Unit Overview – Socially Responsible Engineering & Technology (POS)

Course: Y2 U1 – Energy & Power

Unit Title:  “Fully Charged” – Portable Electronics’ Solar Charging Device

Approximate Length of Unit: 6 Weeks (based on five day weeks; 45 minute periods each day)

Unit Summary

This unit will expose students to basic DC electronics theory, IC (Integrated Circuits) and solar cell technologies. Integrated DC circuits are at the heart of every electronic device, portable and non- portable. Globally, energy production and consumption has taken a toll on our environment. The current and future trend is to develop electronic products, systems and devices that use “Green” energy technologies and/or are highly energy efficient.

At the beginning of the unit we will look at three major “Green” energy production technologies; Hydro-Electric, Wind and Solar Array. The culminating Design Challenge will have students designing a portable DC charging device that is completely “Off Grid”. Students will use current solar film technology to re-charge batteries that power the portable charging device. The charging unit will be capable of providing portable “green” power to a variety of USB powered electronic devices (Cell- Phones, MP3 Players, Tablets, Cooling Fans etc...)

Primary Interdisciplinary Connections: Electrical Engineering, Computer Science

21st Century Themes: Creativity and Innovation, Critical Thinking and Problem Solving, Systems, Alternate Energy

Unit Rationale

Of all human-designed technology, it would be difficult to find a technology that has had a larger impact on human existence than electronic-enabled technologies. In the late-1700’s human existence consisted of an agrarian culture supported strictly by mechanical and metallurgical technologies. However, in a mere 100 years (1-2 human life spans), by the late 1800’s, transportation, housing, food cultivation and preparation, healthcare and communications were revolutionized by the use of electronics-enabled technologies. Some of these enabling technologies included motorized vehicles, lighting and heating, telegraphs, radios and telephones. After an additional brief 100 year span, from approximately 1900 to 2000, brings us to current time where electronics technology is truly dominant in society.

Today, we enjoy the benefits from numerous electronics capabilities and a significant percentage of this “electro” dependence contributes directly to the rapidly growing portable electronics industry. The question is, can we design and engineer these devices to be more energy efficient and incorporate renewable energy technologies. This unit will give students insight on current renewable energy trends and how they can incorporate it into their everyday way of life.

Suggested Materials:

Variety of plastic containers, plastics, cloth and fabrics, old backpacks, purses, small storage containers. USB mini and micro cables, USB “A” female cable. The IC charging circuit is called the MintyBoost v3.0, this is a kit that can be purchased from Adafruit Industries. 18-22GA solid core wire, electronics solder, solder suckers, double sided tape, AA NIMH Re-Chargeable Batteries, 9v Batteries and Snaps, small breadboards, 5V Voltage Regulator (LM7805), .22uf radial capacitors, blocking diodes (35VDC), 3V LED’s. The flexible solar film can be purchased here, Solar Made Power Film


Suggested Tools/Machines:

Basic materials processing and electronics tools such as:

  • Hand Tools
  • Power Tools
  • Soldering Irons and Stands
  • Wire Cutters and Strippers
  • Scroll Saw/Band Saw
  • Drill Press
  • Sanders

Unit Assumptions

  1. Students have been exposed to the problem solving process more than once and that the steps are understood.
  2. Students have been exposed to a variety of hand and power tools and can use them as needed.
  3. Students have been trained in CAD and technical drawing.
  4. Students have processed a variety of modeling and prototyping materials.
  5. Students have accessed and use the internet, email, and research databases.
  6. Students have performed on structured teams.
  7. Students have been exposed to a variety of portable electronic devices

8.   Students have a basic understanding of electronics

Learning Targets

Math (NJCCCS 4)

4.2 All students will develop spatial sense and the ability to use geometric properties, relationships, and measurement to model, describe, and analyze phenomena.

CPI #

Cumulative Progress Indicator (CPI)

4.2.12 A.2

Geometric Properties - Draw perspective views of 3D objects on isometric dot paper, given 2D representations (e.g., nets or projective views).

Science (NJCCCS 5)

5.1 Science Practices: Students will understand that science is both a body of knowledge and an evidence-based, model-building enterprise that continually extends, refines, and revises knowledge. The four science practices strands encompass the knowledge and reasoning skills that students must acquire to be proficient in science.

CPI #

Cumulative Progress Indicator (CPI)

5.1.12.D.1

Engage in multiple forms of discussion in order to process, make sense of, and learn from others’ ideas, observations, and experiences.

Educational Technology (NJCCCS 8.1)

8.1 Educational Technology: All students will use digital tools to access, manage, evaluate, and synthesize information in order to solve problems individually and collaboratively and to create and communicate knowledge.


CPI #

Cumulative Progress Indicator (CPI)

8.1.12.A.4

Create a personalized digital portfolio that contains a résumé, exemplary projects, and activities, which together reflect personal and academic interests, achievements, and career aspirations.

8.1.12.F.2

Analyze the capabilities and limitations of current and emerging technology resources and assess their potential to address educational, career, personal, and social needs.

Engineering and Technological Literacy (NJCCCS 8.2)

8.2 Technology Education, Engineering, and Design: All students will develop an understanding of the nature and impact of technology, engineering, technological design, and the designed world, as they relate to the individual, global society, and the environment.

CPI #

Cumulative Progress Indicator (CPI)

8.2.12.A.1

Design and create a technology product or system that improves the quality of life and identify trade-offs, risks, and benefits.

8.2.12.C.2

Evaluate ethical considerations regarding the sustainability of resources that are used for the design, creation, and maintenance of a chosen product.

8.2.12.F.3

Select and utilize resources that have been modified by digital tools (e.g., Computer Numeric Control (CNC) equipment, CAD software) in the creation of a technological product or system.

8.2.12.G.1

Analyze the interactions among various technologies and collaborate to create a product or system demonstrating their interactivity.

The Career Ready Practices (CRP): component of the CCTC provides a framework for the developmental experiences necessary to becoming career ready; experiences that can be “practiced” using many different approaches in a variety of settings

CPI #

Cumulative Progress Indicator (CPI)

CRP8

 Utilize critical thinking to make sense of problems and persevere in solving them.

 CRP5

Consider the environmental, social and economic impacts of decisions.

Standards 9.3 Career and Technical Education All students who complete a career and technical education program will acquire academic and technical skills for careers in emerging and established professions that lead to technical skill proficiency, credentials, certificates, licenses, and/or degrees.

CPI #

Cumulative Progress Indicator (CPI)

9.3.ST-SM.1

Apply science and mathematics to provide results, answers and algorithms for engineering and technological activities.

9.3.ST.2

Use technology to acquire, manipulate, analyze and report data

9.3.ST.6

Demonstrate technical skills needed in a chosen STEM field.

9.3.ST-ET.6

Apply the knowledge learned in the study of STEM to provide solutions to human and societal problems in an ethical and legal manner.

9.3.ST-SM.2

Apply science and mathematics concepts to the development of plans, processes and projects that address real world problems.


9.3.ST-SM.1

Apply science and mathematics to provide results, answers and algorithms for engineering and technological activities.

9.3.ST-ET.2

Display and communicate STEM information.

9.3.ST-ET.3

Apply processes and concepts for the use of technological tools in STEM.

9.3.ST-ET.1

Use STEM concepts and processes to solve problems involving design and/or production.

9.3.ST-SM.1

Apply science and mathematics to provide results, answers and algorithms for engineering and technological activities.

9.3.ST-SM.4

Apply critical thinking skills to review information, explain statistical analysis, and to translate, interpret and summarize research and statistical data.

Mathematics (Common Core)

G-MG.3. Apply geometric methods to solve design problems (e.g., designing an object or structure to satisfy physical constraints or minimize cost; working with typographic grid systems based on ratios).

N-Q.1. Use units as a way to understand problems and to guide the solution of multi-step problems; choose and interpret units consistently in formulas; choose and interpret the scale and the origin in graphs and data displays.

Science (Common Core)

RST.11-12.4. Determine the meaning of symbols, key terms, and other domain-specific words and phrases as they are used in a specific scientific or technical context relevant to grades 11–12 texts and topics.

Industry Standards

NOCDI

  • STEM – Pre-Engineering, Engineering Technology
  • IEEE -  International Electrical & Electronics Engineers

Unit Essential Questions

  • How can the selection and orientation of a circuits wiring and componentry impact the ultimate output and function of a technological system?
  • What are Integrated Circuits, and how have they impacted the progression of technology in the information age?
  • What is “Green” energy, and how is it linked to sustainability

Unit Enduring Understandings

  • All Electronic devices operate using Alternating of Direct current depending on the context they are used in and the requirements of the system
  • Integrated circuits are microscale metalloid based circuits containing transistors, resistors, capacitors along with other electrical components as needed. These components form the basis of most modern electronics, and provide the “intelligence” needed to meet the demands of users in an

movements?

  • Is “Green” energy always sustainable, and is are sustainable energy sources always “Green”
  • Why is it important to have consistent well defined standards for USB electrical components?
  • Why is Ohms Law considered one of the single most important fundamental understandings required to make informed decisions about electrical systems design?
  • How do photovoltaic cells differ from traditional methods of electrical generation in their utilization and transformation of energy?
  • The argument can be made that all power energy sources are forms of solar power, do you agree with this statement, why or why not?

increasingly complex technological world.

  • Hydro-Electric Generators, Solar Panel Arrays, Wind Turbines  all represent different forms of alternative energy generation methods. These methods are usually classified as “Green” energy sources
  • USB standards are in place to ensure universal connectivity and compatability across an array of diverse devices which utilize them for transmission of power and data sharing
  • Ohms law accounts for and explains the relationship between voltage, resistance, and current in electronic systems, and can be mathematically manipulated to solve for variables as needed to allow for more informed decision making in the design of electronic systems
  • Solar cells utilize semi-conductor wafers to convert light energy to electrical energy by stimulating the flow of electrons, resulting in an output of DC electrical current

Unit Learning Targets (ULT)

  1. Be able to Differentiate between the two types of electrical currents and account for their properties in differing applications (9.3.ST.2) (9.3.ST.6)
  2. Understand   the nature of electricity, electrical generation, and distribution (9.3.ST.1)
  3. Identify various electronic devices, components and Integrated Circuits and account for their properties in differing applications (9.3.ST.2)
  4. Understand how current transformers work to convert and modify current to suit the needs of specific technological systems based on criteria, constraints, and desired outputs (9.3.ST-ET.2) (9.3.ST-ET.3)
  5. Demonstrate how to solder an electronic component to a wire lead and PCB (9.3.ST.6)
  6. Understand how a Printed Circuit Board (PCB) works. (9.3.ST.6)
  7. Identify how a solar cell works and elaborate on the implications of this understanding. (9.3.ST.1) (9.3.ST-ET.3)
  8. Demonstrate how to use an electronic multi-meter to take voltage readings. (9.3.ST.6)
  9. Identify the various types of USB connectors and specifications and effectively account for and implement them in solutions to contextualized design problems. (9.3.ST.2)
  10. Explain the need for standardized well defined componentry and methods of quantifying properties in electronic systems. (9.3.ST.1)
  11. Safely and accurately use tools and machines to process materials in generating a solution to a problem. (9.3.ST.3)
  12. Identify green energy production technologies. (9.3.ST.6)

  1. Differentiate between renewable and non-renewable energy resources, accounting for unique strengths, weaknesses, and considerations that must be made for each when selecting and

  1. Demonstrate how to draw an label an electronic schematic (9.3.ST.6)
  2. Demonstrate how to correctly assemble a basic DC parallel, series and voltage regulating circuit, considering the desired outputs and requirements as they relate to the problem at hand. (9.3.ST-SM.2)
  3. Demonstrate how to develop a Morphological Matrix Chart for brainstorming design ideas. (9.3.ST-ET.4)
  4. Understand how Ohms law can be used to calculate different variables in an electronic system, and manipulated to solve for variables and unknowns as needed. (9.3.ST-SM.1)
  5. Present evidence of a solution to a problem using the data gathered in the design process. (9.3.ST-ET.1) (CRP8)
  6. Document the use of the engineering design process to develop a solution to a problem. (9.3.ST-ET.2) (9.3.ST-ET.4) (CRP5)

Project-Based Learning Plan:

Engineering Design Process (Sequence and Assessments)

Design Brief:

Please See attached worksheet.

Teacher Instruction

Student Evaluation

Step One:  Identify the Problem

Lessons / Topics

Lesson 1: Introduction to AC/DC Electricity

  • How electricity is supplied to your home
  • Devices that require AC/DC currents

Formative Assessments:

  • Teacher questioning during lesson
  • Teacher generated diagrams on whiteboard
  • Student discussion and reflection throughout lesson.
  • Students will create a short list of products and/or devices that they interact with and determine the type of current and voltage that they require. (ULT # 1,2)

Summative Assessments:

In groups, students will utilize dead or recycled cell phone batteries and complete a small lab and research project in which they determine electronic specifications and generate a list of compatible devices. Findings will be evaluated using task specific rubric

Teacher will present Guided Practice Power Point Presentation, having students complete tasks from the PowerPoint at pre-determined breaks in the presentation, compiling a portfolio of relevant assessable data upon completion

Notes: Have a variety of electric/electronic

Notes:


devices (AC & DC) that students can interact with

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pXasvq1ivnw

Step Two:  Frame the Design Brief

Introduction to Design Challenge Lesson 2: Schematic Diagrams and Components

Formative Assessments:

  • Student design teams will begin collaboration on what direction they will take in the overall design of their device
  • Student group discussion of where they have seen schematic diagrams and electronic components (ULT # 3,10)

Summative Assessments:

  • Students will complete an electronic component symbols chart (ULT #14), assessed using a checklist to ensure students utilize proper symbols and conventions
  • Students will sketch basic DC circuit schematic diagrams assessed using a ciruit diagram symbols and conventions rubric (ULT # 15)

Notes: Have a variety of electronic components available for students to interact with and relate the schematic symbols to the actual components

Notes: Use Handouts Electronic Symbols Chart.pdf Electronics Presentation.ppt

Step Three:  Research  & Brainstorming

Lesson 3: Series and Parallel Circuits Lesson 4: Ohm’s Law & Resistors

Lesson 5: Morphological Chart Brainstorming

Formative Assessments:

  • Teacher will model schematic diagraming procedures and though processes, allowing forgroup, pausing to question for understanding and allow for contributions to teacher directed schematics and diagrams on whiteboard to plug in circuit components
  • Group uses whiteboard generated parallel and series circuit diagrams to solve for missing variables in Ohms Law on task sheets created to match instruction (Voltage, Current, or Resistance)
  • Teacher and groups will work together to developed Morphological charts on whiteboard to determine 5 desired design attributes for design solutions.

Summative Assessments

o        Student completes Ohm’s law problems


quiz. (ULT # 17) Students construct basic series and parallel circuits using AA batteries, connectors and colored LED’s, students will be evaluated based on functionality, and be allowed opportunities for redesign and future testing (ULT # 15)

o        Students develop morphological charts using group determined attributes to begin the brainstorming process. Students will submit morphological charts as part of of final design portfolios(ULT # 16)

Notes: Morphological chart template can be created a word document table that is 5 rows by 8 columns with 2” square boxes

Morph Chart Example

Notes: Use Handouts

Ohms Law & Series v Parallel.doc Resistors.ppt

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ta9lE0hPYI8 http://www.quickar.com/ledbasics.htm

Step Four:  Generation Alternate Solutions

Lessons / Topics

Introduction to MintyBoost Tutorial and 5V Charging Circuit

Lesson 6: IC & USB Standards and Power Transformers

Students will also begin to develop rough design sketches of their possible solution using the completed morphological chart

Lesson 7: IC LM7805 and 5v Regulated USB Charging Circuits

Formative Assessments:

  • Group discussion of USB powered and connected devices, provide examples of devices that use USB standards
  • Group discussion of “How do you charge your cell-phone /ipod?”. Teacher will use rate conversations checklist

  • Teacher design meeting with groups to provide feedback about design ideas.

Summative Assessments

  • Students will access mintyboost tutorial page on Internet and list all of its components and determine what IC it uses. Students will complete and submit a materials and specifications list of these items for teacher evaluation/feedback(ULT

# 9)

  • Teacher will observe students cut and strip a USB A Female cable to determine its color code, evaluating using a performance task evaluation checklist. (ULT #6)
  • Students will determine specifications of ac/dc phone charger adapters provided and list relevant information on electrical components specifications guide sheet.(ULT # 4)
  • Students will create preliminary design sketches in isometric format evaluated using standardized rubric for isometric

sketching and drawing

  • Students will create 5V USB charging circuit and test final circuit using multi meter to determine output (ULT # 8)

Notes:

MintyBoost Tutorial Page

Purchase USB Female A Cables Here: USB Cables

Use :

DC Charging Devices.ppx

Step Five:  Chosen Solution with Rationale

Lesson / Time

Lesson 8: PCB (Printed Circuit Boards) and Soldering Techniques.

MintyBoost Kit Assembly activity

Formative Assessments:

  • Group discussion of where you can find PCB’s, what and how they are manufactured, completing a concept map/semantic features analysis of their findings. (ULT # 6)
  • Group discussion and detailed look at the MintyBoost PCB and possible soldering issues.
  • Observe and discuss differences from the 5V Regulator circuit and the MintyBoost PCB. Students will pair and share to discuss findings while teacher circulates the room providing feedback.

Summative Assessments

  • Groups will solder all connections on their 5V regulator circuit, completing and submitting and assessment and reflection of circuit functionality (ULT #5)
  • Finalize design sketches using exact specifications of MintyBoost PCB layout based on rubric results from initial drawings
  • Submit 2-3 paragraph rational statement of intended design solution.

Notes: Have students access MintyBoost tutorial online or print out hard copies for students to reference during the assembly of the circuit. It is important that the instructor carefully monitors each group to ensure the correct placement and soldering of the MintyBoost components to the PCB

Step Six:  Developmental Work

Lesson / Time

Formative Assessments:


MintyBoost Kit Assembly Activity

Lesson 9: Renewable and Non-Renewable energy resources

Lesson 10: Solar Cell Technology and Wiring of Solar Film

  • Teacher questioned background knowledge of what renewable and non-renewable energy resources are. Teacher will use anecdotal records of instant response technologies to track student responses(ULT #13)

Summative Assessments

  • Completion of MintyBoost PCB assembly and multi-meter output testing (ULT # 5,8). Students submit final product for evaluation using project product rubric upon completion
  • Solar Film Wiring and multi-meter voltage output readings. Students submit their findings on relevant task sheet and product is evaluated using performance task checklist (ULT #7,8)

Have students access MintyBoost tutorial online or print out hard copies for students to reference during the assembly of the circuit. It is important that the instructor carefully monitors each group to ensure the correct placement and soldering of the MintyBoost components to the PCB

Notes: Solar Film Supplier

See PowerFilm.jpeg for correct Polarity when wiring.

Step Seven: Prototype

Lessons / Topics

Lesson 11: DC Switches

Formative Assessments:

  • Teacher critique of design solutions as devices are fabricated by teams. Students will respond to teacher feedback in form of an ongoing feedback dialogue portfolio

Summative Assessments:

  • Completion of MintyBoost PCB and incorporating/modification into portable units.
  • Addition of solar cell switching circuit to charge MintyBoost batteries.

Notes: At this stage students should be incorporating the solar cell circuitry with the MintyBoost into their design, to add the solar charging component to the design project

Notes: See

Solar Cell Schematic.pdf


Step Eight:  Testing and Evaluation

Lessons / Topics

Design Project Field Testing

Formative Assessments:

  • Teacher critique of device specifications and durability

Summative Assessments:

  • Team field testing of solutions and capability of charging multiple devices successfully.

Notes:

Notes:

Step Nine:  Redesign and Reflect

Lessons / Topics

Redesign and Reflect

Formative Assessments:

  • Group critique of team design solutions giving “Warm” and “Cool” feedback

Summative Assessments:

Student teams will finalize engineering digital design portfolio documenting entire scope of project, which they have worked on throughout design and development phases. (ULT # 19)?

Notes:

Warm and cool student feedback has students participate in a unanimous critiquing session where design projects are displayed around the room and students can walk around and write their comments on clipboards next to each project

Step Ten: Communicate

Lessons/ Topics

Presentation and Demonstration of Charging Devices

Lesson 12: Review criteria for Public Speaking and Presentations

Student Presentations of design solutions

Formative Assessments:

  • Practice presentations with group members and other groups
  • Groups will complete peer evaluation rubrics and complete short form anecdotal record forms to guide feedback and dialogue.

Summative Assessments:

  • Team presentations of final solution and data developed throughout the design process. Assess with presentation rubric based on teacher established criteria (ULT

# 18)

Notes: Presentations can be completed in a variety of formats; powerpoint, keynote, adobe illustrator, prezi.

Teacher will develop criteria for presentation


format and guidelines in the form of a rubric

Corresponding Technology Student Association (TSA) Activities


Lesson Plans

Lesson

Timeframe

Lesson  1 Introduction to AC/DC Electronics

45mins / 2 days 2 Days to lecture

Lesson 2

Schematic Diagrams & Components

45 mins / 2 days

Day 1 Lecture

Day 2 Review/Student Complete Worksheets

Lesson 3

Series & Parallel Circuits

45mins / 3 Days Day 1 Lecture

Day 2/3 Lecture/ Student Completing Worksheets and Construction of Circuits

Lesson 4

Ohm’s Law & Resistors

45mins / 3 Days Day 1 Lecture

Day 2/3 Student complete worksheets and use existing LED circuits to include resistors

Lesson 5 Morphological Chart Brainstorming

45mins/4 days Day 1 Lecture

Days 2-4 Morph Chart Development

Lesson 6

IC & USB Standards

45mins / 2days Day 1 Lecture

Day 2 Lecture and USB Cable Prepping

Lesson 7

IC LM7805 / 5V Charging Circuits

45mins / 4 days Day 1 Lecture

Day 2-4, Lecture and Circuit Construction

Lesson 8

PCB & Soldering Techniques

45mins / 5days

Day 1 Lecture and Soldering Techniques Days 2-5, MintyBoost Kit Construction

Lesson 9

Renewable & Non-Renewable Energy Resources

45mins / 2 days lecture

Lesson 10

Solar Cell Technology

45mins / 3 days Day 1 Lecture

Days 2-3, Solar Circuit Design

Lesson 11 DC Switches

45mins / 1day

Students will incorporate switch into solar circuitry

Lesson 12 Public Speaking

45 mins / 2 days


Teacher Notes: The above timeframes are just an estimated suggestion as to how much class time should be allocated throughout the entire design process. Once students complete the circuitry portion of the activity, there should be an additional week or so for teams to complete the carrier/holder component.

Curriculum Development Resources

Resources are imbedded throughout document and additional supplements are provided

Resources Updated Summer 2015

Updated Curriculum Development Resources and Addenda:

Improve a Patented Boat Design, Engineer’s Notebook Project 3.0,  Museum of Science, Boston, 2009.  http://arabiamtnhs.dekalb.k12.ga.us/Downloads/project_3.pdf

Design Challenge Modifications Recommendations:

-Supplement Unit1 Introduction, Day 1 - “Phone Mate” Design Brief located in iSTEM PPT (by Pilot Teacher, Dave Doyle,  Delsea Regional High School)

-Supplement Unit I Introduction, Week 1 – “Socially Responsible Innovative Device Accessory – 

Supplemental Reading:

Citizen Engineer Handbook, Chapter 7, Energy & Emissions, citizenengineer.org, 2015

Design Challenge Modifications Recommendations:

-Substitute “USB Charging Challenge” Design Brief (submitted by Chris Better, Gateway Regional High School, 2015)

Updated Curriculum Development Resources and Addenda:

(submitted by Chris Better, Gateway Regional High School, 2015)

Electronics Test (document)

Electronics PowerPoint (PPT)

Capacitor Lab (ppt)

DC Charging Devices (ppt)

Electronic Symbols Chart (PDF)

LM7805 DataSheet (pdf)

MintyBoost Circuit Tutorial (pdf)

Ohms Law Handout (doc)

Resistors Handouts (ppt)

Series vs. Parallel Circuits Handout (doc)

Solar Cells Schematic (pdf)

Solar Charging USB V1 (doc)

Solar Film Polarity (gif)

Solar Lithium Charger Diagram (pdf)

USB Charging Device Challenge (doc)

Unit Overview – Socially Responsible Engineering & Technology (POS)

Course: Y2 U2 – Agriculture, Biotechnology and Manufacturing

Unit Title:  Nature as Model, Measure, Mentor

Approximate Length of Unit:  6 Weeks (based on five day weeks; 45 minute periods each day)

Unit Summary

This unit introduces students to Biomimicry Design Thinking used with Biologists and Designers when solving a real world problem. This approach has students reviewing and applying how various organisms or ecosystems solve the challenges we encounter to save time, money and energy.

Students will be presented with the following:

In groups of 3, select a common interest and develop an invention or innovate to an existing product using Biomimicry to make the product more sustainable, using the “Rules of Nature” and “Life’s Principles.”

At the beginning of this unit, students are exposed to the concept of Biomimicry and the innovations that have been accomplished. Students will engage in a Biomimicry study, apply principles of Biomimicry to a design challenge, and participate in a group design project.

Throughout this unit, students will study nature and abstract functions and principles from the natural world and apply them to human challenges, particularly sustainability challenges. The ability to do this requires practice. Students will demonstrate the ability to apply biological knowledge to human needs. This unit is dedicated to developing and strengthening abstraction/application skills. This unit will provide the students with some insight to a field that continues to provide us with deeper knowledge of the natural world.

Students will acquire insight into the field of Biomimicry. In addition, they will learn to consider nature in all of their design decisions.

Primary Interdisciplinary Connections: Biology

21st Century Themes: Environmental Engineering, Engineering

Unit Rationale

As the population continues to increase, the Earth’s natural resources continue to be strained and depleted. The earth cannot recover the resources as quickly as we use them. Our responsibility lies with taking care of the place that takes care of us.

Students will benefit from learning the Biomimicry Design Thinking process as they continue to face challenges in the design world. This activity/unit will prepare students with a deeper understanding of the natural world and how nature solves problems. While the Biomimicry design spirals are still applicable, the Design Thinking process is more applicable for professionals. Students will gain insight to the process and be better prepared for application in future engineering and design study.


This design process is very similar to the process used for Technology Education and Engineering courses. The difference is that each step requires looking to nature for inspiration and solutions. Since nature has been designing and developing for 3.8 billion years, nature has a few working systems. Our designs should reflect similar attributes to help keep the earth sustainable.

“As a field or meme it integrates with design thinking, systems thinking, and engineering paradigms yet brings a nuanced and deeper background relationship with living systems and biology. This relationship to biological knowledge, and the analog thinking it often inspires, leads to several unexpected benefits that have dramatic impact in the practice of biomimicry. These include but are not limited to; increased fidelity of communication, ability to overcome common cognitive bias, and the creation of positive disruptive frameworks of thought. These have manifested themselves in several ways, but typically are viewed as an ‘engine of innovation’. Yet, perhaps the larger impact of biomimicry thinking is not in incremental innovation, but in changing the conversation and social assumptions of value and goals that emerge as a process of looking to nature.” Tim McGee

Suggested Materials:

Sketch paper Poster boards

Plotter paper if you have plotting capability


Suggested Tools/Machines:

Computers to do research.

Cameras to photograph natural organisms. CAD or Google Sketchup.

Modeling materials if modeling is required. Color pencils, Markers

Unit Assumptions

Students have been exposed to the problem solving process more than once and that the steps are understood.

Students have some ability to sketch.

Students have the ability to use computer-aided design.

Students have accessed and used the Internet, email, and research databases. Students have used APA report formats.

Students have had biology.

Learning Targets

Standards for Technological Literacy (ITEEA)

Standard 11: Students will develop the abilities to apply the design process.

Math (NJCCCS 4)

4.2 All students will develop spatial sense and the ability to use geometric properties, relationships, and measurement to model, describe, and analyze phenomena.

CPI #

Cumulative Progress Indicator (CPI)

4.2.12 A.2

Geometric Properties - Draw perspective views of 3D objects on isometric dot paper, given 2D representations (e.g., nets or projective views).

Science (NJCCCS 5) 5.3 Life Science: All students will understand that life science principles are powerful conceptual tools for making sense of the complexity, diversity, and interconnectedness of life on Earth. Order in natural systems arises in accordance with rules that govern the physical world, and the order of natural systems can be modeled and predicted through the use of mathematics.

C. Interdependence: All animals and most plants depend on both other organisms and their environment to meet their basic needs.

E. Evolution and Diversity: : Sometimes, differences between organisms of the same kind provide advantages for surviving and reproducing in different environments. These selective differences may lead to dramatic changes in characteristics of organisms in a population over extremely long periods of time.

CPI #

Cumulative Progress Indicator (CPI)

5.3.12.C.1

Analyze the interrelationships and interdependencies among different organisms, and explain how these relationships contribute to the stability of the ecosystem.

5.3.12.E.4

Account for the evolution of a species by citing specific evidence of biological mechanisms.

5.4.12.G.1

Explain the unintended consequences of harvesting natural resources from an ecosystem.

Educational Technology (NJCCCS 8.1)

8.1 Educational Technology: All students will use digital tools to access, manage, evaluate, and


synthesize information in order to solve problems individually and collaboratively and to create and communicate knowledge.

CPI #

Cumulative Progress Indicator (CPI)

8.1.12.A.2

Produce and edit a multi-page document for a commercial or professional audience using desktop publishing and/or graphics software.

Engineering and Technological Literacy (NJCCCS 8.2)

8.2 Technology Education, Engineering, and Design: All students will develop an understanding of the nature and impact of technology, engineering, technological design, and the designed world, as they relate to the individual, global society, and the environment.

CPI #

Cumulative Progress Indicator (CPI)

8.2.12.A.1

Design and create a technology product or system that improves the quality of life and identify trade-offs, risks, and benefits.

8.2.12.F.3

Select and utilize resources that have been modified by digital tools (e.g., CNC equipment, CAD software) in the creation of a technological product or system.

8.2.12.G.1

Analyze the interactions among various technologies and collaborate to create a product or system demonstrating their interactivity.

Career Ready Practices: component of the CCTC provides a framework for the developmental experiences necessary to becoming career ready; experiences that can be “practiced” using many different approaches in a variety of settings. Student refine these practices throughout their full continuum of learning: through their journey in school, college, the workforce and when they return to advance their education.

CRP4

Communicate clearly and effectively and with reason.

CRP6

Demonstrate creativity and innovation.

Standards 9.3 Career and Technical Education All students who complete a career and technical education program will acquire academic and technical skills for careers in emerging and established professions that lead to technical skill proficiency, credentials, certificates, licenses, and/or degrees.

CPI #

Cumulative Progress Indicator (CPI)

9.3.ST-ET.2

Display and communicate STEM information.

9.3.ST.1

Apply engineering skills in a project that requires project management, process control and quality assurance.

9.3.ST-ET.5

Apply the knowledge learned in STEM to solve problems.

9.3.ST-ET.5

Apply the knowledge learned in STEM to solve problems.

9.3.ST-SM.2

Apply science and mathematics concepts to the development of plans, processes and projects that address real world problems.

9.3.ST-ET.6

Apply the knowledge learned in the study of STEM to provide solutions to human and societal problems in an ethical and legal manner.

9.3.ST-SM.1

Apply science and mathematics to provide results, answers and algorithms for engineering and technological activities.

9.3.ST-ET.1

Use STEM concepts and processes to solve problems involving design and/or production.

9.3.ST-ET.3

9Apply processes and concepts for the use of technological tools in STEM.

English Language Arts Writing (Common Core)

WHST.11-12.2. Write informative/explanatory texts, including the narration of historical events, scientific


procedures/ experiments, or technical processes.

  • Introduce a topic and organize complex ideas, concepts, and information so that each new element builds on that which precedes it to create a unified whole; include formatting (e.g., headings), graphics (e.g., figures, tables), and multimedia when useful to aiding comprehension.
  • Develop the topic thoroughly by selecting the most significant and relevant facts, extended definitions, concrete details, quotations, or other information and examples appropriate to the audience’s knowledge of the topic.

Industry Standards

NOCDI

  1. Employability Skills – Workplace Readiness
  2. STEM – Pre-Engineering, Engineering Technology

Unit Essential Questions

  • What is Biomimicry Design Thinking and how does it compare and contrast with skills and knowledge associated with the design process?
  • How can Biomimicry benefit society and influence the way technological systems are development?
  • Are there limitations to Biomicry Design thinking, why or why not?
  • How are Biomimicry and conservation of resources linked to one another

Unit Enduring Understandings

  • Biomimicry is the study of the natural world to inspire design and innovation.
  • Biomimicry Design Thinking can lead to sutainable, well-adapted and life-friendly products and process, solutions to major environmental challenges, respect for the natural world and conservation.
  • Biomimicry can assist in creating conditions conducive for life.
  • Biomimicry design thinking shares common attributes with the engineering design process
  • Biomimicry design thinking involves unique skills, processes, and understandings in order to create effective technological systems

Unit Learning Targets

Students will . . .

  • Identify, explain, use and document the steps to “Biomimicry Design Thinking”. Differentiate between Design spiral and Design loop. (ITEEA #11) (9.3.ST-ET.4)
  • Maintain “Research/Engineering Log” using template format provided documenting and illustrating research on nature as inspiration and viable solution (brainstorming) to the problem using the steps of the design process. (5.3.12.C.1, E.4, G.1) (old-9.4.12.O.(1).8) (9.3.ST-ET.4)
  • Executive Summary of the research and development and describe inspiring organisms, processes or systems. (5.3.12.C.1, E.4, G.1) (old-9.4.12.O.(1).8) (8.2.12.A.1) (old-9.4.12.H(5).1) (old-9.4.12.H(5).5)( 9.3.ST-SM.1)
  • Develop Alternate Solutions using the steps of the design process to share with team members. (4.2.12 A.2) (8.2.12.A.1, F.3, G.1) (old-9.4.12.M(1).7) (old-9.4.12.M(2).9) (old-9.4.12.O.17, 21) (old-9.4.12.O.(1).7, 9, 12) (9.3.ST-ET.4)( 9.3.ST-ET.2)
  • Prepare and present an oral presentation to peers and the entire class. (5.3.12.C.1, E.4, G.1) (8.1.12.A.2 ) (old-9.4.12.M.9) ( 9.3.ST-ET.2) (CRP4)
  • Write a rationale report for selected solution. (5.3.12.C.1, E.4, G.1) (WHST.11-12.2)

  • Write descriptions of inspiring nature that inspire new design or design modifications. (5.3.12.C.1, E.4, G.1) (9.3.ST-SM.3) (9.3.ST-SM.4)
  • Write descriptions of nature’s forms, processes and/or systems that relate to the design solution. (5.3.12.C.1, E.4, G.1)( 9.3.ST-ET.5)
  • Write descriptions of design solution. (8.2.12.A.1, G.1) (9.3.ST-ET.4)
  • Complete Working Drawings for design solutions. (4.2.12 A.2) (8.2.12.A.1, F.3, G.1) (old-9.4.12.M(1).7) (old-9.4.12.M(2).9) (9.3.ST-ET.4)
  • Develop a prototype for the design solution using 3D computer modeling for poster. (8.2.12.A.1, F.3, G.1) (9.3.ST-ET.4) (9.3.ST.2) (CRP6)
  • Write a team design evaluation report for the project to discuss how the solution is sustainable, well-adapted and life-friendly, if the solution solves any major environmental challenges, and how the design respects the natural world and conservation. (8.1.12.A.2 ) (old-9.4.12.O.(1).12) (9.3.ST-ET.6)( 9.3.ST-SM.2)
  • Write an Individual Self-Evaluation report for the project. (old-9.4.12.O.(1).7) (9.3.ST-ET.4)
  • Take a quiz/test on Biomimicry. (5.3.12.C.1, E.4, G.1) (ITEEA #11) (9.3.ST-ET.5)

Project-Based Learning Plan:

Engineering Design Process (Sequence and Assessments)

Design Brief/Problem/Opportunity Statement:

In groups of 3, select a common interest and develop an invention or innovate an existing product using Biomimicry to make the product more sustainable, using “Biomimicry Design Thinking”, the “Rules of Nature” and “Life’s Principles.”

Example Background:

Products everywhere are ending up in landfills. These products will be there for thousands of years with no ability to breakdown and return back to the earth in a usable form. Design of new products must use a method of harvesting or using a resource so that the resources are not depleted or permanently damaged.

Humans have a tendency to over engineer. We must start to mimic the Rules of Nature and Life’s Principles in order to sustain human life.

Specifications:

The solution must:

  1. Be more sustainable than the current status.

Constraints:

The solution is limited to the Rules of Nature that apply:

  1. Nature runs on sunlight
  2. Nature uses only the energy it needs
  3. Nature fits form to function
  4. Nature recycles everything
  5. Nature rewards cooperation
  6. Nature banks on diversity
  7. Nature demands local expertise
  8. Nature curbs excesses from within

o        Nature taps the power of limits

Stakeholders:

  • The target audience would be those with the same common interest.
  • The intended user is anyone that wants to use the device.
  • Nature.

Suggested Student Grouping:

Groups of 3 are suggested for this project so that more students have more direct input throughout the process. Students can also be assigned roles of designer, biologist, and engineer during the process so that each focuses more specifically.

Teacher Instruction

Student Evaluation

Step One:  Identify the Problem/Opportunity

Lessons/ Topics

Lesson 1: Reviewing the design project

  • Design Brief
  • Project Expectations
  • Biomimicry Design Thinking
  • Scoping
  • Discovering
  • Creating
  • Evaluating

Lesson 2: Finding common interests between the team members

  • Generating ideas
  • Selecting a common idea

Formative Assessments:

Teacher feedback on student generated:

  • Summary (verbal) of the project expectations.
  • Completed Graphic Organizer to identify design steps. (ULT #1)
  • Abstract differentiating between Design Spiral and Design Thinking for Biomimicry Application. (ULT #1)
  • Completed Graphic Organizer to identify and select student interests.

Summative Assessments:

  • Quiz on steps to Biomimicry Design Thinking process (ULT #1, 14)

Notes:

Have students form teams and create a list of common interests such as sports equipment, music, clothes, games, furniture, cars, etc. so that they can agree on a common direction to focus their efforts for design. This step must be done at the beginning before starting the actual design process.

Introduce students to Biomimicry Design Thinking used by professionals in the design field.

Remind students of the BiomimicryInstitute.org and AskNature.org and allow them to use this site for research.

Notes:

Students will carry Step One information to Step Two in order to create their teams design brief.

The quiz should cover the step titles and subtitles.


Step Two:  Frame the Design Brief

Lesson / Topic

Lesson 3: Completing Scoping steps of Biomimicry Design Thinking process

  • Define Context
  • Design Brief
  • Indentify Function
  • Specifications
  • Integrate Life’s Principles
  • Limitations

Formative Assessments:

Teacher will review and provide feedback on:

  • Completed Scoping steps of the Biomimicry Design Thinking Graphic Organizer (ULT #1)
  • Peer assessment of each other’s graphic organizers if necessary. (ULT #1)

Summative Assessments:

At the end of the step, as measured by a rubric, team will be responsible for:

  • Final background information, design briefs, specifications and constraints. (ULT

#1)

Notes:

Have students develop their team design brief based on the common interest they chose.

Have students develop specifications and limitations for their design brief.

Have students research and write a background that leads explains the context of their design brief.

Notes:

Step Three: Research

Lessons/ Topics

Lesson 4: Completing Discovering steps of Biomimicry Design Thinking process

  • Discover Natural Models

o        Research

  • Abstract Biological Strategies

Lesson 5:  Reviewing Research expectations

  • Documentation
  • Research Log Format
  • Sources

Formative Assessments:

  • Teacher provides feedback on collected research students create using the previously started “Research Log”. (ULT

#2)

Summative Assessments

At the end of the step, each student will be assessed via:

  • “Research/Engineering Log” using template format provided documenting and illustrating:

o        Research on nature as inspiration. (ULT #2)

  • Executive Summary of the research and development and describe inspiring organisms, processes or systems. (ULT #3)

Notes:  Prompt students with the following

Notes:


questions to get them thinking of ideas:

  • What animals or plants remind the team of the topic?
  • What features of the animal or plant are directly related?

  • What could be designed to use those features?

Each team member must brainstorm individually and then share their ideas.

Step Four:  Brainstorming & Generation Alternate Solutions

Lessons/ Time

Lesson 6: Completing Creating steps of Biomimicry Design Thinking process

  • Brainstorming
  • Bioinspired Ideas

Lesson 7:  Reviewing Brainstorming expectations

  • Documentation
  • Research Log Format
  • Sources

Lesson 8: Completing Creating steps of Biomimicry Design Thinking process

  • Emulating
  • Design Principles

Lesson 9:  Reviewing Emulating expectations

  • Generating Alternate Solutions through sketches and drawings

Formative Assessments:

o        Teacher provides feedback on Creating steps of the Biomimincry Design Thinking Graphic Organizer. (ULT #1)

Summative Assessments

At the end of the step, as measured by a rubric, students will be assessed on:

  • Brainstorming to the problem using the steps of the design process. (ULT #1, 2)
  • Alternate Solutions (ULT #4)

Notes:

Have students start developing ideas using the research they have gathered.

Multiple sessions of sketching and collaborating would be the best approach.

Have students be responsible for 3-4 solutions each before sharing their ideas.

Notes:

Step Five:  Chosen Solution with Rationale

Lesson / Time

Lesson 10: Completing Evaluating steps of Biomimicry Design Thinking process

Formative Assessments:

o Teacher provides feedback on Evaluating steps of the Biomimincry Design Thinking Graphic Organizer. (ULT #2)


  • Measure
  • Using Life’s Principles
  • Using Rules of Nature

Lesson 11:  Reviewing Evaluating expectations

  • Rationale Report
  • Pros/Cons
  • Specification Check

Summative Assessments

At the end of the step, as measured by a rubric, students will be assessed on:

o        Rationale report for selected solution. (ULT #6)

Notes:

Have students review their solutions with the Rules of Nature and Life’s Principles as criteria for the specification check. Students can rank their ideas and then tally the scores to see which idea is the best.

Notes:

Step Six:  Developmental Work

Lesson / Time

Lesson 12: Emulating Design Principles – Round 2

  • Descriptions of inspiring nature’s forms, processes and/or systems that relate to the design solution
  • Design solution description
  • Working Drawings

Formative Assessments:

Teacher provides written feedback on:

  • Descriptions of inspiring nature’s forms, processes and/or systems that relate to the design solution (ULT #7, 8)
  • Design solution description (ULT #9)
  • Working Drawings (ULT #10)

Summative Assessments

At the end of the step, as measured by a rubric, students will be assessed for:

  • Descriptions of nature’s forms, processes and/or systems that relate to the design solution (ULT #7, 8)
  • Design solution description (ULT #9)
  • Working Drawings (ULT #10)

Notes:

At this point in the process, the design loop become iterative and can be repeated as the students start developing their solutions with more detail. Each time they identify a problem to solve, the steps can be repeated.

Set the expectations for the deliverables in this step. Depending on the amount of time you are allotting for this project, you may want to require sketches only or a full set of working drawings done using CAD.

Have students describe everything that has been designed and every aspect of inspiration that was used.

Notes:

Step Seven: Prototype


Lessons/ Topics

Lesson 13: Reviewing Team Deliverables

  • Provide a detailed poster of the new product with multiple views.
  • Provide peer presentation for feedback and poster edit.

Formative Assessments:

  • Teacher feedback on prototype poster layout. (ULT #11)
  • Student feedback on peer presentations. (ULT #5)

Summative Assessments:

At the end of the step, as measured by a rubric, designated team member will be responsible for:

  • Prototype of final design poster (ULT #11)

Notes:

Have student create a poster at this point to display their design. These posters can be electronic and projected for presentation purposes or plotted out for display purposes.

Notes:

Step Eight:  Testing and Evaluation

Lessons/ Topics

Lesson 14: Review Biomimicry Design Thinking for Test

  • Scoping
  • Discovering
  • Creating
  • Evaluating

Lesson 15: Reviewing Testing and Evaluating

Deliverables

  • Test Procedures and Results Report
  • Design Evaluation Report

Formative Assessments:

  • Teacher provides feedback on student generated Biomimicry review sheet. (ULT

#1)

  • Teacher provides feedback on testing and evaluation deliverables prior to peer presentations. (ULT #12)

Summative Assessments:

At the end of the step, as measured by a rubric, the team will be responsible for:

  • Evaluation report using Life’s Principles and the Rules of Nature for the project to discuss how the solution is sustainable, well-adapted and life-friendly, if the solution solves any major environmental challenges, and how the design respects the natural world and conservation. (ULT

#12)

Notes:

Have students present their design solutions to another team in the class and get feedback on their applications, improvement suggestions and additional insight. Students will then report on input from peers.

Notes:

Step Nine:  Redesign and Reflect

Lessons/ Topics

Lesson 16: Writing an Individual Self-Evaluation report

Formative Assessments:

N/A


Summative Assessments:

At the end of the step, as measured by a rubric, each team member will be responsible for:

o        An Individual Self-Evaluation report for the project. (ULT #15)

Notes:

Have students write individual reports at this step so that each student can reveal all that he/she has gained during this project. These reports can be very telling. Learning you would never consider often takes place and gets overlooked.

Notes:

Step Ten: Communicate

Lesson / Time

Lesson 17: Outlining a Presentation

  • Harvard Format
  • Phrasal

Lesson 18:  Reviewing Presentation expectations

  • Format
  • Time allotment

Formative Assessments:

o        Peer and teacher comments for improving presentations. (ULT #5)

Summative Assessments:

At the end of the step, as measured by a rubric, the team will be responsible for:

  • A Presentation of project design to peers. (ULT #5)

At the end of the step each team member will take a:

  • Test on Biomimicry (ULT #14)

Notes:

Have students prepare outlines to use for presentations to the class.

Have students present their solutions to the class.

Notes:

Corresponding Technology Student Association (TSA) Activities

Biotechnology Design Engineering Design


Lesson Plans

Lesson

Timeframe

Lesson 1 Reviewing the design project

Lesson 2

Finding common interests between the team members

45 minutes / 2 days

½ day to review lessons and select teams

1 day to brainstorm interests and share with team to select a common interest

½ day for quiz

Lesson 3

Completing Scoping steps of Biomimicry Design Thinking process

  • Define Context
  • Design Brief
  • Indentify Function
  • Specifications
  • Integrate Life’s Principles
  • Limitations

45 minutes / 3 days

½ day to lecture

½ day to define context

1 day to indentify functions/specifications

1 day to integrate Life’s Principles/Limitations

Lesson 4

Completing Discovering steps of Biomimicry Design Thinking process

  • Discover Natural Models

o        Research

  • Abstract Biological Strategies

Lesson 5 Reviewing Research expectations

45 minutes / 3 days

½ day to lecture

2.5 days for Discovering step

Lesson 6

Completing Creating steps of Biomimicry Design Thinking process

  • Brainstorming

o        Bioinspired Ideas

Lesson 7 Reviewing Brainstorming expectations

  • Documentation
  • Research Log Format
  • Sources

Lesson 8

Completing Creating steps of Biomimicry Design Thinking process

  • Emulating

45 minutes / 4 day 1 day to lecture

1 days to brainstorm 2 days to emulate


o        Design Principles

Lesson 9 Reviewing Emulating expectations

  • Generating Alternate Solutions through sketches and drawings

Lesson 10

Completing Evaluating steps of Biomimicry Design Thinking process

  • Measure
  • Using Life’s Principles
  • Using Rules of Nature

Lesson 11 Reviewing Evaluating expectations

  • Rationale Report
  • Pros/Cons Specification Check

45 minutes / 3 day

½ day to lecture

1.5 days to evaluate 1 day to create report

Lesson 12 Emulating Design Principles – Round 2

  • Descriptions of inspiring nature’s forms, processes and/or systems that relate to the design solution
  • Design solution description
  • Working Drawings

45 minutes / 3 days

½ day to review expectations

1.5 days to generate ideas 1 day to write report

Lesson 13 Reviewing Team Deliverables

  • Provide a detailed poster of the new product with multiple views and thorough descriptions

45 minutes / 3 days

½ day to review expectations

2.5 days to generate poster

Lesson 14

Review Biomimicry Design Thinking for Test

  • Scoping
  • Discovering
  • Creating
  • Evaluating

Lesson 15

Reviewing Testing and Evaluation Deliverables

  • Test Procedures and Results Report
  • Design Evaluation Report

45 minutes / 3 days

½ day to review

1.5 days to complete testing and evaluation 1 day to complete report


Lesson 16

Writing an Individual Self-Evaluation report

45 minutes / 2 days

½ day to review expectations

1.5 days to write report

Lesson 17 Outlining a Presentation

  • Harvard Format
  • Phrasal

45 minutes / 2 days

½ day to review

1.5 days to present

Lesson 18 Reviewing Presentation Expectations

45 minutes / 2 days

½ day to review expectations 1 days present

½ day to take test

Teacher Notes:

Curriculum Development Resources

Biomimicry Institute. 2007-2012. 1 July 2012

<biomimicryinstitute.org>.

Biomimicry #1. YMAG. 18 November 2009. 8 July 2012

<http://www.ymag.it/schede.asp?id=1184>.

Life’s Principles. Biomimicry Institute. 8 July 2012.

<http://www.biomimicryinstitute.org/images/sdc2011/Lifes_Principles.pdf>.

McGee, Tim. Biomimicry Thinking. 2 July 2012. Eco|Interface: Mind the Gap. 18 July 2012 < http://www.ecointerface.com/?p=471#comment-384>.


Research/Investigation/Testing Log

Complete all columns for each entry. Feel free to use more than one row per entry. Continue on the back of each page is necessary. Include everything tried and your observations of the test.

Date

Research/Investigation/Testing

Finds/Results


Research/Investigation/Testing Log

Use the space below to sketch out ideas or calculations while investigating.


Biomimicry Design Thinking

Scoping – Define Context

Determine the for which the design must operate or function.

The circumstances that form the setting for real life problem, situation or opportunity related to the project is . . . .

Possible images that convey the real life situations would be . . . . 1.

2.

3.

4.

5.

The climate, atmosphere or environment related to the problem, situation or opportunity is . . . .


Possible images that convey the climate, atmosphere or environment would be . . . . 1.

2.

3.

4.

5.

The conditions of use of the design solution . . .

Possible images that convey the conditions of use would be . . . . 1.

2.

3.

4.

5.

Information related to the end user that is important to know would be . . . .

Possible images that convey the important end use information . . . . 1.

2.

3.

4.

5.

The simulation created for the project consists of . . . .

Possible images that convey the simulation would be . . . . 1.

2.

3.

4.

5.


Scoping – Identify Function

Determine the design function desired.

What you want the design to do? (i.e. be quieter)

Why do you want the design to do that?

Look across discovered strategies to determine what is usable for the design. List and sketch ideas.

Look at the strategies collectively to determine what is usable for the design. List and sketch ideas.

Formulate a statement into context of needed function. (i.e. quiet the sonic boom of the Japanese bullet train)

Translate/Interpret Biological Function (i.e. find the champions in nature that are aerodynamic or hydrodynamic)

Identify the functions (purpose, role, use) (i.e. determine a new form to allow the train to not create such a build up of pressure that causes the sonic boom when it leaves the tunnel)

Ask how does nature do/not do the same function.

Define habitat conditions that reflect design parameters. (i.e. dimensions of tunnel and train, speed of train, pressure build up)


Translate life’s principles into design parameters. Select those that apply to assist in research direction.

Identify what can be optimized rather than maximized. Using multi -functional design where applicable. Always fit form to function.

Consider locally attuned and responsive organisms that are resourceful and opportunistic using shape rather than material that are cellular and nested. Keeping simple, common building blocks and using free energy.

Build in resilience with diversity, decentralized and distributed autonomy, and redundancy.

Leverage interdependence. Recycle all materials. Foster cooperative relationships. Consider self- organizing methods.

Use benign manufacturing, life-friendly materials, water-based chemistry, and self-assembly whenever possible.


Discover

Observe/Determine Nature’s Model – List organisms that immediately come to mind. Do a few searches and continue the list with your new finds.

Abstract

Identify the forms in nature that you can mimic.

Identify the processes in nature that you can mimic.

Identify the systems in nature that you can mimic.

Always return to the question, “Does the design create conditions conducive to life?” Do your solutions have more pros than cons? Do your solutions reduce, reuse, or recycle?


Emulate

Identify multiple sources for inspiration.

Brainstorm Potential Applications.

Brainstorm multiple solutions.

Adapt and evolve your design.


Evaluate

Once again review Life’s Principles to test your design.

http://www.biomimicryinstitute.org/images/sdc2011/Lifes_Principles.pdf


Self-Evaluation

The evaluation of the final solution is a very important part of the design process. This portion of the process allows for deep reflection. Reflection focuses on the final design. In addition to the final design, reflect on the skills gained by the process. Be sure not to sell yourself short. This is the time to express all of the learning that may have not been obvious to the instructors.

Assignment

In a formal technical document, discuss each of the following in a paragraph or more:

  1. Provide the scope of the project and your role on the team. (10)
  2. Describe the team solution and then your part of the solution in detail. Provide imagery of both. (10)
  3. Describe discrepancies between your original design and the final modeled solution. Provide imagery of the final design drawing and photo or image of the final solution illustrating the discrepancies. (10)
  4. Describe design flaws that still exist in your design. Provide specific examples. (5)
  5. Describe unsolved design problems that exist in your design. Provide specific examples. (5)
  6. Provide suggestions for improvements to design. Provide specific examples. (5)
  7. Describe successes you encountered during all phases of the project. Provide specific examples. (5)
  8. Describe setbacks you encountered during all phases of the project. Provide specific examples. (5)
  9. Describe what you learned from your setbacks. Provide specific examples. (10)
  10. Describe additional learning that occurred outside the scope of the project. Provide specific examples. (10)
  11. Discuss specific ways this project helped you improve your:
  1. Problem solving skills related to the steps of the process. Also, provide examples of which steps of the process finally made sense to you. (3)
  2. Communication skills through drawing. Provide examples of what improved and how. (3)
  3. Communication skills through speaking. Provide examples of what improved and how. (3)
  4. Communication skills through writing. Provide examples of what improved and how. (3)
  5. Organizational skills related to file management and time management. Provide specific examples of each. (3)
  1. Conclusion
  1. Provide a summary of the skills and knowledge that you gained and will use beyond MAST. (5)
  2. Provide a statement of something essential that you benefited from during the course of the project. (5)

Cons for this Idea

                  

Unit Overview – Socially Responsible Engineering & Technology (POS)

Course: Y2 U3– Construction Technology

Unit Title:  Constructing Accessibility

Approximate Length of Unit:  6 Weeks (based on five day weeks; 45 minute periods each day)

Unit Summary

This unit will begin by raising student awareness in the daily obstacles and challenges faced by handicapped individuals in their residences. Then, students will be presented with the following problem which they will be required to solve later in the unit by engaging Engineering Design Process:

Design and Develop a residence for a family of four, in which one person is confined to a wheelchair. The residence will be part of an existing apartment building and must fit a given foot print.

At the beginning of this unit, students will be learning about zoning ordinances and building codes and various guidelines related to handicap accessible residences. They will continue to learn about the basic systems of buildings, including: structural, HVAC, electric, plumbing; they will also discover how energy efficiency has influenced their evolution, all the while recording information and reflecting in their journals. In order to prepare them with the understandings they will need to develop a viable solution to the problem, which will take the form of development of working drawings, including elevations, layout, and schematics. The project will culminate in the creation of a scale model.

Throughout the unit, students will also acquire problem solving and critical thinking skills that require them to communicate with others and function in a team environment.

Primary Interdisciplinary Connections:  Architecture, Construction

21st Century Themes: Environmental Literacy

Unit Rationale

The underlying issue of accessibility for handicap issues has a history as old as mankind itself. It was not until the later part of the 20th century that individuals with physical handicaps were given the same rights and considerations as the rest of society. Many times individuals with disabilities did not have access public buildings and facilities, and were often placed into government institutions and shunned by society.

According to the Bureau of Labor and Statistics jobs in Construction and Social Assistance are projected to increase over the period 2010-20. This unit will allow students to explore architecture/construction related careers that cater to often overlooked communities, as well as some of the technical skills required for these careers.

Suggested Materials:

Modeling materials such as cardboard, balsa wood, and foam core board, as well as adhesives.

Suggested Tools/Machines:

Small hand tools and modeling tools for Constructing Accessibility

Unit Assumptions

Students have been exposed to the problem solving process more than once and that the steps are understood.


Students have been exposed to a variety of hand tools and can use them as needed. Students have processed a variety of modeling and prototyping materials.

Students have accessed and use the internet, email, and research databases.

Learning Targets

Standards for Technological Literacy (ITEEA)

Standard 6: Students will develop an understanding of the role of society in the development and use of technology

I. The decision whether to develop a technology is influenced by societal opinions and demands, in addition to corporate cultures.

Standard 20: Students will develop an understanding of and be able to select and use construction technologies

K. Structures are constructed using a variety of processes and procedures.

Science (NJCCCS 5)

5.4 Earth Systems Science: All students will understand that Earth operates as a set of complex, dynamic, and interconnected systems, and is a part of the all-encompassing system of the universe.

CPI #

Cumulative Progress Indicator (CPI)

5.4.12.D.1

Engage in multiple forms of discussion in order to process, make sense of and learn from others’ ideas, observations, and experiences

Educational Technology (NJCCCS 8.1)

8.1 Educational Technology: All students will use digital tools to access, manage, evaluate, and synthesize information in order to solve problems individually and collaboratively and to create and communicate knowledge.

CPI #

Cumulative Progress Indicator (CPI)

8.1.12.C.1

Develop an innovative solution to a complex, local or global problem or issue in collaboration with peers and experts, and present ideas for feedback in an online community.

Engineering and Technological Literacy (NJCCCS 8.2)

8.2 Technology Education, Engineering, and Design: All students will develop an understanding of the nature and impact of technology, engineering, technological design, and the designed world, as they relate to the individual, global society, and the environment.

CPI #

Cumulative Progress Indicator (CPI)

8.2.12.F.3

Select and utilize resources that have been modified by digital tools (e.g., CNC equipment, CAD software) in the creation of a technological product or system.

8.2.12.G.1

Analyze the interactions among various technologies and collaborate to create a product or system demonstrating their interactivity.

The Career Ready Practices: component of the CCTC provides a framework for the developmental experiences necessary to becoming career ready; experiences that can be “practiced” using many different approaches in a variety of settings

CPI #

Cumulative Progress Indicator (CPI)


CRP9

Model integrity, ethical leadership and effective management.

CRP10

Plan education and career paths aligned to personal goals.

Standards 9.3 Career and Technical Education All students who complete a career and technical education program will acquire academic and technical skills for careers in emerging and established professions that lead to technical skill proficiency, credentials, certificates, licenses, and/or degrees.

CPI #

Cumulative Progress Indicator (CPI)

9.3.ST.1

Apply engineering skills in a project that requires project management, process control and   quality assurance.

9.3.ST.2

Use technology to acquire, manipulate, analyze and report data

9.3.ST.6

Demonstrate technical skills needed in a chosen STEM field.

9.3.ST-SM.2

Apply science and mathematics concepts to the development of plans, processes and projects that address real world problems.

9.3.ST-SM.4

Apply critical thinking skills to review information, explain statistical analysis, and to translate, interpret and summarize research and statistical data.

9.3.ST-ET.2

Display and communicate STEM information.

9.3.ST.4

Understand the nature and scope of the Science, Technology, Engineering & Mathematics Career Cluster® and the role of STEM in society and the economy.

9.3.ST-ET.1

Use STEM concepts and processes to solve problems involving design and/or production.

9.3.ST-ET.3

Apply processes and concepts for the use of technological tools in STEM.

9.3.ST.3

Describe and follow safety, health and environmental standards related to science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) workplaces.

9.3.ST-ET.4

Apply the elements of the design process

9.3.ST-ET.5

Apply the knowledge learned in STEM to solve problems.

English Language Arts Writing (Common Core)

W.11-12.2. Write informative/explanatory texts to examine and convey complex ideas, concepts,


and information clearly and accurately through the effective selection, organization, and analysis of content.

  • Develop the topic thoroughly by selecting the most significant and relevant facts, extended definitions, concrete details, quotations, or other information and examples appropriate to the audience’s knowledge of the topic.

W.11-12.7. Conduct short as well as more sustained research projects to answer a question (including a self-generated question) or solve a problem; narrow or broaden the inquiry when appropriate; synthesize multiple sources on the subject, demonstrating understanding of the subject under investigation.

Mathematics (Common Core)

G-MG.3. Apply geometric methods to solve design problems (e.g., designing an object or structure to satisfy physical constraints or minimize cost; working with typographic grid systems based on ratios).

Industry Standards

NOCTI

  1. Employability Skills – Workplace Readiness
  2. STEM – Pre-Engineering, Engineering Technology

Design Brief

Background/Scenario: Nearly one in five Americans is disabled or has great difficulty getting around.. Many of these individuals have difficulty with common everyday tasks at home, at work, and within the community, because of the layout of the home or office that their in. Standard houses and apartments are not constructed to accommodate this population of individuals, thus impacting there productivity and mobility.

Problem/ Opportunity Statement:

Students will work in teams (2-3) to design and develop a an apartment within a given building that will accommodate 4 individuals, one of which is handicapped and confined to a wheel chair.

Groups will develop floor plans complete with mechanical systems and a model of the apartment.

Specifications/Criteria:

Handicap accessible facilities in all common rooms and areas, as well as one bedroom.

Complete drawings for all common systems (heating plumbing, HVAC).

Complete floor plan drawing.

Apartment has an area of 1100 sq. ft.

Visual Model of finished product.

Documentation of the design process.

Constraints:

Time-

  • As allotted by teacher for each step of the design process.

Money-

  • None required.


Energy-

  • Human powered
  • Electrical outlets for hot glue guns

Tools/Machines-

  • Use safety as needed.
  • Modeling tools such as craft knives, straightedges, glue guns.

People-

  • Maximum of 3 people per group.

Information-

  • Acquired through lessons and research.

Materials-

  • Use materials provided by teacher only.

Stakeholders:

  • All students who will advance in course outline.
  • All students who are looking to pursue careers in engineering or technical field.

Student Grouping Notes:

Students can be broken into small groups of 2-3 to work together through the process and act as a competitive company that is trying to propose their design against other companies. Groups should work to develop designs for the apartment and investigate the various systems and building codes.

Material Notes:

Teachers can change the materials based on availability. Foam core and other commercially available modeling materials work well. However cardboard used in shipping and retail applications is often adequate, plentiful and low/no cost.

Unit Essential Questions

  • Why are specific requirements put into place for the design and construction of residences for the disabled
  • How can designers account for cost/benefit tradeoffs in designing and maintaining ADA compliant facilities while still meeting their own requirements such as materials cost, labor requirements, and profits?
  • How does the process of designing and constructing residential structures compare to commercial design and product design processes?
  • How do building codes, planning, and commonly accepted construction practices interact in the design and construction of residential buildings?
  • In what way does efficiency impact the decisions a designer makes in construction technology settings.
  • What does the phrase “form follows function” mean, and how does this idea translate to the way individuals design, build, and plan for the development of a residence

Unit Enduring Understandings

  • Buildings and structures need to be designed so that all stakeholders have equal access and mobility.
  • The construction process requires permits and strict adherence to building codes.
  • Construction Codes are instituted and enforced at National, State, and Local levels in different capacities, and designed must account all different levels of accountability.
  • ADA compliance necessitates different approaches to the design and construction of both residential and commercial buildings.
  • Residential and commercial design require accounting for the unique nature of the individual or business for whom structures are created
  • Construction design requires one to take into account efficiency.
  • Efficiency of a design requires consideration of placement, materials selection, functionality, and accessibility issues relating to the sizes, types, and commonly used construction materials.
  • The design of any system, particularly residential

housing, must account for the intended purpose of an individual subsystem with respect to an individuals intended use and specific needs.

Unit Learning Targets

Throughout the unit, students will acquire insight into the construction field and the architectural guidelines used to accommodate persons with disabilities. In addition, they will take on the roles of architects and contractors in the design and development of a solution for. Collaboration on the unit will provide students with an experience in real world situations.

Students will . . .

  1. Identify common issues and difficulties encountered by individuals with limited mobility in traditional dwellings and environments. (old-9.4.12.B.(1).6) (9.3.ST-SM.3)
  2. Research and describe the steps of the construction process from concept to finished product. (ITEEA 20K) (old-9.4.12.B.(1).4) (9.3.ST-ET.3)
  3. Research and identify outside laws, organizations, and codes that dictate specifications and limitations in construction technology. (ITEEA 6I) (old-9.4.12.B.(1).7) (9.3.ST-ET.6) (CRP10)
  4. Research , identify, and discuss various energy sources utilized in residential dwellings and their impact on operating budgets. (5.4.12.D.1) (old-9.4.12.B.8) (W.11-12.7) (9.3.ST-SM.2)
  5. Analyze the interactions among similar technologies and collaborate to create a demonstrating their interactivity. Develop a viable solution to the problem using the steps of the design process. (old-9.4.12.B.(1).11 )( old-9.4.12.B.(2).16) (9.3.ST-ET.4)
  6. Develop multiple solutions and identify key features for stakeholders. (old-9.4.12.B.(1).9)( old-9.4.12.O.17) (9.3.ST-ET.4)
  7. Summarize rationales for selected solutions. (W.11-12.2.)( old-9.4.12.B.18)( 9.4.12.O.(1).7) (9.3.ST-ET.4) (CRP9)
  8. Complete 2D and 3D drawings. (old-9.4.12.B.(1).9) (old-9.4.12.B.22) (9.3.ST.6)
  1. Select and utilize resources that have been modified by digital tools (e.g., CNC equipment, CAD software) in the creation of a technological product or system. Develop a model to explain the use and features of the residence. (8.2.12.F.3)( old-9.4.12.O.21)( G-MG.3) (9.3.ST.2)
  2. Write a self and design evaluation for the project. ((W.11-12.2.)( old-9.4.12.B.17) (9.3.ST-ET.2)

Project-Based Learning Plan:

Engineering Design Process (Sequence and Assessments)

Teacher Instruction

Student Evaluation

Step One:  Identify the Problem

Lessons/ Topics

Lesson 1: Overview the Constructing Accessibility Design Project

Identifying the Unit Problem

  • Scenario and tasks.
  • Roles of team members
  • Rubric for grading and assessment

Formative Assessments: (must have feedback)

  • Discussion of topic and project to increase breadth and depth of their understanding while discarding erroneous information and expanding and explicating background knowledge.
  • Learning / Response (b)logs by students –

o        Feedback on handicap experience.


Lesson 2: Handicap experience

  • Challenges faced by handicapped individuals
  • Limitations of environment.

Lesson 3: Construction Process

  • Identify stakeholders in construction process.
  • Outline physical steps from design to C.O.

Summative Assessments:

At the end of the step, as measured by a rubric, each group will produce:

o        Quiz on steps of the construction process.

Notes:

Notes:

Step Two:  Frame the Design Brief

Lesson / Topic

Lesson 4: Framing the design brief for the Constructing Accessibility Design Project

  • Review of design brief requirements.
  • Review of specifications.
  • Review of constraints.

Formative Assessments:

  • Learning (b)logs by students – students will document or post their background situation, design brief, specifications and constraints.
  • Peer assessment - students will review each other’s posts and revise if necessary.
  • Teacher questioning – teacher reviews (b)log and provides feedback.

Summative Assessments:

Notes:

Notes:

Step Three:  Research  & Brainstorming

Lessons/ Topics

Lesson 5: Reviewing Step Three deliverables, guidelines and examples.

  • Project research and documentation format.
  • Brainstorming guidelines and expectations.

Lesson 6: American with Disabilities Act (ADA) laws, and new amendments added as of 2008

  • Background information to law.
  • Impacts on building design.
  • Implementation in public/private facilities.
  • Impact of 2008 amendments.

Lesson 7: Energy Efficiency

  • Energy use by systems
  • Impact of LEED certifications.

Formative Assessments:

  • Peer Assessment of alternate energy presentation using rubrics
  • Learning (b)logs by students – students will document or post their research and brainstorming.
  • Teacher questioning – teacher reviews (b)log and provides feedback.

Summative Assessments

At the end of the step, as measured by a rubric, each group will produce:

  • Written exam based on ADA laws.. (ULT#3)
  • PowerPoint or similar presentation describing alternate energy sources utilized in residential dwellings and their impact on operating budgets. (ULT#4&5)
  • Sketches of ideas (brainstorming) to the problem for related system that impact individuals with disabilities. (ULT #6)

Notes:

Teacher should provide examples of past projects so that students can see the types of deliverables that are expected of the students.

Notes:

Adding a feedback log to portfolio components or a separate document allows a standard format to provide ongoing feedback, and allow students to respond in the form of a dialogue to track meaningful design changes based on teacher inputs and student rationales.

Step Four:  Generation Alternate Solutions

Lessons / Topics

Lesson 8: Generating alternate solutions for project deliverables

  • Design Drawings
  • Rough Model

Lesson 9: Presentation Skills

  • Types of presentation mediums
  • Personal appearance and behavior.
  • Group dynamics

Formative Assessments:

  • Learning (b)logs by students – student will document alternate solutions and model.
  • Peer assessment - students will review each other’s posts and revise if necessary.
  • Teacher conferences with student groups to discuss progress and issues.

Summative Assessments

  • Presentation of project designs to peers. Graded by teacher as per rubric. (ULT #6)

Notes:

Teacher should provide examples of the types of drawings and sketches that are required by the students. Examples can then shown with a rubric in order to identify quality and expectations of finished work.

Notes:

Step Five:  Chosen Solution with Rationale

Lesson / Topics

Lesson 10:  Decision Making

  • Design Matrix
  • Pros/Cons
  • Descriptions

Lesson 11:  Effective Updates

  • Creating the outline of content.
  • Planning transition of speakers.
  • Adding visual aids.

Formative Assessments:

  • Learning (b)logs by students – students will document or post their rational and detailed drawings of selected solution
  • Peer assessment of chosen solution documented in presenters (b)log.

Summative Assessments

At the end of the step, as measured by a rubric, team will be will be responsible for:

  • Rationale report for selected solution as measured by a rubric. (ULT #7).

Notes:

Step Six:  Developmental Work

Lessons/ Topics

Lesson 12: Architectural Drawings

  • Drawing formats

Formative Assessments:

o        Learning (b)logs by students – students will document or post drawings and plan of procedures.


  • Architectural Symbols
  • Teacher conferencing with students to review architectural drawings.
  • Architectural drawing symbols and conventions checklist

Summative Assessments

At the end of the step, as measured by a rubric, team will be will be responsible for:

  • 2D drawings of mechanical systems, including electric, HVAC, and plumbing (ULT #5)
  • 2D drawings of wall layout (ULT #8)

Notes:

Teacher should provide examples of the types of drawings and sketches that are required by the students. Examples can then shown with a rubric in order to identify quality and expectations of finished work.

Notes:

Step Seven: Prototype

Lessons/ Topics

Lesson 13: Architectural Modeling Techniques

  • Modeling Materials and Tools
  • Processing and Joining Techniques
  • Finishes and surfaces
  • CAD applications

Formative Assessments:

  • Learning (b)logs by students – students will document or post imagery of prototype production and final product.
  • Team conferences to discuss progress and direction of prototype/model.

Summative Assessments:

At the end of the step, as measured by a rubric, team will be responsible for:

  • Model or Digital Rendering of final design (ULT #9)

Notes:

Teacher should emphasis safety when demonstrating modeling techniques. Have several examples of finished products and demonstrate how to create them.

Notes:

Step Eight:  Testing and Evaluation

Lessons/ Topics

Lesson 14: Review Testing and Evaluation

  • Types of testing methods.
  • Recording of results.
  • Analyzing data.

Formative Assessments:

  • Learning (b)logs by students – students will summarize the critique from project stakeholders.

  • Peer review of procedures, data, and analysis.

Summative Assessments:

At the end of the step, as measured by a rubric, team will be responsible for:

o        Written report of testing procedure, data collected and analysis.

Notes:

Notes:

Step Nine:  Redesign and Reflect

Lessons/ Topics

Lesson 15: Self Reflection

  • Reaching project goals.
  • Working to one’s full potential
  • Working with others.

Formative Assessments:

  • Learning (b)logs by students – students will document or repost imagery of design corrections.

Summative Assessments:

At the end of the step, as measured by a rubric, team will be responsible for:

  • Individual Self-Evaluation report for the project as measured by a rubric. (ULT

#11)

Notes:

Notes:

Step Ten: Communicate

Lessons/ Topics

Lesson 16: Group Critique

  • Types of critique methods
  • Presenter/Participant relationship
  • Specifications and requirements

Formative Assessments:

  • Peer and teacher comments on improving blogs.
  • Complete Feedback log reflection
  • Student survey on project and methodology of work.

Summative Assessments:

At the end of the step, as measured by a rubric, team will be responsible for:

  • Presentation of Design Project to group for (ULT #10)

Notes:

Notes:

Corresponding Technology Student Association (TSA) Activities

Construction Renovation Architectural Modeling CAD 2D - Architecture


Lesson Plans

Lesson

Timeframe

Lesson 1

Overview of the Constructing Accessibility project.

45 minutes / 1 day 1 day for lecture

Lesson 2 Handicap Experience

45 minutes / 1 day 1 day for activity

Lesson 3 Construction Process

45 minutes / 1 day 1 day for lecture

Lesson 4 Design Brief Overview

45 minutes / 1 day 1 day for lecture

Lesson 5

Step Three Deliverables

45 minutes / 1 day 1 day for lecture

Lesson 6

American with Disabilities Act (ADA) laws

45 minutes / 2 day

½ day for lecture, 1 ½ days to research and prepare presentation

Lesson 7 Energy Efficiency

45 minutes / 2 days

½ day for lecture, 1 ½ days to research and prepare presentation

Lesson 8 Alternative Solutions

45 minutes / 2 days

½ day for lecture, 1 ½ days to prepare drawings and/or model

Lesson 9 Presentation Skills

45 minutes / 1 day 2 days to complete

Lesson 10 Rationale

45 minutes / 1 day

1 day for development

Lesson 11 Update Presentation

45 minutes / 1 day 2 day for presentation

Lesson 12 Architectural Drawing

45 minutes / 1 day

1 day for lecture, 7 days to complete

Lesson 13 Architectural Modeling

45 minutes / 1 day

1 day for lecture, 7 days to complete

Lesson 14

Review Testing and Evaluation

45 minutes / 2 day

¼ day for lecture, 1 ¾ day to complete

Lesson 15 Self Reflection

45 minutes / 1 day

¼ day for lecture, ¾ day to complete

Lesson 16 Group Critique

45 minutes / 1 day 2 days to complete

Teacher Notes:


Curriculum Development Resources

Americans with Disabilities Act - http://www.ada.gov/

Accessibilities Codes - http://www.access-board.gov/adaag/html/adaag.htm National Energy Building Codes - http://www.energycodes.gov/

LEED Building Guidelines - http://www.usgbc.org/DisplayPage.aspx?CategoryID=19

 

Resources Updated Summer 2015

Updated Curriculum Development Resources and Addenda:

Undergraduate Awards for Socially Responsible Engineering: https://www.cc-seas.columbia.edu/awards/descriptions/RobertDLilleyAward

Unit Overview – Socially Responsible Engineering & Technology (POS)

Course: Y2 U4 – Transportation Technology

Unit Title:  Passing It Along

Approximate Length of Unit:  6 Weeks (based on five day weeks; 45 minute periods each day)

Unit Summary

Current technology for oil exploration requires equipment to work in a variety of harsh environments and conditions. One area that has gained recent coverage is deep water drilling and exploration in the Gulf of Mexico. Much of the work in drilling and rigging is done on the sea floor several thousands of feet underwater. As an innovation , design and prototype a submersible vehicle that can cap a well head once it is finished being pumped.

“Deepwater drilling is the process of oil and gas exploration and production in depths of more than 500 feet. By this definition, there are approximately 600 deepwater wells in the Gulf of Mexico.”

At the beginning of this unit, students will be learning about the evolution of submersible vehicles, primarily for deep water application. The will be able to describe some of the applications of submersible vehicles in industry. Students will also research the scientific principles that allow a submersible to sink and float such as buoyancy, which is the force exerted by a fluid that opposes an object’s weight. They will also be able to calculate the density of their vehicle and the amount of ballast that may be needed.

In order to prepare them with the understandings they will need to develop a viable solution to the problem, students will need to understand how existing devices work. Once an understanding is acquired, students can then collaborate as a team to develop a design for a submersible that will be perform a few simple tasks.  At the end of the unit, students will develop a prototype and test the operation of the unit.

Throughout the unit, students will acquire insight into the transportation careers

In addition, they will take on the roles of a project manager, manufacturers, scientists and engineers in the design and development of a solution for testing.

Primary Interdisciplinary Connections: Transportation,

21st Century Themes: Environmental Literacy

Unit Rationale

This chosen issue is important as we expand the occurrence of off-shoring drilling in many sensitive areas, such as the arctic. Most students are aware of the dangers of oil exploration and production

This chosen issue is important as we attempt to get the health of people back in check and look to future careers related to engineering and design. Most students know someone that is suffering from an illness or disease and may be suffering from something as well. The health of people is different in different geographic locations and diet can be attributed too much of the problem. Collaboration in design is important to provide students with opportunities to take on leadership roles and experience a variety of


engineering related careers.

According to the Bureau of Labor and Statistics jobs in Transportation are projected to increase over the period of 2010 - 2020.

This unit will allow students to explore transportation related careers that cater to often overlooked communities, as well as some of the technical skills required for these careers.

Suggested Materials:

Modeling materials such as cardboard, balsa wood, and foam core board, as well as adhesives.

Suggested Tools/Machines:

Small hand tools and modeling tools for Constructing Accessibility

Unit Assumptions:

Students have been exposed to the problem solving process more than once and that the steps are understood.

Students have been exposed to a variety of hand tools and power tools and can use them as needed.

Students have processed a variety of modeling and prototyping materials. Students have accessed and use the internet, email, and research databases.

Learning Targets

Standards for Technological Literacy (ITEEA)

Standard 6: Students will develop an understanding of the role of society in the development and use of technology

I. The decision whether to develop a technology is influenced by societal opinions and demands, in addition to corporate cultures.

Standard 20: Students will develop an understanding of and be able to select and use construction technologies

K. Structures are constructed using a variety of processes and procedures.

Math (NJCCCS 4) – I hunted all over for these and am not real sure what version to use. When you get clarification, we can complete this. Not worth attempting at this time.

CPI #

Cumulative Progress Indicator (CPI)

Science (NJCCCS 5)

5.4 Earth Systems Science: All students will understand that Earth operates as a set of complex, dynamic, and interconnected systems, and is a part of the all-encompassing system of the universe.

CPI #

Cumulative Progress Indicator (CPI)

5.4.12.E.1

Model and explain the physical science principles that account for the global energy budget.

Educational Technology (NJCCCS 8.1)

8.1 Educational Technology: All students will use digital tools to access, manage, evaluate, and synthesize information in order to solve problems individually and collaboratively and to create and communicate knowledge.


CPI #

Cumulative Progress Indicator (CPI)

8.1.12.C.1

Develop an innovative solution to a complex, local or global problem or issue in collaboration with peers and experts, and present ideas for feedback in an online community.

Engineering and Technological Literacy (NJCCCS 8.2)

8.2 Technology Education, Engineering, and Design: All students will develop an understanding of the nature and impact of technology, engineering, technological design, and the designed world, as they relate to the individual, global society, and the environment.

CPI #

Cumulative Progress Indicator (CPI)

8.2.12.F.3

Select and utilize resources that have been modified by digital tools (e.g., CNC equipment, CAD software) in the creation of a technological product or system.

8.2.12.G.1

Analyze the interactions among various technologies and collaborate to create a product or system demonstrating their interactivity.

The Career Ready Practices: component of the CCTC provides a framework for the developmental experiences necessary to becoming career ready; experiences that can be “practiced” using many different approaches in a variety of settings

CPI #

Cumulative Progress Indicator (CPI)

CRP4

Communicate clearly and effectively and with reason.

CRP7

Employ valid and reliable research strategies.

CRP9

Model integrity, ethical leadership and effective management.

CRP10

Plan education and career paths aligned to personal goals.

Standards 9.4 Career and Technical Education All students who complete a career and technical education program will acquire academic and technical skills for careers in emerging and established professions that lead to technical skill proficiency, credentials, certificates, licenses, and/or degrees.

CPI #

Cumulative Progress Indicator (CPI)

9.3.ST-ET.5

Apply the knowledge learned in STEM to solve problems.

9.3.ST.1

Apply engineering skills in a project that requires project management, process control and quality assurance.


9.3.ST-ET.1

Use STEM concepts and processes to solve problems involving design and/or production.

9.3.ST-ET.2

Display and communicate STEM information.

9.3.ST.3

Describe and follow safety, health and environmental standards related to science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) workplaces.

English Language Arts Writing (Common Core)

W.11-12.2. Write informative/explanatory texts to examine and convey complex ideas, concepts, and information clearly and accurately through the effective selection, organization, and analysis of content.

  • Develop the topic thoroughly by selecting the most significant and relevant facts, extended definitions, concrete details, quotations, or other information and examples appropriate to the audience’s knowledge of the topic.

W.11-12.7. Conduct short as well as more sustained research projects to answer a question (including a self-generated question) or solve a problem; narrow or broaden the inquiry when appropriate; synthesize multiple sources on the subject, demonstrating understanding of the subject under investigation.

Mathematics (Common Core)

G-MG.3. Apply geometric methods to solve design problems (e.g., designing an object or structure to satisfy physical constraints or minimize cost; working with typographic grid systems based on ratios).

Industry Standards

NOCTI

  1. Employability Skills – Workplace Readiness
  2. STEM – Pre-Engineering, Engineering Technology

Unit Essential Questions

  • What are the many ways in which goods and or people are moved from location to location?
  • What is the process in designing a transportation system?
  • What role does the environment play in transportation design?

Unit Enduring Understandings

  • Transportation takes place in various forms and often includes multiple forms.
  • Transportation systems are designed to meet specific goals and regulation of the user.
  • Environmental impact regulates what forms of transportation can be utilized and where they can be placed.

Unit Learning Targets

Throughout the unit, students will acquire insight into the transportation field and the environmental


guidelines used to accommodate projects. In addition, they will take on the roles of engineers and technicians in the design and development of a solution for. Collaboration on the unit will provide students with an experience in real world situations.

Students will . . .

  • Identify the various methods of transportation available in our society. (9.3.ST-SM.3)
  • Research and describe the modes of transportation as well as any sub classification. (9.3.ST.6) (CRP7)
  • Research and identify the economic, environmental and social impact of transportation on society. (9.3.ST.2) (CRP7)
  • Research and identify outside laws, organizations, and codes that dictate specifications and limitations in pipeline design, implementation and operation. (9.3.ST.2) (CRP10)
  • Research and identify various methods of pipeline inspection and cleaning. (9.3.ST.2)
  • Analyze the interactions among similar technologies and collaborate to create a demonstrating their interactivity. (9.3.ST-ET.4)
  • Develop multiple solutions and identify key features for stakeholders. (old-9.4.12.B.(1).9) (old-9.4.12.O.17) (9.3.ST.6)
  • Summarize rationale for selected solution. (W.11-12.2.) (old- 9.4.12.B.18) (old-9.4.12.O.(1).7) (9.3.ST-ET.2) (CRP9)
  • Complete 2D and 3D drawings. (old-9.4.12.B.(1).9) old- (old-9.4.12.B.22) (9.3.ST.6) (9.3.ST.2)
  • Select and utilize resources that have been modified by digital tools (e.g., CNC equipment, CAD software) in the creation of a technological product or system. Develop a model to explain the use and features of the residence. (8.2.12.F.3) (old-9.4.12.O.21) (9.3.ST.2)
  • Develop a viable solution to the problem using the steps of the design process. (old-9.4.12.B.(1).11) (old-9.4.12.B.(2).16) (9.3.ST-ET.4)
  • Write a self-evaluation and design-evaluation for the project. ((W.11-12.2.) (old-9.4.12.B.17) (9.3.ST-ET.4)
  • Present final solution to a target audience for critique and feedback. (old-9.4.12.O.(1).8) (9.3.ST-ET.4) (CRP4)
  • Create a marketing brochure that would be presented to potential customers. (9.3.ST-ET.2)

Design Brief

Background/Scenario:

Transmission pipelines are found in all fifty states and vary in sizes from 4 to 48 inches. They can carry liquids and gases as well as slurry, a mixture of solid and liquids. Although

With a large demand for petro-chemical products throughout the US, the most cost effective means of transportation has always been pipelines. With over 2.7 million miles of pipeline there is always the risk of a leak or breach and subsequent spilling of materials. PIGs are often used to maintain and inspect these pipelines so that breakdowns and disasters can be avoided.

Problem/ Opportunity Statement: Students will work in teams (2-3) to design and develop a prototype of PIG (Pipeline Inspection Gauge) that will be able to travel through a section of pipeline and remove debris and inspect the condition of the pipeline.

Specifications/Criteria:

Fit within a 4” diameter pipe with one 45° elbow.

Remove surface sludge as well as large debris

Complete drawings for final product.

Visual Model of finished product.

Autonomously Operated

Provide data to external operator about pipeline conditions


Output data in appropriate units

Constraints:

Time- Money- Energy-

Tools/Machines- People- Information- Materials-

Stakeholders:

Student Grouping Notes:

Students can be broken into small groups of 2-3 to work together through the process and act as a company that is trying to propose their design to a large transmission pipeline company. Groups should work to develop designs for the pipeline and various methods with which to move the PIG by use of air.

Students will then gather to test and evaluate the design and then present their findings to a panel of judges.

Groups of two will allow both parties to be involved in the design, prototyping and testing of the product. Documentation of work should be done by individuals.

Material Notes:

Teacher Instruction

Student Evaluation

Step One:  Identify the Problem

Lessons/ Topics

Formative Assessments:

Summative Assessments:

At the end of the step, as measured by a rubric, team will be responsible for:

Notes:

Notes:

Step Two:  Frame the Design Brief

Lessons/ Topics

Formative Assessments:

Summative Assessments:

At the end of the step, as measured by a rubric, team will be responsible for:

Notes:

Notes:

Step Three:  Research  & Brainstorming

Lessons/ Topics

Formative Assessments:

Summative Assessments:

At the end of the step, as measured by a rubric,


team will be responsible for:

Notes:

Notes:

Step Four:  Generation Alternate Solutions

Lessons/ Topics

Formative Assessments:

Summative Assessments:

At the end of the step, as measured by a rubric, team will be responsible for:

Notes:

Notes:

Step Five:  Chosen Solution with Rationale

Lessons/ Topics

Formative Assessments:

Summative Assessments:

At the end of the step, as measured by a rubric, team will be responsible for:

Notes:

Step Six:  Developmental Work

Lessons/ Topics

Formative Assessments:

Summative Assessments:

At the end of the step, as measured by a rubric, team will be responsible for:

Notes:

Notes:

Step Seven: Prototype

Lessons/ Topics

Formative Assessments:

Summative Assessments:

At the end of the step, as measured by a rubric, team will be responsible for:

Notes:

Notes:

Step Eight:  Testing and Evaluation

Lessons/ Topics

Formative Assessments:

Summative Assessments:

At the end of the step, as measured by a rubric, team will be responsible for:

Notes:

Notes:


Step Nine:  Redesign and Reflect

Lessons/ Topics

Formative Assessments:

Summative Assessments:

At the end of the step, as measured by a rubric, team will be responsible for:

Notes:

Notes:

Step Ten: Communicate

Lessons/ Topics

Formative Assessments:

Summative Assessments:

At the end of the step, as measured by a rubric, team will be responsible for:

Notes:

Notes:

Corresponding Technology Student Association (TSA) Activities

Construction Renovation Architectural Modeling CAD 2D - Architecture

Lesson Plans

Lesson

Timeframe

Lesson 1

Overview of the Constructing Accessibility project.

45 minutes / 1 day 1 day for lecture


Teacher Notes:

Curriculum Development Resources

Resources Updated Summer 2015

Updated Curriculum Development Resources and Addenda:

Improve a Patented Boat Design, Engineer’s Notebook Project 3.0,  Museum of Science, Boston, 2009.  http://arabiamtnhs.dekalb.k12.ga.us/Downloads/project_3.pdf

Supplemental Reading:

Citizen Engineer Handbook, Chapter 7, Energy & Emissions, citizenengineer.org, 2015

Unit Overview – Socially Responsible Engineering & Technology (POS)

Course: Y2 U5 - Medical Engineering, Biomedical Engineering, Bioengineering

Unit Title:  Engineering Prosthetics

Approximate Length of Unit:  6 Weeks (based on five day weeks; 45 minute periods each day)

Unit Summary

This unit will provide students with insight to the medical engineering field. Students will be presented with the following problem:

Based on a person who has sustained a physical loss of a limb from trauma, disease or defect, design and animate a prosthetic that incorporates a heat or pressure sensor and feedback system.

Some ideas for orthotic project work could be related to:

  • Upper Extremity Prosthetics
  • Lower Extremity Prosthetics
  • Robotic Prostheses integrating several components with or without biosensors

Some ideas for higher level prosthetic project work could be related to:

  1. Improve the performance of artificial joints
  2. Extend life of artificial joints to be used in younger and more active patients
  3. Develop Bionics
  4. Restore the senses of smell and taste

Based on a person who has sustained a physical impairment from a stroke, spinal cord injury or some congenital abnormality such as spina bifida or cerebral palsy, design and prototype an orthotic to correct limb or torso function.

Some ideas for orthotic project work could be related to:

  • Upper-Limb Orthosis
  • Lower-Limb Orthosis
  • Torso or Spinal Orthosis

The devices are generally used to: (Orthotics)

  • Control, guide, limit and/or immobilize an extremity, joint or body segment for a particular reason
  • Restrict movement in a given direction
  • Assist movement generally
  • Reduce weight bearing forces for a particular purpose
  • Aid rehabilitation from fractures after the removal of a cast
  • Correct the shape and/or function of the body
  • Provide easier movement capability or reduce pain

Note: Prosthetics are not orthotics. Orthotics mostly resemble a brace of some sort to support a limb or


torso, while prosthetics are the complete limb.

In order to prepare them with the understandings they will need to develop a viable solution to the problem, students will need to understand the nature of the issue. Once an understanding is acquired, students can then collaborate as a team to develop a personal unit for someone to get health related feedback. At the end of the unit, students will develop a model or animation to explain the use and operation of the solution.

Throughout the unit, students will acquire insight into the medical field careers and material science. In addition, they will take on the roles of a project manager, manufacturers, scientists and engineers in the design and development of a solution.

Primary Interdisciplinary Connections:  Engineering, Medical Science

21st Century Themes: Health Literacy

Unit Rationale

This unit of study is important to expose students to future careers assisting people achieve a better way of life from a physical birth defect, after a debilitating illness or injury from an accident. Injuries differ in different geographic locations and career fields. Birth defects are as different as people are different.

Collaboration in design is important to provide students with opportunities to take on leadership roles and experience a variety of engineering related careers. Learning to work with others can benefit students when they need to work with different professionals in the future.

Medical Engineering also known as Bioengineering and Biomedical Engineering has been responsible for such advances as hip replacements, pacemakers, medical imaging, life support systems and medical lasers. The Medical Engineer must be capable of integrating engineering practices with medical knowledge of how the human body functions when healthy, diseased or injured. Most Medical Engineering courses have a mechanical or electronic foundation; others may be based more on materials, physics or biology. Core modules of mechanical engineering and basic medicine, together with specialist modules in biomechanics, biofluids and biomaterials, implant design and artificial organs, rehabilitation engineering, computer and robotic assisted surgery, tissue engineering, physiological measurements, medical imaging and diagnostic techniques, and regulatory issues and medical ethics. In most engineering disciplines, team-working, presentation and inter-personal skills are very important for Medical Engineers as they will often be the person bridging the gap between clinicians, patients, sales and marketing, and the manufacturing activities. Medical Engineers are however unique in their systems and integrative approach to problem solving, their ability to carry the results of basic research into the commercial and clinical setting and their ability to function in a multidisciplinary environment. (Fagan)

This unit will provide the students with some insight to a dynamic and challenging field that will continue to change and evolve. With design yet again being the focus of this unit, students will gain further experience in the design process.

Suggested Materials:

plastic, elastic, metal, Velcro, laces, string, rope, fabric, plaster, CAD/CAM materials

Suggested Tools/Machines:

Students might need some sculpting tools, sandpaper, paintbrushes, knives, files, wire cutters, rotary drills, etc., small hand and modeling tools for project modeling and prototyping.


Unit Assumptions

Students have been exposed to the problem solving process more than once and that the steps are understood.

Students have access to AutoDesk Inventor, Google Sketch-Up, Pro/Engineer, or SolidWorks. Students have processed a variety of modeling and prototyping materials in order to make informed decisions for material selection.

Students have accessed and use the internet, email, and research databases. Students have used MLA and APA report formats.

Students have performed on structured teams.

Students know the role of various team members and a systems engineer.

Learning Targets

Standards for Technological Literacy (ITEEA)

Standard 14: Students will develop an understanding of and be able to select and use medical  technologies.

K. Medical technologies include prevention and rehabilitation, vaccines and pharmaceuticals, medical and surgical procedures, genetic engineering, and the systems within which health is protected and maintained.

Math (NJCCCS 4)

4.2 All students will develop spatial sense and the ability to use geometric properties, relationships, and measurement to model, describe, and analyze phenomena.

CPI #

Cumulative Progress Indicator (CPI)

4.2.12 A.2

Geometric Properties - Draw perspective views of 3D objects on isometric dot paper, given 2D representations (e.g., nets or projective views).

Science (NJCCCS 5)

5.3 Life Science: All students will understand that life science principles are powerful conceptual tools for making sense of the complexity, diversity, and interconnectedness of life on Earth. Order in natural systems arises in accordance with rules that govern the physical world, and the order of natural systems can be modeled and predicted through the use of mathematics.

CPI #

Cumulative Progress Indicator (CPI)

5.3.12.A.6

Describe how a disease is the result of a malfunctioning system, organ, and cell, and relate this to possible treatment interventions (e.g., diabetes, cystic fibrosis, lactose intolerance).

Educational Technology (NJCCCS 8.1)

8.1 Educational Technology: All students will use digital tools to access, manage, evaluate, and synthesize information in order to solve problems individually and collaboratively and to create and communicate knowledge.

CPI #

Cumulative Progress Indicator (CPI)

8.1.12.A.2

Produce and edit a multi-page document for a commercial or professional audience using desktop publishing and/or graphics software.

Engineering and Technological Literacy (NJCCCS 8.2)

8.2 Technology Education, Engineering, and Design: All students will develop an understanding of the nature and impact of technology, engineering, technological design, and the designed world, as they relate


to the individual, global society, and the environment.

CPI #

Cumulative Progress Indicator (CPI)

8.2.12.A.1

Design and create a technology product or system that improves the quality of life and identify trade-offs, risks, and benefits.

8.2.12.F.3

Select and utilize resources that have been modified by digital tools (e.g., CNC equipment, CAD software) in the creation of a technological product or system.

8.2.12.G.1

Analyze the interactions among various technologies and collaborate to create a product or system demonstrating their interactivity.

The Career Ready Practices: component of the CCTC provides a framework for the developmental experiences necessary to becoming career ready; experiences that can be “practiced” using many different approaches in a variety of settings

CPI #

Cumulative Progress Indicator (CPI)

CRP4

Communicate clearly and effectively and with reason.

CRP7

Employ valid and reliable research strategies.

CRP9

Model integrity, ethical leadership and effective management.

Standards 9.3 Career and Technical Education All students who complete a career and technical education program will acquire academic and technical skills for careers in emerging and established professions that lead to technical skill proficiency, credentials, certificates, licenses, and/or degrees.

CPI #

Cumulative Progress Indicator (CPI)

9.3.ST-ET.6

Apply the knowledge learned in the study of STEM to provide solutions to human and societal problems in an ethical and legal manner.

9.3.ST-ET.1

Use STEM concepts and processes to solve problems involving design and/or production.

9.3.ST-ET.2

Display and communicate STEM information.

9.3.ST.3

Describe and follow safety, health and environmental standards related to science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) workplaces.

9.3.ST-SM.2

Apply science and mathematics concepts to the development of plans, processes and projects that address real world problems.

9.3.ST-ET.1

Use STEM concepts and processes to solve problems involving design and/or production.

9.3.ST.1

Apply engineering skills in a project that requires project management, process control and quality assurance.

9.3.ST-ET.1

Use STEM concepts and processes to solve problems involving design and/or production.

9.3.ST.2

Use technology to acquire, manipulate, analyze and report data.


9.3.ST-ET.3

Apply processes and concepts for the use of technological tools in STEM.

9.3.ST.6

Demonstrate technical skills needed in a chosen STEM field.

English Language Arts Writing (Common Core)

WHST.11-12.2. Write informative/explanatory texts, including the narration of historical events, scientific procedures/ experiments, or technical processes.

  • Introduce a topic and organize complex ideas, concepts, and information so that each new element builds on that which precedes it to create a unified whole; include formatting (e.g., headings), graphics (e.g., figures, tables), and multimedia when useful to aiding comprehension.
  • Develop the topic thoroughly by selecting the most significant and relevant facts, extended definitions, concrete details, quotations, or other information and examples appropriate to the audience’s knowledge of the topic.

Industry Standards

NOCDI

  • Employability Skills – Workplace Readiness
  • STEM – Pre-Engineering, Engineering Technology

Unit Essential Questions

  • What skills, understandings, and attitudes are associated are required to successfully engage and solve problems related to medical engineering?
  • How does a design team member work effectively to be a productive person of the team?
  • How have developments in medical technologies changed the world and outlooks on the future for both those who benefit and engage in development in the field?
  • How does the direct impact on human life and biological function manifest itself in approaches to making design decisions with regard to Bio- medical technology systems?
  • What principles of design are universal regardless of the area of technology into which a design solution would be classified

Unit Enduring Understandings

  1. Medical Engineering encompasses a broad spectrum of assisting devices from prosthetics to orthotics and internal connective body parts as well as instruments and equipment.
  2. Large design projects require department personnel to manage the integration of engineering efforts.
  3. Medical engineering can have vast impacts on its beneficiaries and changes the outlook towards the future about different diseases and impairments
  4. The nature of medical engineering requires unique considerations on the part of designers to account for the potential impact design decisions have on parties invested products and developments associated with medical engineering
  5. Despite the complexities of medical engineering, and the unique nature of the parties most invested in development, universal principles still dictate sound design in medical engineering technologies

Unit Learning Targets

Throughout the unit, students will acquire insight into the biomedical engineering field and related material sciences. In addition, they will take on the roles of scientists and engineers in the design and development of a solution improve physical loss or conditions. Role-playing provides students with the opportunity to gain experience in systems engineering and learn leadership techniques.


Students will . . .

  1. Identify physical loss or impairments due to congenital abnormalities. (5.3.12.A.6) (STL #14K) (9.3.ST-ET.6)
  2. Research and document in logs and formal reports/presentations limiting factors of a physical impairment. (5.3.12.A.6) (old-9.4.12.O.(1).8) (STL #14K) (9.3.ST.2) (CRP7)
  3. Research and document in logs and formal reports/presentations methods of assisting someone overcome physical challenges to regain mobility in independence. (5.3.12.A.6) (old-9.4.12.O.(1).8) (STL #14K) (9.3.ST.2) (CRP7)
  4. Research and document in logs and formal reports/presentations nature of the challenge as a scientist, designer, engineer, manufacturer. Once an understanding is acquired, students can then be engaged in developing a personal unit for someone to get feedback on their own bodies needs for the day. (STL #14K) (old-9.4.12.O.(1).8) (9.3.ST-ET.2) (CRP7)
  5. Analyze the design challenge, document in logs and collaborate to create a product or system overcome the challenges of the patient. Develop viable solutions to the problem using the steps of the design process. (8.2.12.G.1) (old-9.4.12.M(1).7) (old-9.4.12.M(2).9) (old-9.4.12.O.17) (old-9.4.12.O.21) (old-9.4.12.O.(1).7) old- (9.4.12.O.(1).12) (9.3.ST-ET.4)
  6. Analyze and document in logs, materials and manufacturing processes used to produce solution. (old-9.4.12.O.(1).9) (old-9.4.12.O.17) (old-9.4.12.O.(1).9) (old-9.4.12.O.(1).12) (9.3.ST-ET.1)
  7. In a formal report, summarize the research and development and describe how the product improves the quality of life meets legal and ethical protocols. Identify and explain processes used for the product design, development, and production and describe how they work together to demonstrate an understanding of the medical engineering product development process. (8.2.12.A.1 ) (old-9.4.12.H(5).1) (old-9.4.12.H(5).5) (old-9.4.12.O.17) (9.3.ST.1)
  8. In a formal report, summarize rationale for selected solution. (WHST.11-12.2) (old-9.4.12.O.17)
  9. Complete 2D and 3D drawings and plan of procedures. (4.2.12 A.2) (8.1.12.A.2) (old-9.4.12.M(1).7) (old-9.4.12.M(2).9) (4.2.12 A.2) (old-9.4.12.O.17) (9.3.ST.6)
  10. Select and utilize resources that have been modified by digital tools (e.g., CNC equipment, CAD software) in the creation of a technological product or system. (8.2.12.F.3) (old-9.4.12.O.17) (9.3.ST.6)

11. Write Instructions for product use. (WHST.11-12.2) (old-9.4.12.O.17) (old-9.4.12.O.21) (old-9.4.12.O.(1).7) (old-9.4.12.O.(1).9) (9.3.ST-ET.4) (CRP9)

  • In a formal report, document test procedures and test results. (old-9.4.12.O.(1).12) (old-9.4.12.O.17) (old-9.4.12.O.21) (9.3.ST-ET.4) (CRP9)
  • In a formal report, evaluate the final product. (old-9.4.12.O.(1).7) (old-9.4.12.O.17) (old-9.4.12.O.21) (9.3.ST-ET.4)
  • Work effectively on multidisciplinary teams consisting of designers/engineers, scientists and manufacturers. Keep a Time on Task Log. (old-9.4.12.O.21) (old-9.4.12.O.17) (old- 9.1.12.C.5) (9.3.ST-ET.4) (9.3.ST.5) (CRP9)
  • Present project design to peers at various stages of the process formally and informally. (old-9.4.12.M.9) (9.3.ST-ET.2) (CRP4)

Project-Based Learning Plan:

Engineering Design Process (Sequence and Assessments)

Design Brief/Problem/Opportunity Statement:

In a team of 4-7 (1 project manager and 3-6 others to act as scientists, designers/engineers, and manufacturers), design and develop a model or prototype for a personal biofeedback test device.

Example Background:


As of 2008, in the United States, approximately 1.7 million people were living with limb loss. (Zeigler- Graham) Congenital Abnormalities, Cancer, Trauma, and Dsyvascular causes resulted in these physical losses. At this time, according to National Limb Loss Information Center, amputations related to cancer and trauma decreased, while dysvascular amputations increased. Congenital related limb loss rates had not changed.

Specifications:

The personal device must

Constraints:

The device is limited to: Energy:

Stakeholders:

Suggested Student Grouping:

Students can be broken into small groups of 4-7 (for teams of 4, have one of each role; for teams of 5-7, have one team leader and double up on the other roles) to work together through the process and act as a competitive company that is trying to propose their design against other companies. The teams could then


present to a panel of stakeholders to get feedback and a critique. The teams could also be formed so that those designing it are not the same as those producing the model so that a higher level of communication must take place in order to convey the correct information.

Suggested Teacher Preparation:

Students will need a patient. The patient, missing a limb, can be sculpted out of packing tape to create the body form so students can measure and eventually test their solution for fit. If a real patient is available and willing, the solutions can be tested for operation as well. Do a search on packing tape sculpture and find some examples and tutorials. You will definitely need assistance for this activity.

Teacher Instruction

Student Evaluation

Step One:  Identify the Problem

Lessons/ Topics

Lesson 1: Reviewing Project Background

  • Statistics
  • Definitions
  • Introduce packing tape patient

Lesson 2: Reviewing Stakeholders and Required Project Research

  • Various types of amputees
  • Various types of orthotics
  • Various types of prosthetics

Lesson 3: Reviewing Principles and Practices of Effective Teamwork

  • Leadership
  • Teamwork
  • Team Roles

Formative Assessments:

Teacher feedback on:

  • Completed Graphic Organizer in a

Research Log” posing prompts such as:

  • What I know . . .
  • What I need to know . . . (ULT #1-5)
  • Peer assessment – students will review each other’s logs and pose further questions.  (ULT #1-5)
  • Student produced and maintained “Time on Task Log” to monitor and model work ethics and practices. (ULT #17)
  • Pretest on principles and practices of effective teamwork. (ULT #17)

Summative Assessments:

At the end of the step, as measured by a rubric, designated team member will be responsible for a research report or PowerPoint Slides to:

  • Identify, describe and provide imagery of various amputees and their limits. (ULT

#1, 2)

  • Identify, describe and provide various types of orthotics. (ULT #3)

-OR-

  • Identify and provide imagery of various types of prosthetics. (ULT #3)

Notes:

Review the questions that students will be able to answer at the end of this unit and that students will be assessed on. The following introductory lessons can spark conversation to lead into the design project.

Notes:

Students should divide up the research topics to complete the task. Students must present their findings to each other.

Finding imagery of each topic allows the student


Provide students with a TOT Log to keep track of their work on the project. The TOT Log acts as a time sheet that someone would complete on a job.

Students must form teams:

Head designer – in charge of overall design and appearance.

Manufacturer – in charge of the material selection for the solution.

Scientist – in charge of the physics related to the final solution.

Project Manager – in charge of team collaboration and writing reports to include team work.

to gain a deeper understanding of the related concerns and possibilities.

Step Two:  Frame the Design Brief

Lesson / Topic

Lesson 4: Framing the Design Brief for the Medical Project

  • Review of design brief requirements
  • Review of specifications
  • Review of constraints

Formative Assessments:

  • Using a “DBSC Organizer”, students will document the background situation, individual design brief, specifications and constraints. (ULT #1-5)
  • Peer assessment - students will review and revise each other’s graphic organizers if necessary. (ULT #1-5)
  • Teacher will review and provide feedback on individual design briefs, specs and criteria pertaining to role on team. (ULT

#1-5)

Summative Assessments:

At the end of the step, as measured by a rubric, team will be responsible for:

o        Role related design briefs, specifications and constraints formalized from DBSC Organizer onto a separate document. (ULT

#1-5)

Notes:

Each student on the team has a different end user.

  • The Scientist provides deliverables for Project Manager and Designer/Engineer to use.
  • The Project Manager provides deliverables for the client.
  • The Manufacturer provides deliverables for other the Designer/Engineer and Project Manager to use.
  • The Designer/Engineer provides deliverables for the Project Manager and Manufacturer to use.

Notes:

Students must complete a graphic organizer to organize their information about the project. The end result will be a refined design brief, and a set of specifications and criteria for their role on the team submitted as a formal document.


Each student on the team provides different deliverables, so each student will have a different design brief. Use this time to differentiate between their roles and expectations.

Step Three:  Research  & Brainstorming

Lessons/ Topics

Lesson 5:  Reviewing Design Process Deliverables

  • PowerPoint Slideshow
  • Engineering Log
  • Flow Chart Analysis Report
  • Executive Report

Formative Assessments:

o        Teacher provides feedback on collected research students create using the previously started “Research Log”. (ULT

#1-4)

Summative Assessments

At the end of the step, as measured by a rubric, designated team member will be responsible for:

Scientist

  • PowerPoint Slides of:
  • Impairment. (ULT #1)
  • Physical limitations to overcome. (ULT #4)

Designer/Engineer

  • Keep “Research/Engineering Log” using template format provided documenting and illustrating:
  • Research on appearance, form, and materials. (ULT #4)
  • Research existing conditions of patient. (ULT #5)
  • Viable solution (brainstorming) to the problem using the steps of the design process. (ULT #5)

Manufacturer

  • PowerPoint Slides of materials and manufacturing processes used to produce existing devices. (ULT #4)

Project Manager

  • Executive Report of the research and development and describe how the product improves the quality of life meets legal and ethical protocols. Identify and explain processes used for the product design, development, and production and describe how they work together to demonstrate an understanding of the biotechnology product development process. (ULT #1-7)

Notes:

Notes:


Project Manager (1) – must maintain completed work and finalize documentation for presentation use to the client. Will have to schedule work to be done and track deliverables by team members.

Scientist (2) – must understand the performance of a healthy body. Must look materials to determine the best materials for the task. Must work together to divide and conquer the tasks and collaborate on final deliverables.

Designer/Engineer (2) – must understand the end user needs and interaction with solution. Must work together to divide and conquer the tasks and collaborate on final documentation.

Manufacturer (2) – must understand the materials involved and be able to identify how mass production of the item would happen. Must look beyond the modeling materials used for this project to the real materials in order to propose the manufacturing process. Must work together to divide and conquer the tasks and collaborate on final documentation.

Guide students to determine whom to contact as experts. Arrange for mentors for the project in order for students to have professionals in the related fields to talk to. Invite practitioner or service rep to visit with class.

Each student or pair of students on the team must become the expert(s) in a particular area of the project.

Scientist – in charge of the physics related to the final solution. Information such as patient height, weight, angles, pressures, etc. may be vital to the design challenge.

Designer/Engineer – in charge of overall design and appearance.

Manufacturer – in charge of the material selection for the solution.

Project Manager – in charge of team collaboration and writing reports to include team work.

Step Four:  Generation Alternate Solutions

Lessons/ Time

Lesson 6: Generating Alternate Solutions through Sketches and Drawings

  • 2D Drawings
  • 3D Drawings

Lesson 7: Modeling Alternate Solutions

  • Materials/Adhesives

-OR-

  • Inventor or Equivalent Animation

Formative Assessments:

  • Teacher conferences with students about alternate solutions and model expectations after students complete “Concept Organizer” for each of their solutions. (ULT #6 and 13)

Summative Assessments

  • Alternate Solutions as per rubric (ULT #6)
  • 3D physical model or computer generated model of final product as per rubric. (ULT

#13)

Notes:

Indicate the level of expectations you have for end product.

Provide students with the Concept Organizer to evaluate their alternate solutions.

Notes:


Step Five:  Chosen Solution with Rationale

Lesson / Time

Lesson 8: Outlining a Presentation

  • Harvard Format
  • Phrasal

Lesson 9: Writing a Rationale Report

  • Pros and Cons
  • Specification Check

Formative Assessments:

  • Teacher feedback on outline prior to presentation with rubric on Oral Presentation or teacher/ team meeting. (ULT #14)

Summative Assessments

  • Oral presentation as per rubric (ULT #14)
  • Rationale report for selected solution as measured by a rubric. (ULT #9)

Notes:

After oral presentation of the options and selected solution, teacher will collect solution with detailed rationale and drawing of selected solution, provide feedback and return work to students for revisions if necessary.

Each solution designed must be described with pros and cons for each.

A specification check is a table with the specs listed in the first column and the alternate solutions across the first row. A rating system is designed and used in the corresponding boxes. Points are tallied and best score is considered the most viable.

Notes:

Students must use their Concept Organizers to complete this step. Project manager must lead rationale report as others provide the input based on their role checking against the constraints and specifications.

Step Six:  Developmental Work

Lesson / Time

Lesson 10: Reviewing Team Role Deliverables

  • Device Instructions Preparation
  • Working Drawings
  • Plan of Procedures Preparation
  • Animation Concept

Formative Assessments:

Teacher provides written feedback on:

Project Manager/Scientist

  • “Device Instructions Organizer” for content and layout. (ULT #11)

Designers/Engineers

  • 2D and 3D drawings (ULT #9, 10)
  • Teacher provides written feedback on animation concept for solution. (ULT #9, 10)

Manufacturers

  • Completed POP Organizer. (ULT # 9, 10)
  • Model concept generated by student (#9, 10)

Summative Assessments N/A


Notes: Provide students with Device Instructions Organizer, and POP Organizer

Notes: Students will use CAD and publishing software to produce a set of Working Drawings and a Plan of Procedures (POP) for producing the final product. Note that the POP must be done for the manufacturing process not the modeling process.

Step Seven: Prototype

Lessons/ Topics

Lesson 11: Reviewing Team Role Deliverables

Formative Assessments:

o        Teacher feedback on prototype animation or model as requested from student or team. (ULT #10)

Summative Assessments:

At the end of the step, as measured by a rubric, designated team member will be responsible for:

Project Manager/Scientist

  • “Device Instructions”. (ULT #11)

Designers/Engineers

  • 2D and 3D drawings (ULT #9, 10)
  • Animation. (ULT #9, 10)

Manufacturers

  • Plan of Procedures. (ULT # 9, 10)

o        Model. (#9, 10)

Notes:

Notes:

Step Eight:  Testing and Evaluation

Lessons/ Topics

Lesson 12: Reviewing Testing and Evaluation Deliverables

  • Test Procedures and Results Report

Formative Assessments:

o        Teacher provides feedback on areas of focus and appropriate illustrations or photos to include in both reports after students complete a “Testing Log Organizer” and an “Evaluation Organizer.” (ULT #12, 13)

Summative Assessments:

At the end of the step, as measured by a rubric, designated team member will be responsible for:

Project Manager with team input:

o        Test Procedures and Results report. (ULT

#12)

Notes: Provide students with copies of the Testing Log and Evaluation Organizer. Students must form larger groups to complete these.

Notes: Students must work together as stated above to complete the Testing Log and Evaluation Organizer.


Step Nine:  Redesign and Reflect

Lessons/ Topics

Lesson 13:  Writing an Design Evaluation Report

  • Expectations
  • Format

Lesson 14: Conducting a Post Test for Principles and Practices of Effective Teamwork

Formative Assessments:

  • Teacher/Student discussion to clarify any erroneous information about report expectations. (ULT #14)
  • Written feedback by project manager and teacher on TOT Logs submitted by each team member at this time. (ULT #15)

Summative Assessments:

  • Team Design Evaluation report for the project. (ULT #13)
  • Follow the principles and practices of effective teamwork as measured on a teamwork performance rating scale. (ULT

#14)

Notes:

Notes: Students will complete a design evaluation report to reflect on all aspects of the project.

Step Ten: Communicate

Lesson / Time

Lesson 15: Outlining a Presentation

  • Harvard Format
  • Phrasal

Formative Assessments:

  • Peer and teacher comments for improving presentations. (ULT #18)

Summative Assessments:

  • Presentation of project design to peers. (ULT #18)

Notes:

Notes: Students will present individually and in small groups at various stages of the project to gain feedback and input where needed. This final presentation must be organized by the Project Manager and assure that all team members have a speaking role.

Corresponding Technology Student Association (TSA) Activities

Biotechnology Design Engineering Design


Lesson Plans

Lesson

Timeframe

Lesson  1 Reviewing Project Background

Lesson 2

Reviewing Stakeholders and Required Project research

Lesson 3

Reviewing Principles and Practices of Effective Teamwork.

45 minutes / 3 days

1 day to review lessons and select teams 2 day to research and prepare documents

Lesson 4

Framing the Design Brief for the Medical Design Project.

45 minutes / 3 days

½ day to lecture, 2 days to determine individual design briefs, specs, and constraints

Lesson 5

Reviewing Design Process Deliverables.

45 minutes / 4 day

½ day to lecture, 3 days to select teams, and start research

Lesson 6

Generating Alternate Solutions through Sketches and drawings.

Lesson  7 Modeling Alternate Solutions

45 minutes / 1 day

½ day to lecture, 3 days to select teams, and start research

Lesson 8 Outlining a Presentation

Lesson 9

Writing a Rationale Report

45 minutes / 4 days

½ day to review expectations, 3.5 days to generate ideas.

Lesson 10

Reviewing Team Role Deliverables (Preparation)

  • Device Instructions
  • Working Drawings
  • Plan of Procedures
  • Animation or Physical Model

45 minutes / 3 days

½ day to review options, 2.5 days to research

Lesson 11

Reviewing Team Role Deliverables (Production)

  • Device Instructions
  • Working Drawings
  • Plan of Procedures

45 minutes / 3 days

½ day to review options, 2.5 days to produce deliverables


Lesson 12

Reviewing Testing and Evaluation Deliverables

45 minutes / 3 days

½ day to review options, 2.5 days to produce deliverables

Lesson 13

Writing an Individual Self-Evaluation Report

Lesson 14

Conducting a Post Test for Principles and Practices of Effective Teamwork

45 minutes / 3 days

½ day to review expectations, 1.5 days to prepare, 1 day to take test

Lesson 15 Outlining a Presentation

45 minutes / 3 days

½ day to review outlining and ½ day to prepare outline

2 days to present

Teacher Notes:

Curriculum Development Resources

Adams, Patricia F., et al, “Current Estimates from the National Health Interview Survey, 1996,” Vital and Health Statistics 10:200 (1999).Gravlee, Jocelyn R., M.D. and Van

Durme, Daniel J. M.D. Braces and Splints for musculoskeletal conditions. American Family Physician. 9 February 2010. . 26 July 2012 < http://www.aafp.org/afp/2007/0201/p342.html>.

Fagan, Dr. M. J. What is Medical Engineering. Science & Engineering. 26 July 2012 < http://science- engineering.net/medical_engineering.htm>.

National Limb loss Information Center. I.Fact Sheet. Amputation Statistics by Cause. 2008. Retrieved 26 July 2012, from http://www.amputee-coalition.org/fact_sheets/amp_stats_cause.html

Orthotics. (n.d.). In Wikipedia. Retrieved 26 July 2012, from http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Orthotics Prosthetics. (n.d.). In Wikipedia. Retrieved 26 July 2012, from http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Prosthesis

Ziegler-Graham, Kathryn, PhD, et al. “Estimating the Prevalence of Limb Loss in the United States - 2005 to 2050,” Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation 89 (2008): 422-429.

Notes:


Research/Investigation/Testing Log

Complete all columns for each entry. Feel free to use more than one row per entry. Continue on the back of each page is necessary. Include everything tried and your observations of the test.

Date

Research/Investigation/Testing

Finds/Results


Research/Investigation/Testing Log

Use the space below to sketch out ideas or calculations while investigating. Include a sketch of the tank and course, electrical circuit used as a wire diagram, vessel designs tried, issues encountered, and solutions.


Time on Task Log

Complete all columns for each entry. Feel free to use more than one row per entry. Continue on the back of each page is necessary. Include all class work and homework; time spent on tasks outside of class.

Date

Task Description

Time on Task


Design Brief, Specs and Criteria Organizer

End User

Problem

What Why

Specs

The device must:        End User must:

1.        1.

2.        2.

3.        3.

4.        4.

5.        5.

Constraints

The device is limited to:        End User is limited to:

1.        1.

2.        2.

3.        3.

4.        4.

5.        5.

20


Concept Organizer

Idea Description:

Pros for this Idea        Unresolved aspects

of the Idea


Cons for this Idea


Plan of Procedures

Plan of Procedures for (insert design object or system)

(Provide a 3D image of the final solution and give a brief description of the design solutions and work to be completed for construction or productions. Use the chart below to list all supplies need to produce parts of the solution.)

Supply list

Item

Description

QTY

Size

Remarks

1

2

3

4

Etc.

(Give a brief description of the material processing that needs to be done and use the chart below to identify all of the tools and equipment needed.)

Tools and Equipment list

Item

Description

Use

1

2

3

Etc.

Material Processing Procedures

(Give a brief description of the parts that need to be produced and use the chart below to identify the materials needed for processing.)

Material list

Item

Description

QTY

Size

Remarks

1

Pinewood Block

1

1.5”x1.25”x8”

Lure Body

2

Zinc

2.2

Grams

(State tool with (T#) to use, include action, supply with (S#). Use words like measure, draw, scribe, cut, score, and fold. – Delete this text. )

Part P1: 1.

2.

3.

4.

Part P2: 1.


2.

3.

Part P3: 1.

2.

3.

Part P4: 1.

2.

3.

Assembly Procedures

(Give a brief description the assembly and use the chart below to identify the parts needed for final assembly.)

Parts list

Item

Description

QTY

Size

Remarks

1

2

3

4

Etc.

(Include action, parts with (P#) for each step.) Use verbs like fold, insert, slide, crease, bend and place. This section requires images of each step!!! And an image of the final product assembled. – delete this)

Example: Fold and slide flap b into slot d on the base (P5).

1.

2.

3.

Etc.


Device Instruction Organizer Device:  _        

STEP #  _        

Possible Illustration: _        

STEP #  _        

Possible Illustration: _        

STEP #  _        

Possible Illustration: _        

STEP #  _        

Possible Illustration: _        


Plan of Procedures Organizer

Part or Process: _        _

STEP #  _        

Possible Illustration: _        

STEP #  _        

Possible Illustration: _        

STEP #  _        

Possible Illustration: _        

STEP #  _        

Possible Illustration: _        

Unit Overview – Socially Responsible Engineering & Technology (POS)

Course:  Y2 U6 – Communication and Information

Unit Title:   Clearing my Pathway

Approximate Length of Unit:  5 Weeks (based on five day weeks; 45 minute periods each day)

Unit Summary

This unit will raise student awareness to the social, financial, and educational challenges associated with preparing for higher education and civic responsibility. Students will be presented with the following problem.

The economic collapse of 2008 triggered fallouts in the banking, housing, and financial industries which are still being countered today.   The decision making of many were called into question, and as a result a greater sense of how the economy worked was necessary in order to avoid similar missteps in the future. Young Americans, through increased rigor in education, are especially important in regard to greater social, financial, and civic responsibility in the future. The need for a more transparent dialogue about these topics exist using emerging forms of communication and information technologies. In a design team of two, students will develop and present a public service announcement (PSA) highlighting a facet of society that requires enhanced focus towards social, financial, and/or civic responsibility. Through use of available audio and visual communication technologies, students will inform, persuade, entertain, control, manage, and educate their audience on the topic of their choice.

Throughout the unit, students will also acquire technical skills that employ planning and time management skills and tools to enhance results and complete work tasks, while concurrently demonstrating proper application of the digital audio and visual communication tools available to them.

Primary interdisciplinary connections:  Financial Literacy, Civics, Language Arts

21st century themes: Global Awareness, Civic Literacy, Environmental Literacy

Unit Rationale:

In 2010, New Jersey became only the fourth state in the country to require a semester course in personal finance. This legislation was passed in an attempt to avoid institutional abuses in regard to housing, banking, corporate leadership, and credit in the future. Students on a pathway to higher education and civic responsibility in their future must be educated on these topics and others during their high school experience.  Students can appreciate these real life concerns as they embrace the adult challenges of energy conservation, environmental awareness, purchasing a new home or vehicle, obtaining credit cards, opening bank accounts, and saving money.        Current and future challenges in regard to social responsibility will be eased if students can use multiple forms of audio and visual communication to educate their audience on the topic of their choice.

Learning Targets

Standards for Technological Literacy :

Standard 17: Students will develop an understanding of and be able to select and use information and communication technologies.

L. Information and communication technologies include the inputs, processes, and outputs associated with sending and receiving information.

N. Information and communication systems can be used to inform, persuade, entertain, control, manage, and educate.


P.  There are many ways to communicate information, such as graphic and electronic means.

Science (NJCCCS 5)

5.1 Science Practices - All students will understand that science is both a body of knowledge and an evidence based, model-building enterprise that continually extends, refines, and revises knowledge. The four Science Practices strands encompass the knowledge and reasoning skills that students must acquire to be proficient in science.

CPI#

Cumulative Progress Indicators (CPI)

5.1.12.D.2

Science involves using language, both oral and written, as a tool for making thinking public. Represent ideas using literal representations, such as graphs, tables, journals, concept maps, and diagrams.

Mathematics (NJCCCS 4)

4.5 Mathematical Processes – All students will use mathematical processes of problem solving, communication, connections, reasoning, representations, and technology to solve problems and communicate mathematical ideas.

CPI#

Cumulative Progress Indicators (CPI)

4.5.F.12.1

Use technology to gather, analyze, and communication mathematical information.

Educational Technology (NJCCCS 8.1)

8.1 Educational Technology: All students will use digital tools to access, manage, evaluate, and synthesize information in order to solve problems individually and collaboratively and to create and communicate knowledge.

CPI#

Cumulative Progress Indicators (CPI)

8.1.12.C.1

Digital tools and environments support the learning process and foster collaboration in solving local or global issues and problems. Develop an innovative solution to a complex local or global problem / issue in collaboration with peers and experts and present ideas for feedback in an online community.

Engineering and Technological Literacy (NJCCCS 8.2)

8.2 Technology Education, Engineering, and Design - All students will develop an understanding of the nature and impact of technology, engineering, technological design, and the designed world, as they relate to the individual, global society, and the environment.

CPI#

Cumulative Progress Indicators (CPI)

8.2.12.C.1

Analyze the ethical impact of a product, system or environment worldwide and report findings in a web-based publication for further comment and analysis.

The Career Ready Practices: component of the CCTC provides a framework for the developmental experiences necessary to becoming career ready; experiences that can be “practiced” using many different approaches in a variety of settings

CPI #

Cumulative Progress Indicator (CPI)

CRP8.

Utilize critical thinking to make sense of problems and persevere in solving them.

CRP5.

Consider the environmental, social and economic impacts of decisions.

Standard 9.2 Personal Financial Literacy: All students will develop skills and strategies that promote personal and financial responsibility related to financial planning, savings, investment, and charitable giving in the global economy.


CPI #

Cumulative Progress Indicator (CPI)

9.2.12.D.2

Assess factors that influence financial planning.

9.2.12.E.2

Determine how objective, accurate, and current financial information affects the prioritization of financial decisions.

Standard 9.3 Career and Technical Education All students who complete a career and technical education program will acquire academic and technical skills for careers in emerging and established professions that lead to technical skill proficiency, credentials, certificates, licenses, and/or degrees.

CPI #

Cumulative Progress Indicator (CPI)

9.3.ST.6

Demonstrate technical skills needed in a chosen STEM field.

9.3.ST-ET.2

Display and communicate STEM information.

9.3.ST-ET.1

Use STEM concepts and processes to solve problems involving design and/or production.

9.3.ST.1

Apply engineering skills in a project that requires project management, process control and quality assurance.

9.3.ST-SM.4

Apply critical thinking skills to review information, explain statistical analysis, and to translate, interpret and summarize research and statistical data.

9.3.ST.2

Use technology to acquire, manipulate, analyze and report data.

Industry Standards –

NOCTI –

  • STEM – Pre-Engineering, Engineering Technology

Design Brief

Background/Scenario:

The economic collapse of 2008 triggered fallouts in the banking, housing, and financial industries which are still being countered today. The decision making of many were called into question, and as a result a greater sense of how the economy worked was necessary in order to avoid similar missteps in the future. Young Americans are especially important in regard to greater social, financial, and civic responsibility in the future. The need for a more transparent dialogue about these topics exist using emerging forms of communication and information technologies.

Problem/Opportunity Statement:

In a design team of two, students will develop and present a public service announcement (PSA) highlighting a facet of society that requires enhanced focus towards social, financial, and/or civic responsibility. Through use of available audio and visual communication technologies, students will inform, persuade, entertain, control, manage, and educate their audience on the topic of their choice.

Specifications/Criteria:

  1. The topic should be chosen the discretion of the students and must be approved by the instructor to avoid duplication.
  2. The topic should focus on current concerns within the framework of social, financial, and civic responsibility.
  3. PSA should inform, persuade, entertain, control, manage, and educate the intended audience about social, financial, and/or civic responsibility.

Constraints:

Time –

  • The PSA should last 90 seconds.

Money -

  • No limit; students can use props at their own discretion.

Energy –

Tools/Machines

  • Podcasts are the recommended form of communication based on available resources.

People

  • Maximum of two people per group

Information

  • Acquired through lessons, past experiences, and research.

Materials

  • Classroom materials
  • Students are also encouraged to bring in items from home.

Stakeholders:

  • All students who will advance in course outline.
  • All students who are looking to pursue career in engineering or technical field.
  • Contributing members of our society.

Student Grouping Notes:

  • Groups of two will allow both parties to be involved in brainstorming, design, and communication.  Larger groups will garner a less efficient distribution of tasks.

Material Notes:

  • The resources used in the development of the PSA will be determined by what is available in the classroom. Students should be encouraged to use their own forms of technology if appropriate ones are not available at school.


Unit Essential Questions

  • To what extent should individuals, and institutions, both private and governmental be held responsible for the actions of others?
  • How did the economic collapse of 2008 change individuals’ outlooks towards personal finance and larger issues of economic importance
  • How does the intended message impact the selected media used to deliver it?
  • What role does technological development play in the way people receive, interpret, and act on different message formats and media
  • How do different personnel function together on a design project? What personnel is required to manage all of the experts involved in a project?
  • How does a design team member work effectively to be a productive person of a team?

Unit Enduring Understandings

  1. Social, financial, and economic responsibility are related parts of civics.
  2. Social, financial, and economic responsibility involve understanding of current events and circumstances related to a phenomena and require individual and institution accountability
  3. In order to develop greater levels of social, financial, and economic responsibilities, individuals can gain perspective on how to do so from analyzing historical events
  4. PSA’s provide an effective means to engage an audience about issues related to social responsibility
  5. Effective group communication enhances product function and efficiency.

Unit Learning Targets

Throughout the unit, students will acquire insights into various applications of electrical, mechanical, and fluid power. In addition, they will cooperatively apply applications of each type of power to meet the goal of efficient product recycling. The nature of this particular engineering design will require enhanced communication, testing, and continuous evaluation.

Students will ...

  1. Communicate current challenges related to social responsibility.        (5.1.12.D.2) (9.3.ST-ET.2)
  2. Research the contributing factors associated with economic, financial, and/or social challenges to a society.  (8.2.12.C.1) (9.2.12.D.2) (9.2.12.E.2) (9.3.ST-ET.6) (CRP5)
  3. Apply technical competence in order to communicate and inform using digital tools. (4.5.F.12.1) (8.1.12.C.1) (old-9.4.12.C.(1).3) (old-9.4.12.O.32) (9.3.ST.6)
  4. Identify the input, process, output, and feedback of a message. (ITEEA17L) (CRP8)
  5. Recognize the challenges of design under constraint. (9.1.12.A.1) (9.3.ST-ET.4) (CRP8)
  6. Generate multiple PSA topic ideas that would enhance focus on social responsibility. (ITEEA17P) (9.3.ST-SM.2) (9.3.ST.4) (CRP5)
  7. Communicate in various forms in order to inform, persuade, entertain, control, manage, and educate all audiences. (4.2.12.D.2) (9.1.12.E.1) (old- 9.4.12.O.9) (ITEEA17N) (9.3.ST-ET.2)
  8. Execute structured learning experiences to maximize efficient use of time and material. (9.1.12.A.1) (CRP8)
  9. Evaluate and re-design the public service announcement as needed throughout the design process. (old-9.4.12.O.4) (old-9.4.12.C.(1).6) (9.3.ST-ET.4) (CRP8)
  10. Suggest through digital communication methods to enhance social responsibility in the future. (old-9.4.12.F.37) (old-9.4.12.O.15) (9.3.ST.2)  (CRP5)
  11. Present completed PSA to peers. (8.1.4.A.3) (9.3.ST-ET.2)

Project-Based Learning Plan:

Engineering  Design Process (Sequence and Assessments)

Teacher Instruction

Student Evaluation

Step One:  Identify the Problem

Lesson 1:

  • What happened in 2008? Lesson 2:
  • What is a Public Service Announcement (PSA)?

Formative Assessments (must have feedback):

  • Student design teams will assess the social, economic, and financial problems that contributed to the 2008 collapse.
  • Student design teams will collaborate with other design teams to share answers.
  • Student design teams will critique existing PSA’s.

Summative Assessments:

  • Test – 2008 Contributing Factors (ULT

#1, 2)

  • Quiz -What is a PSA? (ULT #4)

Notes:

Teacher is encouraged to show multiple PSA’s of varying quality to expose students to strong and weak qualities.

Notes:

Students should be encouraged to use credible, objective sources.

Step Two:  Frame the Design Brief

Lesson 3: Framing the design brief for the PSA project

  • Review of design brief requirements
  • Review of specifications
  • Review of constraints

Formative Assessments:

  • Teacher will conference with each two- person design team to review and provide feedback on specifications of the design brief, using probing questioning techniques to gain insight into students understanding.

Summative Assessments:

  • Quiz - Primary constraints and specifications of design brief. (ULT#5)

Notes:

Notes:

Step Three:  Research  & Brainstorming

Lesson 4:

  • How to inform, persuade, entertain, control, manage, and educate an audience?

Formative Assessments:

  • Student design teams will review existing PSA’s looking for components identified

in Lesson 4.

  • Teacher will conference with design teams to stimulate brainstorming of how their topic would be communicated, providing input and scaffolding to encourage use of multiple brainstorming techniques and generation of a broad array of ideas.

Summative Assessments:

  • Written Exam - Methods to Connect with an Audience (ULT #7)

Notes:

Teacher can present same PSA’s as Step 1, with greater attention to specific components delivered in this lesson.

Teacher could also assign certain design teams to locate PSA’s specifically geared to one of the components above.

Notes:

Step Four:  Generation Alternate Solutions

Lesson 5:

  • Communicating the Message

Formative Assessments:

  • Teacher will critique proposals of possible solutions, focusing on attention to enhancing social responsibility using a criteria rooted checklist or evaluation form.
  • Teacher will review the rubric criteria and show students examples of PSA’s receiving different rubric scores if available.

Summative Assessments:

  • Paper with rubric – Communicating the message and potential announcement details to instructor (3 minimum) (ULT

#6)

Notes:

Multiple days must be allocated for this step. Teacher should encourage students to explore as many different PSA options as possible, as long as they focus on enhancing facets of social responsibility.

Notes:

Students should continually evaluate different PSA’s.

Teacher will establish meeting times with each group to discuss formal possible solutions.

Teacher will communicate need for concise, informed deliveries within the parameters of the design brief.

Step Five:  Chosen Solution with Rationale

Formative Assessments:


Lesson 6:

  • Explaining the Most Effective Public Service Announcement
  • Teacher will continue to critique quality of message and flow of detail.
  • Peers of design teams will assess solutions for completeness and relevance and offer feedback.
  • Review presentation rubric with students prior to final presentation.
  • After graded presentation, teacher will collect solution with detailed rationales and storyboard, provide feedback, and return the work to students with revisions.

Summative Assessments:

  • Presentation with rubric – Students share best solution for PSA. (ULT#9)

Notes:

Notes:

Students must continue to check their PSA versus the specifications of the design brief.

Step Six:  Developmental Work

Lesson 7:  The Value of Editing

Formative Assessments:

  • Teacher will keep anecdotal records in regard to proper digital tool usage and storage.

Summative Assessments:

  • Quiz: Using Editing Tools to Stay Within the Design Brief (ULT #3)

Notes: Teacher must encourage students to consistently evaluate time limitations in order to stay on message.

Teacher could present television commercials on how companies use ad time to pitch product as additional examples.

Notes:

Students will develop timeline for what is presented throughout message. Students should be challenged to use presentation time productively.

Step Seven:  Prototype / Production

Lesson 8:

Classroom Organization/Citizenship and Digital Tool Usage

Formative Assessments:

  • Internal group members will continuously self-assess edited material for accuracy and completeness.
  • Teacher will keep anecdotal records during filming/editing and provide feedback as needed.
  • Teacher will continue to keep anecdotal records in regard to usage, storage, and classroom citizenship and provide periodic feedback to maintain classroom

structure.

  • Teacher will question students during the editing process to clarify problems and guide improvement.

Summative Assessments:

  • Demonstration w/ rubric: Proper digital tool usage and classroom clean up (ULT

#8).

Notes:

Teacher will ensure that all students complete tasks with an ongoing emphasis on message and timeframe.

Teacher should encourage student groups to maintain focus on the specific PSA goals; to inform, persuade, entertain, control, and manage information.

Significant time must be allocated for editing.

Notes: Students must consider proper use of PSA time.  Design brief must remain readily available.

Step Eight:  Testing and Evaluation

Lesson 9:  Finalizing a PSA

Formative Assessments:

  • Teacher will continue anecdotal records in regard to digital tool usage.
  • Peer assessment of other PSA’s. Feedback will be required and used as potential guide to re-design.
  • Teacher will review presentation criteria before displaying first PSA.
  • After each design team presents the PSA, teacher will conference with students to evaluate connection to opportunity statement and generate feedback.

Summative Assessments:

  • Quiz:  When is a PSA complete? (ULT

#10)

Notes:

Notes:

Step Nine:  Redesign and Reflect

Lesson 10:  Review – Clarifying the Message

Formative Assessments:

  • Teacher will conference with each design team to evaluate and provide feedback on their ability to inform, persuade, entertain, control, manage, and educate their audience.
  • Teacher will show examples of original and edited PSA’s if available and conference with students to provide feedback as needed.

Summative Assessments:

At the end of steps eight and nine, as measured by a rubric, designated members will be responsible for:

  • Reflection Paper: What needed to be clarified to enhance focus on social responsibility?  (ULT #9)

Notes:

Notes:

Step Ten: Communicate

Lesson 11:  Delivering Effective Presentations

Formative Assessments:

  • Students will practice using presentation software/equipment delivery. Using the rubric they will be evaluated on, peers and instructor will provide feedback on what to improve.
  • Students will rate their understanding of presentation expectations and software tools on exit tickets

Summative Assessments:

  • Performance activity w/rubric: Presentation of PSA to audience. (ULT

#11)

Notes:

Notes:

Corresponding Technology Student Association (TSA) Activities

Open Source Software Development On Demand Video

Extemporaneous Speech Digital Video Production

Curriculum Development Resources

National Institute of Justice

http://www.nij.gov/topics/courts/restorative-justice/marketing-media/psa.htm Technology Student Association

www.tsaweb.org


Lesson Plans

Lesson

Timeframe

Lesson 1

What Happened in 2008?

45 minutes / 2 days

Lesson 2

What is a Public Service Announcement (PSA)?

45 minutes / 2 days

Lesson 3

Framing the Design Brief for the PSA Project

45 minutes / 2 days

1 day to present specifications, 1 day to guide classroom Q/A

Lesson 4

How to inform, persuade, entertain, control, manage, and educate an audience?

45 minutes / 2 days

1 day lecture, 1 day discuss examples

Lesson 5 Communicating the Message

45 minutes / 6 days

½ day to review expectations, 5.5 days to generate ideas.

Lesson 6

Explaining the Most Effective Public Service Announcement

45 minutes / 2 days

2 days to present and provide feedback

Lesson 7

The Value of Editing

45 minutes / 8 days 8 days to edit

Lesson 8

Classsroom Organization/Citizenship and Digital Tool Usage

45 minutes /  ½ day

½ day to review options, ½ to produce draft timeline

Lesson 9 Finalizing a PSA

45 minutes / 1.5 days

1 day to discuss qualities of complete PSA, ½ day assessment

Lesson 10

Review – Clarifying the Message

45 minutes / 2 days

2 days to complete editing

Lesson 11

Review – Delivering Effective Presentations

45 minutes / 2 days

Teacher Notes:

Curriculum Development Resources

 

Resources Updated Summer 2015

Supplemental Reading:

Citizen Engineer Handbook, Chapter 15, Protecting Digital Rights. citizenengineer.org, 2015