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ChEN6353 Syllabus 2021
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CH EN 6353 - Fluid Mechanics
Fall 2021

Lectures: MWF 10:45AM-11:35AM in WEB 1248

Instructor: Prof. Tony Saad

Office: MEB 2286

E-mail: Via Canvas

Phone: 801-585-0344

Office Hours: Mondays from 2:00 - 3:30 PM. Also Announced weekly or by appointment. Office hours may be conducted over zoom as needed and if necessary.

Teaching assistant: Hayden Hedworth

E-mail: Via Canvas

Office Hours: MWF 11:45 - 12:30 PM INSCC third floor conference room (Rm 345). Please come prepared with clear questions. Time limits are set for students seeking help so as to make sure everyone can get a chance to discuss their questions.

Prerequisites: Undergraduate fluid mechanics, Graduate Standing, OR Instructor’s consent.

Catalog description: Introduction to tensor analysis and derivation of governing partial differential equations. Solution of problems in Newtonian, laminar, incompressible flow. Introduction to potential flow, turbulence, non-Newtonian flow, and compressible flow.

COVID-19 and our safety

This is an in-person class. If you are feeling ill for any reason you are strongly advised to stay home and watch the recorded lecture. If you have not been vaccinated for COVID19, you are strongly advised to do so. The CDC also encourages you to wear a mask (https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/vaccines/fully-vaccinated-guidance.html).

Self-reporting

Report classroom exposures to the Contact Tracing Team by:

• Using the coronavirus.utah.edu website, or

• Calling the hotline – 801-213-2874

If exposed, you can help by watching for a call or text from the contact tracing team and responding quickly.

You are also advised to do FREE weekly asymptomatic testing:

https://alert.utah.edu/covid/testing/ (Links to an external site.)

You can follow University of Utah Covid Updates here: https://coronavirus.utah.edu/

University leaders have sent a campus-wide statement  calling on the campus community to take specific actions as coronavirus transmission rates rise in the Salt Lake Valley. Read that message here (Links to an external site.).

Those actions include:

Lectures

There are two sets of recorded lectures for this course: current and permanent.

The permanent lecture set consists of high quality lectures with detailed derivations of the “individual” topic covered in class. Those are sort of “frozen in time” and you should refer to those primarily as you prepare for class or review.

The current lectures constitute the currently recorded lectures in class.

Permanent lectures: https://youtube.com/playlist?list=PLEaLl6Sf-KIA1PBwcsRSVglFGpdI5K7GR

Current Lectures: https://youtube.com/playlist?list=PLEaLl6Sf-KIDik59E2e0e6asxSVkI6Ty-

Grading

Homework: 20%

Midterm exams (2): 35%

Quizzes: 5%

Project: 10%

Final Exam: 30%

Grades will be assigned on the following scale, normalized to the highest student in the class (who, by definition, is 100%):

92< A ≤ 100,   89 < A- ≤ 92

86 < B+ ≤ 89,   81 < B ≤ 86,   78 < B- ≤ 81

75 < C+ ≤ 78,   70 < C ≤ 75,   67 < C- ≤ 70

64 < D+ ≤ 67,   59 < D ≤ 64,   56 < D- ≤ 59

E ≤ 56

I reserve the right to adjust this scale downward if I deem it necessary. Note: I do not curve grades in this course. It is theoretically possible for everyone in the class to get an A (or an F). Your performance depends only on how you do, not on how everyone else in the class does. It is therefore in your best interests to (1) do well on your own, and (2) help your classmates within the limits of the academic integrity policy. I also reserve the right to adjust (boost) your final grade in a way that reflects your participation in class, progress throughout the course, creativity in answering questions, etc...

Textbook

Wilkes, “Fluid Mechanics for Chemical Engineers" 3rd Edition. Prentice Hall, 2018.

Full text available online through the library (Go to the Marriott Library website, search for Wilkes Fluid Mechanics, and follow the link that result from the search).

Reading Assignments

Suggested reading is noted in class schedule below. *indicates optional readings from other texts.

Other Texts

The following books are recommended for an alternative/complement to Wilkes (either buy used or use PDFs chapter selections on canvas):

James Fay: Introduction to Fluid Mechanics

Frank M. White: Fluid Mechancis

Munson, Young, and Okishii: Fundamentals of Fluid Mechanics

Bird, Stewart, and Lightfoot, Transport Phenomena

Other Resources

I highly recommend these videos available on YouTube

  1. National Committee on Fluid Mechanics: http://web.mit.edu/hml/ncfmf.html
  2. Iowa Institute of Hydraulic Research: https://www.iihr.uiowa.edu/research/publications-and-media/films-by-hunter-rouse/

Exams

We will hold three exams in this class, two midterms and one final.

Midterm Examinations

We will have two midterm examinations tentatively scheduled for October 4 during the regularly scheduled class period and November 15. The exams will be closed book and closed-notes. I will give you a summary of important equations copied from Wilkes with the exam. You are also allowed to have and use a single letter-size, double-sided, handwritten summary sheet prepared by you.

Final Examination

The Final Examination will be on Wednesday, December 15, 2021, 10:30 AM – 12:30 PM in the regularly scheduled classroom. The final will be a comprehensive closed-book, closed-notes examination. During the final, you are allowed to have 2 letter-size, double-sided, hand-written summary sheets prepared by you. I will also give you equations copied from Wilkes with the exam.

Quizzes

We will have regular quizzes to test your qualitative understanding of fluid mechanics and what we are learning in class. These will be assigned on Canvas so please bring your laptop/tablet with you to class. If you do not have access to a laptop/tablet please let me know and I can arrange to provide you with a physical copy of the quiz.

Homework

6-8 assignments. Homework assignments can be either typeset using LaTeX, Word, or any other software of your choice or handwritten. If your typeset reports include graphical illustrations, they may be created using appropriate software or drawn by hand, scanned, and included in the report. All reports (typeset or not) must be turned in electronically, through Canvas. If your assignment is handwritten, the writing must be readable and clear. Homeworks are assigned on Mondays and are due Monday a week later at midnight. Submissions after the deadline will cause a 25% daily penalty. NO EXCEPTIONS. Those with formal CDS forms are provided extensions as needed and no more than three days. If you need to request an extension due to extenuating circumstances, you must discuss this with me immediately and no later than 3 days after the homework is assigned. You are allowed up to two courtesy extensions in total.

Assignments will receive some partial credit (see below). Homework will be graded if you get the answer correct. Questions will rarely depend on the result from a previous question or they will be framed in such a way that you can assume that you have the result.

Late policy

- 25% penalty, up to 1 d late

- 50% penalty, 1-2 d late

- 75 % penalty, 2-3 d late

- 100% penalty (no credit), 3+ d late

Contesting your grade

You have three days from the date that your homework or exam grade is released to contest your grade. You must open a case by sending an email to me and the TAs via canvas and provide sufficient and adequate documentation as to why you are contesting your grade.

Partial Credit

Homework assignments will receive some partial credit according to the following policy:

For exams, adequate partial credit will be given if the exam is of the handwritten type. For online exams, NO partial credit will be given on all online-type exams - instead, online-type exams will consist of many low-stakes questions and you will be allowed multiple attempts.

Project

Groups of 2 to 4 students will select (with instructor’s approval) a problem that cannot be solved analytically and obtain the solution using computational tools. All groups will be required to turn in working code that solves the problem and make a 10 min presentation describing the project and the results. Each group will submit a single report and provide an evaluation of the contribution of the group members to the project. The mandatory components of the project report are: (a) Problem statement and discussion; (b) Problem set up including governing equations, simplifying assumptions and their justification, geometry of the computational domain, and boundary conditions; (c) Description of the method used to solve the problem numerically; (d) Results, discussion, and conclusions; (e) Authorship statement stating which group members were responsible for which parts of the project.

Project Software

We will use COMSOL (available in the ICC and CADE labs). The software should be used remotely. To create an ICC account, follow this link: https://www.che.utah.edu/undergraduate/forms/icc/.

Course Objectives

After completing the course, students must be able to:

  1. Specify governing equations and boundary conditions for fluid flow problems.
  2. Simplify the Navier-Stokes equations as applied to a given flow situation as much as is possible without substantial loss of accuracy.
  3. Calculate velocity distributions for simple flows and find forces on solid objects using analytical methods.
  4. Use physical intuition in conjunction with the governing PDEs to obtain analytical solutions that predict the effects of experimental parameters on laminar flows occurring in practical engineering problems.
  5. Analyze and interpret the results, and reformulate the problem if necessary to find an appropriate solution.
  6. Describe and explain the introductory concepts of turbulent flows, non-Newtonian flows, viscoelastic flows, and computational fluid dynamics.

Addressing Sexual Misconduct

Title IX makes it clear that violence and harassment based on sex and gender (which includes sexual orientation and gender identity/expression) is a Civil Rights offense subject to the same kinds of accountability and the same kinds of support applied to offenses against other protected categories such as race, national origin, color, religion, age, status as a person with a disability, veteran’s status or genetic information. If you or someone you know has been harassed or assaulted, you are encouraged to report it to the Title IX Coordinator in the Office of Equal Opportunity and Affirmative Action, 135 Park Building, 801-581-8365, or the Office of the Dean of Students, 270 Union Building, 801-581-7066. For support and confidential consultation, contact the Center for Student Wellness, 426 SSB, 801-581-7776. To report to the police, contact the Department of Public Safety, 801-585-2677(COPS).

Academic Misconduct

All instances of academic misconduct will be handled in accordance with the Student Code (http://regulations.utah.edu/academics/6-400.php).

Academic Ethics

Refer to the University’s Code of Student Rights and Responsibilities (“Student Code”).

Accommodations, Students with Disabilities (ADA)

The University of Utah seeks to provide equal access to its programs, services, and activities for people with disabilities. If you need accommodations for this class, reasonable prior notice needs to be given to the Center for Disability Services, 162 Olpin Union Building, 801-581-5020 (V/TDD). The CDS will work with you and the instructor to make arrangements for accommodations. All written information in this course can be made available in an alternative format with prior notification to the Center for Disability Services. Additional information is found in the College Guidelines.

Tentative Schedule

Class #

Day

Date

Topic

Reading

HW

1

Mon

23-Aug

Course Introduction

Wilkes 1, Fay 1, Munson 1, White 1

2

Wed

25-Aug

Review of vector algebra and calculus 1

Wilkes 5.1-5.3, Wilkes Appendix C, Fay 1

3

Fri

27-Aug

Review of vector algebra and calculus 2

4

Mon

30-Aug

Conservation laws, Eulerian/Lagrangian Views, Material derivative, Reynolds transport theorem

Fay 3.1-3.2, Fay 5.2, White 3.1-3.2, Munson 4

HW1 out

5

Wed

1-Sep

Conservation of Mass: Integral form + examples

Fay 3.3, White 3.3, Munson 5.1

6

Fri

3-Sep

Conservation of Mass: Differential form + examples

Wilkes 5.5, Munson 6.2, White 4.2

--

Mon

6-Sep

Labor Day - no class

HW1 due, HW2 out

7

Wed

8-Sep

Linear Momentum Balance: Forces

Fay 2.1-2.2, Fay 5.2

8

Fri

10-Sep

Integral form of momentum balance

Fay 5, White 3.4, Munson 5.2

9

Mon

13-Sep

Differential form of momentum balance

HW2 due, HW3 out

10

Wed

15-Sep

Inviscid Flows 1

11

Fri

17-Sep

Inviscid Flows 2

Wilkes 5.4-5.5

12

Mon

20-Sep

The Viscous Stress tensor 1

HW3 due, HW4 out

13

Wed

22-Sep

The Viscous Stress tensor 2

Wilkes 5.7

14

Fri

24-Sep

Derivation of the Navier-Stokes equations

15

Mon

27-Sep

Navier-Stokes equations example 1

Wilkes 6

HW4 due, HW5 out

16

Wed

29-Sep

Navier-Stokes equations example 2

17

Fri

1-Oct

Navier-Stokes equations example 3

18

Mon

4-Oct

Review for Midterm

HW5 due

19

Wed

6-Oct

Intro to Scaling and Non-Dimensionalization: Falling Ball Example

Cengel 7.1

20

Fri

8-Oct

Exam 1

--

Mon

11-Oct

Fall Break, no class

--

Wed

13-Oct

Fall Break, no class

--

Fri

15-Oct

Fall Break, no class

21

Mon

18-Oct

Exam 1 Solution and discussion

Wilkes 14

22

Wed

20-Oct

Introduction to CFD and Comsol, Intro to Scaling of Equations

Wilkes 13.1-13.2, 14

Proj. Ideas Due

23

Fri

22-Oct

Scaling and Normalization of NS Equations

Cengel 9

24

Mon

25-Oct

Streamfunction, Stokes' Flow around Sphere

Wilkes 4.10

HW7 out

25

Wed

27-Oct

Finish Stokes' flow around a sphere

26

Fri

29-Oct

Vorticity formulation of the N-S equations

27

Mon

1-Nov

Velocity potential and irrotational flows

Wilkes 7.1-7.8

HW7 due

28

Wed

3-Nov

Examples of irrotational flows

Munson

29

Fri

5-Nov

Irrotational flows: building blocks

30

Mon

8-Nov

Irrotational flows: building blocks

HW8 out

31

Wed

10-Nov

Superposition of irrotational flows + python demo

32

Fri

12-Nov

Superposition of irrotational flows + python demo

33

Mon

15-Nov

Introduction to boundary layer theory

Cimbala 10.8

HW8 due

34

Wed

17-Nov

Blasius' solution of boundary layer on a flat plate

HW9 out

35

Fri

19-Nov

Displacement thickness, momentum thickness, turbulent boundary layers, separation

36

Mon

22-Nov

Introduction to Turbulence

37

Wed

24-Nov

Exam 2

HW9 due

--

Fri

26-Nov

Thanksgiving break - No Class

38

Mon

29-Nov

RANS models of turbulent momentum transport

39

Wed

1-Dec

Computational Fluid Dynamics

40

Fri

3-Dec

No class - department luncheon

41

Mon

6-Dec

Project presentations

42

Wed

8-Dec

Course Wrap-up

43

Fri

10-Dec

Review Session

Wed

15-Dec

Final exam, 10:30 AM - 12:30 PM (in class)