CH EN 6353 Fall 2019 Fluid Mechanics

Lectures: MWF 10:45AM-11:35AM in FASB 101

Instructor: Prof. Tony Saad

Office: CME 115

E-mail: tony.saad@chemeng.utah.edu (Use for personal communication/needs)

Phone: 801-585-0344

Office Hours: Fridays from 2:00 - 3:30 PM. Also Announced weekly or by appointment.

Teaching assistant: Mokbel Karam

E-mail: chen6353help@gmail.com (use for all help related questions)

Office Hours: Fridays from 1:00 - 3:00 PM.

Prerequisites: Undergraduate fluid mechanics, Graduate Standing, OR Instructor’s consent.

Catalog description:

Introduction to tensor analysis and derivation of governing partial differential equations. Solution of problems in Newtonian, laminar, incompressible flow. Introduction to potential flow, turbulence, non-Newtonian flow, and compressible flow.

Grading:

Homework: 20%

Midterm exams: 35%

Quizzes: 5%

Project: 10%

Final: 30%

Textbook:

Wilkes, “Fluid Mechanics for Chemical Engineers" 3rd Edition. Prentice Hall, 2018.

Full text available online through the library (Go to the Marriott Library website, search for Wilkes Fluid Mechanics, and follow the link that result from the search).

Reading Assignments:

Suggested reading is noted in class schedule below. *indicates optional readings from other texts.

Other Texts:

The following books are recommended for an alternative/complement to Wilkes (either buy used or use PDFs chapter selections on canvas):

James Fay: Introduction to Fluid Mechanics

Frank M. White: Fluid Mechancis

Munson, Young, and Okishii: Fundamentals of Fluid Mechanics

Bird, Stewart, and Lightfoot, Transport Phenomena

Other Resources

I highly recommend these videos available on YouTube

  1. National Committee on Fluid Mechanics: http://web.mit.edu/hml/ncfmf.html
  2. Iowa Institute of Hydraulic Research: https://www.iihr.uiowa.edu/research/publications-and-media/films-by-hunter-rouse/

Exams:

We will hold two exams in this class.

Midterm Examinations:

We will have two midterm examinations tentatively scheduled for October 4 during the regularly scheduled class period and November 15. The exams will be closed book and closed-notes. I will give you a summary of important equations copied from Wilkes with the exam. You are also allowed to have and use a single letter-size, double-sided, handwritten summary sheet prepared by you.

Final Examination:

The Final Examination will be on Monday, December 9, 2019, 10:30 AM – 12:30 PM in the regularly scheduled classroom. The final will be a comprehensive closed-book, closed-notes examination. During the final, you are allowed to have 2 letter-size, double-sided, hand-written summary sheets prepared by you. I will also give you equations copied from Wilkes with the exam.

Quizzes:

We will have a weekly quiz to test your qualitative understanding of fluid mechanics and what we are learning in class. These will be assigned on Canvas so please bring your laptop/tablet with you to class. If you do not have access to a laptop/tablet please let me know and I can arrange to provide you with a physical copy of the quiz.

Homework:

6-8 assignments. Homework assignments must be typeset using LaTeX, Word, or any other software of your choice. If your typeset reports include graphical illustrations, they may be created using appropriate software or drawn by hand, scanned, and included in the report. All reports (typeset or not) must be turned in electronically, through Canvas.

Late policy:

- 10% penalty, up to 1 d late

- 25% penalty, 1-2 d late

- 50 % penalty, 2-3 d late

- 100% penalty (no credit), 3+ d late

Project:

Groups of 2 to 4 students will select (with instructor’s approval) a problem that cannot be solved analytically and obtain the solution using computational tools. All groups will be required to turn in working code that solves the problem and make a 10 min presentation describing the project and the results. Each group will submit a single report and provide an evaluation of the contribution of the group members to the project. The mandatory components of the project report are: (a) Problem statement and discussion; (b) Problem set up including governing equations, simplifying assumptions and their justification, geometry of the computational domain, and boundary conditions; (c) Description of the method used to solve the problem numerically; (d) Results, discussion, and conclusions; (e) Authorship statement stating which group members were responsible for which parts of the project.

Project Software:

We will use COMSOL (available in the ICC and CADE labs). The software should be used remotely. To create an ICC account, follow this link: https://www.che.utah.edu/undergraduate/forms/icc/.

Course Objectives:

After completing the course, students must be able to:

  1. Specify governing equations and boundary conditions for fluid flow problems.
  2. Simplify the Navier-Stokes equations as applied to a given flow situation as much as is possible without substantial loss of accuracy.
  3. Calculate velocity distributions for simple flows and find forces on solid objects using analytical methods.
  4. Use physical intuition in conjunction with the governing PDEs to obtain analytical solutions that predict the effects of experimental parameters  on laminar flows occurring in practical engineering problems.
  5. Analyze and interpret the results, and reformulate the problem if necessary to find an appropriate solution.
  6. Describe and explain the introductory concepts of turbulent flows, non-Newtonian flows, viscoelastic flows, and computational fluid dynamics.

Academic Ethics:

Refer to the University’s Code of Student Rights and Responsibilities (“Student Code”).

Accommodations:

The University of Utah seeks to provide equal access to its programs, services, and activities for people with disabilities. If you need accommodations for this class, reasonable prior notice needs to be given to the Center for Disability Services, 162 Olpin Union Building, 801-5815020 (V/TDD). The CDS will work with you and the instructor to make arrangements for accommodations. All written information in this course can be made available in an alternative format with prior notification to the Center for Disability Services. Additional information is found in the College Guidelines.

Schedule:

Class #

Day

Date

Topic

Reading

HW

1

Mon

19-Aug

Course Introduction

Wilkes 1, Fay 1, Munson 1, White 1

2

Wed

21-Aug

Review of vector algebra and calculus 1

Wilkes 5.1-5.3, Wilkes Appendix C, Fay 1

3

Fri

23-Aug

Review of vector algebra and calculus 2

4

Mon

26-Aug

Conservation laws, Eulerian/Lagrangian Views, Material derivative, Reynolds transport theorem

Fay 3.1-3.2, Fay 5.2, White 3.1-3.2, Munson 4

HW1 out

5

Wed

28-Aug

Conservation of Mass: Integral form + examples

Fay 3.3, White 3.3, Munson 5.1

6

Fri

30-Aug

Conservation of Mass: Differential form + examples

Wilkes 5.5, Munson 6.2, White 4.2

--

Mon

2-Sep

Labor Day - no class

HW1 due, HW2 out

7

Wed

4-Sep

Linear Momentum Balance: Forces

Fay 2.1-2.2, Fay 5.2

8

Fri

6-Sep

Integral form of momentum balance

Fay 5, White 3.4, Munson 5.2

9

Mon

9-Sep

Differential form of momentum balance

HW2 due, HW3 out

10

Wed

11-Sep

Inviscid Flows 1

11

Fri

13-Sep

Inviscid Flows 2

Wilkes 5.4-5.5

12

Mon

16-Sep

The Viscous Stress tensor 1

HW3 due, HW4 out

13

Wed

18-Sep

The Viscous Stress tensor 2

Wilkes 5.7

14

Fri

20-Sep

Derivation of the Navier-Stokes equations

15

Mon

23-Sep

Navier-Stokes equations example 1

Wilkes 6

HW4 due, HW5 out

16

Wed

25-Sep

Navier-Stokes equations example 2

17

Fri

27-Sep

Navier-Stokes equations example 3

18

Mon

30-Sep

Review for Midterm

HW5 due

19

Wed

2-Oct

Intro to Scaling and Non-Dimensionalization: Falling Ball Example

Cengel 7.1

--

Fri

4-Oct

Exam 1

--

Mon

7-Oct

Fall Break, no class

--

Wed

9-Oct

Fall Break, no class

--

Fri

11-Oct

Fall Break, no class

20

Mon

14-Oct

Exam 1 Solution and discussion

Wilkes 14

21

Wed

16-Oct

Introduction to CFD and Comsol, Intro to Scaling of Equations

Wilkes 13.1-13.2, 14

Proj. Ideas Due

22

Fri

18-Oct

Scaling and Normalization of NS Equations

Cengel 9

23

Mon

21-Oct

Streamfunction, Stokes' Flow around Sphere

Wilkes 4.10

HW7 out

24

Wed

23-Oct

Finish Stokes' flow around a sphere

25

Fri

25-Oct

Vorticity formulation of the N-S equations

26

Mon

28-Oct

Velocity potential and irrotational flows

Wilkes 7.1-7.8

HW7 due, HW8 out

27

Wed

30-Oct

Examples of irrotational flows

28

Fri

1-Nov

Irrotational flows: building blocks

29

Mon

4-Nov

Irrotational flows: building blocks

30

Wed

6-Nov

Superposition of irrotational flows + python demo

31

Fri

8-Nov

Superposition of irrotational flows + python demo

32

Mon

11-Nov

Introduction to boundary layer thoeory

33

Wed

13-Nov

Blasius' solution of boundary layer on a flat plate

34

Fri

15-Nov

Displacement thickness, momentum thickness, turbulent boundary layers, separation

35

Mon

18-Nov

Introduction to Turbulence

36

Wed

20-Nov

RANS models of turbulent momentum transport

37

Fri

22-Nov

Exam 2

38

Mon

25-Nov

Computational Fluid Dynamics 1

39

Wed

27-Nov

No class - department luncheon

--

Fri

29-Nov

No class - Day after thanksgiving

41

Mon

2-Dec

Project presentations

42

Wed

4-Dec

Course Wrap-up

43

Fri

6-Dec

Review Session

--

Mon

9-Dec

Final exam, in normal classroom