Enteral Feeding

  What is  Enteral Feeding?

A way to provide food/nutrition through a tube placed in the nose, the stomach, or the small intestine. Enteral feedings are indicated for infant/children who are unable to ingest an adequate amount of nutrition orally. This may include; who are unconscious, unable to swallow, ventilated, transitioning from parenteral nutrition, or have a primary aspiration.  

A tube in the nose is called a nasogastric tube (NG)  or nasoenteral tube. A tube that goes through the skin into the stomach is called a gastrostomy (GT). It may be placed there using a technique called percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG). A tube into the small intestine is called a jejunostomy (JT). It may be placed there using a technique called percutaneous endoscopic jejunostomy (PEJ).

The most common method of enteral feeding delivery for infant/children is an enteral feeding pump, which controls delivery.

Complications of enteral feeding

Infection

Gastroesophageal reflux and aspiration

Gastrointestinal symptoms

Monitoring

Monitoring should include the general observations, particularly if your child is at high risk of refeeding syndrome. 

Consideration should also be given to:

Types of Enteral Feeding Machines (shown below)