Title:

Age of Big Business: 1865-1890

   Pacing Guide:

13 days

Primary Interdisciplinary Connections:

Language Arts through reading, comprehension, analysis, and persuasive writing.

21st Century Themes:

Critical Thinking and Problem Solving through document analysis and persuasive writing.

Communication and Collaboration through small group work.

Career Readiness Practices

CRP2. Apply appropriate academic and technical skills.

CRP4. Communicate clearly and effectively and with reason.

CRP6. Demonstrate creativity and innovation.

CRP7. Employ valid and reliable research strategies.

CRP8. Utilize critical thinking to make sense of problems and persevere in solving them.

CRP9. Model integrity, ethical leadership and effective management.

CRP11. Use technology to enhance productivity.

CRP12. Work productively in teams while using cultural global competence

Technology Standards:

8.1.12.A.2  Produce and edit a multi-page digital document for a commercial or professional audience and present it to peers and/or professionals in that related area for review.

UNIT SUMMARY

This unit focuses on the age of big business and industrialization, the Gilded Age.  Students will learn about the government’s role in allowing business to grow, the development of monopolies, issues of unionization, and the advent of the Progressive movement.

LEARNING TARGETS

ESSENTIAL QUESTIONS

ENDURING UNDERSTANDINGS

How did industrialization affect government and society?

The extremely wealthy justified their wealth using Social Darwinist beliefs.

STANDARDS

Content Statement

CPI#

Cumulative Progress Indicator (CPI)

Technological developments and unregulated business practices revolutionized transportation, manufacturing, and consumption and changed the daily lives of Americans.
6.1.12.A.5.a

Relate industrial growth to the need for social and governmental reforms.

6.1.12.B.5.b

Assess the impact of rapid urbanization on the environment and on the quality of life in cities.

6.1.12.C.5.a

Analyze the economic practices of various business organizations (i.e., corporations and monopolies) regarding the production and marketing of goods, and explain the positive or negative impact of these practices on the nation and on individuals.  

6.1.12.C.5.b

Compare and contrast economic development of the North, South, and West in the post-Civil War period.  

Unit Learning Targets

Students will…

  • Explain how the extremely wealthy justified their wealth using Social Darwinist beliefs.

  • Analyze the economic practices of various business organizations (i.e., corporations and monopolies) regarding the production and marketing of goods, and explain the positive or negative impact of these practices on the nation and on individuals.  

EVIDENCE OF LEARNING

Summative Assessment

  • Essay
  • Unit Test

Equipment Needed:

Teacher Resources:

  • American Pageant
  • America’s History
  • Document: Intro to “Origin” by Charles Darwin
  • Document: “Gospel of Wealth” by Andrew Carnegie
  • Images of robber baron homes: Breakers in Newport, Rhode Island and Rosecliff
  • Edsitement: Robber Barons or Captains of Industry?

  • American Pageant
  • America’s History
  • Document: Intro to “Origin” by Charles Darwin
  • Document: “Gospel of Wealth” by Andrew Carnegie
  • Images of robber baron homes: Breakers in Newport, Rhode Island and Rosecliff
  • Edsitement: Robber Barons or Captains of Industry?


GATEWAY GROUP CURRICULUM UNIT PLAN OVERVIEW

Content Area:

AP US History II

  Grade Level:

10

Unit Title:

Politics and Society in the 1890s  

   Pacing Guide:

14 days

Primary Interdisciplinary Connections:

Language Arts through reading, comprehension, analysis, and persuasive writing.

21st Century Themes:

Critical Thinking and Problem Solving through document analysis.

Civic Literacy through learning about the development of laws on business.

Career Readiness Practices

CRP1. Act as a responsible and contributing citizen and employee.

CRP2. Apply appropriate academic and technical skills.

CRP3. Attend to personal health and financial well-being.

CRP4. Communicate clearly and effectively and with reason.

CRP5. Consider the environmental, social and economic impacts of decisions.

CRP6. Demonstrate creativity and innovation.

CRP7. Employ valid and reliable research strategies.

CRP8. Utilize critical thinking to make sense of problems and persevere in solving them.

CRP9. Model integrity, ethical leadership and effective management.

CRP10. Plan education and career paths aligned to personal goals.

CRP11. Use technology to enhance productivity.

CRP12. Work productively in teams while using cultural global competence

Technology Standards: 8.1.12.E.1  Produce a position statement about a real world problem by developing a systematic plan of investigation with peers and experts synthesizing information from multiple sources.

UNIT SUMMARY

This unit dovetails with the previous unit on Big Business in the Gilded Age.  This unit focuses on the governmental influence (or lack thereof) on the development of the time.

LEARNING TARGETS

ESSENTIAL QUESTIONS

ENDURING UNDERSTANDINGS

What is the relationship between government and business?

  1. America’s economic growth between 1860 and 1900 is attributed to the government policy of laissez-faire.
  2. Increased urbanization in America during the Gilded Age destroyed the idea of Jeffersonian Democracy.
  3. The federal government hindered unionization movements.

STANDARDS

Content Statement

CPI#

Cumulative Progress Indicator (CPI)

The Industrial Revolution and immigration had a powerful impact on labor relations, urbanization, the environment, and cultural values and created tensions between ethnic and social groups.
6.1.12.A.5.a

Relate industrial growth to the need for social and governmental reforms.

6.1.12.A.5.b

Assess the impact of governmental efforts to regulate industrial and financial systems in order to provide economic stability.

6.1.12.A.5.c

Analyze the effectiveness of governmental policies and of actions by groups and individuals to address discrimination against new immigrants, Native Americans, and African Americans.

6.1.12.D.5.a

Analyze government policies and other factors that promoted innovation, entrepreneurship, and industrialization in New Jersey and the United States during this period.

6.1.12.D.6.a

Assess the impact of technological innovation and immigration on the development of agriculture, industry, and urban culture during the late 19th century in New Jersey (i.e., Paterson Silk Strike 1913) and the United States.

Unit Learning Targets

Students will…

  • Analyze to what extent was America’s economic growth between 1860 and 1900 was attributed to the government policy of laissez-faire.

  • Evaluate how increased urbanization in America during the Gilded Age destroyed the idea of Jeffersonian Democracy.

  • Explain how the federal government hindered unionization movements.

EVIDENCE OF LEARNING

Summative Assessment

  • Unit Test

Equipment Needed:

Teacher Resources:

  • American Pageant
  • America’s History
  • Document: “Twelve year old boy (who had sworn he was sixteen) pulling threads in a sweat shop, about 1889” by Jacob Riis (America’s History pg. 606)
  • Document: “I Hear America Singing” by Walt Whitman

  • American Pageant
  • America’s History
  • Document: “Twelve year old boy (who had sworn he was sixteen) pulling threads in a sweat shop, about 1889” by Jacob Riis (America’s History pg. 606)
  • Document: “I Hear America Singing” by Walt Whitman


GATEWAY GROUP CURRICULUM UNIT PLAN OVERVIEW

Content Area:

AP US History II

  Grade Level:

10

Unit Title:

Progressive Era and the Age of Imperialism

   Pacing Guide:

15 days

Primary Interdisciplinary Connections:

Language Arts through reading, comprehension, analysis, and persuasive writing.

21st Century Themes:

Critical Thinking through document and issue analysis.

Communication and Collaboration through class discussion and defense of opinions.

Career Readiness Practices

CRP1. Act as a responsible and contributing citizen and employee.

CRP2. Apply appropriate academic and technical skills.

CRP3. Attend to personal health and financial well-being.

CRP4. Communicate clearly and effectively and with reason.

CRP5. Consider the environmental, social and economic impacts of decisions.

CRP6. Demonstrate creativity and innovation.

CRP7. Employ valid and reliable research strategies.

CRP8. Utilize critical thinking to make sense of problems and persevere in solving them.

CRP11. Use technology to enhance productivity.

CRP12. Work productively in teams while using cultural global competence

Technology Standards:

8.1.12.A.2  Produce and edit a multi-page digital document for a commercial or professional audience and present it to peers and/or professionals in that related area for review.

 

UNIT SUMMARY

This unit begins with the social consequences of the Age of Big Business.  The Progressive Era has its roots in the 1840’s, but flourishes in reaction to the urbanization and industrialization of the United States.  Progressivism gathers strong support from the philosophy of Social Darwinism.  Judged harshly in modern interpretation, Social Darwinism was the common thought of the day and thoroughly understanding that thought processes is essential to understanding the reforms Progressivism sought and the foreign policy that developed.

The Age of Imperialism was strongly motivated by Social Darwinism.  Critical analysis of the period, within historical context and with the benefit of historical reflection is a major part of the learning.  Included are learning about the Spanish-American War, China’s Open Door Policy, and the Roosevelt Corollary.

LEARNING TARGETS

ESSENTIAL QUESTIONS

ENDURING UNDERSTANDINGS

What role did social reform play?

What inspired America to colonize other parts of the world?

  1. In response to the growth of industrialization and urbanization, Progressives sought to right the injustices done to those least able to cope.
  2. America made itself an imperialist power and justified their motivations by their belief they were uplifting, civilizing, and Christianizing “inferior” races/people/cultures.
  3. America’s imperialism positioned it as a growing world power that came to fruition by the end of the 20th century.

STANDARDS

Content Statement

CPI#

Cumulative Progress Indicator (CPI)

Progressive reform movements promoted government efforts to address problems created by rapid industrialization, immigration, and unfair treatment of women, children, and minority groups.
6.1.12.A.6.a

Evaluate the effectiveness of Progressive reforms in preventing unfair business practices and political corruption and in promoting social justice.

6.1.12.A.6.b

Evaluate the ways in which women organized to promote government policies (i.e., abolition, women’s suffrage, and the temperance movement) designed to address injustice, inequality, workplace safety, and immorality.  

6.1.12.A.6.c

Relate the creation of African American advocacy organizations (i.e., the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People) to United States Supreme Court decisions (i.e., Plessy v. Ferguson) and state and local governmental policies.

6.1.12.D.6.c

Analyze the successes and failures of efforts to expand women’s rights, including the work of important leaders (i.e., Elizabeth Cady Stanton, Susan B. Anthony, Alice Paul, and Lucy Stone) and the eventual ratification of the 19th Amendment.

An expanding market for international trade promoted policies that resulted in America emerging as a world power.

6.1.12.B.6.a

Determine the role geography played in gaining access to raw materials and finding new global markets to promote trade.

6.1.12.D.6.b

Compare and contrast the foreign policies of American presidents during this time period, and analyze how these presidents contributed to the United States becoming a world power.  

Unit Learning Targets

Students will…

  • America made itself an imperialist power and justified their motivations by their belief they were uplifting, civilizing, and Christianizing “inferior” races/people/cultures.

  • America’s imperialism positioned it as a growing world power that came to fruition by the end of the 20th century.

EVIDENCE OF LEARNING

Summative Assessment

  • Essay
  • Unit Test

Equipment Needed:

Teacher Resources:

  • American Pageant
  • America’s History
  • Document: Senate speech by Alfred Beveridge of Indiana
  • Document: “White Man’s Burden” by Rudyard Kipling 1899
  • Document: “Measuring Uncle Sam for a New Suit” by JS Pughe in Puck Magazine, 1900
  • Document: Cartoon, China’s Open Door policy, Teddy Roosevelt and his Big Stick Diplomacy

  • American Pageant
  • America’s History
  • Document: Senate speech by Alfred Beveridge of Indiana
  • Document: “White Man’s Burden” by Rudyard Kipling 1899
  • Document: “Measuring Uncle Sam for a New Suit” by JS Pughe in Puck Magazine, 1900
  • Document: Cartoon, China’s Open Door policy, Teddy Roosevelt and his Big Stick Diplomacy


GATEWAY GROUP CURRICULUM UNIT PLAN OVERVIEW

Content Area:

AP US History II

  Grade Level:

10

Unit Title:

WWI and the Roaring Twenties

   Pacing Guide:

15 days

Primary Interdisciplinary Connections:

Language Arts through reading, comprehension, analysis, and persuasive writing.

21st Century Themes:

Communication and Collaboration through small group work.

Information Literacy through researching of primary sources.

Critical Thinking and Problem Solving through analysis of major policy decisions.

Global Awareness through evaluation of America’s place in the world’s foreign policy.

Career Readiness Practices

CRP2. Apply appropriate academic and technical skills.

CRP4. Communicate clearly and effectively and with reason.

CRP5. Consider the environmental, social and economic impacts of decisions.

CRP6. Demonstrate creativity and innovation.

CRP7. Employ valid and reliable research strategies.

CRP8. Utilize critical thinking to make sense of problems and persevere in solving them.

CRP9. Model integrity, ethical leadership and effective management.

CRP11. Use technology to enhance productivity.

CRP12. Work productively in teams while using cultural global competence

Technology Standards:

8.1.12.A.5  Create a report from a relational database consisting of at least two tables and describe the process, and explain the report results.

UNIT SUMMARY

This unit marks the United States’ shift into a role of prominence on the world stage.  Highlighted by its new role as a major negotiating power, the United States and its foreign policy draws influence from Washington’s Farewell Address advising neutrality and also the reactionary nature of politics common for the time.

LEARNING TARGETS

ESSENTIAL QUESTIONS

ENDURING UNDERSTANDINGS

How did the US get involved in WWI?

Why were the twenties roaring?

  1. American entry into World War I was a result of America’s rise as an imperial power and marked a turning point in its interaction in foreign affairs.
  2. The Roaring 20’s were marked by violations of political, economic, and social laws.
  3. Following WWI, Americans were wary about interacting with other nations and saw a resurgence of Nativism.
  4. Economic growth in the 1920’s was a complex illusion marred by unethical investment practices and environmental effects on agriculture.

STANDARDS

Content Statement

CPI#

Cumulative Progress Indicator (CPI)

United States involvement in World War I affected politics, the economy, and geopolitical relations following the war.
6.1.12.A.7.a

Analyze the reasons for the policy of neutrality regarding World War I, and explain why the United States eventually entered the war.

6.1.12.A.7.b

Evaluate the impact of government policies designed to promote patriotism and to protect national security during times of war (i.e., the Espionage Act and the Sedition Amendment) on individual rights.

6.1.12.A.7.c

Analyze the Treaty of Versailles and the League of Nations from the perspectives of different countries.

6.1.12.D.7.a

Evaluate the effectiveness of Woodrow Wilson’s leadership during and immediately after World War I.

6.1.12.D.7.b

Determine the extent to which propaganda, the media, and special interest groups shaped American public opinion and American foreign policy during World War I.

The 1920s is characterized as a time of social, economic, technological, and political change, as well as a time of emerging isolationism, racial and social tensions, and economic problems.

6.1.12.A.8.a

Relate government policies to the prosperity of the country during the 1920s, and determine the impact of these policies on business and the consumer.  

6.1.12.A.8.b

Compare and contrast the global marketing practices of United States factories and farms with American public opinion and government policies that favored isolationism.   

6.1.12.A.8.c

Relate social intolerance, xenophobia, and fear of anarchists to government policies restricting immigration, advocacy, and labor organizations.  

6.1.12.B.8.a

Determine the impact of the expansion of agricultural production into marginal farmlands and other ineffective agricultural practices on people and the environment.

6.1.12.C.8.a

Analyze the push-pull factors that led to the Great Migration.   

6.1.12.C.8.b

Relate social, cultural, and technological changes in the interwar period to the rise of a consumer economy and the changing role and status of women.

6.1.12.D.8.a

Explain why the Great Migration led to heightened racial tensions, restrictive laws, a rise in repressive organizations, and an increase in violence  

6.1.12.D.8.b

Assess the impact of artists, writers, and musicians of the 1920s, including the Harlem Renaissance, on American culture and values.  

6.1.12.B.9.a

Determine how agricultural practices, overproduction, and the Dust Bowl intensified the worsening economic situation during the Great Depression.  

Unit Learning Targets

Students will…

  • Explain how American entry into World War I was a result of America’s rise as an imperial power and marked a turning point in its interaction in foreign affairs.

  • Analyze how the Roaring 20’s were marked by violations of political, economic, and social laws.

  • Explain why, following WWI, Americans were wary about interacting with other nations and saw a resurgence of Nativism.

  • Analyze how economic growth in the 1920’s was a complex illusion marred by unethical investment practices and environmental effects on agriculture.

EVIDENCE OF LEARNING

Summative Assessment

  • Unit Test
  • Essay/DBQ

Equipment Needed:

Teacher Resources:

  • American Pageant
  • America’s History
  • UC Open Access
  • Edsitement
  • Document: painting of Sacco and Vanzetti
  • Document: Address to congress in Declaration of War
  • Document: Wilson’s pre-war Address to Congress
  • Prohibition a documentary by Ken Burns

  • American Pageant
  • America’s History
  • UC Open Access
  • Edsitement
  • Document: painting of Sacco and Vanzetti
  • Document: Address to congress in Declaration of War
  • Document: Wilson’s pre-war Address to Congress
  • Prohibition a documentary by Ken Burns


GATEWAY GROUP CURRICULUM UNIT PLAN OVERVIEW

Content Area:

AP US History II

  Grade Level:

10

Unit Title:

The 1930’s and WWII 1929-1945

   Pacing Guide:

13 days

Primary Interdisciplinary Connections:

Language Arts through reading, comprehension, analysis, and persuasive writing.

21st Century Themes:

Critical Thinking through document and position analysis.

Financial Literacy through a study of economic cycles.

Career Readiness Practices

CRP1. Act as a responsible and contributing citizen and employee.

CRP4. Communicate clearly and effectively and with reason.

CRP5. Consider the environmental, social and economic impacts of decisions.

CRP6. Demonstrate creativity and innovation.

CRP7. Employ valid and reliable research strategies.

CRP8. Utilize critical thinking to make sense of problems and persevere in solving them.

CRP9. Model integrity, ethical leadership and effective management.

CRP11. Use technology to enhance productivity.

CRP12. Work productively in teams while using cultural global competence

Technology Standards:

8.1.12.A.3  Collaborate in online courses, learning communities, social networks or virtual worlds to discuss a resolution to a problem or issue.

UNIT SUMMARY

From boom to bust, the United States rapidly transitioned from its most prosperous decade to its most disastrous decade.  This unit will examine the consequences of the causes of the Great Depression and include an analysis of the effectiveness of the presidents in their handling of the crisis.  During this period of inward reflection, the rest of the world, principally European nations, were sinking into another World War.  This unit concludes with a look at the reasons for America’s entry into the war and the effect the war had on all aspects of society.

LEARNING TARGETS

ESSENTIAL QUESTIONS

ENDURING UNDERSTANDINGS

How did America get out of the Great Depression?

Why did the US get involved in WWII?

  1. The role of the federal government became more prominent and powerful in the lives of American citizens as a result of New Deal programs.
  2. The groundwork for the United States’ entry into WWII was laid long before the bombing of Pearl Harbor.
  3. The manufacturing requirements of a nation at war helped to pull the nation out of the Great Depression and altered gender and race roles.

STANDARDS

Content Statement

CPI#

Cumulative Progress Indicator (CPI)

The Great Depression resulted from government economic policies, business practices, and individual decisions, and it impacted business and society.
6.1.12.A.9.a

Analyze how the actions and policies of the United States government contributed to the Great Depression.

6.1.12.C.9.a

Explain how government can adjust taxes, interest rates, and spending and use other policies to restore the country’s economic health.

6.1.12.C.9.d

Compare and contrast the causes and outcomes of the stock market crash in 1929 and other periods of economic instability.

6.1.12.D.9.a

Explore the global context of the Great Depression and the reasons for the worldwide economic collapse.

6.1.12.D.9.b

Analyze the impact of the Great Depression on the American family, migratory groups, and ethnic and racial minorities.

Aimed at recovery, relief, and reform, New Deal programs had a lasting impact on the expansion of the role of the national government in the economy.

6.1.12.A.10.a

Explain how and why conflict developed between the Supreme Court and other branches of government over aspects of the New Deal. 

6.1.12.A.10.b

Assess the effectiveness of governmental policies enacted during the New Deal period (i.e., the FDIC, NLRB, and Social Security) in protecting the welfare of individuals.

6.1.12.A.10.c

Evaluate the short- and long-term impact of the expanded role of government on economic policy, capitalism, and society.

6.1.12.B.10.a

Assess the effectiveness of New Deal programs designed to protect the environment.

6.1.12.C.10.a

Evaluate the effectiveness of economic regulations and standards established during this time period in combating the Great Depression.  

6.1.12.C.10.b

Compare and contrast the economic ideologies of the two major political parties regarding the role of government during the New Deal and today.

6.1.12.D.10.c

Explain how key individuals, including minorities and women (i.e., Eleanor Roosevelt and Frances Perkins), shaped the core ideologies and policies of the New Deal.

The United States participated in World War II as an Allied force to prevent military conquests by Germany, Italy, and Japan.

6.1.12.A.11.a

Evaluate the effectiveness of international agreements following World War I in preventing international disputes during the 1920s and 1930s.  

6.1.12.A.11.b

Compare and contrast different perspectives about how the United States should respond to aggressive policies and actions taken by other nations at this time.   

6.1.12.A.11.c

Determine if American policies regarding Japanese internment and actions against other minority groups were a denial of civil rights.   

6.1.12.D.11.c

Explain why women, African Americans, Native Americans, Asian Americans, and other minority groups often expressed a strong sense of nationalism despite the discrimination they experienced in the military and workforce.

6.1.12.C.11.b

Relate new wartime inventions to scientific and technological advancements in the civilian world.

Unit Learning Targets

Students will…

  • The role of the federal government became more prominent and powerful in the lives of American citizens as a result of New Deal programs.

  • The groundwork for the United States’ entry into WWII was laid long before the bombing of Pearl Harbor.

  • The manufacturing requirements of a nation at war helped to pull the nation out of the Great Depression and altered gender and race roles.

EVIDENCE OF LEARNING

Summative Assessment

  • DBQ
  • Essay
  • Unit Test

Equipment Needed:

Teacher Resources:

  • American Pageant
  • America’s History
  • UC Open Access
  • Edsitement
  • After the Fact: The Art of Historical Detection, Chapter 5
  • 2003 AP Exam DBQ

  • American Pageant
  • America’s History
  • UC Open Access
  • Edsitement
  • After the Fact: The Art of Historical Detection, Chapter 5
  • 2003 AP Exam DBQ


GATEWAY GROUP CURRICULUM UNIT PLAN OVERVIEW

Content Area:

AP US History II

  Grade Level:

10

Unit Title:

The Cold War and the 1950’s

   Pacing Guide:

14 days

Primary Interdisciplinary Connections:

Language Arts through reading, comprehension, analysis, and persuasive writing.

21st Century Themes:

Global Awareness through consideration of the consequences of Cold War decision-making.

Critical Thinking and Problem Solving through document analysis.

Creativity and Innovation through creating a photo journal.

Career Readiness Practices

CRP1. Act as a responsible and contributing citizen and employee.

CRP2. Apply appropriate academic and technical skills.

CRP4. Communicate clearly and effectively and with reason.

CRP5. Consider the environmental, social and economic impacts of decisions.

CRP6. Demonstrate creativity and innovation.

CRP7. Employ valid and reliable research strategies.

CRP8. Utilize critical thinking to make sense of problems and persevere in solving them.

Technology Standards:

8.1.12.C.1  Develop an innovative solution to a real world problem or issue in collaboration with peers and experts, and present ideas for feedback through social media or in an online community.

UNIT SUMMARY

This unit focuses on the aftermath of the dropping of the atomic bomb in 1945 and the dawning of the atomic age.  While the Cold War covers a period over 40 years in length, this unit focuses on the 50s and early 60s.  Included in this unit is the suburbanization of post-war America and the unprecedented prosperity that accompanied it.  While some mention of minorities’ advancements is made in terms of the contrast between urban and suburban environments, an in-depth study is reserved to the Civil Rights unit.

LEARNING TARGETS

ESSENTIAL QUESTIONS

ENDURING UNDERSTANDINGS

What were the short-term and long-term consequences of using the atomic bomb?

What was it like for America at home after the war?

  1. The Cold War was in response to military and political advancements ushered in by the atomic age.
  2. Conformity was the main goal of white, middle-class families in the 1950s.
  3. A sharp contrast between middle-class whites and urban minorities became evident in the 1950s and resulted in the beginning of the blacks’ Civil Rights Movement.

STANDARDS

Content Statement

CPI#

Cumulative Progress Indicator (CPI)

Cold War tensions between the United States and communist countries resulted in conflict that influenced domestic and foreign policy for over forty years.
6.1.12.A.12.a

Analyze ideological differences and other factors that contributed to the Cold War and to United States involvement in conflicts intended to contain communism, including the Korean War, the Cuban Missile Crisis, and the Vietnam War.

6.1.12.A.12.b

Examine constitutional issues involving war powers, as they relate to United States military intervention in the Korean War, the Vietnam War, and other conflicts.

6.1.12.A.12.c

Explain how the Arab-Israeli conflict influenced American foreign policy.

6.1.12.B.12.a

Evaluate the effectiveness of the Marshall Plan and regional alliances in the rebuilding of European nations in the post World War II period.

6.1.12.C.12.a

Explain the implications and outcomes of the Space Race from the perspectives of the scientific community, the government, and the people.

6.1.12.C.12.d

Assess the role of the public and private sectors in promoting economic growth and ensuring economic stability.

6.1.12.D.12.b

Analyze efforts to eliminate communism, such as McCarthyism, and their impact on individual civil liberties.  

6.1.12.D.12.c

Evaluate how the development of nuclear weapons by industrialized countries and developing counties affected international relations.  

6.1.12.D.12.d

Compare and contrast American public support of the government and military during the Vietnam War with that of other conflicts.  

6.1.12.D.12.e

Analyze the role that media played in bringing information to the American public and shaping public attitudes toward the Vietnam War.  

Unit Learning Targets

Students will…

  • The Cold War was in response to military and political advancements ushered in by the atomic age.

  • Conformity was the main goal of white, middle-class families in the 1950s.

  • A sharp contrast between middle-class whites and urban minorities became evident in the 1950s and resulted in the beginning of the blacks’ Civil Rights Movement.

EVIDENCE OF LEARNING

Summative Assessment

  • Essay
  • DBQ
  • Unit Test

Equipment Needed:

Teacher Resources:

  • American Pageant
  • America’s History
  • After the Fact chapter on the decision to drop the atomic bomb
  • UC Open Access lessons
  • Document: census data from 1950 and from 1970
  • Document:  “Rosie the Riveter” essay from “After the Fact”
  • Document:  Job ads for women’s jobs from 1957 out of Riddle’s binder

  • American Pageant
  • America’s History
  • After the Fact chapter on the decision to drop the atomic bomb
  • UC Open Access lessons
  • Document: census data from 1950 and from 1970
  • Document:  “Rosie the Riveter” essay from “After the Fact”
  • Document:  Job ads for women’s jobs from 1957 out of Riddle’s binder


GATEWAY GROUP CURRICULUM UNIT PLAN OVERVIEW

Content Area:

AP US History II

  Grade Level:

10

Unit Title:

Changing America: 1960-1980

   Pacing Guide:

15 days

Primary Interdisciplinary Connections:

Language Arts through reading, comprehension, analysis, and persuasive writing.

21st Century Themes:

Critical Thinking through document analysis.

Communication and Collaboration through small group interaction.

Career Readiness Practices

CRP1. Act as a responsible and contributing citizen and employee.

CRP3. Attend to personal health and financial well-being.

CRP4. Communicate clearly and effectively and with reason.

CRP5. Consider the environmental, social and economic impacts of decisions.

CRP6. Demonstrate creativity and innovation.

CRP7. Employ valid and reliable research strategies.

CRP8. Utilize critical thinking to make sense of problems and persevere in solving them.

CRP11. Use technology to enhance productivity.

CRP12. Work productively in teams while using cultural global competence

Technology Standards:

8.1.12.A.2  Produce and edit a multi-page digital document for a commercial or professional audience and present it to peers and/or professionals in that related area for review.

UNIT SUMMARY

This unit covers all of the Civil Rights Movements of the second half of the 20th century: African Americans, Native Americans, Latinos, and women.  Emphasis is placed on the factors leading to the progress toward equality and the consequences (positive and negative) of that transition.  With the changing times came shifts in the presidency.  The imperial president emerges beginning with Kennedy and comes crashing down amid the scandal of Watergate.  Taken together, these ideas merge into profound change in American society and the world.

LEARNING TARGETS

ESSENTIAL QUESTIONS

ENDURING UNDERSTANDINGS

Why did America change so much in the second half of the 20th century?

  1. The Civil Rights Movements in America between 1945 and 1975 polarized racial and gender feelings.
  2. The Great Society marked a stark contrast to the Stagnant Seventies.
  3. The counterculture movement and minority civil rights movements marked a sharp contrast from the conformity of the 1950’s.
  4. The expansion of the imperial presidency came to a cynical halt with the Watergate scandal, ushering in increased cynicism and suspicion of government leaders.

STANDARDS

Content Statement

CPI#

Cumulative Progress Indicator (CPI)

The Civil Rights movement marked a period of social turmoil and political reform, resulting in the expansion of rights and opportunities for individuals and groups previously discriminated against.
6.1.12.A.13.b

Analyze the effectiveness of national legislation, policies, and Supreme Court decisions (i.e., the Civil Rights Act, the Voting Rights Act, the Equal Rights Amendment, Title VII, Title IX, Affirmative Action, Brown v. Board of Education, and Roe v. Wade) in promoting civil liberties and equal opportunities.  

6.1.12.A.13.c

Determine the extent to which changes in national policy after 1965 impacted immigration to New Jersey and the United States.

6.1.12.B.13.a

Determine the factors that led to migration from American cities to suburbs in the 1950s and 1960s, and describe how this movement impacted cities.

6.1.12.B.13.b

Evaluate the effectiveness of environmental movements and their influence on public attitudes and environmental protection laws.

6.1.12.C.13.a

Explain how individuals and organizations used economic measures (e.g., the Montgomery Bus Boycott, sit downs, etc.) as weapons in the struggle for civil and human rights.  

6.1.12.C.13.c

Determine the effectiveness of social legislation that was enacted to end poverty in the 1960s and today.  

6.1.12.D.13.a

Determine the impetus for the Civil Rights Movement, and explain why national governmental actions were needed to ensure civil rights for African Americans.

6.1.12.D.13.b

Compare and contrast the leadership and ideology of Martin Luther King, Jr., and Malcolm X during the Civil Rights Movement, and evaluate their legacies.

6.1.12.D.13.c

Analyze the successes and failures of women’s rights organizations, the American Indian Movement, and La Raza in their pursuit of civil rights and equal opportunities.  

6.1.12.D.13.d

Determine the extent to which suburban living and television supported conformity and stereotyping during this time period, while new music, art, and literature acted as catalysts for the counterculture movement.

6.1.12.D.13.e

Explain why the Peace Corps was created and how its role has evolved over time.

6.1.12.D.13.f

Relate the changing role of women in the labor force to changes in family structure.

Unit Learning Targets

Students will…

  • Explain how the Civil Rights Movements in America between 1945 and 1975 polarized racial and gender feelings.

  • Demonstrate how the Great Society marked a stark contrast to the Stagnant Seventies.

  • Analyze how the counterculture movement and minority civil rights movements marked a sharp contrast from the conformity of the 1950’s.

  • Explain how the expansion of the imperial presidency came to a cynical halt with the Watergate scandal, and ushered in increased cynicism and suspicion of government leaders.

EVIDENCE OF LEARNING

Summative Assessment

  • Essay
  • DBQ
  • Unit Test

Equipment Needed:

Teacher Resources:

  • American Pageant
  • America’s History
  • UC Open Access
  • Edsitement
  • Document: Letter from Birmingham City Jail
  • Document: I have a dream
  • Document: Kennedy’s Inaugural Address (video clip of the end) “torch has been passed to a new generation of America, born in this century”
  • Document: We will go to the moon before the end of this decade.
  • Document: Chickens come home to roost by Malcolm X
  • ESSAY:  DBQ on Nixon from 2011 exam

  • American Pageant
  • America’s History
  • UC Open Access
  • Edsitement
  • Document: Letter from Birmingham City Jail
  • Document: I have a dream
  • Document: Kennedy’s Inaugural Address (video clip of the end) “torch has been passed to a new generation of America, born in this century”
  • Document: We will go to the moon before the end of this decade.
  • Document: Chickens come home to roost by Malcolm X
  • ESSAY:  DBQ on Nixon from 2011 exam


GATEWAY GROUP CURRICULUM UNIT PLAN OVERVIEW

Content Area:

AP US History II

  Grade Level:

10

Unit Title:

Modern America 1980-Present

   Pacing Guide:

10 days

Primary Interdisciplinary Connections:

Language Arts through reading, comprehension, analysis, and persuasive writing.

21st Century Themes:

Critical Thinking through analysis of documents and information.

Civic Literacy through election analysis of voter participation.

Career Readiness Practices

CRP1. Act as a responsible and contributing citizen and employee.

CRP2. Apply appropriate academic and technical skills.

CRP4. Communicate clearly and effectively and with reason.

CRP5. Consider the environmental, social and economic impacts of decisions.

CRP6. Demonstrate creativity and innovation.

CRP7. Employ valid and reliable research strategies.

CRP8. Utilize critical thinking to make sense of problems and persevere in solving them.

CRP9. Model integrity, ethical leadership and effective management.

CRP11. Use technology to enhance productivity.

CRP12. Work productively in teams while using cultural global competence

Technology Standards:

8.1.12.C.1  Develop an innovative solution to a real world problem or issue in collaboration with peers and experts, and present ideas for feedback through social media or in an online community.

UNIT SUMMARY

The resurgence of conservatism was in reaction to the counterculture movement of the 1960s.  Because of movement’s influence on politics, business, and society, the so-called “silent majority” spoke out in 1980 and elected a neo-conservative Ronald Reagan.  The influence of Reagan’s presidency is felt today and some students may naturally make the connection between the conservative rhetoric of today’s Republican party with the seeds sown in the 80s.  This unit will also cover the fall of Communist Soviet Union, Persian Gulf War, the election of 1992 and the resurgence of the Democratic party, Clinton’s impeachment, and will end with the election of 2000.

LEARNING TARGETS

ESSENTIAL QUESTIONS

ENDURING UNDERSTANDINGS

Why do people talk about Reagan and the 80s so much?

  1. Conservatism was a reactionary movement to the counterculture influence of the 1960s and 1970s.
  2. In large part because of the continued recessed economy, the Republicans lost the 1992 election.
  3. Since the Corrupt Bargain of 1824, no presidential election has been as disputed as the election of 2000.

STANDARDS

Content Statement

CPI#

Cumulative Progress Indicator (CPI)

Differing views on government’s role in social and economic issues led to greater partisanship in government decision-making.
6.1.12.D.14.d

Evaluate the extent to which women, minorities, individuals with gender preferences, and individuals with disabilities have met their goals of equality in the workplace, politics, and society.

The increased economic prosperity and opportunities experienced by many masked growing tensions and disparities experienced by some individuals and groups.

6.1.12.C.14.a

Analyze economic trends, income distribution, labor participation (i.e., employment, the composition of the work force), and government and consumer debt and their impact on society.  

The United States has used various methods to achieve foreign policy goals that affect the global balance of power, national security, other national interests, and the development of democratic societies.

6.1.12.A.15.a

Analyze the factors that led to the fall of communism in Eastern European countries and the Soviet Union, and determine how the fall influenced the global power structure.

6.1.12.C.15.a

Relate the role of America’s dependence on foreign oil to its economy and foreign policy.

Unit Learning Targets

Students will…

  • Explain how Conservatism was a reactionary movement to the counterculture influence of the 1960s and 1970s.

  • Analyze the extent to which the continued recessed economy and minority voters played when the Republicans lost the 1992 election.

  • Describe how, since the Corrupt Bargain of 1824, no presidential election has been as disputed as the election of 2000.

EVIDENCE OF LEARNING

Summative Assessment

  • Unit Test

Equipment Needed:

Teacher Resources:

  • American Pageant
  • America’s History
  • UC Open Access
  • American Pageant
  • America’s History
  • UC Open Access


REV Sep 2016