“The Catholic school pursues cultural goals and the natural development  

        of youth to the same degree as any other school. What makes the  

       Catholic school distinctive is its attempt to generate a community climate

       in the school that is permeated by the Gospel spirit of freedom and love.”

                                                                          – Second Vatican Council

EDUCATION

The goal of Catholic schools is to help develop students by providing them with the knowledge, skills and attitudes that will prepare them to deal with the challenges of life and help them grow and understand the teachings and traditions of the Church. In our Catholic schools, faith and culture come together so that faith becomes an active and visible part of the lives of the students and staff – in what they study and in how they relate to one another. In a climate of openness, trust and cooperation, the school, the home and the parish work together to create an authentic community and a strong partnership.

High School Scope and Sequence 

Alberta Education diplomas and certificates certify that the holder has successfully completed a prescribed program of instruction. A student who is awarded a diploma or certificate from the list below is a graduate:

          • Alberta High School Diploma (English and Francophone)

          • Certificate of High School Achievement (English and Francophone)

          • Certificate of Achievement

          • Certificate of School Completion

          • Alberta High School Diploma as a Mature Student

          • High School Equivalency Diploma (by two options)

Note:

The possession of a diploma or certificate does not necessarily guarantee admission to a post-secondary institution. Students should be advised to check the calendars of post-secondary institutions for admission requirements.

For more information reference The Guide to Education at Alberta Education

This booklet describes the types of high school courses and programs that are offered at St. Michael’s School. Students can access additional resources and information from Alberta Learning and MyPass which can be accessed at the following link/url: Alberta Learning or www.alberta.ca/education.aspx

Course descriptions in this booklet are adapted from the Alberta Education Program of Studies. Course offerings are dependent on student enrollment and may be cancelled or offered via Alberta Distance Education due to low enrolment.

A minimum grade of 50% is required to receive course credit. It should be noted that in many cases a grade of 65% or greater is recommended to move into the next course in the sequence. Teachers will work with students to make recommendations that meet their specific learning needs and post-secondary goals. More information and resources for high school students can be found at the following site:

Alberta Education: www.alberta.ca/education.aspx

Graduation Requirements

A highlight of high school is participation in the Grade 12 graduation ceremonies. 

Each May, qualifying Gr. 12 grad candidates participate in a Graduation Mass and ceremony,

which includes a certificate recognizing the completion of 12 years of learning and ceremonial activities. Graduation is an important tradition of St. Michael’s School and rite of passage that is not to be missed!

To be eligible to participate in St. Michael’s School graduation ceremony, students must:

  • Be eligible for a HighSchool Diploma according to Alberta Education standards,
  • Be registered in 30 level courses in their Grade 12 year,
  • Successfully complete R.E. 15, 25 & 35
  • Successfully complete 100 credits (including transferred credits from another high school).

- Students must be enrolled in a program that will enable them to participate in the graduation

ceremony by the May graduation date. To determine this we expect students to have

completed 80 credits by the end of the first semester and be enrolled and passing sufficient courses

by midterm of the second semester. Individual circumstances may be weighed and considered.

Students do not automatically qualify to graduate; course drops, uncompleted courses, failing a class

and /or class withdrawals may result in student ineligibility. The graduation fee must be paid

prior to the end of Semester 1.

Alberta High School Diploma: Graduation Requirements (English)

The requirements in this chart are based on the minimum requirements for a student to attain a High School Diploma. The requirements for entry into post-secondary institutions and workplaces may require additional and/or specific courses.

100 Credits Including the following:

English Language Arts 30 Level

(English Lang. Arts 30-1 or 30-2)

Social Studies 30 Level

(Social 30-1 or 30-2)

Mathematics 20 Level

Math 20-1, Math 20-2 or Math 20-3)

Science 20 Level

(Science 20, Science 24, Biology 20, Chemistry 20 or Physics 20)

Physical Education 10

(Phys. Ed 10 - 3 credits)

Career and Life Management 10

(CALM - 3 credits)

10 credits in any combination from:

  • Career and Technology Study (CTS) courses
  • Fine Arts Courses
  • Second Language Courses
  • Physical Education 20 and/or 30
  • Knowledge and Employability Courses
  • Registered Apprenticeship Program courses
  • Locally developed courses in CTS, Fine Arts, second languages, or Knowledge and Employability Occupational courses

10 credits in any 30 level course

(in addition to 30 Level English Language Arts and Social Studies as specified above)

These courses may include:

  • 30 - level locally developed courses
  • Advanced level (3000 series) in Career Technology Studies courses         
  • 30 - level Work Experience courses                                  
  • 30 - level Knowledge and Employability courses
  • 30 - level Registered Apprenticeship courses                
  • 30- level Green Certificate Specialization courses
  • Special Projects 30

 

Alberta Education diplomas and certificates certify that the holder has successfully completed a prescribed program of instruction. A student who is awarded a diploma or certificate from the list below is a graduate.

 • Alberta High School Diploma (English and Francophone)

 • Certificate of High School Achievement (English and Francophone)

• Certificate of Achievement

• Certificate of School Completion

• Alberta High School Diploma as a Mature Student

• High School Equivalency Diploma (by two options) Note: The possession of a diploma or certificate does not necessarily guarantee admission to a post-secondary institution. Students should be advised to check the calendars of post-secondary institutions for admission requirements. For more information on any of the pathways see the Guide to Education.

ST MICHAEL SCHOOL COURSE OFFERINGS:

Religious Education

Students in Holy Spirit School Division are required to complete 3 credits of Religious Education in each year of attendance in order to participate in school graduation exercises.

Religious Education 15                                                                                                 3 credits

Students will examine the culture in which they are maturing, and reflect on Christ’s invitation to transform it. They will be encouraged to demonstrate through word and action the teaching of Christ: that a disciple’s life is a life lived for others and in service of Christ and His Church. Through the study of various print and visual texts, as well as discussion and reflection, the course provides opportunities for students to more fully explore their relationships with God, others and self, as presented in their own and other cultures and from a Catholic perspective.

In the Religious Education (Roman Catholic) 15 course, students will:

A. Explore what creation stories from a variety of world religions and Church teachings reveal about what it means to be human.

B. Understand the dynamic nature of culture, the need for adaptability and optimism, and our role as agents within culture.

C. Understand how the signs, symbols and rituals of various world religions, including Canada’s First Nations, Métis and Inuit communities, influence culture.

D. Examine the impact that faith in Christ, and the God whom Jesus reveals, should have upon culture.

E. Explore ideas and challenges that arise when examining relationships between self, others and God as presented both in culture and from a Catholic perspective.

F. Understand and experience humility and open-mindedness through active participation in the prayer life of the Eucharistic community.

Religious Education 25                                                                                                3 credits

In this course, students will have an opportunity to demonstrate their learning through a variety of print, visual and oral media, and deepen their understanding of the Old Testament, each of the four Gospels as four distinct accounts of the message of Jesus and the role of Paul in the early years of the Church development and history.

In the Religious Education (Roman Catholic) 25 course, students will:

A.        Identify Scripture and Tradition as the primary sources of Christian belief.

B.        Explore history of Judaism as a foundation of Christianity while demonstrating respect, empathy and compassion for the history of the Jewish people.

C.        Know the Christian response to Jesus’ question: “Who do people say I am?”

D.        Explore the salvation doctrine of other world religions.

E.        Understand the ministry and core teachings of Jesus and their implications for Christian life through a study of the     Gospels.

F.        Explain, working with multiple perspectives, ways contemporary Christians cooperate in bringing about the Reign of God.

G.        (5-credit Course Only) Learn about Paul’s life, his missionary journeys and his letters.

H.        (5-credit Course Only) Examine how the Church developed and expanded following the Apostolic Era.

I.        Explore the many ways Catholics pray using Scripture.

Religious Education 35                                                                                                3 credits

Students will explore their creativity in the ways they choose to communicate what they have learned and their response to the call to discipleship. They will explore ethical and moral guides for living and learn that the major life decisions of a disciple or Christ must flow from a living relationship of love with the Lord and the wisdom acquired through that relationship. As true disciples, students will strive to live in the world conscious that their choices should be rooted in their relationship with Christ and fidelity to His call. They will focus on making moral and ethical decisions based on truth.

In the Religious Education (Roman Catholic) 35 course, students will:

A.        Understand themselves through critical thinking, personal discovery and by examining ethical theories as moral persons invited to live the way of Christ.

B.        Understand the self-revelation of God through the interpretation of Exodus and the prophetic call narratives.

C.        Recognize revelation and the Tradition of the Catholic Church as a guide to moral living.

D.        Explore and respect how other world religions understand their sacred texts as guides to moral living.

E.        Understand the spiritual dimension of relationships, marriage and family life.

F.        Examine how other world religions approach current moral issues.

G.        (5-credit Course Only) Identify through prayerful reflection what contributes to happiness and the good life.

H.        (5-credit Course Only) Recognize, both as individuals and as members of their community, the nature of human freedom.

English Language Arts (ELA)

Alberta Education Guidelines

ELA 10-1 (5 Credits)              ELA 20-1 (5 Credits)                 ELA 30-1 (5 Credits)

This sequence of ELA is intended for students who have demonstrated strengths in their use of language and in their understanding of print and non-print texts. It provides a more in-depth study of text in terms of increased emphasis on textual analysis. It requires both the study of and writing of essays. It emphasizes the creation of personal responses to texts, and requires critical analytical responses to literary texts and contexts. ELA 30-1 is a prerequisite to all university programs and many college programs.

A minimum grade of 65% in grade 9 is recommended to enroll in ELA 10-1 and is also recommended to move from 10-1 to 20-1 and from 20-1 to 30-1. Students with grades less than 65% may be recommended to enroll in the dash two (-2) stream.

ELA 10-2 (5 Credits)              ELA 20-2 (5 Credits)                 ELA 30-2 (5 Credits)

This sequence of ELA is intended to develop language arts strategies and skills to strengthen the confident and competent use of language and understanding of texts. Students are taught additional reading comprehension strategies to assist them in developing their reading and text study skills. This sequence requires the study of popular nonfiction. It emphasizes the creation of personal responses to contexts, and requires analytical responses to other print and non-print texts and contexts. ELA 30-2 is a prerequisite to some post-secondary institutions but is not accepted by universities.

Social Studies

Alberta Education Guidelines

Although the content, skills and attitudes are similar for the dash 1 (-1) and dash 2 (-2) sequences, the expectations for Social Studies 10-1. 20-1, and 30-1 are more challenging, particularly in the depth of concept and skill development. For example,  Soc 10-1 students are expected to develop the skills necessary for composing an argumentative essay. Soc 10-2 students are expected to develop the ability to defend a position in a short written assignment. The nature of the approved student resources differs for each sequence.

Social Studies 10-2 or 10-2                                                                                        (5 credits)

What is globalization and how does it affect us? Social Studies 10-1 students explore the changing meaning of identity and citizenship in a globalizing world, while also understanding the impacts of globalization, both positive and negative, on people worldwide. A minimum grade of 65% is recommended ub grade 9 Social Studies to enroll in Soc 10-1.

What is globalization and how does it impact me? Social Studies 10-2 students explore the history and effects of globalization. They develop an understanding of the impact that globalization has on people’s identity and citizenship, while addressing emerging issues that globalization presents.. Students with a grade of 50-65% in grade 9 are recommended to enroll in Soc 10-2.

Social Studies 20-1 or 20-2                                                                                       (5 credits)

What is nationalism and how does it affect us? Social Studies 20-1 students look at the origins and effects of nationalism and weigh its benefits and limitations. They examine issues related to nationalism and consider impacts on individuals, international relations and citizenship. A grade of 65% in Soc 10-1 is recommended.

What is nationalism and how does it affect me? In Social Studies 20-2, students examine the origins and effects of nationalism from various perspectives, developing an understanding of the impact of nationalism on individuals, international relations and citizenship in Canada. Students with a grade of 50-65% in Soc 10-1 are recommended to enroll in Soc 20-2.

Social Studies 30-1 or 30-2                                                                                      (5 credits)

What are ideologies and how do they affect us? Social Studies 30-1 students examine multiple perspectives on various ideologies and on the influence of these ideologies, focusing particularly on liberalism. They develop an understanding of how ideologies can shape us and our world.

What are ideologies and how do they affect us? Social Studies 30-2 students will examine multiple perspectives on various ideologies, focusing in particular on liberalism. They will develop an understanding of how ideologies can shape us and our world.

Mathematics 

Alberta Education Guidelines

Math 10C                                                                                                                    (5 credits)

This course is the starting point after which a student will choose to enter either the 20-1 →30-1, or the 20-2 →30-2 sequences. The course will allow the student a better chance to make an informed decision about which sequence in Grade 11 and Grade 12 will best meet their learning needs and career expectations. Prerequisite: 50% in gr. 9 Mathematics, but a minimum grade of 65% is recommended.

Mathematics 10C students determine the surface area and volume of 3-D objects and use trigonometric ratios to solve problems involving right triangles. They simplify expressions that involve powers with integral and rational exponents and simplify or factor polynomial expressions. At this level, students also analyze linear relations, solve systems of linear equations and solve problems related to both of these sets of skills.

Math 20-1 (5 Credits)              Math 30-1 (5 Credits)                Math 31 (5 Credits)                                                                                                                        

This course sequence is designed to provide students with the mathematical understandings and critical-thinking skills identified for entry into post-secondary programs that require the study of calculus (ie. Engineering) A minimum grade of 65% is recommended to move from Math 10C to Math 20-1 and from 20-1 to 30-1. Math 30-1 is strongly recommended as a prerequisite for Math 31.

Mathematics 20-1 students investigate arithmetic and geometric patterns and use the sine and cosine laws to solve problems involving triangles. They investigate the properties of radicals and rational expressions. Mathematics 20-1 students also analyze the characteristics of absolute value functions and quadratic functions, solve quadratic equations and systems of equations in various ways, and analyze the relationship between a function and its reciprocal.

Mathematics 30-1 students investigate the properties of logarithms; study the characteristics and transformations of trigonometric, polynomial, exponential and logarithmic functions by sketching and analyzing their graphs; and solve equations and problems related to these functions. Students also use basic counting principles to determine the number of permutations or combinations of the elements of a set to solve problems.

Mathematics 31 students determine the limit of a function at finite or infinite values of the independent variable. They use derivative theorems to determine the derivative of a function, either explicitly or implicitly, and use derivatives to sketch graphs of functions and solve optimization problems. They also investigate the relationship between differentiation and integration.

Math 20-2 (5 Credits)              Math 30-2 (5 Credits)                                                                                                                                

This course sequence is designed to provide students with the mathematical understandings and critical-thinking skills identified for post-secondary programs that do not require the study of calculus (ie. Nursing).

Mathematics 20-2 students use proportional reasoning to solve real-life problems involving 2-D shapes and 3-D objects. They use the properties of angles and triangles, including the sine and cosine laws, to solve problems; use reasoning to prove conjectures; use spatial reasoning to solve puzzles; and solve problems that involve radicals. They interpret statistical data, solve problems involving quadratics and research and present a mathematical topic of their choice.

Mathematics 30-2 students use numerical and logical reasoning to solve puzzles, and solve real-life problems about the probability of events occurring. They solve problems algebraically involving rational equations; investigate exponential, logarithmic, polynomial and sinusoidal functions; and research and present a mathematical topic of their choice.

Math 10-3 (5 Credits)              Math 20-3 (5 Credits)           Math 30-3 (5 Credits)                                                                                                                                 

This course sequence is designed to provide students with the mathematical understandings and critical-thinking skills identified for entry into the majority of trades and for direct entry into the workforce.

Mathematics 10-3 students solve linear and area measurement problems of 2-D shapes and 3-D objects using SI and imperial units. They use spatial reasoning to solve puzzles; solve problems involving right triangles and angles; solve unit pricing, currency exchange and income problems; and manipulate formulas to solve problems. They also use scale factors and parallel and perpendicular lines to solve problems.

Mathematics 20-3 students solve surface area, volume and capacity problems. They use primary trigonometry to solve problems involving two or three right triangles, and model and draw 3-D objects and their views to scale. They use numerical reasoning to solve puzzles; create and analyze personal budgets; use proportional reasoning, unit analysis and manipulation of formulas to solve problems; and create and interpret graphs. Students use their understanding of slope and rate of change to interpret graphs.

Mathematics 30-3 students investigate the limitations of measuring instruments, use trigonometry to solve problems involving triangles, and describe and illustrate properties of polygons. They investigate slides, rotations, flips and size changes of 2-D shapes or 3-D objects; they use logical reasoning to solve puzzles; and they solve various other problems involving financial situations, linear relations and probability.

Science

Alberta Education Guidelines

Science 10                                                                                                                  (5 credits)

Diverse learning experiences within the science 10 program provides students with opportunities to explore, analyze and appreciate the interrelationships among science, technology, society and the environment, and to develop understandings that will affect their personal lives, their careers and their futures. A grade of 65% in Science 9 is recommended.

What happened to that energy? Science 10 students are introduced to the biological, chemical, physical and Earth sciences. By studying chemical reactions, cellular and multicellular processes that occur in plants, the conservation and conversion of energy, and Earth’s climate, they discover how energy is transformed.

Biology 20 (5 Credits)              Biology 30 (5 Credits)     

Biology 20 consists of four units of study: A. Energy and Matter Exchange in the BIosphere, B. Ecosystems and Population Change, C. Photosynthesis and Cellular Respiration, D. Human Systems. How and why does energy flow through living systems? Biology 20 students examine the interactions of living systems to better understand the constant flow of energy and the cycling of matter. Specifically, students explore the functioning of the human body and the mechanisms that work to maintain balance in organisms in ecosystems and in the biosphere.

Biology 30 consists of four units of study: A. Nervous and Endocrine Systems, B. Reproduction and Development, C. Cell Division, Genetics and Molecular Biology, D. Population and Community Dynamics. Why is there so much diversity? Biology 30 students conduct lab work and investigate how human systems sense and respond to the environment. They explore human reproduction and development at the cellular level and at the organism level. Students investigate the basic structure and role of DNA and investigate the inheritance of traits in individuals and populations. They analyze the changes in populations resulting from natural and human-induced changes in the environment and discover that living systems are dynamic.

Chemistry 20 (5 Credits)              Chemistry 30 (5 Credits)     

Chemistry 20 consists of four units of study: A. The Diversity of Matter and Chemical Bonding, B. Forms of Matter: Gases, C. Matter as Solutions, Acids and Bases, D. Quantitative Relationships in Chemical Changes. How do atoms combine to create matter?  Chemistry 20 students explore matter and how it changes in order to understand the natural world. They investigate the chemical properties of solutions, and they apply their understanding of chemical bonds to explain ionic and molecular compounds. Students explain the behaviour of gases, using the gas laws, and also work to balance chemical equations.

Chemistry 30 consists of four units of study: A. Thermochemical Changes, B. Electrochemical Changes, C. Chemical Changes of Organic Compounds, De. Chemical Equilibrium Focusing on Acid-Base Systems. How can you predict chemical equilibrium? Chemistry 30 students examine and quantify how thermochemical and electrochemical systems use or provide energy. They explore common organic compounds—those that contain carbon—and how they are used in technological applications and everyday life. Students also investigate acid-base reactions and interpret how they eventually reach equilibrium.

Physics 20 (5 Credits)              Physics 30 (5 Credits)     

Physics 20 consists of four units of study: A. Kinematics, B. Dynamics, C. Circular Motion, Work and Energy, D. Oscillatory Motion and Mechanical Waves. Math 20-1 is recommended as a prerequisite. How does a lacrosse player know when to release the ball? Physics 20 students investigate the motion of objects. They apply Newton’s law of universal gravitation to astronomical observations. They also describe how energy is transmitted by mechanical waves and how waves relate to medical technologies, industry and musical instruments.

Physics 30 consists of four units of study: A. Momentum and Impulse, B. Forces and Fields, C. electromagnetic Radiation, D. Atomic Physics. When does a model or a theory need to change? Physics 30 students consider historical experiments and explore why the model of the atom has changed as a result of experiments and observations of natural phenomena. Students apply a quantitative approach to describe conservation of momentum in an isolated system, and they investigate applications and implications of electric and magnetic forces and fields. They also use the concept of wave-particle duality to understand both wave and photon behaviour of electromagnetic radiations.

Science 14 (5 Credits)              Science 24 (5 Credits)     

The Science 14/Science 24 program is a two-course sequence that allows students to meet the course requirements of the Alberta High School Diploma and also provides opportunities for transfer into the academic program. To become scientifically literate, students must develop a thorough knowledge of science and its relationship to technologies and society.

How can we conserve energy? Science 14 students learn about the atom, the periodic table and the safe handling of chemicals. They investigate how energy is transferred in machines, and they examine the digestive and circulatory systems, including way to keep these systems healthy. Students also explore how human activities influence the flow of matter and energy in the biosphere.

Why do we need vaccines and antibiotics? Science 24 students investigate common chemical reactions and examine energy conversions in biological, chemical, physical and technological systems. They learn about human health and the immune system. They also investigate the principles that describe the motion of objects and apply their knowledge to real-life situations.

Physical Education

The aim of the K-12 Physical Education program is to enable students to develop the knowledge, skills and attitudes necessary to lead an active, healthy lifestyle. Curriculum experiences provide students with opportunities to develop the habit of being active daily, the skills to enjoy successful participation, and to realize the benefits resulting from activity. This is the focus of an “active living” approach.

Exemptions from Physical Education: Exemptions from participation in physical education may be given for medical conditions, when a medical certificate from a doctor is presented to the principal; for religious beliefs, when a statement in writing from the parent is presented to the principal; and when access to facilities is prohibitive. When exemption is granted, activities consistent with the program outcomes will be substituted, where appropriate.

Physical Education 10 (3 or 5 Credits)       

A minimum of three credits at the 10 level are required to fulfill Alberta Education graduation requirements. There is a fee associated with the Phys.Ed. course to cover off-campus activity costs. Students choosing the 3 credit are enrolled for one semester only.

What is my body capable of? Through activities in the school and community, Phys. Ed. 10 students will explore their physical abilities and improve their fitness level. They will understand that fitness impacts well-being and body image. Communicating with others, students will develop a sense of fair play and exercise their leadership abilities. They will discover the importance of safe, active living for life; set goals; and challenge themselves as part of an active, healthy lifestyle. Courses may be worth 3 or 5 credits.

Physical Education 20 (3 or 5 Credits)          Physical Education 30 (3 or 5 Credits)

Prerequisite of Physical Education 10. There is a fee associated with this course to cover off-campus activity costs.

Fitness is fun and good for me. Through activities in the school and community, Phys. Ed 20/30 students will explore what they are capable of and improve their physical abilities. Students will enjoy better fitness and well-being and have a deeper understanding of an improved body image. Communicating with others, they will develop a sense of fair play and exercise their leadership abilities. Students will understand the importance of safe, active living for life; and they’ll set goals and challenge themselves as part of an active, healthy lifestyle.

Career and Life Management (CALM)

CALM                                                                                                                        (3 Credits)       

CALM (3 credits) is a requirement for fulfilling the Alberta Education graduation requirements. The aim of the CALM course is articulated through three general outcomes:

        Personal Choices / Resource Choices /         Career and Life Choices

Handle life CALMly! CALM students  will enhance their ability to make good choices today and in the future. They will examine health holistically: the emotional, intellectual, social, spiritual and physical dimensions. They will learn how to make responsible choices about money and other resources, and they’ll learn that their decisions are based on their values and goals. Your teen will continue to plot out their career path as they plan for life after high school.

Career and Technology Studies (CTS)

CTS engages students in learning opportunities to discover their interests in practical and purposeful ways:

CTS is organized into five clusters: Business, Administration, Finance & Information Technology (BIT), Health, Recreation & Human Services (HRH), Media, Design & Communication Arts (MDC), Natural Resources (NAT), and Trades, Manufacturing & Transportation (TMT). For the 2019-2020 school year St. Michael’s School is offering the following choices:

HCS3000 Workplace Safety Systems                                                                        (1 Credit)       

Students gain the attitudes, knowledge and skills related to workplace health and safety and examine relevant legislation required in the workplace. This course is also a prerequisite course for all off-campus learning experiences.

Legal Studies (HRH)                                                                                                  (3 Credits)       

Health, Recreation & Human Services (HRH)

The focus of the HRH cluster is for students to develop and apply important knowledge, skills and attitudes so they can provide care and services for individuals and groups in a variety of industries, such as health care, recreation, cosmetology, the food industry and the legal system.

Legal Studies students become familiar with the influence, impact and complexities of the law in daily life.

Environmental Science (NAT)                                                                                     (3 Credits)       

Natural Resources (NAT)

The focus of the NAT cluster is for students to develop and apply the knowledge, skills and attitudes to work individually and collectively, as private citizens and as members of the workforce, toward the conservation and responsible use of energy and natural resources. NAT focuses on conservation and the sustainable use of natural resources. In this cluster, learners develop the motivation and commitment to work individually and collectively as private citizens and members of the workforce toward the conservation and responsible use of air, energy, forests, land, minerals, water and wildlife.

Environmental Science students examine the management and conservation of the environment and propose actions that foster the sustainable development and use of resources.

Fitness (HRH)                                                                                                             (3 Credits)       

Health, Recreation & Human Services (HRH)

The focus of the HRH cluster is for students to develop and apply important knowledge, skills and attitudes so they can provide care and services for individuals and groups in a variety of industries, such as health care, recreation, cosmetology, the food industry and the legal system. 

Fitness Students will develop skills useful for coaching, fitness leadership, sport performance, athletic therapy and leading recreational activities.

Livingstone Range Partnership with Matthew Halton School        )       

Our ongoing partnership with Matthew Halton School allows St. Michael’s students to access courses in the Trades, Manufacturing & Transportation (TMT) cluster. Availability is limited and is subject to approval by school administration and course availability.

Trades, Manufacturing & Transportation (TMT)

The focus of the TMT cluster is for students to develop and apply important knowledge, skills and attitudes relative to the manufacture and assembly of products from individual components and the processing of raw materials into products. This cluster includes courses that relate to manufacturing, processing, utilities, construction, mechanics, fabrication, trades supervision, trades contracting, logistics, transportation and heavy equipment.

Construction – develop skills in the use of tools and materials used in construction processes. Safely transform common wood materials into useful products.

Fabrication – develop skills in the use of tools and materials used in fabrication processes. Safely transform common metals into useful products.

Foods – examine the role of food, looking beyond consumption to production, visual appreciation, nutrition, meal planning, economics and preparation.

Mechanics – inspect, diagnose, repair and service mechanical, electrical and electronic systems and components of cars and light and commercial transport trucks.

Fine Arts

Art 10 (3 Credits)              Art 20 (3 or 5 Credits)           Art 30 (5 Credits)                                                                                                                                 

Art 10 gives students the basics then delves in-depth into two-dimensional media such as drawing, painting and printmaking plus three-dimensional media such as sculpture and ceramics. Skills are built in developing concepts, compositions and techniques.

Art 20 builds sequentially on the conceptual, formal and technical strategies offered in Art 10 with a further emphasis on personal expression, creativity and imagination. Prerequisite of Art 10.

Art 30 focuses on refinement and honing of skills in 2D and 3D media, along with independence in the selection of projects and media. Formal, technical and conceptual goals remain key. Prerequisite of Art 20.

Art students will create art by using a variety of media. Students will develop their artistic, technical and critical skills as they explore visual expression. Students will discover various ways to share their thoughts and ideas with others.

General Music 10 (3 Credits)   General Music 20 (3 or 5 Credits)   General Music 30 (5 Credits)

 Senior high school General Music 10–20–30 is a sequence of courses for students who are interested in a broad spectrum of musical experiences within a nonperformance-based environment but not interested in specializing in choral or instrumental performance. General Music 10, 20 and 30 are offered for 3 or 5 credits. The required component in each of the three levels of General Music 10–20–30 includes two modules: − Theory: Elements and Structures − Music Making.

 The elective component in each course consists of one level of one module, if the student is taking a 3-credit course; and one level of each of the three modules, if the student is taking a 5-credit course. These modules may be selected on the basis of student and teacher interest.

Elective Components  • Composition  • History of Western Music  • Music and Technology  • World Music  • Careers in Music

• Jazz Appreciation  • Popular Music.

Additional Complementary Courses

Psychology (Personal/General/Abnormal)                                                             (3 Credits)       

The objectives of the 3-credit courses in psychology are designed to develop within the student the skills and understandings that make it possible for more effective living in our complex environment. The student’s attention will focus on the scientific approach to understanding human behaviour so that he or she may appreciate more fully the behaviour of self and others.

Personal Psychology 20 students are introduced to the science of psychology as they explore six themes that include: personality, behaviour, intelligence, heredity and environment, the biological influences on behaviour and the understanding of perception.

General Psychology 20 students continue to expand on their knowledge by exploring eight themes that include: the history of psychological schools of thought, principles of learning, how to learn efficiently, the process of thinking, facing frustration and conflict, emotional problems of adolescents, behavioural disorders and their treatment and career opportunities in Psychology. Prerequisite - Personal Psychology 20 is recommended.

Abnormal Psychology 35 provides an overview of abnormal behaviour and conditions that afflict individuals in Canadian society. This course deals with views of abnormality, causal factors, and types of disorders, as well as assessment, prevention and treatment. Students will gain a basic understanding of the major concepts in abnormal psychology and the complicated nature of psychological illness. Prerequisite - General Psychology 20.

Personal Finance (FIN1010) Personal Taxation (FIN2060)Personal Investment Planning(FIN3080)  

Students explore concepts that affect the finances of an individual, including a code of conduct, the economic environment, acquiring and using financial resources and the effects of government legislation.

Students examine the Canadian income tax system through the preparation of a variety of personal income tax returns, completed manually and/or electronically.

Students are introduced to the capital market and the available securities when building a personal investment portfolio. Students research and analyze a variety of securities, including equities, fixed income and mutual funds.

Work Exp. 15            25         35                                                                                                                           

This course sequence is available to students who have completed grade 10. Students are able to earn pay and credits while working off campus. This course is generally scheduled outside of the normal school day. The Off-Campus Coordinator (Mark Boschee), employer, and student collaborate in developing a learning plan for the student. Interested students should make an appointment with Mr. Boschee for enrolment. Work Experience 35 level credits may be used toward fulfilling the 30 level requirements for an Alberta High School Diploma.

Registered Apprenticeship Program (RAP)                                                                                                                          

This program is an opportunity for high school students to complete their high school diploma while also working as an indentured apprentice earning hours towards a Journeyman’s Certificate in one of Alberta’s 50+ trades. Students should make an appointment with Mr. Boschee (the Off-Campus Coordinator) for more information.

Green Certificate Program                                                                                                                    

The Green Certificate Program provides trainees with opportunities to enter a variety of agriculture-related, structured learning pathways as a part of their senior high school program and to earn up to 16 Grade 12 diploma credits and a credential leading to a career in agribusiness. Students learn on the job, under the direction of experienced farm personnel and under the supervision and administration of Alberta Agriculture and Forestry (AF) and Alberta Education. Students should read the Green Certificate Program Guidelines (Green Certificate Program Guidelines) and make an appointment with Mr. Boschee (the Off-Campus Coordinator) for more information. Participants must be at least 15 years of age and in at least Grade 10 to apply. If you are in 4-H, you may want to inform your leader that you are enrolled in Green Certificate so they can register you for the Green Certificate 4-H Project in the fall.

Alberta High School Diploma Requirements

Courses

Minimum Requirements

English

ELA 30-1 or ELA 30-2

Social Studies

SOC 30-1 or SOC 30-2

Mathematics 20 level

Math 20-1, Math 20-2 or Math 20-3

Science 20 level

Science 24, Bio 20/Chem 20 or Physics 20

Physical Education 10

3 credits

Career and Life Management

3 credits

Career & Technology Studies or

Fine Arts or

International Languages or

French Language Arts or

Phys. Ed. 20 / 30 or

Knowledge and Employability (K & E) courses or

Registered Apprenticeship Program (RAP) or

10 credits

30 Level courses in addition to ELA 30 and Soc 30

10 credits

Religious Studies 15, 25 & 35

9 credits

Other Credits

15 minimum

Total

100 minimum

Certificate of High School Achievement

Certificate of High School Achievement Requirements

The requirements indicated in this chart are the minimum requirements for a student to attain a Certificate of High School Achievement. The requirements for entry into post-secondary institutions and workplaces may require additional and/or specific courses.

80 Credits Including the following:

English Language Arts 20-2 or 30-4

Mathematics 10-3 or 20-4

Science 14 or 20-4

Social Studies 10-2 or 20-4

Physical Education 10 (3 credits)

Career and Life Management (CALM) (3 credits)

Religious Studies 15, 25 & 35*

*required to participate in graduation ceremony

5 credits in:

30 level Knowledge & Employability Occupational Course or

Advanced Level 3000 Career and Technology Studies (CTS) course or

30 Level Locally Developed course with an Occupational Focus

 and 5 credits in:

30 Level Knowledge and Employability Workplace Practicum course or

30 Level Work experience Course or

30 Level Green Certificate Course 

or 

30 Level Registered Apprenticeship Program (RAP) Course

Certificate of School Completion

The Certificate of School Completion can be awarded to students with significant cognitive disabilities who meet the qualification criteria listed below. Students must be nominated by the Principal / Associate Principal of the school. The school administrators, in recognizing the spirit of accomplishments of students with significant cognitive delays, will make the decision on awarding this certificate. The following will be taken into consideration:

Qualification Criteria: