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ZBTHS Course Guide 23-24
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Zion-Benton Township High School COURSE GUIDE

2023 - 2024


 TABLE OF CONTENTS

ZION-BENTON TOWNSHIP HIGH SCHOOL        4

INTRODUCTION        5

Graduation Requirements        6

Important Information Regarding Graduation Requirements        6

Class Load        6

College/Post-Secondary School Admission Guidelines        7

NCAA Requirements        7

Early Graduation        7

Pass/Fail Course Options        7

Second Grade Option        8

Schedule Changes        8

Physical Education        8

The Advisory Program        9

Alternative to High School Attendance: College Credits During Senior Year        9

Accelerated Placement Policy        9

Dual Credit at ZBTHS and the College of Lake County        10

Advanced Placement Program        10

Lake County Tech Campus        10

Summer School        11

Credit Recovery        11

Special Services        11

Special Education        12

Fees        12

Title IX Compliance        12

Sample Four-Year High School Plan        13

Honors Recognition        14

COURSE OFFERINGS        15

BILINGUAL EDUCATION        15

CAREER AND TECHNICAL EDUCATION        19

DRIVER EDUCATION        27

ENGLISH AND READING        28

HEALTH AND PHYSICAL EDUCATION        33

MATHEMATICS        37

NAVAL JUNIOR RESERVE OFFICER TRAINING CORP (NJROTC)        41

SCIENCE        42

SOCIAL SCIENCE        46

SPECIAL EDUCATION        50

VISUAL AND PERFORMING ARTS        56

WORLD LANGUAGE        63

LAKE COUNTY TECH CAMPUS        68

CAREER CLUSTERS        74

Agriculture, Food & Natural Resources        75

Architecture & Construction        76

Arts, Audio Visual Technology & Communication        77

Business, Management, Marketing & Finance        78

Education & Training        79

Health Science        80

Hospitality        81

Human Services        82

Information Technology        83

Law & Public Safety        84

Manufacturing        85

Science, Technology, Engineering & Mathematics        86

Service Technologies        87

PURPOSE

The purpose of the Course Guide is to provide information important for choosing an appropriate course sequence and selecting courses needed to achieve educational and career goals.

ZION-BENTON TOWNSHIP HIGH SCHOOL

Vision: Empower students to thrive in today’s global society

Core Beliefs

Guiding Principles

Mission: To promote self-worth, social responsibility and life-long learning in partnership with our community

INTRODUCTION

A NOTE ABOUT COURSE OFFERINGS

Classes at Zion-Benton Township High School are offered among various departments  While each class presents students with unique content, all are intended to produce high school graduates with the skills necessary for success in college and a professional career.  

English, Mathematics, Science, and Social Science classes are also presented in multiple levels, which incorporate varying degrees of complexity and sophistication.  A student’s initial placement is primarily determined based on an analysis of multiple measures from eighth grade. Classes focus on mastery of the skills necessary for rigorous academic work.   Honors level classes challenge students to apply advanced skills toward increasingly intricate tasks.  Regardless of their level, all students in a course will encounter the same content. This commitment to a common curriculum allows high-achieving freshmen to transition to more demanding levels in later years without encountering gaps in their content knowledge.

Education is a collaborative effort involving the contributions of students, families, teachers, support staff, administrators, and the community as a whole.  It is our hope that the selection of courses will be a process in which attention is given to each student’s academic potential and plans for the future. Throughout their time at ZBTHS, students will play an increasingly important role in selecting their courses of study; the awareness that decisions in high school have enduring consequences is a powerful lesson for adolescents.  Student placement is a vital process in the implementation of Zion-Benton Township High School’s mission:

“To promote self-worth, social responsibility, and lifelong learning in partnership with our community.”

Superintendent                                                               ZBTHS Department Heads

Dr. Jesse Rodriguez                                                                Mr. Michael Blades

Executive Director of Student Services                                        Dr. Jasey Kolarik

Mr. Jacob Carlson                                                                Ms. Jennifer Lang

Executive Director of Special Services                                        Dr. Nicole Stommel

Dr. Susan Barker                                                                Mr. Andrew Stout

Exec. Dir. of Leadership Support & Strategic Planning                         Ms. Emily Waddick

Dr. Chris Pawelczyk                                                                Mr. Michael Wollney

Exec. Dir. of Academic Excellence

Ms. Michelle Hassan

Principal                                                         

Mr. Zackary Livingston

Assistant Principal                                 

Dr. Joaquin Stephenson


Graduation Requirements

To be eligible for a diploma from this high school, a student must have completed eight semesters of high

school attendance with the final semester as a full-time student at Zion-Benton Township High School.

Curriculum Area

Carnegie Units Required

 2024

Carnegie Units Required

2025, 2026 & 2027

English

4.00

4.0

Mathematics

3.00

3.00

Science

(1 year of a lab science)

2.50

3.00

Social Science

(1 year of U.S. History,

1 semester of Government)

3.00

3.00

Physical Education

3.00

3.00

Health

0.50

0.50

Personal Finance

(Consumer Education)

0.50

0.50

Electives

4.00

4.50

Senior Year Core Electives

1.00

1.00

Total Required Credits

21.5

22.5

Definition of a Carnegie Unit:

A unit of credit is given for a successfully completed 36-week full-credit course or two 18-week courses meeting one period each day, five days weekly.  Summer School and Before/After School credit recovery courses earn a semester of credit of 0.50 except for Driver Education, which is 0.25 credit.                

Important Information Regarding Graduation Requirements

  1. Students must pass the Constitution test to be eligible for graduation. This test will be offered in the senior year Government course.
  2. If a student fails a course required for graduation, he/she must make up that credit through one of the following options:   a) Before or After School        b.)Summer School        c).Correspondence Courses
  3. A pass/fail option is available for some courses.  Students should see their counselor if they wish to explore this avenue.
  4. The PE requirement can be met by enrolling in NJROTC or Marching Band or by participating in Grades 10, 11, or 12 athletics.  See your counselor for details.  If an exemption is granted, the course must be replaced with another credit.
  5. Consumer Education is a state requirement that is fulfilled by Personal Finance. There are other options that can take the place of the Personal Finance/Consumer Ed requirement.  (AP Econ, Business INCubator, Instr. Life Management or Instr.  Consumer Math must pass both semesters)  

Class Load

For all four years all students must request a schedule of six courses including Physical Education. A study hall can be added to a student's schedule. Music and NJROTC courses may be taken as either part of the normal load or as an extra subject.

Students must obtain special permission to carry less than the normal number of subjects.  Students electing two or more Advanced Placement courses are encouraged to carry only four academic courses.  It is suggested they have at least one scheduled study hall.

Students may petition to carry an additional course(s). Enrollment will be granted on a space available basis only.

College/Post-Secondary School Admission Guidelines

These guidelines provide direction in planning for college and/or post high school instruction and career decisions.  Students must select courses and electives that will help them meet the entrance requirements of the college or post-secondary school of their choice.  Not all schools and colleges have the same admissions requirements.  Parents, counselors, and advisors must work jointly with students to help them choose the proper courses to achieve their desired goals for entrance to the institution of their choice and their career objectives.

Colleges generally have the following admission requirements:

English: 4 years

Mathematics: 3-4 years

Science: 3 years

Social Science: 3 years

World Language: 2 years

However, it is important to consult the college/university you plan to attend for requirements specific to that institution.  Please see the College Counselor at ZBTHS with any questions or concerns regarding admission guidelines.

NCAA Requirements

Students who plan to practice and play their freshman year at an NCAA Division I or Division II College must satisfy the requirements of NCAA Bylaw 14.3, commonly known as Proposition 48. Courses approved by the NCAA are noted in the course number. Some courses within our school curriculum, credit recovery, and correspondence may not satisfy NCAA requirements.  For additional information, please see the College Counselor or the Athletic Director.

Early Graduation

Due to senior core elective requirements, students may choose to graduate after seven semesters. Students must meet the following conditions:

  1. Make an application to the appropriate counselor for approval of a plan to complete high school in this manner. This must be done prior to the end of the junior year.  This plan requires written parental permission unless the student is eighteen years old.  The Executive Director of Student Services makes the final decision.
  2. Pass all required subjects.
  3. Earn sufficient credits in summer courses and/or by carrying extra full-credit subjects during regular semesters to meet minimum graduation requirements.

Pass/Fail Course Options

In order to encourage students to explore areas of interest that might otherwise be avoided, a pass-fail course option is offered. The pass-fail option is not available for advanced placement courses and all required courses.

Pass-fail options generally benefit those students who fear a low grade might affect their rank-in-class, those who are apprehensive about taking a very difficult subject, and those whose fears about grades interfere with their ability to learn.

Pass-fail options available:

1. Physical Education.

2. One elective course per semester.

Rules and guidelines for the pass-fail option:

a. Pass-fail courses are considered as a part of the normal academic class load.

b. All course prerequisites remain in force.

c. Parental consent forms are required for any pass-fail course request.  No changes will be permitted once the pass-fail option is approved and the course begins.

d. Students taking a pass-fail option will be subject to the same grading standards as any other student in the class.  A student must earn a passing grade in order to receive a "P." The teacher will keep a regular grade record, but will report the Progress Report and semester grades as a "P" or "NC" (no credit).

e. Pass-fail subjects will count for credit toward graduation, but will not be used in computing grade point average or rank-in-class.

  1. The student must declare in writing to the teacher the pass-fail course option within the first six weeks of the semester.

Students are cautioned to find out in advance if pass-fail courses will be acceptable to the specific college or university they plan to enter. Pass-fail applications are available from a student's counselor. Counselors should be consulted before a pass-fail request is made.

Second Grade Option

Students may repeat courses at ZBTHS to improve a grade.

a. This option may be used only once per course.

b. Students may not repeat courses at other institutions and transfer the grade to Zion-Benton Township High School.

c. This option may be used only if the first grade was a "C" or “D”.

d. Pass-Fail courses cannot be repeated for a grade.

e. This provision may apply to a maximum of two (2) units of credit per student.

Schedule Changes

Students must take responsibility with their parents and counselor for the registration and scheduling process. It is not easy to change schedules once registration is completed. Courses selected during the spring registration process may not be changed after the confirmation deadline in May unless a compelling reason exists and only if there is room in the course.

Schedule changes may be made for one of the following reasons:

a. Students failed a required course needed for graduation.

b. Course completed by attending Summer or Alternative School.

c. Data error in a student's schedule requiring a change.

School Administrators may request schedule changes to be made at any time for one of the following reasons:

a. To balance class enrollments, student disciplinary problems and other.

b. Placement in Special Education (Instructional and TAB) or Bilingual Education.

Physical Education

Students may request exemption from physical education for the following reasons:

a. A student in grades 10, 11, or 12 who is participating in athletics may request an exemption.  Grade 10 exemptions will be considered on a case by case basis.

b. A student enrolled in Marching Band may request an exemption for the fall semester each year.

c. A student enrolled in Naval Science (NJROTC) may request an exemption.

d. The student provides written evidence from an institution of higher education that a specific course not included in existing state or local school minimum graduation standards is required for admission.  School district staff must verify that the student's present and proposed schedule will not permit completion of the needed course.

e. The student lacks sufficient course credit or one or more courses required by state statute or local school board policies for graduation.  Students who have failed required courses, transferred into the district with deficient credits, or who lack credits due to other causes will be eligible to apply for this exemption.

Parents who desire that their student be excused from physical education for religious reasons must request special permission from the Executive Director of Student Services.

Each request for exemption from physical education instruction is to be verified and eligibility determined on a case-by-case basis by school district staff.  Every student excused from physical education course requirements will be provided with a schedule that meets minimum school day requirements and other policies of the district.  No credit is issued for P.E. exemptions.

Approvals of exemptions will be for one semester only but may be renewed for additional semesters if circumstances warrant.  Please see graduation requirement on page five for additional information on graduation credit requirements.

MEDICAL EXCUSES FROM P.E.

a.        A parent may request in writing for their son/daughter to be excused from P.E. up to three days.

b.        Students who need to be excused from P.E. longer than three days must have an excuse from the doctor.

c.        Students who are excused from P.E. for more than nine weeks by a physician will be medically excused.  Credit for P.E. will not be given, and the student will not have to make up that semester of P.E.

The Advisory Program

Advisory is a “small school within a large school” that provides the more intimate relationship of a small school community during the four years of high school.  The advisory system strives to provide each student with an advisor/advocate in order to nurture, inform, protect, and promote each advisee’s best interest and well-being.  At the heart of the system is the relationship between advisor and advisee—where students have a person who knows them, cares about them, assists them, and will support each student’s academic and social-emotional growth. The advisor, a certified teacher, is paired with approximately 30 students, and they meet each school day for 21 minutes during an “advisory period.”  Advisors serve several important functions for their advisees. These include being a mentor, acting as a coach, and serving as an advocate.

Alternative to High School Attendance: College Credits During Senior Year

Students may elect to substitute college attendance for their regular senior term or second semester of their regular senior term under the following conditions:

a.        Make an application to the Executive Director of Student Services for approval of a plan to complete high school in this manner not later than the first semester of the junior year in high school.

b.        Have and maintain a B (3.0) grade average based on all full-credit subjects completed.

c.        Have passed all required subjects or agree to take in a post-high school institution (college) the same required subjects or acceptable college equivalents for any required senior subjects unless taken by special permission in prior years of summer terms.

d.        Have written parental permission, unless eighteen (18) years old.

e.        Present evidence of completion of at least 12 semester hours of post-high school credit for each semester of high school missed.

f.        The Zion-Benton Township High School diploma will be issued after the student has completed the requirements noted in A to E of this section.

Accelerated Placement Policy

Participation in the District’s accelerated programming--its Honors, Advanced Placement, and Dual Credit courses are  open to all students who may benefit from accelerated placement. In order to challenge each and every student to his or her fullest potential, the District uses multiple valid, reliable student performance measures to provide recommendations for placement, including, but not limited to, grades, standardized assessment data, faculty recommendations, learning mindset indicators, and student and parent requests.    Additionally Article 1A of the ISBE School code specifies, the district will allow for the automatic enrollment into the next rigorous level of advanced coursework if the student meets or exceeds state standards in ELA, Mathematics, or science on a state assessment.

Recommendations for student enrollment in the District’s Honors, Advanced Placement, and Dual Credit courses are based on the aforementioned criteria developed by the District or by the specific criteria developed by the governing body of the course (e.g., the College of Lake County for Dual Credit courses) and occur during the spring of each school year.  However, because the District monitors student progress on a continuous basis, students, parents, counselors, and teachers may request changes in placement during the school year.  Prior to a student’s removal from or addition to an accelerated course, parents and students are notified of the proposed change by their teacher and/or counselor and engaged in the decision-making process prior to any course change.  

Dual Credit at ZBTHS and the College of Lake County

Juniors and seniors who meet the College of Lake County’s eligibility requirements may receive dual credit for qualifying elective courses during their junior and senior years. All electives that are eligible for dual credit with the College of Lake County (CLC) will be aligned to rigorous expectations and outcomes as designated by CLC. The Executive Director of Student Services must be consulted for eligibility, possible restrictions affecting grade point average, and athletic eligibility. Students are cautioned that some colleges will not accept courses under dual credit. Information regarding dual enrollment procedures will be provided to all juniors and seniors in time for students and parents to follow the required procedures to gain CLC approval. Completion of enrollment procedures with CLC and any payment of associated fees are the responsibility of the student and his/her parent. Students may transfer in CLC credits taken at CLC up to the number of elective credits needed for graduation. Permission must be obtained from the Executive Director of Student Services prior to taking the course(s).  Students must maintain a cumulative 2.0 GPA at the conclusion of the semester preceding enrollment in the dual credit course(s) to qualify for dual credit courses. Administrative approval may be granted under special circumstances. Students who satisfy the completion of the course requirements with a grade of C or better will be awarded college credit through CLC as noted within the course description.  As well, all students who pass this course with a D or better will receive .5 credit on their high school transcript and be awarded the appropriate high school grade weighting associated with their final grade.  Students are cautioned by CLC that they need to maintain a “C” in their dual credit course to avoid negative impact when securing financial aid for college.  Dual credit offerings are determined annually with CLC and subject to instructor availability.

Advanced Placement Program

The Advanced Placement (AP) Program is a curriculum sponsored by the College Board which offers standardized courses to high school students that are generally recognized to be equivalent to undergraduate courses in college. Therefore, all students planning to attend a college or university should consider taking AP courses while in high school. Participating colleges grant credit to students who obtained high enough scores on the exams to qualify. Zion-Benton Township High School offers 21 AP courses each year. Placement in AP courses is determined by PSAT scores, previous academic success in the corresponding subject area, and/or teacher recommendation. AP courses and grade weighted courses are listed on page eleven. The expectation for students enrolled in AP courses is to take the culminating AP exam at no cost, performing to the best of their abilities at the conclusion of the course. Exceptions must be approved by the administration.

Lake County Tech Campus 

ZBTHS offers juniors or seniors the opportunity to enroll in occupationally oriented programs at the Lake County Tech Campus (LCTC) in Grayslake.  All programs are two-year programs; however, students may take only the first year of the sequence if they desire. There are no tuition costs to the student for LCTC. Some programs will require the purchase of tools.

The Tech Campus is located next to the campus of the College of Lake County in Grayslake. The Tech Campus offers excellent educational opportunities to students who wish to obtain specialized vocational-technical skills. Students taking courses at the Tech Campus will divide their school day between the home school and the Tech Campus. Students will not be permitted to drive their own cars. Credits earned at the Tech Campus apply to graduation credits. The district will provide bus transportation to the Tech Campus for programs during the school day. Students attending the 3rd session are required to provide their own transportation home from the campus at the end of the day or take the late bus. Students interested in programs at the Tech Campus must request special application forms from their advisor/counselor. Once accepted for placement in a Tech Campus program, the student must remain enrolled for a minimum of one semester.

Note: Students withdrawing from the Tech Campus program before the July cut-off deadline will be charged $50. Students withdrawing without valid cause after the August cut-off will be assessed a $500 charge due to the District’s liability to pay the full-year tuition cost.

COURSES OFFERED AT LAKE COUNTY TECH CAMPUS

 

Human Services Programs

Manufacturing/Industrial Programs

Biomedical Science

Computer Integrated Manufacturing & Civil Engineering and Architecture

Certified Nurse Assisting

Computer Support Services

Cosmetology

Construction Skills & Management

Criminal Justice

Engineering Technology

Culinary Arts

Laser Technology

Early Education and Teaching

Machining Technology

Emergency Medical Services

Robotics and Automation

Firefighting

Welding & Fabrication

Law Enforcement and Crime Scene Investigation

Medical Assisting

Transportation Programs

Automotive Collision Repair

Automotive Service

 

         

Summer School

The high school conducts summer sessions, in which students may take a maximum of one unit of credit to make up courses missed or failed.  A separate bulletin describing the summer term is published in April.  Students will be required to attend a minimum number of classroom hours to earn credit.

Credit Recovery

Zion-Benton Township High School District 126 offers credit recovery course options (similar to summer school) each semester before and after school based on sufficient enrollment. Students may enroll to make up courses missed or failed. Course offerings and additional information are available in Student Services.

Special Services

A wide range of special services is available to those students who have demonstrated the need for eligibility. These services include: Homebound/hospitalized instruction, educational and psychological testing, substance abuse counseling, and accommodations for the 504 Plan.

The Student Assistance Program (SAP) is a special support program that is available to assist students in dealing with issues related to alcohol, other drugs, and other related issues that may disrupt the student’s ability to achieve academically. Various support groups are offered to qualifying students. Students may be referred to the SAP through means of a self-referral or a referral from a teacher, parent, or friend. A team of specially trained educators screens each referral, interviews the student, and recommends an appropriate support program. Students who desire more information should talk with their counselor or advisor.   Any student or parent, who believes that there is a learning problem or a need for special service, should contact the student's counselor for further information.

Special Education

District 126 provides all students with disabilities a free and appropriate public education, in accordance with applicable state and federal laws. Parents/guardians of a student with disabilities and the student serve as team members with the public school staff in determining eligibility for and provisions of special education services. Every identified student will be assigned a case manager to facilitate registration, monitor compliance with legal requirements, and provide assistance to students, teachers, and parents.  

The major goals of the District 126 Special Education Department are:

  1. To provide the specialized instruction and supports necessary for a student with identified special education needs, in the least restrictive environment in which the student can succeed;
  2. To ensure, as much as possible, that each student is encouraged:
  1. to identify strengths and to minimize weaknesses,

        b.        to accept a major portion of the responsibility for the quality of his/her life,

        c.        to view oneself as a capable human being able to contribute to the home and school community, and

        d.        to actively engage in planning a post-high school career.

In order to achieve these goals, the District’s Special Education Department offers a continuum of resources and instructional services for eligible students with disabilities in the categorical areas of: learning disabilities, cognitive disabilities, emotional disturbances, autism, physical disabilities, traumatic brain injuries, other health impairments, hearing and vision impairments (including deafness and deaf-blindness), and speech and language disabilities. Students will be registered for general education classes unless the student’s individualized education program (IEP) specifics a more restrictive environment. The goal is to meet the educational and/or emotional needs of students using the least restrictive environment appropriate to the individual child.  

To offer a full continuum of special education options, District 126 works with the Special Education District of Lake County (SEDOL). For additional information, contact the Special Education Dept. at 847-731-9500.

Fees

All students must pay a standard fee that includes book rental, technology fee, towel fee, consumables and lab fees, student handbook, and purchase of a lock. Some courses require additional material fees, workbooks, and/or supplemental reading texts. As soon as the instructor informs students what is needed, students should pay the fee or purchase the materials.  Fees can be viewed and paid online, at any time, using Skyward Family Access. A District fee waiver application is available in the District’s Business Office.

Title IX Compliance

Zion-Benton Township High School is in compliance with all federal and state Non-Discrimination and Equal Opportunity Laws, Orders and Regulations. The school will not discriminate against any of its educational programs and activities. Title IX of the Educational Amendments of 1972 and regulations issued there under require Zion-Benton Township High School not to discriminate on the basis of sex in its educational programs and activities including the areas of employment. Questions may be directed to the Title IX Coordinator at 847-731-9361 or write 3901 W. 21st Street, Zion, Illinois 60099.

Sample Four-Year High School Plan

Freshman Year

Semester 1

Semester 2

English 1

English 1

Math 1

Math 1

Social Studies / AP Human Geo / AP Econ

Social Studies / AP Human Geo / AP Econ

Biology

Biology

Physical Ed.

Health

Elective

Elective

Study Hall/Overload

Study Hall/Overload

Advisory/Lunch

Advisory/Lunch

Sophomore Year

Semester 1

Semester 2

English 2

English 2

Math 2

Math 2

Continental Studies / AP Choices   

Continental Studies / AP Choices

Chemistry

Chemistry

Physical Ed.

Driver Ed** or Physical Ed.

Personal Finance*

Elective

Study Hall/Overload

Study Hall/Overload

Advisory/Lunch

Advisory/Lunch

Junior Year

Semester 1

Semester 2

English 3

English 3

Math 3 or Data Science

Math 3 or Data Science

United States History

United States History

Physics, Earth Science, or AP Offering

Physics, Earth Science, or AP Offering

Physical Ed.

Physical Ed.

Elective

Elective

Study Hall/Overload

Study Hall/Overload

Advisory/Lunch

Advisory/Lunch

Senior Year

Semester 1

Semester 2

English Literature Elective

English Composition Elective

Physical Ed.

Physical Ed.

Government

Elective

Core Elective

Core Elective

Elective

Elective

Elective

Elective

Study Hall/Overload

Study Hall/Overload

Advisory/Lunch

Advisory/Lunch

*Personal Finance can be taken sophomore, junior, or senior year.

**Driver Ed is not a graduation requirement but may be taken sophomore, junior, or senior year.

Honors Recognition

Determining Grade Point Average

Weighted Grade Point Averages are determined by averaging honor points awarded for grades earned. Grades earned in driver education and courses taken on a pass/fail basis will not be used in computing grade point averages or rank in class.

Grade Weighted Courses

Honors English 1                                Honors English 2

AP English Language & Composition                AP English Literature & Composition

Dual Credit English Composition 1 & 2                Math 1 Honors

Math 2 Honors                                Honors Pre-Calculus

Math 3 Honors                                AP Statistics        

AP Calculus AB/BC                                Honors Biology

AP Computer Science Principles                AP Biology

Honors Chemistry                                AP Environmental Science

AP Chemistry                                        AP Physics 2

AP Physics C                                         AP Human Geography

AP Economics (2)                                AP United States History

AP World History                                AP Psychology

AP United States Government and Politics        AP Music Theory

AP Studio Art                                        German 3 & 4

French 3 & 4                                        American Sign Language  3 & 4

Spanish 3 & 4                                        AP Spanish Language and Culture

AP Spanish Literature and Culture                Dual Credit Machine Trades Blueprint Reading

Dual Credit Intro. To Business                        AP Pre-calculus

The table below illustrates honor points earned for grades:

A

B

C

D

Pass

Fail

Normal Honor Points

4

3

2

1

0

0

Weighted Honor Points

5

4

3

1

0

0

Honor Roll

At the end of each semester an Honor Roll and a High Honor Roll will be computed and published.  Students achieving a 3.50 to 3.74 weighted grade point average will be listed on the Honor Roll.  Students with weighted averages of 3.75 and above will be listed on the high honor roll.

Grades in Driver Education and pass/fail courses are not included in honor roll computations. Students receiving “incomplete” grades may not have their name published although they may make Honor Roll status after the incomplete is removed.  

Graduation Honors

Student graduation honors will be awarded based on the Cum Laude system. Graduation honors will be based upon the seventh semester cumulative grade point average. Final class standing is based upon the completion of all graduation requirements.  Cumulative grade point average at the end of six semesters will be available as soon as possible so that students may audit and verify the computation.  Seventh semester cumulative grade point average will be released as quickly as possible following the close of the seventh semester

The table below illustrates the Graduation Honors Recognition Program:

Rank Designation

Grade Point Average

Summa Cum Laude

4.00 and higher

Magna Cum Laude

3.75 to 3.99

Cum Laude

3.50  to 3.74


COURSE OFFERINGS

BILINGUAL EDUCATION

Bilingual courses are for students who are learning English as a second or other language.  Bilingual courses are offered in English, Mathematics, Science, and Social Science. Mainstream content classes provide instruction and assistance in English language acquisition while students with limited English proficiency are placed in sheltered content classes.  Mainstream and sheltered content classes fulfill graduation requirements in our academic departments.  

The goals of the Bilingual Education program are to help students acquire social and academic English language proficiency in all four language domains (reading, writing, speaking, and listening) while gaining the academic skills needed for success in school and the workplace.  Registration in Bilingual classes is restricted to students identified as Emergent Bilinguals through language proficiency testing and teacher recommendation.

Michael Blades, Department Head

847-731-9370 - bladesm@zbths.org

PERSONAL FINANCE                                        EL050

Either Semester – .50 Credit – 10, 11, 12.  Graduation Requirement

Prerequisite: Students identified through testing and teacher recommendation as English Learners.

Course Description: This course is designed to support English Learners. This required course provides students with the knowledge and skills they need to explore their financial future while making life-long decisions. Students will gain an understanding of financial services, budgeting, credit cards, loans, investing, retirement, insurance, and taxes.  This course fulfills the state requirement of Consumer Economics.  Throughout the year, students learn the content of the course and improve their academic English language skills in computer technology.

DRIVER EDUCATION                                        EL047

Either Semester – .25 Credit – Elective - 10, 11, 12

Prerequisite: Students identified through testing and teacher recommendation as English Language Learners (ELLs).

Fees: Student Driving Permit $20 (Secretary of State).  Driver Education fee:  $275

Course Description: This course content is identical to mainstream Driver Education, but the instruction and materials are designed to support English Learners.  Students will simultaneously learn the content of the course and improve their English language skills.

HEALTH                                         EL042

Either Semester – .50 Credit – 9, 10, 11, 12

Prerequisite: Students identified through testing and teacher recommendation as English Language Learners.

Course Description: The course content is identical to mainstream Health, but the instruction and materials are designed to support English Learners.  Throughout the year, students learn the content of the course and improve their academic English language skills in health.

BEGINNER ENGLISH FOR EMERGENT BILINGUALS                        EL011

All Year – 1 Credit – 9, 10, 11, 12

Students enrolled in Beginner English for Emergent Bilinguals may also attend Bilingual Resource Center for credit.

Prerequisite: Students identified through testing and teacher recommendation as English Learners.

Course Description: This course is designed for students with very limited proficiency in English.  The course provides individualized work in language development, including reading, writing, speaking, and listening.  Special emphasis is placed on the development of both conversational and academic vocabulary.


INTERMEDIATE ENGLISH FOR EMERGENT BILINGUALS                
EL012

All Year – 1 Credit – 9, 10, 11, 12

Students enrolled in Intermediate English for Emergent Bilinguals may also attend Bilingual Resource Center for credit.

Prerequisite: Students identified through testing and teacher recommendation as English Learners.

Course Description: This course is designed for limited English proficiency students who have some fluency but need to continue to develop their English language skills. It builds on the language introduced in the beginner level course and further expands students’ reading and writing skills. Special emphasis is placed on the development of both conversational and academic proficiency.

ADVANCED ENGLISH FOR EMERGENT BILINGUALS                        EL013

All Year – 1 Credit – 9, 10, 11, 12

Students enrolled in Advanced English for Emergent Bilinguals may also attend Bilingual Resource Center for credit.

Prerequisite: Students identified through testing and teacher recommendation as English Learners.

Course Description: This course is designed for advanced English Learners.  Special emphasis is placed on the development of academic language proficiency in preparation for mainstream English classes.

MATH 1                                                EL055 – NCAA

All Year – 1 Credit – 9

Prerequisite: Students identified through testing, teacher recommendation as English Learners, and prerequisites as required by the mathematics department.

Fees: A TI-84 Plus Graphing Calculator is encouraged.

Course Description: This course integrates the foundational concepts of algebra, geometry, and statistics with instruction and materials designed to support English learners. In this course, students will focus on linear and exponential relationships as well as geometric relationships. Major concepts include representing/analyzing data, solving linear equations and inequalities, graphing linear and exponential functions, transformational geometry, congruence, and angle relationships.

MATH 2                                                EL057 – NCAA

All Year – 1 Credit – 10

Prerequisite: Students identified through testing, teacher recommendation as English Learners, and prerequisites as required by the mathematics department.

Fees: A TI-84 Plus Graphing Calculator is encouraged.

Course Description: This course is designed to develop a deeper understanding of the foundational concepts of algebra, geometry, and probability with instruction and materials designed to support English learners. In this course students will extend their knowledge from Math 1 to quadratic models. Other major concepts include rational exponents, similarity, right triangle trigonometry, probability, volume, and properties of circles.

MATH 3                                                EL058 – NCAA

All Year – 1 Credit – 11

Prerequisite: Students identified through testing, teacher recommendation as English Learners, and prerequisites as required by the mathematics department.

Fees: A TI-84 Plus Graphing Calculator is encouraged.

Course Description:This course is designed to develop a deeper understanding of the underlying concepts of algebra, geometry and statistics with instruction and materials to support English learners. As the third course in the integrated sequence, this course will afford the student opportunities for engaging in activities that will facilitate the transition to more abstract ways of thinking. Units include: exponential and logarithmic functions, polynomials, circles and trigonometry, applied geometry, and inferential statistics.

BIOLOGY                                        EL021 – NCAA

All Year – 1 Credit – 9

Prerequisite: Students identified through testing, teacher recommendation as English Learners, and prerequisites as required by the science department.

Course Description: This course is identical to mainstream Biology.  The content is the same as mainstream freshman Biology, but the instruction and materials are designed to support English Learners.  Throughout the year, students learn the content of the course and improve their academic English language skills in science.

CHEMISTRY                                        EL022 – NCAA

All Year – 1 Credit – 10

Prerequisite: Students identified through testing, teacher recommendation as English Learners, and prerequisites as required by the science department.

Course Description: This course is identical to mainstream Chemistry.  The content is the same as mainstream sophomore Chemistry, but the instruction and materials are designed to support English Learners. Throughout the year, students learn the content of the course and improve their academic English language skills in science.

EARTH SCIENCE                                                                EL025  – NCAA Pending

All Year - 1 Credit- 11 and 12

Prerequisite: Students identified through testing and teacher recommendation as English Learners and prerequisites as required by the science department.

Course Description: This course is identical to mainstream Earth Science. The content is the same as mainstream Earth Science, but the instruction and materials are designed to support English Learners.  Earth Science is a course that collectively seeks an understanding of the earth and its environment in space.  Students will explore the topics of oceanography, geology, astronomy, meteorology and geography.  Students will have the opportunity to participate in laboratory investigations and simulations to gain personal experiences with the surroundings in which they live.

PHYSICS                                        EL024 – NCAA

All Year-1 Credit – 11

Prerequisite: Students identified through testing and teacher recommendation as English Learners and prerequisites as required by the science department.

Course Description: This course is identical to mainstream Physics. The content is the same as mainstream junior Physics but the instruction and materials are designed to support English Learners.  Students will simultaneously learn the content of the course and improve their English language skills.

        

SOCIAL STUDIES                                        EL030 – NCAA

All Year – 1 Credit – 9

Prerequisite: Students identified through testing and teacher recommendation as English Language Learners.

Course Description: This course is identical to mainstream Social Studies. The content is the same as mainstream freshmen social studies classes, but the instruction and materials are designed to support English Learners. Throughout the year, students learn the content of the course and improve their academic English language skills in social studies.

AFRICAN STUDIES: HISTORY AND INFLUENCE                                EL034 – NCAA

Either Semester - .50 – Sophomore Core, Elective –10, 11, 12.

This course is part of the sophomore core, continental studies classes. Students select two of the following four classes: African Studies, East Asian Studies, European and West Asian Studies, and Latin American Studies. . The course cannot be taken to replace a missing U.S. History or U.S. Government course.

Prerequisite: Students identified through testing and teacher recommendation as English Learners.

Course Description:  In this course, students will explore the history and influence of the African continent. The content is the same as mainstream African Studies, but the instruction and materials are designed to support English Learners. Throughout the year, students learn the content of the course and improve their academic English language skills in social studies. 

EAST ASIAN STUDIES: HISTORY AND INFLUENCE                        EL035 – NCAA

Either Semester - .50 – Sophomore Core, Elective –10, 11, 12.

This course is part of the sophomore core, continental studies classes. Students select two of the following four classes: African Studies, East Asian Studies, European and West Asian Studies, and Latin American Studies. . The course cannot be taken to replace a missing U.S. History or U.S. Government course.

Prerequisite: Students identified through testing and teacher recommendation as English Learners.

Course Description:  In this course, students will explore the history and influence of East Asia. The content is identical to mainstream East Asian Studies, but the instruction and materials are designed to support English Learners. Throughout the year, students learn the content of the course and improve their academic English language skills in social studies.

EUROPEAN AND WEST ASIAN STUDIES: HISTORY AND INFLUENCE EL036 – NCAA

Either Semester - .50 – Sophomore Core, Elective –10, 11, 12.

This course is part of the sophomore core, continental studies classes. Students select two of the following four classes: African Studies, East Asian Studies, European and West Asian Studies, and Latin American Studies. . The course cannot be taken to replace a missing U.S. History or U.S. Government course.

Prerequisite: Students identified through testing and teacher recommendation as English Learners.

Course Description:  In this course, students will explore the history and influence of Europe and Western Asia. The content is identical to  mainstream European and West Asian Studies, but the instruction and materials are designed to support English Learners. Throughout the year, students learn the content of the course and improve their academic English language skills in social studies.

LATIN AMERICAN STUDIES: HISTORY AND INFLUENCE                EL037 – NCAA

Either Semester - .50 – Sophomore Core, Elective –10, 11, 12.

This course is part of the sophomore core, continental studies classes. Students select two of the following four classes: African Studies, East Asian Studies, European and West Asian Studies, and Latin American Studies. . The course cannot be taken to replace a missing U.S. History or U.S. Government course.

Prerequisite: Students identified through testing and teacher recommendation as English Learners.

Course Description: In this course, students will explore the history and influence of Latin America. The content is identical to mainstream Latin American Studies, but the instruction and materials are designed to support English Learners. Throughout the year, students learn the content of the course and improve their academic English language skills in social studies.

UNITED STATES HISTORY                                        EL032 – NCAA

All Year - 1 Credit - 11

Prerequisite: Students identified through testing and teacher recommendation as English Learners.

Course Description: The content is identical to mainstream junior United States History classes, but the instruction and materials are designed to support English Learners. Students will simultaneously learn the content of the course and improve their academic English language skills in history.

UNITED STATES GOVERNMENT                                        EL033 – NCAA

Either Semester - .50 Credit - 12

Prerequisite: Students identified through testing and teacher recommendation as English Learners.

Course Description: The content is identical to mainstream United States Government classes, but the instruction and materials are designed to support English Learners. This course will meet the Illinois State Board of Education’s requirements with regards to passing the Federal and State Constitution Test, and Civics. Students will simultaneously learn the content of the course and improve their English language skills.

BILINGUAL RESOURCE CENTER                                        EL0911/EL0913

Either Semester – .25 Credit – Elective – 9, 10, 11, 12

Prerequisite: Students identified through testing and teacher recommendation as English Learners.

Course Description: This course is designed to help the individual Bilingual student in daily classroom work.  Students will also prepare for the ACCESS Test over the course of the year. Supplementary academic materials are made readily available to students along with tutoring and other assistance.

CAREER AND TECHNICAL EDUCATION

The Career and Technical Education Department seeks to expose students to diverse and expansive academic programming that prepares students for a variety of careers within Business, Marketing, and Computer Education; Family and Consumer Sciences; and Technology and Engineering Education fields. The knowledge and skills acquired through the department’s coursework plays a pivotal role in preparing students for life beyond high school. Because of the emphasis on postsecondary readiness, students will also have a number of opportunities to earn dual credit or industry-relevant credentials as part of completing coursework. Regardless of the coursework pursued, the department’s programming emphasizes the development of knowledge and skills that are applicable in and transferable to a variety of settings--to postsecondary education, the workplace, and life.

Andrew Stout, Department Head
847-731-9492 - stouta@zbths.org

BUSINESS EDUCATION

PERSONAL FINANCE                                        BE502

Either Semester - .50 Credit - 10, 11, 12

Course Description: This required course provides students with the knowledge and skills they need to explore their financial future while making life-long decisions. Students will gain an understanding of

financial services, budgeting, credit cards, loans, investing, retirement, insurance, and taxes.  This course fulfills the state requirement of consumer economics.

BUSINESS CONCEPTS                                        BE503

Either Semester - .50 Credit – Elective - 9, 10, 11, 12

Course Description: This course is a “survey” type of course that will introduce students to the world of business and help prepare them for the economic roles of consumer, worker, and citizen.  Topics include: basic economics, business ethics, potential business ownership, employer/employee relationships, human resource issues, business technology applications, and the role of consumers in our economy.  The course emphasizes skills, knowledge, and resources needed for careers of the 21st Century.

BUSINESS LAW                                        BE504

Either Semester - .50 Credit - Elective – 11, 12

Course Description: This course is designed as an introduction to law and its application to everyday life.  Emphasis will be placed on both criminal and civil laws and their influence on contracts, employment, minors, and property.  Group discussion is an integral part of daily class requirements.   Career opportunities are highlighted throughout the semester.

BUSINESS INCubatoredu                                        BE506

All Year – 1 Credit  Elective - 10, 11, 12

Prerequisite: Open to any Junior or Senior; however, any Sophomore with a teacher recommendation may participate.

Course Description: What if Shark Tank was a class? 

This hands-on  and team-based course is designed to get students excited about becoming true entrepreneurs by giving them the opportunity to create and fully develop their own product or service. Real-world entrepreneurs and business experts serve as coaches and mentors guiding student teams through the process of ideation, market research, and business plan development. Over the course of the year, student teams learn about marketing, accounting, as well as the legal aspects of starting a business. The businesses students build are real – which means students experience mistakes, take risks, and learn to pivot based on market needs. Students have access to a network of professionals to further develop their skills (teamwork, problem solving, presentation, communication) for college and career readiness. Pitch Week helps to further fire the entrepreneurial spirit by putting student teams in front of actual investors in a ‘SharkTank’-style pitch event to win funding and turn their wishful thinking into a reality. Successful completion of this course (both semesters) fulfills the Consumer Education graduation requirement.

OWNING AND OPERATING A BUSINESS                                 BE527

Either Semester -.50 Credit - Elective – 11, 12

Helpful Course(s): Business Concepts, Sports and Entertainment Marketing, and Business Law

Course Description: Students will acquire the skills that will permit them to become their own boss.  They will begin to develop the knowledge and confidence necessary to build their own business. Owning and Operating a Business offers exceptional opportunities for men/women who work hard to find new and better ways to serve the needs and wants of the customer.  Various topics include:  entrepreneurial options for the new century, analyzing elements for success, dealing with your competition, creating a business plan for success, basic accounting and management decisions, influences of marketing, business ethics, and student entrepreneurs.

SPORTS AND ENTERTAINMENT MARKETING                                BE509

Either Semester - .50 Credit - Elective – 9, 10, 11, 12

Helpful Course: Business Concepts

Course Description: This course introduces students to the fundamentals of marketing through the sports and entertainment industries. Students will explore both the sports and entertainment industries, focusing on real world business perspectives and the role these areas play in our society. Students will develop their understanding of marketing concepts and strategies, the marketing mix, marketing ethics and law and the components of a marketing plan. Students will also be exposed to more traditional forms of marketing; school, television, radio, in stores, and Internet. Students will learn and apply the functions of marketing through hands-on learning, group activities and projects, videos, computer integrated activities and a field trip.

MOBILE APPS AND CODING                                        BE521

Either Semester - .50 Credit – Elective - 9, 10, 11, 12

Course Description:  In this course, students will learn problem-solving strategies, software design, and the foundations of computer science. Students will use two key tools: the Project STEM programming environment and EarSketch, a software package that turns your code into music.  Not only will this course prepare you for continuing your studies in computer science (for example, by taking AP Computer Science Principles), but it will also teach you how to think like a scientist and solve real-world problems, skills that are important to every 21st-century citizen.  There are no prerequisites for this course, although you should have basic familiarity with how to operate a computer and use applications. It's also recommended that you have familiarity with basic algebra principles before starting this course.

MICROSOFT OFFICE SPECIALIST (MOS) PREPARATION                BE505

Either Semester - .50 Credit – Elective - 11, 12

Course Description: Successful completion of this course will prepare students to earn one or more Microsoft Office Specialist (MOS) certification(s).  These certifications provide students a competitive edge in today’s technology-centered job market and equip students with the skills they need in college.  Students will gain a fundamental understanding of the Microsoft Word, Excel, and PowerPoint environments and the ability to complete tasks independently.  

(DUAL CREDIT) INTRODUCTION TO BUSINESS                                        DC403

Either Semester - .50 Credit – Elective - 11, 12

3.0 College Credit and high school grade weighting available for eligible students

Course Description: This dual credit course provides a broad overview of the principles, functions, and careers in business.  Students will develop critical business knowledge and skills in a dynamic environment that emphasizes “real-world” applications of business concepts. Topics included are: economics, global business, ethics, business structures, entrepreneurship, management, marketing, accounting, finance, and operations management. 

 

BUSINESS EDUCATION SEMINAR                                TBA

Either Semester - .50 Credit - Elective 11, 12 – may be repeated for a total of one credit

Prerequisite: Written counselor, teacher and Division Chair approval

Course Description: This capstone course is designed for students wishing to obtain specialized Business credit.

Includes an in-depth project in the seminar area of study.

 

FOR THE FOLLOWING COURSES, PLEASE SEE LAKE COUNTY TECH CAMPUS BEGINNING ON PAGE 68:

CYBERSECURITY                                         TC697

GAME PROGRAMMING AND VIRTUALIZATION                         TC679

FAMILY AND CONSUMER SCIENCE

FAMILY RELATIONS AND PARENTING                                        FC552

Either Semester - .50 Credit - Elective – 10, 11, 12

Course Description: This course is an in-depth study of the child and the parents.  Topics include:  parenthood readiness, qualities of a good parent, environmental and hereditary factors affecting the child, reproduction and parenting responsibilities. The student will study the young child from conception through the birth process. The prenatal unit stresses fetal development and maternal care. Students participate in hands-on experiences to develop good parenting and childcare skills as well as explore careers in the childcare field.

EARLY CHILDHOOD STUDIES                                        FC553

Either Semester - .50 Credit - Elective – 10, 11, 12

Course Description: This course is designed to help students prepare for a career in early childhood education. Class starts with an overview of the physical, cognitive, social, and emotional characteristics of young children. Students in Early Childhood Studies will also learn strategies for keeping children safe, healthy, and well-nourished. In addition, students will learn to provide experiences that build children's curiosity and enthusiasm for learning. The course will prepare the student for the L.C.H.S. Technology Campus "Early Childhood Education" program, world of work and / or parenting roles.

LIFE MANAGEMENT                                        FC554

Either Semester - .50 Credit - Elective 10, 11, 12

Course Description: This course takes students on a journey into adulthood. Students will learn communication skills to improve relationships with others personally and professionally. This course encourages students to build a sense of identity and become independent. This course introduces daily aspects of life as an adult from financial preparation to learning about the importance of dressing for the occasion to make a good impression. Students will find structure in life through the roles they fill as a parent, spouse, and worker.

INTRODUCTION TO FOODS AND NUTRITION                                FC559

Either Semester - .50 Credit - Elective – 10, 11, 12

Course Description: This is an introductory level course for students who are new to the culinary world and those who want to brush up on their skills.  Throughout the course students will develop a knowledge and understanding of culinary principles and nutrition. This course encompasses food service preparation management, nutrition concepts, safety and sanitation practices, and maximizing food resources. Careers in culinary arts and nutrition will be explored. Laboratory participation in which students will serve up simple and challenging recipes to build their skillset is required for success.  

MENU PLANNING AND ENTERTAINING                                        FC560

Either Semester - .50 Credit - Elective - 10, 11, 12

Prerequisite: Introduction to Foods and Nutrition with a “C” or higher

Course Description: This sequential course focuses on expanding students’ knowledge and experiences with nutrition concepts, food science, and healthy lifestyles.  Students will learn about nutritional analysis, food allergies, menu analysis, and food safety and sanitation covered through theory, projects and laboratory experiences.  Students will utilize this information about meal planning and preparation, as well as catering to special dietary concerns related to allergies and cultures.  This course will also teach about budgeting for meals and presentations for entertaining. Culinary lab experience is mandatory for success as students prepare dishes that focus on nutritional and visual appeal.

FAMILY AND CONSUMER SCIENCES SEMINAR                                TBA

Either Semester - .50 Credit – Elective – 10, 11, 12.  May be repeated for a total of one credit.

Prerequisite: Written teacher and Division Chair approval

Course Description: Designed for students wishing to obtain specialized Family and Consumer Science credit. Includes an in-depth project in the seminar area of study.

FOR THE FOLLOWING COURSES, PLEASE SEE LAKE COUNTY TECH CAMPUS BEGINNING ON PAGE 64:

CERTIFIED NURSE ASSISTING                                        TC653

COSMETOLOGY                                        TC657

CULINARY ARTS                                        TC656

EARLY EDUCATION AND TEACHING                                        TC655

MEDICAL ASSISTING                                        TC654

INDUSTRY AND TECHNOLOGY

INTRODUCTIONS TO DRONES                                                IA651

Either Semester -  .50 Credit — Elective - 9, 10, 11, 12

This introductory course allows students to explore the world of drones, Unmanned Aircraft Systems (UAS) and their related technologies.  Students will discover how drones are currently being used in a wide range of applications and what the future holds for this fast-growing technology. In this introductory course, students will fly drones and learn the fundamentals of operating unmanned aircrafts. Students will also explore the usage of drone technologies in aerial photography and modern business and industry, examine how drones are affecting our lives, and learn about the increasing career possibilities in the drone technology field.

DRONE PILOT PREPARATION                                                IA652

2nd Semester - .50 Credit — Elective - 11-12

Prerequisites: Introduction to Drones, Students must be 16 years or older. 

This course expands on content within Introduction to Drones.  In this course, students will become familiar with remote aviation as well as practice and learn the skills necessary to be a safe and efficient remote pilot. Students will further explore remote aviation careers,  Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) rules and regulations; types and capabilities of Unmanned Aircraft Systems (UAS); drone piloting; aerial photography and videography; maintenance and preflight procedures; and aeronautical decision making. As part of coursework, students will have the opportunity to earn their FAA Part 107 certification and add “FAA-Certified UAS Pilot” to their resume.

3-D MODELING                                        IA650

Either Semester - .50 Credit – Elective - 9, 10, 11, 12

Course Description: This course is an introduction into the 3D drawing and printing world.  During this class students will learn how to draw 3-dimensionally using the Autodesk Inventor software and print using a 3D printer.  In order to be successful in this course, students should be able to follow complex directions. This class is great for anyone expressing interest in engineering, modeling, design, jewelry making, and development jobs.  

PRE-ARCHITECTURE                                        IA604

Either Semester - .50 Credit – Elective - 9, 10, 11, 12

Course Description: This course is of particular value for students interested in the following fields: architectural drafting, interior design, the building trades, or other residential architecture areas. This course introduces the student to tools and techniques used in the field of architecture. The student will draw a set of plans for a house including floor plans, foundation plans, elevations, site plans and perspectives. A computer and AutoCAD software will be used to complete many of these tasks.

MACHINE TRADES BLUEPRINT READING (DUAL CREDIT)                DC406

Either Semester - .50 Credit (Grade Weighted) - Elective – 10, 11, 12.

3.0 college credit and high school grade weighting available for eligible students.

Prerequisite: A score of 470 or above on the Evidence Based Reading and Writing section of the SAT/PSAT OR Top 1/3 of class after 6 semesters of high school OR Unweighted cumulative GPA 3.0 or above after 5 semesters.

Course Description: This dual credit course is designed to study the principles that are essential for visualization and training in the interpretation of blueprints and sketches of machine parts.  Attention is given to representations of common machine processes, special forms of dimensioning, sections, auxiliary views, symbols, geometric tolerancing, machine sketching, surface finished and other drafting design principles.  Upon successful completion, this course fulfills 3 credits towards a Machine Tool Trades Associate’s Degree in Applied Science and Career Programs at the College of Lake County (CLC).  Students may also apply these credits to an Associates in Arts or an Associates in Science as elective credits at CLC.  

ENGINEERING AND ARCHITECTURE                                         IA605

Either Semester - .50 Credit - Elective – 10, 11, 12

Prerequisite: Credit in two of the following courses: Pre-Architecture, 3D Modeling, or Machine Trades Blueprint Reading

Course Description: This course is an expansion and continuation of 3D Modeling, Machine Trades Blueprint Reading, and Pre-Architecture. Students will further their knowledge in Engineering and Architecture by creating more detailed and in-depth drawings through Aspire, Inventor, AutoCAD, laser engraving/cutting, CNC Routing, 3D Printing, and problem solving.  Students may repeat this class for elective credit.

ELECTRICITY & ELECTRONICS 1                                        IA608

Either Semester - .50 Credit – Elective 9, 10, 11, 12

Course Description: Electricity and Electronics 1 provides opportunity for students to study AC and DC currents, their properties, their applications, advantages and disadvantages.  The study of resistors, semiconductors, fuses, circuit breakers, switches of all types and wiring will be covered.  Students will create basic circuits, learn soldering skills, learn how to read resistor color coding, and study and wire basic home circuits and switches.  This will give the students hands-on experience in wiring. The class will conclude with a look at the overall impact of electricity and new technologies such as electric and hybrid vehicles, mass transit applications, cell phone technology and computing technologies.

ELECTRICITY & ELECTRONICS 2                                        IA628

Either Semester - .50 Credit – Elective - 9, 10, 11, 12

Course Description: Electricity and Electronics 2 is an in-depth hands-on course related to the use and function of electricity.  More complex circuits are studied and skills in soldering are furthered.  Safety will be covered by way of the students earning an OSHA 10 hour certification card. In the area of residential wiring, the main project includes coordinating with the Carpentry and Construction class to wire solar cells and install all wiring and the breaker box into the S.H.E.D. project. 

METALS 1                                        IA609

Either Semester - .50 Credit - Elective - 9, 10, 11, 12

Course Description: This course is an introduction to basic machining, metal forming, and metal artwork.  Areas of study include basic lathe and millwork procedures, arc and oxygen acetylene gas welding, metal forming, sheet metal manufacturing, and tinwork.  Shop safety and basic math skills are integrated throughout the areas of study.

METALS 2                                        IA630

Either Semester - .50 Credit - Elective – 9, 10, 11, 12

Prerequisite: “C” or higher in Metals 1

Course Description: A continuation in metalworking studies.  Areas of study include advanced lathe and milling machine process, M.I.G. and T.I.G. welding, plasma arc procedures, metal pattern making and molding.  Other areas of study include Computer Numerical Control (CNC).

POWER MECHANICS 1                                        IA610

Either Semester - .50 Credit - Elective - 9, 10, 11, 12

Course Description: An introduction to the auto-power field, this course covers the basic concepts of power technology.  Study in power technology includes various accessory systems common to the transportation industry.  This will include engine rebuilding, valve and seat grinding, carburetor work, tune-ups and various repairs.  Work is done on small 2 and 4 cycle engines. 

POWER MECHANICS 2                                        IA612

Either Semester - .50 Credit - Elective – 9, 10, 11, 12

Prerequisite: “C” or higher in Power Mechanics 1 (Suggested)

Course Description: This course is a continuation of Power Mechanics 1 with emphasis on engine troubleshooting and repair.  The planned activities will allow students to become knowledgeable of fundamental principles and technical skills related to troubleshooting, repairing, identifying parts and making precision measurements. Safety will be a key component of this class. Students who successfully display proficiency in these skills have the opportunity to earn industry-recognized technician certification by the Engine & Equipment Training Council. In addition to the small engine topics above, students will also be exposed to career opportunities related to small engines as well as an emphasis on soft skills that are necessary to be successful in any workplace.

VIDEO PRODUCTION 1                                         IA624

Either Semester – .50 Credit – Elective – 9, 10, 11, 12

Course Description: This is a lab class designed to introduce students to the fundamentals of both live and recorded video production. Students will learn audio and video editing and have the opportunity to earn the industry-recognized credential, Adobe Certified Associate certification in Premiere Pro. Instruction includes camera operations, sound and lighting techniques, sound mixing, and online streaming. Students learn the operation and maintenance of video production equipment such as,  cameras, microphones, lighting equipment, audio mixing, live video switching, and other equipment used in the video and audio production.  Students become members of a TV studio crew and may be required to assist with recording various ZBTHS after-school activities..  Video Production 1 is the prerequisite for Video Production 2.

VIDEO PRODUCTION 2                                         IA625

Either Semester – .50 Credit – Elective – 9, 10, 11, 12

Prerequisite: Video Production

Course Description: This is a lab class designed to continue the study of video production by crewing and creating programs for ZBTV. In addition to expanding on the activities explored in the first course, students work in a team-based environment to create a variety of video and audio related broadcasts. Students gain further expertise in producing, directing, and using the camera, character generator, cinematography, audio board, special effects and editing during both studio and remote shoots.  Students fulfill in-school and after-school commitments with maturity and dedication to excellence.  

GRAPHIC ART AND DESIGN 1                                        IA631

Either Semester – .50 Credit – Elective – 10, 11, 12

Course Description: This is a lab class designed for students interested in basic graphics arts and graphic design techniques. Students learn design, layout, and computer applications that are currently used in the advertising industry. Techniques such as layering, compositing, and photographic artwork will be explored as well as current trends in graphic design including color theory, typography, and layout and composition.  Students with a strong artistic background or who have a strong interest in improving their digital artistic skills should take this course.

GRAPHIC ART AND DESIGN 2                                        IA632

Either Semester – .50 Credit – Elective – 10, 11, 12

Prerequisite: Graphic Art and Design 1

Course Description: This is a lab class designed for students interested in advanced graphic art and graphic design techniques.  Adobe Photoshop, Adobe Illustrator, and other applications are explored.  Illustrations and computer-generated images created in Photoshop and Illustrator are compiled into a student portfolio.  Art students who want to major in graphic arts or graphic design will have the opportunity to create a portfolio of digital images for admission into college programs.  Students will also have the opportunity to earn the industry-recognized credential, Adobe Certified Associate certification in Photoshop.

PRINTING 1                                        IA614

Either Semester - .50 Credit - Elective - 9, 10, 11, 12

Helpful Course: Pre-Architecture

Course Description: Printing is an introductory course for all students who are interested or curious in graphic arts. Basic skills such as computer layout and design work will lead into  projects in the area of sublimation printing including phone cases, coffee mugs, dog tags, and more!  In screen-printing, students will be able to print on t-shirts & hoodies as well as create stickers and posters.  All projects are student designed to appeal to the interest of each student.

The final project will be planned out by the student from start to finish and then approved by the instructor.

PRINTING 2                                        IA615

Either Semester - .50 Credit - Elective – 9, 10, 11, 12

Prerequisite: “C” or higher in Printing 1 (Suggested)

Course Description: Printing 2 is a continuation of Printing 1.Sublimation, Screen Printing, UV Printing and Direct to Garment Printing will be covered in this course. Projects will include personalized 12-month calendars and concept board games. Sublimation projects will allow the student to emphasize an individual interest and to create their own projects such as water bottles, puzzles,  and Direct-to-Garment printing that allows students’ digital designs to be printed directly onto a T-shirt or hoodie.  Students will have the opportunity to earn industry-recognized certification in screen printing from the American Screen Printing Association.

WOODS 1                                        IA617

Either Semester - .50 Credit - Elective - 9, 10, 11, 12.  May be taken independently with instructor approval.

Course Description: This course is for any student who wants to learn how to use woodworking tools while completing projects to gain skills that lead into woodworking and construction.  Course content includes selecting, planning, constructing and finishing projects such as a bird feeder, cutting board, and a clock.  Machine operations, hand tool processes and portable power tool operations are required laboratory learning experiences.  Instruction will be individualized with each student taught according to knowledge and skill development needs.

WOODS 2                                        IA619

Either Semester - .50 Credit - Elective – 9, 10, 11, 12.  May be taken independently with instructor approval.

Prerequisite: “C” or higher in Woods

Course Description: Woods 2 provides the opportunity to continue using proper methods and skills to create projects throughout the semester. The course content includes material estimation, cost estimation, project design and composition, and the use of specialty tools and finishes.  Students will learn how to design projects using the Aspire program and then set cut paths to send to the CNC router for final cutting.  The ability to design and run a CNC router will help students who are going into the fields of engineering, architecture, manufacturing, cabinet making, and woodworking. Some of the projects that students will make during this class include a name sign, a family sign, a shaped cutting board, a phone speaker amplifier, and an epoxy river box. 

INTRODUCTION TO CARPENTRY - BUILDING TRADES CONSTRUCTION        IA618

Either Semester - .50 Credit - Elective – 11, 12

Course Description: This introductory course is for students interested in exploring the building trades.  Units of instruction the first semester include gaining knowledge and skills using fixed woodworking machines, hand tools, and portable power tools used in the carpentry profession.  Projects are required.  Second semester instruction involves learning an understanding of architectural drawing, blueprint reading, using and maintaining hand and power tools, understanding and using building materials, and understanding construction procedures and processes. Throughout the year, students will construct a model house. This introductory course is for students desiring to gain knowledge and skills required for admission to the building trades capstone occupational course.

TECHNOLOGY SEMINAR                                        TBA

Either Semester - .50 Credit - Elective- 10, 11, 12.  May be repeated for a total of one credit.

Prerequisite: Written Division Chair approval

Course Description: Designed for students wishing to obtain specialized technology credit. This course includes an in-depth project in the seminar area of study.

FOR THE FOLLOWING COURSES, PLEASE SEE LAKE COUNTY TECH CAMPUS BEGINNING ON PAGE 68:

CYBERSECURITY                                        TC697

AUTOMOTIVE COLLISION REPAIR                                        TC659

AUTOMOTIVE SERVICE                                        TC670

COMPUTER INTEGRATED MANUFACTURING & CIVIL ENGINEERING AND ARCHITECTURE        TC694

COMPUTER SUPPORT SERVICES                                        TC680

CONSTRUCTION SKILLS & MANAGEMENT                                TC682

CRIMINAL JUSTICE                                        TC690

EMERGENCY MEDICAL SERVICES                                        TC651

ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGY                                                TC692

FIREFIGHTING                                        TC686

GAME PROGRAMMING AND VIRTUALIZATION                        TC679

LASER TECHNOLOGY                                        TC691

LAW ENFORCEMENT AND CRIME SCENE INVESTIGATION                TC698

MACHINING TECHNOLOGY                                        TC658

MULTIMEDIA DESIGN                                        TC663

ROBOTICS AND AUTOMATION                                        TC696

WELDING & FABRICATION                                        TC667

DRIVER EDUCATION

The purpose of Driver Education is to enhance a student’s ability to physically drive an automobile, to develop a mental process of decision-making, and to interact emotionally and socially with other drivers. The Driver Education program will provide each student with the knowledge and skills to be a safe and confident driver.  

Dr. Nicole Stommel, Department Head
847-731-9440 – stommeln@zbths.org

DRIVER EDUCATION                                        DE427/DE428

Either Semester - .25 Credit – Elective – 10, 11, 12

Prerequisite: Driver Education is available to students who are at least 15 years old, have obtained sophomore status, and have earned a passing grade in at least eight semester courses during the previous two semesters prior to enrolling.

Fees: Student driving permit $20 (Secretary of State) Driver Education fee: $275.  The $275 fee must be paid in full by the last day of registration.  Those who pay after the deadline will be put on a waitlist. 

Course Description: Driver Education is made up of two phases: classroom (minimum of 30 hours) and behind the wheel (minimum of 6 hours). Both phases must be successfully completed in order to obtain an Illinois driver’s license prior to the age of 18.  In order to participate in behind the wheel (BTW), students must adhere to the fee and permit deadlines mailed home in the permit packet approximately one month prior to the start date of the course. Students who do not adhere to the deadlines will be placed on a waiting list and are not guaranteed to participate in BTW. The behind-the-wheel fee will be refunded if the student does not participate. NOTE:  Driver Education make-up is offered only during Summer School.

INSTRUCTIONAL DRIVER EDUCATION                                        DE425/DE426

Either Semester - .25 Credit – Elective - 10, 11, 12

Prerequisite: By placement only 

Fees: Student Driving Permit $20 (Secretary of State).  Driver Education fee:  $275

Course Description: Same as Driver Education

ENGLISH AND READING 

As adults, today's students will encounter tremendous change during their lifetime.  Our goal in the English and Reading Department is to help students refine skills that will allow them to meet and adapt to an American culture that science, technology, business and the media reshape daily.  We also want to instill a love of learning and an appreciation of the world around them.  Therefore, we believe that students must think, read, speak, and write at more than a functional level; they must do so at a creative and critical one that will give them an independence of mind and a freedom of spirit.

Michael Blades, Department Head

847-731-9370 - bladesm@zbths.org

ENGLISH SEMESTER GENRE STUDY

The following courses are offered for .50 credit to Seniors as Comp. or Lit. Credit to Juniors as elective credit, or Seniors as Core Elective Credit. These courses may be taken in either the 1st or 2nd Semester. The composition requirements for each of the following courses are identical and align with our mission to prepare students for post-secondary education. 

SENIOR YEAR REQUIREMENTS

All students must earn 1 credit of English during their senior year, half of which must consist of an approved Literature (Lit.) course and an approved Composition (Comp.) course. To fulfill this requirement, students may elect to take one year-long course or an approved combination of semester courses.

NOTE: All Elective courses do not meet the senior English requirement and may only count for core Elective credit.

ENGLISH 1                                        EN127 – NCAA

All Year – 1 Credit – 9

Prerequisite: Placement

Fees: Paperback Texts/Workbooks

Summer Reading Required

Course Description: This course introduces the fundamental skills of effective written and oral communication with an emphasis on college readiness.  Coursework focuses on style, structure, and language appropriate for various purposes and audiences.  Students are actively involved in research methodology and literacy development.  They review and expand upon basic grammar and usage, study vocabulary, read selected fiction and nonfiction texts, and use technology to develop multimedia products and presentations. This course includes a unit on Media Literacy.

HONORS ENGLISH 1                                         EN129 – NCAA

All Year – 1 Credit (Grade Weighted) – 9

Prerequisite: Placement

Fees: Paperback Texts/Workbooks

Summer Reading Required

Course Description: This course is an accelerated and enhanced approach to English 1.  Coursework focuses on style, structure, and language appropriate for various purposes and audiences.  Students are actively involved in research methodology and literacy development.  They review and expand upon basic grammar and usage, study vocabulary, read selected fiction and nonfiction texts, and use technology to develop multimedia products and presentations.This course includes a unit on Media Literacy.

ENGLISH 1 EXTENSION                                        RD191

All Year – No Credit – Elective – 9

Prerequisite: Students are assigned according to their English grade and/or teacher recommendation.

Course Description: This course is designed to be taken concurrently with English 1. English 1 Extension will focus on supporting and developing problem solving and content area skills to help students be successful in English 1.  Students will be placed into English 1 Extension based on teacher recommendation and student performance in English 1 at any time during the school year. The student may exit the course at any time during the semester by demonstrating proficiency in their English 1 course and teacher recommendation.

ENGLISH 2                                        EN133 – NCAA

All Year – 1 Credit – 10

Prerequisite: Placement

Fees: Paperback Texts/Workbooks

Summer Reading Required

Course Description: This course introduces students to world literature through the study of its traditions, techniques, and genres.  Students investigate how past world beliefs and values have influenced our culture today.  The course emphasizes extensive instruction in the writing process in which students produce a variety of paragraphs, essays, journals, and other forms of writing.  Students build upon grammar and vocabulary from their freshman English course.  This course also incorporates a study of humanities as a means of investigating world literature.

HONORS ENGLISH 2                                        EN135 – NCAA

All Year – 1 Credit (Grade Weighted) – 10

Prerequisite: Placement

Fees: Paperback Texts/Workbooks

Summer Reading Required

Course Description: This course offers students an accelerated and enhanced examination of world literature through the study of its traditions, techniques, and genres.  Students investigate how past world beliefs and values have influenced our culture today.  The course emphasizes extensive instruction in the writing process in which students produce a variety of paragraphs, essays, journals, and other forms of writing.  Students build upon grammar and vocabulary from their freshman English course. This course also incorporates a study of humanities as a means of investigating world literature.

ENGLISH 3                                 EN136 – NCAA

All Year – 1 Credit – 11

Prerequisite: Placement

Fees: Paperback Texts/Workbooks

Summer Reading Required

Course Description: In this course, students explore and analyze a presentation of the traditions, techniques, and genres of American literature. The course emphasizes writing and offers targeted instruction in the writing process. In addition, the curriculum includes usage and mechanics, analytical reading techniques, rhetorical analysis, and vocabulary development. This course is designed for students who need additional support to further hone their reading and writing skills.

AP ENGLISH LANGUAGE AND COMPOSITION                                EN112 – NCAA

All Year – 1 Credit (Grade Weighted) – 11

Prerequisite: See page 11.

Fees: Paperback texts required. See page 11 for AP Examination requirement at no cost.

Summer Reading Required

Course Description: This college level course focuses on an in-depth study of various literary genre and critical/analytical writing.  Entering students should be competent writers and responsible workers since fewer grades will occur.  Regularly assigned timed writings, formal compositions, research projects, and active reading will be used to stimulate the kind of thinking and writing that will prepare students for the Advanced Placement English Language and Composition Exam given each May.  This is the most challenging course in the Junior English program.  Students who receive a 4 or 5 on the AP Exam typically receive credit for both semesters of freshman college English.  Depending on the college, students may receive from 3 to 9 hours of English credit. Preparation for the ACT & SAT exams are emphasized.

CONTEMPORARY TEXTS AND COMPOSITION                                EN145 – NCAA

All Year – 1 Lit. and Comp. Credit – 12

Prerequisite: Successful completion of three years of English and junior teacher recommendation.

Fees: Paperback texts.

Summer Reading Required

Course Description: This course will focus on developing writing skills in order to prepare students for college. Students will analyze contemporary texts (novels, short stories, poetry, pictures, videos, etc.) from a variety of sources and cultural viewpoints in order to enhance their understanding of the world around them and better understand one another. The texts will predominantly span from 1950 to the present as the course will examine how the post-World War II world is structured and what this structure says about the way that we deal with other cultures and form our identities. This course will also stress advanced composition techniques, strategies, and formats.

AP ENGLISH LITERATURE AND COMPOSITION                        EN116 – NCAA

All Year –1 Lit. and Comp. Credit (Grade Weighted) – 12

Prerequisite: Grade of “C” or better in AP Language and Composition OR Teacher Recommendation. Approval by Division Chair.

Fees: Paperback texts required. See page 11 for AP Examination requirement at no cost.

Summer Reading Required

Course Description: While teaching those skills necessary to do well on the Advanced Placement English Literature and Composition Exam, AP refines the knowledge and skills for thinking and decision-making.  This college level course examines a wide range of American, British and world literature and requires students to write analytical papers about their readings.  The class refines skills in writing, research procedures and critical reading.  Teachers use open inquiry and Socratic methods.  Generally, AP develops those skills necessary for college and professional success. Students who receive a 4 or 5 on the AP Exam typically receive credit for both semesters of freshman college English.  Depending on the college, students may receive from 3 to 9 hours of English credit.  

ENGLISH ELECTIVE PROGRAM

The English Elective Program is designed for those students who enjoy Language Arts activities such as reading and writing.

Students are strongly encouraged to discuss elective options with their current English teacher so they can choose appropriately and be prepared for the highly specialized nature and more mature reading and writing levels expected in these courses. Electives not listed for sophomores can be taken with Division Chair approval.

Please note that any elective course that satisfies the fourth-year graduation requirement for English fulfills that requirement only if taken during the student’s senior year. If taken during the freshman, sophomore, or junior year, the course will only count as an elective credit.

DUAL CREDIT ENGLISH COMPOSITION I                                        DC404

Either Semester – .50 Credit (Grade Weighted) – Elective or Comp. – 12.  

3 college credits and .5 high school grade weighting available for eligible students.  

Prerequisite: A score of 470 or above on the Evidence Based Reading and Writing section of the SAT/PSAT OR Top 1/3 of class after 6 semesters of high school OR Unweighted cumulative GPA 3.0 or above after 5 semesters.

Course Description: This course is designed to help students develop their competence in college-level writing and in the analysis of texts so they can enter the dialogue of the academic community. This course includes the analysis and practice of argument and the use of critical thinking to read, analyze, and produce college-level texts.

Dual Credit English Composition 2 (2nd semester)                                       DC409

Second Semester ONLY :  .50 (Grade Weighted Elective or Lit and Comp. - 12

3 college credits and .5 high school grade weighting available for eligible students.

   Prerequisites:   Successful completion of DC404: Dual Credit English Composition I

Course Description:This course furthers the work done in English Composition I by providing students more      experience   as academic writers, readers, researchers and critical thinkers. To help students construct their own meaning    while  engaging with the texts of others, they will develop the ability to collect, evaluate, and incorporate varied sources in thoughtfully-written analyses and arguments. Students' work should demonstrate the ability to position themselves   within the context of academic and societal conversations using a variety of texts, which may include literature, arguments  on various issues, news articles, films, advertisements, and websites.

JOURNALISM                                        EN117

All Year – 1 Credit– Elective – 9, 10, 11, 12 Comp. – 12.  

Prerequisite: “B” average in previous high school or junior high English courses.

Helpful Courses: Yearbook, Printing, Computer Tech

Summer Reading required if taken for a Comp. credit during semester 1 of senior year.

Course Description: This course is the study of print media with a strong emphasis on news style.  Students build specialized skills in news, features, editorial, and sports writing.  They also work with layout and photography.  Students in this class produce all issues of the school newspaper which may require additional time after school to meet deadlines. Therefore, students enrolled in this course must be interested in what is happening in and around the school.  Students may take this course a second time for elective credit with the Journalism teacher’s approval. This course counts as an elective if taken freshman, sophomore, or junior year.

INTRODUCTION TO YEARBOOK                                        EN118

All Year – 1 Credit – Elective – 9, 10, 11, 12 – Lab Course. Does not fulfill senior year English requirement.  

Prerequisite: “B” average in previous high school or junior high school English courses and recommendation from their current English teacher.

Helpful Courses: Journalism, Photography, Computer Tech, and Creative Writing

Course Description: This course is designed to expose students to the world of publishing by producing the ZBTHS yearbook, the Nor’Easter.  Students learn the fundamentals of layout and design, photography, editing, and marketing.  Students enrolled in this course must have strong writing skills and a sincere interest in school activities and events.  Additional time after school may be required to meet plant deadlines; therefore, students must have good attendance, be responsible, and be self-motivated. Semester grades are based on the student’s ability to meet deadlines and submit pages that meet established publishing standards. This course counts as an elective credit only.

ADVANCED YEARBOOK                                        EN119

All Year – 1 Credit – Elective – 10, 11, 12

Lab Course. Does not fulfill senior year English requirement.  

Prerequisite: “B” average in previous high school English classes.  Must complete an application, have successfully completed a full year of Introduction to Yearbook, and have the recommendation of their Yearbook teacher.

Helpful Courses: Journalism, Photography, Computer Tech, and Creative Writing

        Course Description: This course is designed for students with experience in yearbook production. It continues the study of publishing through production of the ZBTHS yearbook, the Nor’Easter.  Students refine their skills in designing page layout and writing feature stories for the yearbook.  Students enrolled in this course must be self-motivated with the ability to work efficiently with less experienced students in order to produce an accurate record of school life at ZBTHS.  They also must be able to spend out-of-class time working on the Nor’easter.  Finally, students enrolled in this course are expected to take on the role of editor and be responsible for the cohesiveness of a section in the yearbook.  This course counts as an elective credit only. Students may repeat this course for elective credit with the Yearbook teacher’s approval.

CREATIVE WRITING 1                                        EN120 – NCAA

Either Semester – .50 Credit – Elective 10, 11, 12 Comp. – 12.  

Course Description: In this course, students develop an awareness of the quality of the human experience through creative writing in a writer’s workshop setting.  Fiction, nonfiction, poetry, and personal essays are among a variety of genres in which the students write.  This course counts as an elective if taken junior year.

CREATIVE WRITING 2                                        EN121 – NCAA

Either Semester – .50 Credit – Elective 10, 11, 12 Comp. – 12.  

Prerequisite: Successful completion of Creative Writing 1.

Course Description: In this course, students develop advanced creative writing skills that build upon and extend those developed in Creative Writing 1.  Special emphasis is placed on writing for specific audiences and for basic and sophisticated understandings. Students also develop their own material to present in a writer’s workshop setting.  Units of study include philosophies of editing in all genres, children's stories, and a unit of independent study to be determined by the student and the teacher. This course counts as an elective if taken junior year.

PUBLIC SPEAKING                                                                EN123 – NCAA

Either Semester – .50 Credit – Elective –11, 12 – Comp. – 12.  

Summer Reading required if taken for a Comp. credit during semester 1 of senior year

Course Description: Public Speaking is a one-semester course in which students study all aspects of the communication process while building confidence and poise.  Special emphasis is placed on controlling stage fright.  Through the preparation, delivery, and critical analysis of speeches, presentations, and other performances, students develop effective speaking and listening skills for a variety of situations.  This course is excellent preparation for a freshman college speech class. This course counts as an elective if taken junior year.

MYTHOLOGY AND COMPOSITION                                        EN130 – NCAA

Either Semester – .50 Credit – Elective – 11, 12 – Lit. or Comp. – 12.  

Summer Reading required if taken for a Lit. or Comp. credit during semester 1 of senior year

Course Description: This course introduces the various elements of myths and legends in a multicultural setting.  The class will, from week to week, study lore from all over the globe throughout many different time periods. This course will also stress advanced composition techniques, strategies, and formats, and there will be a number of opportunities for learning key English reading and writing skills such as research projects, formal presentations, outside novel reading, and analytical essay composition.  This course is both very engaging in its content as well as innovative in its approach.  It is an excellent opportunity to explore the story-telling traditions of the world. This course counts as an elective if taken junior year.

THE BIBLE AS LITERATURE AND COMPOSITION                        EN131

Either Semester – .50 Credit – Elective – 11, 12.  Lit. or Comp. – 12.  

Summer Reading required if taken for a Lit. or Comp. credit during semester 1 of senior year

Course Description: This course is designed as a study of the Bible as literature and the Bible in literature. It is an academic study of selected narratives, characters, discourses, proverbs, and poetry from the Old Testament and New Testament.  Students will engage in literary analysis of the Bible and learn important character themes and motifs that are essential for understanding a variety of other Western literature. Students will further explore the impact that translations of the Bible have had on the English language and the Bible’s influence on Western culture. This course will also stress advanced composition techniques, strategies, and formats.  This course counts as an elective if taken junior year.

AFRICAN LITERATURE AND COMPOSITION                                EN125 – NCAA

Either Semester – .50 Credit – Elective – 11, 12.  Lit. or Comp. – 12.  

Summer Reading required if taken for a Lit. or Comp. credit during semester 1 of senior year

Course Description: African Literature is a one-semester survey course that focuses on the diverse writers and voices of Africa. Through the study of poetry, short stories, novels and nonfiction, students will gain a global perspective of the world and develop a deeper understanding of Africa’s story from pre-colonial through modern times. Due to the broad scope of the continent, the curriculum for this course will pay special attention to areas of American settlements in West Africa and the multicultural rainbow nation of South Africa. This course will also stress advanced composition techniques, strategies, and formats. This course counts as an elective if taken junior year.

LATINX LITERATURE AND COMPOSITION                                        EN140 – NCAA

Either Semester – .50 Credit – Elective – 11, 12.  Lit. or Comp. – 12.  

Summer Reading required if taken for a Lit. or Comp. credit during semester 1 of senior year

Course Description: Latinx Literature and Composition is a one-semester survey course that focuses on the diverse writers and voices of the Latinx diaspora.  Through the study of poetry, short stories, novels and nonfiction, students will gain a global perspective of the world and develop a deeper understanding of Latinx experiences both in the United States and abroad. This course will also stress advanced composition techniques, strategies, and formats. This course counts as an elective if taken junior year.

INTRODUCTION TO TEACHING                                                EN147

Either Semester - .50 Credit - Elective –11, 12.

Prerequisite: Division Chair approval.

Course Description: This course provides the prospective teacher with an introduction to teaching in the United States school systems. This course will provide students considering the teaching profession exposure to best practices in education coupled with practical pre-teaching experiences. Students should expect to engage critically with the course content, reading and writing to sources, observing and analyzing practice, creating a lesson utilizing effective teaching practices, and regularly reflecting on experiences.

HEALTH AND PHYSICAL EDUCATION

Webster’s Dictionary defines health as a “state of physical and mental wellbeing, a condition of body or mind.” It is because we feel a healthy body is a prerequisite for participation in and enjoyment of the many activities provided by the school and society that we place a high value upon our Health and Physical Education Programs. The state of Illinois echoes the importance of these subjects by including successful completion of both Health and Physical Education coursework in all public school graduation requirements.

Our concern goes beyond that of physical conditioning alone.  It extends to the development of and appreciation of activity as a means of reducing tensions inherent in a highly technical and swift-moving society.  It also encompasses the teaching of these types of recreational activities that will enable the individual to remain an active participant, rather than a passive spectator, in the years beyond one's high school experience.

Michael Wollney, Department Head
847-731-9570 – wollneym@zbths.org

IMPORTANT PE COURSE INFORMATION

Every physical education course fulfills .50 credit of the 3.0 graduation requirement.

In all regular physical education classes instructional swimming and physical fitness testing are required.

FRESHMAN FITNESS ORIENTATION                        (Male) PE401 - (Female) PE402

Either Semester - .50 Credit – Required 9

Fees: Students must purchase an approved physical education uniform and padlock.

Course Description: The purpose of this course is to promote health and wellness as a way of life. Emphasis will be placed on creating a healthy lifestyle. Topical areas will include: fitness development, aquatics, stress management, nutrition, and body systems. Activities will focus on intellectual as well as physical development allowing for the development of total wellness.

PHYSICAL EDUCATION 2                                        PE4031/PE4033

Either Semester - .50 Credit – Required 10

Fees: Proper physical education uniform and padlock required.

Course Description: Progression of fitness components and skill development through emphasis on physical fitness, individual and team activities as well as swimming in a health club fashion.

PHYSICAL EDUCATION 3 AND 4                                        PE4071/PE4073

Required Both Semesters - .50 Credit per semester – 11, 12

Fees: Proper physical education uniform and padlock required.

Course Description: In this junior and senior course the emphasis shifts from mass group activities to individual or carry-over activities. The majority of the program will emphasize fitness and individual sports, although some team sports and swimming will be offered in a health club fashion.

PHYSICAL EDUCATION: TEAM SPORTS                                        PE4411/PE4413

Required  - .50 Credit per semester – 11, 12

Fees: Proper physical education uniform and padlock required.

Course Description:  The purpose of this junior or senior course is to develop the physical skills necessary in many forms of movement, knowledge of and team sports concepts such as offensive and defensive strategies and tactics. And appropriate social behaviors within the team or group setting. The integration of fitness concepts throughout the content is critical to the success of this course.  Units may include, but are not limited to the following sports, Volleyball, Kickball, Ultimate Frisbee, Flag Football, Floor Hockey, Softball/Baseball as well as swimming related sports.

MODIFIED PHYSICAL EDUCATION                                         PE4181/PE4183

Either Semester - .50 Credit - 9, 10, 11, 12

Prerequisite: Placement

Course Description: This course is designed to meet the needs of students who cannot handle the physical demands of a regular-paced physical education class and/or would benefit from more individualized attention.  The emphasis will be on improving conditioning and lifetime activities as deemed appropriate for the student's physical condition.  This course satisfies graduation requirements.

INTEGRATED PHYSICAL EDUCATION - S                                 PE4301/PE4303

Either or Both Semesters -.50 Credit – 10, 11, 12

Prerequisite: Placement – Instructor approval required. Also, must be able to swim.

Course Description: Integrated physical education is designed for students in the Supported Instructional Program (SIP) and for sophomores, juniors, and seniors who are thinking about becoming teachers and/or plan on working with people with disabilities. Sophomore, junior and senior classmates will act as student leaders for their assigned peer students Health enrolled in this course. Student leaders will provide assistance to their peer student before, during, and after class. Activities are designed to aid the peer student in the development of social skills, personal hygiene, physical fitness, aquatic skills, and individual and team game concepts.

INTEGRATED PHYSICAL EDUCATION - E                                 PE4311/PE4313

Either or Both Semesters -.50 Credit – 10, 11, 12

Prerequisite: Pass Integrated PE 1 with an “A” or with instructor approval.

Course Description: Integrated PE 2 is designed for students in Educational Life Skills (ELS) and sophomores, juniors, or seniors who are thinking about becoming teachers and/or plan on working with students with special needs. The leaders in this class will help their partners on a daily basis with activities, fitness, or games. These activities are designed to aid the partners in developing social skills, personal hygiene, physical activity, and work on individual and team game concepts.

HEALTH                                        PE422

Either Semester - .50 Credit - 9, 10, 11, 12

Course Description: Health is a wellness-based class that offers students an opportunity to improve and maintain their health status both by increasing their health literacy and developing life-long healthy habits. Students will cultivate and utilize College Readiness academic skills as they learn factual information to help them develop healthy behaviors. Topics include wellness, character development, personality development, emotional development, nutrition, nutrition, body composition and weight management, mental health, managing stress and anxiety, mental disorders, effective communication, family crises, abstinence and relationships, reproductive systems, the life cycle, sexually transmitted infections and HIV/AIDS, sexual assault awareness, the Safe Haven Law, infections and non-infectious diseases, tobacco, alcohol, and medicines and drugs.

ADVENTURE EDUCATION                                        PE4211/PE4213

Either Semester - .50 Credit – 11, 12

Prerequisite: Instructor approval required

Fees: Required fees for field/camping trips and materials. Proper PE uniform and padlock required.

Course Description: This course is for juniors and seniors willing to work with others in a team oriented atmosphere.  A variety of activities will be used to improve the student’s self-esteem, their ability to take risks, improve the student’s ability to cooperate and work well with others through the use of Adventure Education, challenge activities, camping/outdoor skills, physical fitness, swimming, rock climbing, rappelling, and community service. The physical fitness component will be strenuous as it will include rock climbing, high ropes, running, muscular strength and muscular endurance.

Note:  This course may be taken up to 2 semesters (for regular students) to 3 semesters (for student leaders).

ATHLETIC TRAINING                                        PE4141/PE4143

Either Semester - .50 Credit – Elective – 10, 11, 12 (Not an activity based class. WILL NOT MEET P.E. Graduation Requirement)

Prerequisite: Students must have a strong interest in a medical field and commitment to hours outside of the academic day working with Zion-Benton Athletics. Academically strong students will be required to study anatomy and physiology.

Fees: An optional fee for any student wishing to receive an American Red Cross certificate for CPR & AED.

Course Description: Students will develop a broad knowledge of Athletic Training. This course will provide a stepping-stone and strong base of knowledge for those students who will pursue a career in the medical field. Topics will also include: basic first aid, CPR certification, injury recognition, basic knowledge in care and evaluation of injuries, assisting in rehabilitation programs set up by certified staff, and taping and bandaging techniques. Students enrolled in this course are required to complete 20 hours of field experience.

STRENGTH TRAINING AND CONDITIONING                                PE4291/PE4293

Either Semester - .50 Credit – 11, 12

Fees: Proper P.E. uniform and padlock required.

Course Description: This course is designed for students willing to work as individuals to improve overall fitness and muscular strength. Daily workouts may include but are not limited to:  resistance training with universal weights; free weights; medicine balls; resistance tubing; body bars and isometrics. Other workouts may include:  aerobic activity; circuit training; plyometrics; aquatic training; and running and flexibility. Discussions covering heart rate, nutrition, proper hydration, specificity, overload, progressive resistive exercise principles, and safety rules and guidelines in the weight room will be covered. This course is designed for all junior and senior students regardless of current fitness levels or athletic ability.

Note:  This course may be taken up to two semesters.

LIFEGUARD TRAINING                                        PE4111/PE4113

Either Semester - .50 Credit – 10, 11, 12

Prerequisite: Students must be 15 years of age and have sophomore, junior, or senior status on or before the scheduled beginning of the class.  The course may only be repeated once.  Instructor approval is required. Students must be able to do the following:  

  1. Swim 300 yards continuously using these strokes in the following order: (a.) 100 yards of front crawl using rhythmic breathing and a stabilizing, propellant kick.  Rhythmic breathing can be performed either by breathing to the side for front crawl or the front for breaststroke. (b.) 100 yards breaststroke (c.) 100 yards of either front crawl using rhythmic breathing or breaststroke.  These 100 yards may be a mixture of front crawl and breaststroke.  Note:  There is no time requirement for this skill.  Prospective participants must show only that they can swim 300 yards using the above strokes without stopping.
  2. Swim 20 yards using the front crawl or breaststroke, surface dive to a depth of 7 – 10 feet, retrieve a 10 lb. brick, return to the surface, and swim 20 yards back to the starting point with the brick. This test must be completed in 1 minute 40 seconds.

Fees: Approximately $55 for supplies (CPR Mask/Whistle/Lanyard) and the student Lifeguarding Manual. There is also an additional, optional fee for students who would like to receive a Lifeguard certificate from the American Red Cross.

Course Description: The course consists of professional life guarding and injury prevention, patron surveillance and emergency preparation, water rescue skills, breathing emergencies, cardiac emergencies, first aid, caring for head spinal injury, skills scenarios, and written examinations for each area.  Upon completion and satisfactory performance on skills and written tests, the participant receives certification for lifeguard training, first aid, C.P.R. training, A.E.D. Defibrillation use, bag valve masks, and disease transmission.

LIFEGUARD SEMINAR                                        PE411

Either Semester - .50 Credit – 10, 11, 12

Prerequisite: Lifeguard certification and other related first aid credentials must be presented to the counselor at time of registration.  The course may be repeated. Instructor approval is required.

Course Description: Students certified as lifeguards are responsible for guarding patrons at the aquatic center. Students must possess national lifeguard certification and be qualified in First Aid, CPR-PRO, and AED. Lifeguards complete records, reports, and a weekly mandatory in-service; monitor and communicate with patrons during assigned class period; set up materials and work with PE instructors as needed during assigned class period; and assist with clean-up as needed.  Lifeguards must wear appropriate lifeguard attire with hip-pack; be capable of recognizing a swimmer in distress, active or passive drowning; remain professional at all times; and have the ability to stabilize head, neck, back due to a spinal injury.

WATER SAFETY INSTRUCTION                                        PE4121/PE4123

Either Semester - .50 Credit – 11, 12

Prerequisite: Recommendation by Aquatics Director, written exam of basic water safety knowledge, swimming skills test include the following: front crawl, back crawl, sidestroke, breaststroke, elementary backstroke, butterfly. Students must be 16 years of age and have junior or senior status on or before the beginning of class.

Fees: Students must purchase the Water Safety Instructor’s Candidate Kit for approximately $50. There is also an additional, optional fee for students who would like to receive a WSI certificate from the American Red Cross.

Course Description: This is a course designed to train instructor candidates to teach American Red Cross swimming and water safety courses.  Successful completion will enable the student to teach the following courses:  American Red Cross Swimming Courses, Levels 1 thru 6; Water Safety Instructor Aide; Infant and PreSchool Aquatics; Community Water Safety; Safety Training for Swim Coaches.  Students will write block and lesson plans, learn various teaching and instructional methods, safety precautions, dealing with cultural diversities, teaching those with disabilities, student teaching experience in the ZBTHS Physical Education Classes, and Saturday Learn to Swim Program for Children, when available.  May only be repeated once.

        

MATHEMATICS

The Zion-Benton Township High School Mathematics Department believes in providing students with opportunities to develop the skills necessary to live and work productively as well as to provide the strong background needed to pursue future mathematics studies.  The department's offerings provide options for meeting the individual needs and goals of a broad range of students.

Courses offered within the Mathematics Department help students learn challenging mathematical ideas through the implementation of the Common Core State Standards and the Common Core Math Practices below.

Common Core Math Practices

  • Make sense of problems and persevere in solving them.
  • Reason abstractly and quantitatively.
  • Construct viable arguments and critique the reasoning of others.
  • Model with mathematics.
  • Use appropriate tools strategically.
  • Attend to precision.
  • Look for and make use of structure.
  • Look for and express regularity in repeated reasoning.

The sequential nature of mathematics education requires a strict interpretation of course prerequisites. It would be to the student’s advantage to have earned a grade of “C” or better to advance to the next level. The ZBTHS graduation requirement is three years of mathematics. However, it is strongly recommended that college-bound students have four years of high school mathematics credit.

Dr. Nicole Stommel, Department Head
847-731-9440 –
nicole.stommel@zb126.org

MATH 1 EXTENSION                                                        MA163

All Year – No Credit - 9

Prerequisite: Placement

Fees: A TI-84 Plus Graphing Calculator is encouraged

Course Description: This course is designed to be taken concurrently with Math 1. Math 1 Extension will focus on supporting and developing problem solving and content area skills to help students be successful in Math 1.  Students will be placed into Math 1 Extension based on teacher recommendation and student performance in Math 1 at any time throughout the semester.  The student may also exit the course by demonstrating proficiency in their Math 1 course and teacher recommendation.

MATH 1                                                MA164 - NCAA

All Year - 1 Credit - 9

Fees: A TI-84 Plus Graphing Calculator is encouraged

Course Description: This course integrates the foundational concepts of algebra, geometry, and statistics. In this course, students will focus on linear and exponential relationships as well as geometric relationships. Major concepts include representing/analyzing data, solving linear equations and inequalities, graphing linear and exponential functions, transformational geometry, congruence, and angle relationships.

MATH 1 HONORS                                        MA165 – NCAA

All Year - 1 Credit (Grade Weighted) – 9

Prerequisite: Placement

Fees: A TI-84 Plus Graphing Calculator is encouraged

Course Description: Math 1 Honors has similar topics to Math 1, but involves deeper investigation into mathematical concepts and principles. This course integrates the foundational concepts of algebra, geometry, and statistics.  In this course, students will focus on linear and exponential relationships as well as geometric relationships.  Major concepts include representing/analyzing data, solving linear equations and inequalities, graphing linear and exponential functions, transformational geometry, congruence, and angle relationships.


MATH 2 EXTENSION                                        MA142

All Year - 1.0   Math Elective Credit - 10

Prerequisite: Placement

Fees: A TI-84 Plus Graphing Calculator is encouraged

Course Description: This course is designed to be taken concurrently with Math 2. It will focus on correcting student misconceptions about mathematics that will hinder student understanding of higher mathematical concepts. Students in this course will receive additional support on the topics presented in Math 2.

MATH 2                                                MA140 – NCAA

All Year - 1 Credit - 10

Prerequisite: Math 1, Math 1 Honors, or Placement

Fees: A TI-84 Plus Graphing Calculator is encouraged

Course Description: This course is designed to develop a deeper understanding of the foundational concepts of algebra, geometry, and probability. In this course students will extend their knowledge from Math 1 to quadratic models. Other major concepts include rational exponents, similarity, right triangle trigonometry, probability, volume, and properties of circles.

MATH 2 HONORS                                        MA141 – NCAA

All Year - 1 Credit (Grade Weighted) – 9, 10

Prerequisites: Math 1/Math 1 Honors with teacher recommendation

Fees: A TI-84 Plus Graphing Calculator is encouraged

Course Description: Math 2 Honors has similar topics to Math 2, but involves deeper investigation into mathematical concepts and principles. This course is designed to develop a deeper understanding of the foundational concepts of algebra, geometry, and probability. In this course students will extend their knowledge from Math 1 to quadratic models. Other major concepts include rational exponents, similarity, right triangle trigonometry, probability, volume, and properties of circles.  

MATH 3                                                MA150 – NCAA

All Year - 1 Credit – 10, 11

Prerequisites: Math 2 or Math 2 Honors

Fees: TI-84 Plus Graphing Calculator is encouraged

Course Description: This course is designed to develop a deeper understanding of the underlying concepts of algebra, geometry and statistics and serves as a foundation for Pre-Calculus. As the third course in the integrated sequence, this course will afford the student opportunities for engaging in activities that will facilitate the transition to more abstract ways of thinking. Units include: exponential and logarithmic functions, polynomials, circles and trigonometry, applied geometry, and inferential statistics.  

MATH 3 HONORS                                        MA151 – NCAA

All Year - 1 Credit (Grade Weighted) – 10, 11

Prerequisites: Math 2 Honors or Math 2 with teacher recommendation

Fees: TI-84 Plus Graphing Calculator is encouraged

Course Description: Math 3 Honors has similar topics to Math 3, but involves deeper investigation into the mathematical concepts and principles of algebra, geometry, and statistics  and serves as a foundation for Pre-Calculus. As the third course in the integrated sequence, this course will afford the student opportunities for engaging in activities that will facilitate the transition to more abstract ways of thinking. Units include: exponential and logarithmic functions, polynomials, circles and trigonometry, applied geometry, and inferential statistics.

EXPLORATIONS IN DATA SCIENCE                                          MA191 - NCAA (pending)

    All Year - 1 Credit  - 11, 12

Prerequisites: Math 2 or Math 2 Honors

Fees: TI-84 Plus Graphing Calculator is encouraged

Course Description: In this course students will learn to understand, ask questions of, and represent data through                         project-based units.  Students will explore data through active engagement, developing their understanding of data     analysis, sampling, correlation/causation, bias and uncertainty, probability, modeling with data, making and evaluating data-based arguments, and the power of data in society.  Additionally, students will have the opportunity to develop their communication skills as they make sense of data in their own community.  At the end of the course students will have a portfolio of their data science work to showcase their newly developed knowledge and understanding.

TRANSITIONAL MATH                                        MA146

All Year - 1 Senior Elective Credit – 12

Prerequisite: Passing grades in both semesters of Math 1, Math 2, and Math 3

Fees: Material Fees TBA

Course Description: Students earning a C or higher in this course will automatically be placed into a credit-bearing general education math course in any Illinois community college and participating four-year universities (avoiding remedial mathematics in the Quantitative Literacy/Statistics pathway).  This course focuses on developing mathematical maturity through problem solving, critical thinking, data analysis, and the writing and communication of mathematics. Students will develop conceptual and procedural tools that support the use of key mathematical concepts in a variety of contexts. Instruction will emphasize the connections between verbal, numerical, symbolic, and graphical representation of the concepts being taught. Emphasis will be placed on modeling and problem solving, with techniques and manipulations covered in context. The three strands for the course are Algebra, functions, and modeling as they apply to linear, polynomial, rational, and exponential expressions, equations, and functions.

APPLIED MATHEMATICS 1                                        DC405

Either Semester - .5 Senior Core Elective Credit – 12.  Potential for 3.0 College of Lake County Credits.

Prerequisite: Passing grades in both semesters of Math 1, Math 2, and Math 3

Fees:  TI-84 Plus Graphing Calculator is encouraged

Course Description: This dual credit course offers students who plan to pursue a variety of career pathways at CLC an opportunity to successfully complete a required or general education course.  It does not, however, serve as a dual-credit bearing course should students select a General Education program or STEM program at CLC.  Basic principles of mathematics are studied, with applications to trade problems.  Review of fractions, decimals, ratios, proportions, and percent. Introductory algebra, practical geometry, measuring systems, precision, accuracy, and scientific notation.

PRE-CALCULUS                                        MA160 – NCAA

All Year - 1 Credit – 11, 12

Prerequisite: Math 3

Fees:  TI-84 Plus Graphing Calculator is encouraged

Course Description: This course provides a foundation for advanced mathematics and builds on material learned in Math 3. Content includes matrices, functions (exponential, logarithmic, trigonometric, piecewise, and step), rational expressions/equations/functions, trigonometric relationships and equations, and limits.

PRE-CALCULUS HONORS                                        MA162 – NCAA

All Year - 1 Credit (Grade Weighted) – 11, 12

Prerequisite: Math 3 Honors or Math 3 with teacher recommendation.

Fees: TI-84 Plus Graphing Calculator is required.

Course Description: This course provides a pathway to advanced mathematics, specifically AP Calculus AB/BC.  Students will engage in learning that builds on material in Math 3 Honors.  Content includes matrices, functions (exponential, logarithmic, trigonometric, piecewise, and step), rational expressions/equations/functions, trigonometric relationships and equations, and limits.

AP PRE-CALCULUS                                                                MA192 - NCAA Pending

All Year: 1 Credit  (Grade Weighted)  - 11, 12

Prerequisites:  Successful completion of Math 3 Honors

Fees: TI-84 Plus Graphing Calculator is required.

Course Description: In AP Precalculus, students will explore everyday situations and phenomena using mathematical tools and lenses. Through regular practice, students build deep mastery of modeling and functions (polynomial, rational, exponential, logarithmic, trigonometric, polar), and they examine scenarios through multiple representations. They will learn how to observe, explore, and build mathematical meaning from dynamic systems, an important practice for thriving in an ever-changing world.

AP CALCULUS AB/BC                                        MA161 – NCAA

All Year - 1 Credit (Grade Weighted) – 11, 12

Prerequisite: Pre-Calculus (Honors or AP), Department Chair Approval for AP Calculus BC

Fees: See page 10 for AP examination requirement at no cost. TI-84 Plus Graphing Calculator is required.

Course Description: Students will explore the concepts, methods, and applications of differential and integral calculus.  Units of study include: limits and continuity, differentiation, applications of differentiation, integration, differential equations, and applications of integration. Students enrolled in BC will work self-paced, following the College Board curriculum, and will extend their learning to include topics such as parametric, polar, and vector functions, and series.  This course will prepare students for the AP Calculus test (AB or BC).

AP COMPUTER SCIENCE PRINCIPLES                                        MA175 – NCAA

All Year - 1 Credit (Grade Weighted) – 10, 11, 12

Prerequisite: See page 10.

Fees: See page 10 for A.P. examination requirement at no cost.

Course Description: This is an introductory AP course designed to broaden participation in the field of computer science.  Students will be introduced to the creative aspects of programming, abstractions, algorithms, large data sets, the internet, cyber security concerns, and computing impacts.  Students will be given the opportunity to use technology to address real-world problems and build relevant solutions.  

AP STATISTICS                                        MA182 – NCAA

All Year – 1 Credit (Grade Weighted) – 12  

Prerequisite: See page 11.

Fees: TI-84 Plus Graphing Calculator is required. See page 10 for AP examination requirement at no cost.

Course Description: The purpose of this course is to provide students with tools for collecting, analyzing and drawing conclusions from raw data.  Students will learn the concepts of randomness, probability, anticipating patterns and statistical inference in addition to the proper techniques necessary to plan a study.  

NAVAL JUNIOR RESERVE OFFICER TRAINING CORP (NJROTC)

The NJROTC Program is a four-year program conducted to provide an opportunity for secondary school students. (freshmen through seniors) to learn the basic elements and requirements for national security and their personal obligation as Americans. The specific objectives of NJROTC are to:

  • Promote patriotism
  • Develop informed and responsible citizens
  • Promote habits of orderliness and precision and develop respect for constituted authority
  • Develop a high degree of personal honor, self-reliance, individual discipline and leadership

To participate in the program a student must: 

  • Be at least 14 years old and in grades 9 through 12
  • Be of good moral character
  • Be physical fit to participate in NJROTC training (a student is considered to meet this requirement

if able to fully participate in the school physical education program)

  • Comply with established personal grooming standards
  • Wear uniforms on selected days

Andrew Stout, Department Head
847-731-9492 - stouta@zbths.org

EACH SEMESTER OF PARTICIPATION IN NAVAL SCIENCE A STUDENT MAY WAIVE ONE PHYSICAL EDUCATION GRADUATION REQUIREMENT. 

NAVAL SCIENCE 1                                                                NS530

All Year - 1 Credit - Elective - 9, 10, 11, 12

Prerequisite: Approval of instructor and parent permission.

Fees: Name Tag, NJROTC polo shirt, and t-shirt (Cost $35).

Course Description: This course provides an introduction to the precepts of citizenship, the elements of leadership, and the value of scholarship in attaining life goals. The course is designed to engender a sound appreciation for the heritage and traditions of America. Included with the classroom instruction will be a weekly drill session to incorporate discipline, pride, and precision into the student's life and one day of physical fitness training.

NAVAL SCIENCE 2                                        NS531

All Year - 1 Credit - Elective – 10, 11, 12

Prerequisite: A passing grade in Naval Science I or recommendation of the Naval Science Instructor (NSI).

Course Description: This course is a continuation of leadership and citizenship training with emphasis on the role of sea power in world history. The principles of navigation, astronomy, climatology and basic seamanship are introduced during this year. Leadership opportunities in academic, drill and orienteering teams, as well as the color guard, increase as the student advances knowledge and gains greater responsibility. Included with the classroom instruction will be a weekly drill session to incorporate discipline, pride, and precision into the student's life and one day of physical fitness training.

NAVAL SCIENCE 3                                        NS532

All Year - 1 Credit - Elective – 11, 12

Prerequisite: Passing grade in Naval Science 2 or recommendation of the Naval Science Instructor (NSI).

Course Description: This course is a continuation of those disciplines introduced in Naval Science 1 and 2, with greater emphasis on increased leadership roles within the Cadet

Corps. Naval Knowledge studies include Naval Operations, Naval Communications, Naval Intelligence, and Naval Law. Continued study in the areas of Shipboard Organization and Watches coupled with advanced seamanship are presented during this course. Included with the classroom instruction will be a weekly drill session to incorporate discipline, pride, and precision into the student's life and one day of physical fitness training.

NAVAL SCIENCE 4                                        NS533

All Year - 1 Credit - Elective - 12

Prerequisite: Passing grade in Naval Science 3, or approval of instructor and parent permission.

Course Description: This course is a continuation of advanced leadership concepts with emphasis on leadership by example. Leadership studies include: (1) Application of leadership qualities and principles, (2) Evaluation of Performance (3) Giving Instruction (4) Better and effective communication skills. This course will require the student to analyze, discuss and document various leadership scenarios and vignettes. All NS4 students will be assigned positions of responsibility in the Battalion organization, and will be expected to lead the Battalion throughout the year. Included with the classroom instruction will be a weekly drill session to incorporate discipline, pride, and precision into the student's life and one day of physical fitness training.

SCIENCE

The aim of science education is to develop in learners a rich and full understanding of the inquiry process; the key concepts and principles of life science, physical science, and earth and space sciences; and issues of science, understandings and their interactions with the natural world”- Illinois State Board of Education.

In our ever changing world, students need the skills necessary to evaluate and understand the wealth of new information that is created every day. The goal of the science program is to help students acquire content knowledge while increasing their scientific literacy skills. The science courses incorporate the three Dimensions of the Next Generation Science Standards:  Science and Engineering Practices, Cross Cutting Concepts, and Disciplinary Core Ideas. Zion-Benton also strives to follow the NSTA's recommendation that 40 percent of science instruction time be spent in laboratory and hands-on activities.

                                                                                                                                                    Michael Wollney, Department Head
                                                                                                                                                847-731-9570 – wollneym@zbths.org

BIOLOGY                                        SC221 – NCAA

All Year - 1 Credit - 9

Prerequisites: Placement

Course Description: Students in this course will increase their knowledge of core biology concepts while engaging in science practices such as asking questions, carrying out investigations, interpreting data, using models to explain phenomena, and constructing explanations. The major themes covered by the course include structure/function, inheritance of traits, natural selection/evolution, and ecology. Students will engage in class discussion, participate in laboratory investigations, construct scientific explanations and obtain information through reading and interpreting scientific and technical text.

HONORS BIOLOGY                                                                SC224 – NCAA

All Year - 1 Credit (Grade Weighted) – 9

Prerequisites: Placement

Course Description: Honors Biology is similar to Biology but at a more challenging pace and depth. Students in this course will increase their knowledge of core biology concepts while engaging in science practices such as asking questions, carrying out investigations, interpreting data, using models to explain phenomena, and constructing explanations. The major themes covered by the course include, structure/function, inheritance of traits, natural selection/evolution, and ecology. Students will engage in class discussion, participate in laboratory investigations, construct scientific explanations and obtain information through reading and interpreting scientific and technical text.

CHEMISTRY                                                                        SC225 – NCAA

All Year - 1 Credit - 10

Prerequisites: Placement

Fees: Students need a scientific calculator for class.

Course Description: In Chemistry students will investigate fundamental chemistry concepts including, properties of matter, atomic structure, periodic trends, chemical bonding, energy, laws of conservation, pH, nuclear chemistry, and organic chemistry. The goals of the course are to integrate the study of mathematics (especially algebra) into chemistry, to improve problem-solving skills and reasoning ability. This course is designed for students needing additional support.

HONORS CHEMISTRY                                                        SC227 – NCAA

All Year - 1 Credit (Grade Weighted) – 10

Prerequisites: Placement

Fees: Students need a scientific calculator for class.

Course Description: The content of this course is similar to that of Advanced Chemistry; however, students explore topics in greater depth and at a more challenging pace. Selected advanced topics in chemistry are added to challenge the science-oriented student with a strong math background. This is a lab based course where experiments will be performed and studied to further clarify chemical concepts studied in class.  

EARTH SCIENCE                                                                SC228  – NCAA Pending

All Year - 1 Credit – 11, 12

Prerequisites: Placement

Fees: Students need a scientific calculator for class.

Course Description: Earth Science is a course that collectively seeks an understanding of the earth and its environment in space.  Students will explore the topics of oceanography, geology, astronomy, meteorology and geography.  Students will have the opportunity to participate in laboratory investigations and simulations to gain personal experiences with the surroundings in which they live.

PHYSICS                                                                        SC215 – NCAA

All Year - 1 Credit – 11,12

Prerequisites:  Placement

Fees: Students need a scientific calculator for class.

Course Description: In Physics students will investigate fundamental physics concepts including: velocity and acceleration, force, work and energy, momentum, geo-physics, optics, electricity, magnetism, and waves. The goals of the course are to integrate the study of mathematics (especially algebra) into physics to improve problem-solving skills and reasoning ability. This course is designed for students needing additional support.

AP COURSES

All AP science courses, except AP Environmental Science and AP Physics C, require additional time for laboratory experiences; thus, one and one-half periods of class time is scheduled. Students enrolled in AP courses may be assigned summer work that is to be completed before the start of the school year. See page 11 regarding the Advanced Placement Program. Passing this course does not assure college credit; college credit depends on the score received on the AP Exam and the discretion of the college.

AP PHYSICS C                                        SC217 – NCAA

All Year - 1 Credit (Grade Weighted) – 11, 12

Prerequisites: See page 11

Fees: Scientific calculator required (approximately $100). See page 11 for AP Examination requirement at no cost.

Course Description: This course is designed to be the equivalent of first semester freshman college physics. Students should be self-motivated and have good study habits. Nightly homework is very common. This course will further the student's knowledge of the physical world. While calculus will be needed for this course, any knowledge of calculus will be covered in class. Areas of study include: kinematics, dynamics including: rotating systems, and momentum and energy.

AP BIOLOGY                                        SC207 – NCAA

All Year - 1 Credit (Grade Weighted) – 11, 12

Prerequisites: See page 11.

Fees: See page 11 for AP Examination requirement at no cost.

Course Description: This course is designed to be equivalent to freshman college biology. A thorough presentation of the concepts of biology including laboratory investigations will be undertaken. Topics to be studied will include: microbiology, cell physiology, biochemistry, molecular genetics, and evolution.

AP CHEMISTRY                                        SC206 – NCAA

All Year - 1 Credit (Grade Weighted) – 11, 12

Prerequisites: See page 11.

Fees: Required materials—bound lab notebook, scientific calculator (approximately $100).  See page 11 for AP Examination requirement at no cost.

Course Description: This course is designed to be the equivalent of freshman college chemistry.  Students are required to take the Advanced Placement Exam. Kinetics, thermodynamics, inorganic and organic chemistry, and reaction predictions are among the topics to be covered. Labs are scheduled an average of twice weekly. Occasionally students may be required to meet before or after school for additional lab preparation.

AP PHYSICS 2                                        SC210 – NCAA

All Year - 1 Credit (Grade Weighted) – 12

Prerequisites: See page 11.

Fees: Scientific calculator required (approximately $100). See page 11 for AP Examination requirement at no cost.

Course Description: This course is designed to be the equivalent of second semester freshman college physics. Students should be self-motivated and have good study habits. This course will further the student's knowledge of the physical world. Electric and magnetic systems are studied in depth, as well as fluid and thermodynamics, optics, waves, and modern physics.

AP ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE                                        SC214-NCAA

All Year - 1 Credit (Grade Weighted) – 11, 12

Prerequisites: See page 11.

Fees: Minor costs of field trips.  See page 11 for AP Examination requirement at no cost.

Course Description: The AP Environmental Science course is designed to engage students with the scientific principles, concepts, and methodologies required to understand the interrelationships within the natural world. The course requires that students identify and analyze natural and human-made environmental problems, evaluate the relative risks associated with these problems, and examine alternative solutions for resolving or preventing them. AP Environmental Science is interdisciplinary, embracing topics from geology, biology, physics, chemistry, math, and social sciences.  Students are expected to engage in laboratory and fieldwork investigations and attend required field trips.

SCIENCE ELECTIVE PROGRAM

HUMAN ANATOMY & PHYSIOLOGY                                        SC218 – NCAA

Either Semester - .50 Credit – Elective – 11, 12

Course Description: This course is for those interested in science-related fields. Anatomy is a discussion and laboratory based study of the human body. The study will range from molecules, cells, body systems, and processes. Dissection of appropriate organs will compliment coursework. The course is designed for college preparation, especially for biology and health/medical career majors.  

ASTRONOMY                                        SC212 – NCAA

Either Semester - .50 Credit – Elective – 11, 12

Course Description: This course is a one term introduction to astronomy, which covers the nature of science; sun, planets, and moons; origin of the solar system; nature and evolution of stars; exploding stars; stellar remnants, including white dwarfs, neutron stars, and black holes; extrasolar planetary systems; galaxies and quasars; dark matter and dark energy; the Big Bang and the fate of the universe; and life in the universe. This course includes lectures and observation. A possible field trip to Adler Planetarium may be required with nominal charge.  

FORENSIC SCIENCE                                        SC213 – NCAA

Either Semester - .50 Credit – Elective – 11, 12

Fees: Minor costs of field trips.

Course Description: Forensic Science is the study of evidence and its use in a court of law. This course will investigate the following areas of forensic science: fingerprinting, DNA, toxicology, serology, blood spatter, ballistics, forgery, forensic psychology, and science in the courtroom. This course will involve all areas of science that are previously parts of the science curriculum with a concentration in chemistry and physics. This course will involve math skills of algebra, geometry, and trigonometry.  Strong math skills are recommended.

ENVIRONMENTAL ECOLOGY 1                                        SC219 – NCAA

Either Semester – .50 Credit - Elective – 11, 12

Fees: Minor costs of field trips.

Course Description: Environmental Ecology will seek to understand the ecological principles necessary for human society to lessen its impact on the planet. Students will then apply this knowledge in determining technological and behavioral changes that societies could initiate to create a model for living sustainably in our environment. Semester 1 will focus on ecology and field studies.

ENVIRONMENTAL ECOLOGY 2                                        SC220 – NCAA

Either Semester – .50 Credit - Elective – 11, 12

Fees: Minor costs of field trips.

Course Description: Environmental Ecology will seek to understand the ecological principles necessary for human society to lessen its impact on the planet. Students will then apply this knowledge in determining technological and behavioral changes that societies could initiate to create a model for living sustainably in our environment. Semester 2 will focus on the effects of both natural and human impacts on the environment and potential solutions through sustainable practices.

SCIENCE/TECHNOLOGY SEMINAR                                        TBA

Either Semester - .50 Credit - Elective - 10, 11, 12 - may be repeated for a total of one credit.

Prerequisite: Science Division Chair / Director of Technology approval, by special permission only. A written plan of study and an agreement with a teacher to serve as mentor must be completed.

Fees: Materials for project.

Course Description: Designed for students wishing to obtain specialized science / technology credit, help prepare classroom laboratory materials, and support technology. The plan of study may include an in-depth laboratory project in the area of study as well as a review of scientific literature to support the project.

FOR THE FOLLOWING COURSES, PLEASE SEE LAKE COUNTY TECH CAMPUS BEGINNING ON PAGE 64:

BIOMEDICAL SCIENCE                                        TC640

LAW ENFORCEMENT AND CRIME SCENE INVESTIGATION                TC6901

SOCIAL SCIENCE

The Social Science Department  is committed to building excellence and positively impacting our community by enhancing access to all. This faculty seeks to provide equitable access to learning opportunities, address inclusive ideas, and perspectives of all students.

We acknowledge and hold central to our teaching practices our students’ diverse intersectionalities including race, gender, socioeconomic background, religion, sexual orientation, gender identity, age, physical ability, ethnicity, country of origin, and intellectual perspective. To meet these diverse needs, the Social Science faculty strive to provide an inclusive environment where diversity is examined, protected, promoted, and celebrated.

Furthermore, we endeavor to develop a climate and culture where classrooms are a safe community of learners who are respected, reflected in the curriculum, universally supported, fairly assessed, and feel a strong sense of belonging.

Dr. Jasey Kolarik, Department Head

847-731-9540 - kolarikj@zbths.org

IMPORTANT SOCIAL SCIENCE COURSE INFORMATION
Three years are required for graduation, of which 1.0 must include a U.S. History course and .5 must include a Government course.  

SOCIAL STUDIES                                        SS318 – NCAA

All Year - 1 Credit - 9

Prerequisite: Placement

Course Description: Social Studies is a one-year course focused on reading skill development designed to familiarize students with topics in social science centered on Geography, Sociology, Economics and Political Science. Students will also be introduced to the various methodologies employed by social scientists. In this class students will focus on Common Core State Standards for Grades 9-10 Literacy in History/Social Studies along with Illinois Learning Standards for Social Science. Reading materials will challenge students by presenting implicit concepts supported by data and context-dependent words. Students will address contemporary issues from multiple perspectives and will gain an understanding of how social scientists understand and shape the world. Built around enduring questions relevant to students’ own lives, Social Studies encourages students to recognize and address social problems and to foresee the consequences of their own actions. Significant emphasis will be placed on the development of all students as participating and responsible members of their community and nation.

AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY                                                        SS333 – NCAA

All Year - 1 Credit (Grade Weighted) – 9, 10, 11, 12

Prerequisite: None

Fees: See page 10 for AP Examination requirement at no cost.

Course Description: This course is designed to be the equivalent of a college survey. It aims to introduce students to the basic concepts of human geography and provide a geographic framework for the analysis of current world problems through the use of case studies. The course offers students the opportunity to understand the tools, themes, and concepts of geography; to think critically about geographic problems on the global, national and local scales; to appreciate the diversity of global cultures, including their cultural and economic characteristics; to understand how cultural landscapes are created and how they change over time; and to prepare for the Advanced Placement Human Geography examination.

AP ECONOMICS                                                                SS348 – NCAA

All Year - 1 Credit (Grade Weighted) – 9, 10, 11, 12

Prerequisite: None

Fees: See page 10 for AP Examination requirement at no cost.

Course Description: As a part of macroeconomics, students explore the principles of economics that apply to an economic system as a whole. The second half of the course focuses on microeconomics where students study the principles of economics that apply to the behavior of individuals within an economic system. Students will use graphs, charts, and data to analyze, describe, and explain economic concepts. This course prepares students for both the AP Microeconomics and AP Macroeconomics exams. This course fulfills the state requirement of Consumer Economics,when passing both semesters. .

AFRICAN STUDIES: HISTORY AND INFLUENCE                                SS349 – NCAA

Either Semester - .50 – Sophomore Core, Elective –10. 11, 12.

This course is part of the sophomore core, continental studies classes. Students select two of the following four classes: African Studies, East Asian Studies, European and West Asian Studies, and Latin American Studies. . The course cannot be taken to replace a missing U.S. History or U.S. Government course.

Fees: Materials for projects

Course Description:  In this course, students will explore the history and influence of the African continent. Beginning with modern geography and current events, this course will trace the region’s foundational civilizations, interactions with growing globalization, establishment of a modern identity, and place in the contemporary world. Students will discover major voices and movements within Africa and surrounding regions through both primary and secondary sources. Regions and time periods of focus in the course include: Global positioning (geography and current events), foundational civilizations, post classical and colonialism, independence and change, and contemporary influences across Africa from Ancient Egypt to Sudanic and Swahili States, to colonial and post-colonial state-building across the continent.

EAST ASIAN STUDIES: HISTORY AND INFLUENCE                        SS350 – NCAA Pending

Either Semester - .50 – Sophomore Core, Elective –10, 11, 12.

This course is part of the sophomore core, continental studies classes. Students select two of the following four classes: African Studies, East Asian Studies, European and West Asian Studies, and Latin American Studies. . The course cannot be taken to replace a missing U.S. History or U.S. Government course.

Fees: Materials for projects

Course Description:  In this course, students will explore the history and influence of East Asia. Beginning with modern geography and current events, this course will trace the region’s foundational civilizations, interactions with growing globalization, establishment of a modern identity, and place in the contemporary world. Students will discover major voices and movements within the region through both primary and secondary sources. Regions and time periods of focus in the course include: Global positioning (geography and current events), foundational civilizations, post classical and colonialism, independence and change, and contemporary influences in areas including China, Japan, India, Indonesia, and South Pacific.

EUROPEAN AND WEST ASIAN STUDIES: HISTORY AND INFLUENCE                  SS351 – NCAA Pending

Either Semester - .50 – Sophomore Core, Elective –10, 11, 12.

This course is part of the sophomore core, continental studies classes. Students select two of the following four classes: African Studies, East Asian Studies, European and West Asian Studies, and Latin American Studies. . The course cannot be taken to replace a missing U.S. History or U.S. Government course.

Fees: Materials for projects

Course Description:  In this course, students will explore the history and influence of Europe and Western Asia. Beginning with modern geography and current events, this course will trace the region’s foundational civilizations, interactions with growing globalization, establishment of a modern identity, and place in the contemporary world. Students will discover major voices and movements within the region through both primary and secondary sources. Regions and time periods of focus in the course include: Global positioning (geography and current events), foundational civilizations, post classical and colonialism, independence and change, and contemporary influences in areas including the British Isles, Scandinavia, Eastern and Western Europe,the Balkans, Levante and Mashriq.

LATIN AMERICAN STUDIES: HISTORY AND INFLUENCE                SS352 – NCAA

Either Semester - .50 – Sophomore Core, Elective –10, 11, 12.

This course is part of the sophomore core, continental studies classes. Students select two of the following four classes: African Studies, East Asian Studies, European and West Asian Studies, and Latin American Studies. . The course cannot be taken to replace a missing U.S. History or U.S. Government course.

Fees: Materials for projects

Course Description: In this course, students will explore the history and influence of Latin America. Beginning with modern geography and current events, this course will trace the region’s foundational civilizations, interactions with growing globalization, establishment of a modern identity, and place in the contemporary world. Students will discover major voices and movements within the region through both primary and secondary sources. Regions and time periods of focus in the course include: Global positioning (geography and current events), foundational civilizations, post classical and colonialism, independence and change, and contemporary influences in Mexico, Central America, the Caribbean, and South American continent.

AP WORLD HISTORY                                                        SS346 – NCAA

All Year - 1 Credit (Grade Weighted) – 10, 11, 12

Prerequisite: See page 11.

Fee: See page 10 for AP Examination requirement at no cost.

Course Description: AP World History follows the approved College Board curriculum, skills, practices, and themes. The course is equivalent to a general World History course taken in the first year of college.  The course investigates how themes have changed and continued over time in different places. Students will refine their analytical abilities and critical thinking skills in order to understand historical context, make comparisons across cultures, use documents and other primary sources, and recognize and discuss different interpretations and historical frameworks. Students will be expected to take extensive notes on their secondary source reading, be prepared to participate in classroom discussions, and write a number of analytical, comparative, evolutionary, and document-based essays in preparation for the Advanced Placement World History examination. Students who take the AP Exam may earn college credit.

UNITED STATES HISTORY                                        SS330 – NCAA

All Year - 1 Credit - 11

Prerequisite: Placement

Fees: Materials for projects

Course Description: This course focuses on the unique history of the United States within a global world. The emphasis of this course is placed on the diversity of the American people from the Colonial Era to present day. This class will explore what it means to be an American and the development of the nation’s past and its relation to the present. In addition to learning about America’s history, successful students in this course will be expected to actively participate in class discussions, to improve their abilities to read and think analytically, and to express their ideas in verbal and written form.

AP        UNITED STATES HISTORY                                        SS307 – NCAA

All Year - 1 Credit (Grade Weighted) - 11

Prerequisite: See page 11.

Fees: See page 10 for AP Examination requirement at no cost.

Course Description: This course is a college-level survey that traces the development of the American experience from the Age of Exploration and Discovery to the present day. Emphasis is placed on a variety of interpretations of important time periods and themes in American history, with special attention paid to the four historical thinking skills and seven core themes as outlined by the College Board. Students should expect highly dedicated teachers and to read roughly 150 pages per week in assigned text and source material. Students will be expected to take extensive notes on their secondary source reading, be prepared to participate in classroom discussions, and write a number of analytical, comparative, evolutionary, and document-based essays in preparation for the Advanced Placement US History examination. All work culminates in, and prepares the student for, the AP exam. Students who take AP exam may earn college credit.

UNITED STATES GOVERNMENT                                        SS309 – NCAA

Either Semester - .50 Credit – 12

Prerequisite: Placement

Fees: Materials for projects

Course Description: This course analyzes the system of politics in America. Students will learn about the theories and foundations of American Government, the U.S. Constitution, political ideology, voter behavior, the legal aspects of individual rights, as well as state and local government. This course will meet Illinois State Board of Education’s requirements with regards to passing the Federal and State Constitution Test, and other civic requirements. Students will be asked to get involved in a number of different civic activities throughout the course..

ADVANCED UNITED STATES GOVERNMENT                                SS310 – NCAA

Either Semester - .50 Credit – 12

Prerequisite: Placement

Fees: Materials for projects

Course Description: This course analyzes the system of politics in America. Students will learn about the theories and foundations of American Government, the U.S. Constitution, political ideology, voter behavior, the legal aspects of individual rights, as well as state and local government. This course will meet Illinois State Board of Education’s requirements with regards to passing the Federal and State Constitution Test, and other civic requirements. Students will be asked to get involved in a number of different civic activities throughout the course.

AP UNITED STATES GOVERNMENT AND POLITICS                        SS311 - NCAA

All Year - 1 Credit (Grade Weighted) - 12 - Meets graduation requirement, U.S. and Illinois Constitution Requirement.  

Prerequisite: See page 11.

Fees: See page 10 for AP Examination requirement at no cost.

Course Description: The Advanced Placement Course in United States Government and Politics is designed to give students a critical perspective on politics and government. This course involves both the study of general concepts used to interpret United States politics, civics, and the analysis of specific case studies. It also requires familiarity with the various institutions, groups, beliefs, and ideas that make up the American political reality. The subjects that the course covers include constitutional underpinnings, policy making institutions such as the legislature, the executive, the bureaucracy, and the courts, public opinion and the media, political participation and voting behavior, political parties, interest groups, election laws and election, civil liberties and rights, and accelerated budget making. Students who take the AP Exam may earn college credit.

SOCIAL SCIENCE ELECTIVE PROGRAM

PSYCHOLOGY I                                                                SS315 – NCAA

Either Semester - .50 Senior Core Elective Credit – 11, 12.

Fees: Materials for projects

Course Description: This course deals with the study of human behavior.  Topics to be developed include: an introduction, history, and research methods of psychology, biological bases of behavior, consciousness, sensation and perception, cognition, learning, and life span development.

PSYCHOLOGY II                                        SS316 – NCAA

Second Semester - .50 Senior Core Elective Credit – 11, 12. 

The course cannot be taken to replace a missing Social Studies, World History, U.S. History, or U.S. Government course.

Prerequisite: Successful Completion Psych 1

Fees: Materials for projects

Course Description: This course deals with a reinforcement of the foundations acquired during Psychology I. Topics to be developed include: personality and its assessment, motivation and emotion, stress and health, psychological disorders, treatment of psychological disorders, and social psychology. A research project may be required.

AP PSYCHOLOGY                                        SS317 – NCAA

All Year - 1 Credit (Grade Weighted) – 1.0 Senior Core Elective – 11, 12.

The course cannot be taken to replace a missing U.S. History, or U.S. Government course.

Prerequisite: See page 11.

Fees: See page 10 for AP Examination requirement at no cost.

Course Description: Advanced Placement Psychology is designed for the highly motivated student and will provide a solid background for college psychology courses.  This course deals with the study of human behavior.  Topics to be developed include:  history and approaches of psychology, research methods, biological bases of behavior, sensation and perception, states of consciousness, learning, cognition, motivation and emotion, developmental psychology, personality, testing and individual differences, abnormal psychology, treatment of psychological disorders, and social psychology.  Research projects are required.

SOCIOLOGY I                                                                SS321 – NCAA

Either Semester - .50 Credit - Elective – 11, 12.

 The course cannot be taken to replace a missing U.S. History, or U.S. Government course.

Fees: Materials for projects

Course Description: This course deals with the study of society.  Sociology is concerned with groups – how they are formed and how they change – and with the actions of individuals within groups.  Topics to be developed include: an introduction to sociology, sociologists doing research, culture, socialization, social structure and society, social stratification, inequalities of race and ethnicity, and inequalities of age and gender.

SOCIOLOGY II                                                                SS324 – NCAA

Either Semester - .50 Credit - Elective – 11, 12.

The course cannot be taken to replace a missing U.S. History, or U.S. Government course.

Prerequisite: Sociology I

Fees: Materials for projects

Course Description: This course deals with a reinforcement of the foundations acquired during Sociology I. Sociology II is a study of contemporary social problems that plague different levels of society. Students will examine these problems using the conflict, symbolic interactionist, and functionalist perspectives. Topics to be developed include, but are not limited to, social institutions, population and urbanization, collective behavior and social movements, and social change and modernization. A research project may be required.

SOCIAL SCIENCE SEMINAR                                                TBA

Either Semester - .50 Credit – Elective - 10, 11, 12. May be repeated for a total of 1 Credit.

Prerequisite: Department Chair approval

Course Description: Designed for students wishing to obtain specialized Social Science credit.  The course includes an in-depth project in the seminar area of study. Written teacher and department head approval is required.

SPECIAL EDUCATION

District 126 provides all students with disabilities a free and appropriate public education in accordance with applicable state and federal laws. Parents/guardians of students with disabilities and the student serve as team members with the public school staff in determining eligibility for and provisions of special education services. Every identified student will be assigned a case manager to facilitate registration, monitor compliance with legal requirements, and provide assistance to students, teachers, and parents.

The major goals of the Special Education Department are: 

  • to provide the specialized instruction and supports necessary for a student with identified special education needs in the least restrictive environment in which the student can succeed; and
  • to ensure, as much as possible, that each student is encouraged:
  • to identify strengths and to minimize weaknesses,
  • to accept a major portion of the responsibility for the quality of his/her life,
  • to view oneself as a capable human being able to contribute to the home and school community, and
  • to actively engage in planning a post-high school career

In order to achieve these goals, the District’s Special Education Department offers a continuum of resources and instructional services for eligible students with disabilities in the categorical areas of:  Learning Disabilities, Intellectual Disabilities, Emotional Disturbances, Autism, Physical Disabilities, Traumatic Brain Injuries, Other Health Impairments, Hearing and Vision Impairments (including deafness and deaf-blindness), and Speech and Language disabilities. Students will be registered for general education classes unless the student’s Individualized Education Program (IEP) specifies a more restrictive environment. The goal is to meet the educational and/or emotional needs of students using the least restrictive environment appropriate to the individual child. To offer a full continuum of special education options, District 126 works with the Special Education District of Lake County (SEDOL). For additional information, contact the Special Education Department at 847-731-9713.

Emily Waddick - Department Head

847-731-9713 – waddicke@zbths.org

INSTRUCTIONAL STRATEGIC READING                                        SP256

All Year - 1 Credit

Prerequisite: Approval of Director of Special Education and parent permission.

Course Description: Strategic Reading is a small group instruction course focusing on the four components of research-based reading instruction--decoding, fluency, vocabulary building, and comprehension—to help students improve reading performance. As students develop skills in the four identified areas, they also receive guidance in applying the strategies to content area classes (English, social science, math and science), thus giving them the additional support they may need to succeed in such courses. It also provides additional support to students preparing for SAT testing. Non-fiction individualized computer instruction provides visual, auditory, and kinesthetic practice specific to the student’s independent level of comprehension, vocabulary, and grammar. In addition to reading skills, students learn basic grammar and spelling through the writing process. Students will work toward completion of course goals consistent with their IEP goals.

READING FOUNDATIONS                                        SP226

All Year - 1 Credit

Prerequisites: Approval of Director of Special Education and parent permission.

Course Description: Reading Foundations is a small group instruction course focusing on reading, grammar, punctuation, and parts of speech in addition to the content in their English and Reading course. This course will allow students to make gains towards becoming closer to grade level in the areas of their Lexile, fluency, and spelling. This course has two different delivery methods. The online component provides students with the opportunity to move at their own pace. While students work online, the teacher receives reports and will make assignments at critical junctures within students’ learning paths. The teacher directed components reinforce grade-level expectations while delivering explicit instruction. This combination ensures accelerated learning, intensive instruction of foundational skills, and exposure to grade-equivalent standards, text, and vocabulary to move students to reading independence. Students will work toward completion of course goals consistent with their IEP goals.

INSTRUCTIONAL ENGLISH 1                                                SP240

All Year - 1 Credit - 9

Prerequisite: Approval of Director of Special Education and parent permission.

Fees: Paperback Texts. Summer Reading Required.

Course Description: This course is designed to accept eligible students at their present level of ability, this course offers a basic introduction to effective written and oral communication skills and is designed for students needing additional support. Students will work toward completion of course goals consistent with their IEP goals. Coursework focuses on style, structure, and language appropriate for various purposes and audiences. Students will be actively involved in research methodology, writing, and speaking. As part of the coursework, students will review basic grammar and usage, study vocabulary, read selected fiction and nonfiction texts, and utilize technology to develop multimedia products and presentations.  This course uses materials, methods, and objectives appropriate to the student.  

INSTRUCTIONAL ENGLISH 2                                                SP246        

All Year – 1 Credit – 10

Fees: Paperback Texts/Workbooks

Summer Reading Required

Course Description: This course introduces students to world literature through the study of its traditions, techniques, and genres.  Students investigate how past world beliefs and values have influenced our culture today.  The course emphasizes extensive instruction in the writing process in which students produce a variety of paragraphs, essays, journals, and other forms of writing.  Students build upon grammar and vocabulary from their freshman English course.  This course also incorporates a study of humanities as a means of investigating world literature.  Students will work towards completion of course goals consistent with their IEP goals.

INSTRUCTIONAL ENGLISH 3                                 SP251

All Year-1 Credit - 11

Prerequisite: Approval of Director of Special Education and parent permission.

Fees: Paperback Texts.  Summer Reading Required.

Course Description: This course is designed to accept eligible students at their present level of ability.  Students will work toward completion of course goals consistent with their IEP. The course utilizes materials, methods, and objectives appropriate to the student.

INSTRUCTIONAL CONTEMPORARY TEXTS AND COMPOSITION        SP252

All Year - 1 Credit - 12

Prerequisite: Approval of Director of Special Education and parent permission.

Fees: Paperback Texts.  Summer Reading Required.

Course Description: This course will focus on developing writing skills for post-secondary planning. Students will spend time reading contemporary texts that will encourage them to consider the challenges that come about while making the transition from adolescence into adulthood. This course stresses the importance of class discussions, required written assignments, and reading of contemporary literature. Students will work toward completion of course goals consistent with their IEP goals.

INSTRUCTIONAL SOCIAL STUDIES                                        SP242

All Year - 1 Credit - 9

Prerequisite: Approval of Director of Special Education and parent permission.

Course Description: This course is intended for students who require instructional services and is designed to accept eligible students at their present level of ability. The course will familiarize students with several social science disciplines and the various methodologies employed by social scientists. Students will work toward completion of course goals consistent with their IEP goals. Students will address contemporary issues from multiple perspectives and will gain an understanding of how social scientists understand and shape the world. Social Studies encourages students to recognize and address social problems and to foresee the consequences of their own actions. Significant emphasis will be placed on the development of all students as participating and responsible members of their community and their nation.

INSTRUCTIONAL CONTINENTAL STUDIES: HISTORY AND INFLUENCE        SP304

Year Long- 1.0 – Sophomore Core, Elective –11, 12.

This course is part of the sophomore core, continental studies classes. The course cannot be taken to replace a missing U.S. History or U.S. Government course.

Fees: Materials for projects

Course Description:  In this course, students will explore the history and influence of African, Asian, European and Latin American culture on the world. Beginning with modern geography and current events, this course will trace the region’s foundational civilizations, interactions with growing globalization, establishment of a modern identity, and place in the contemporary world. Students will discover major voices and movements within the culture and surrounding regions through both primary and secondary sources. Regions and time periods of focus in the course include: Global positioning (geography and current events), foundational civilizations, post classical and colonialism, independence and change, and contemporary influences across continents . Students will work toward completion of course goals consistent with their IEP goals.

INSTRUCTIONAL UNITED STATES HISTORY                                SP259

All Year - 1 Credit - 11

Prerequisite: Approval of Director of Special Education and parent permission.

Course Description: This course will examine American History. Significant time periods and events will be covered and discussed throughout the course. Students will learn about American influences, expansion, and global events that have impacted America and the overall American experience.  Content of the course will be integrated with content presented in other core areas. Students will work toward completion of course goals consistent with their IEP goals.  

INSTRUCTIONAL GOVERNMENT                                        SP260

Either Semester - .50 Credit - 12

Prerequisite: Approval of Director of Special Education and parent permission.

Course Description: This course is designed to accept eligible students at their present ability level.  Students will work towards course goals as well as IEP goals. This course will utilize materials, methods and objectives that are appropriate to individual students. The student will study the structure of government, analyze the consequences of participation and non-participation in the electoral process, and understand historical events and processes that brought about changes in the United States.  Students will also look at the roles and influences of individuals, groups and the media in shaping current debates on state and national policies. This course will meet Illinois State Board of Education’s requirements with regards to passing the Federal and State Constitution Test, and other civic requirements. Students will be asked to get involved in a number of different civic activities throughout the course.

INSTRUCTIONAL BIOLOGY                                        SP243

All Year - 1 Credit - 9

Prerequisite: Approval of Director of Special Education and parent permission.

Course Description: This course is intended for students who need instructional services and is designed to accept eligible students at their present level of ability. Instructional Biology is a laboratory-oriented class where biological concepts are investigated. Important topics covered are biochemistry, ecology, cells, genetics, evolution, microbiology, animals, and human systems. Group and individual projects, laboratory activities, and cooperative learning groups are utilized in this class in order to give students the scientific knowledge and skills to be successful.  Students will work toward completion of course goals consistent with their IEP goals.

INSTRUCTIONAL CHEMISTRY                                        SP249

All Year - 1 Credit - 10

Prerequisite: Approval of Director of Special Education and parent permission.

Course Description: In Instructional Chemistry students will investigate fundamental chemistry concepts including: properties of matter, atomic structure, periodic trends, chemical bonding, energy, laws of conservation, pH, nuclear chemistry, and organic chemistry. The goals of the course are to integrate the study of mathematics into chemistry, to improve problem-solving skills, and reasoning ability. Students in the instructional class will receive instruction that is aligned to the regular curriculum. In some cases, based on student needs, parallel activities will be planned to illustrate concepts that are presented in the regular chemistry class. Students will work toward completion of course goals consistent with their IEP goals.

INSTRUCTIONAL PHYSICS                                        SP254

All Year - 1 Credit - 11

Prerequisite: Approval of Director of Special Education and parent permission.

Course Description: This course is intended for students who need instructional support.  It is designed to accept eligible students at their present ability level.  Instructional Physics is a laboratory oriented class where students will study concepts related to physical sciences.  Topics covered include:  constant velocity, acceleration, forces, universal gravitation, work and energy, and momentum. Group and individual projects, laboratory activities, and cooperative learning groups are utilized in this course to teach students problem solving skills and scientific concepts. Students will work towards completion of course goals consistent with their IEP goals.  

INSTRUCTIONAL EARTH SCIENCE                                        SP299

All Year - 1 Credit- 11 and 12

Prerequisite: Approval of Director of Special Education and parent permission

Course Description:  Instructional Earth Science is a course that collectively seeks an understanding of the earth and its environment in space.  Students will explore the topics of oceanography, geology, astronomy, meteorology and geography.  Students will have the opportunity to participate in laboratory investigations and simulations to gain personal experiences with the surroundings in which they live.  Students will work towards completion of course goals consistent with their IEP goals.

INSTRUCTIONAL ENVIRONMENTAL ECOLOGY                                SP266

All Year – 1 Credit – 12

Prerequisite: Approval of Director of Special Education and parent permission.

Course Description: Instructional Environmental Science is designed to accept eligible students at their present level of ability.  This course is designed to increase students’ awareness of the universe they live in.  Among units covered are astronomy, geography, geology, meteorology, oceanography, mineralogy, and the earth’s natural resources.  Students will work toward completion of course goals consistent with their IEP.  This course utilizes materials, methods, and objectives appropriate to the student.  

FOUNDATIONAL MATH 1                                        SP244

All Year - 1 Credit - 9

Prerequisites: Approval of Director of Special Education and parent permission.

Course Description: This course is intended for students who need instructional support and is designed to accept eligible students at their present level of ability. The course will familiarize students with basic math and math life skill concepts. Students will work toward completion of course goals consistent with their IEP goals.

FOUNDATIONAL  MATH 2                                        SP255

All Year - 1 Credit - 10

Prerequisites: Approval of Director of Special Education and parent permission.

Course Description: This course is designed to accept eligible students at their present level of ability. Students will work toward completion of course goals consistent with their IEP goals. This course utilizes materials, methods, and objectives appropriate to the student.

FOUNDATIONAL  MATH 3                                        SP258

All Year - 1 Credit – 11, 12

Prerequisites: Approval of Director of Special Education and parent permission.

Course Description: This course is designed to accept eligible students at their present ability level.  Students will work towards completion of course goals consistent with their IEP.  This course utilizes materials, methods, and objectives appropriate to the student.

INSTRUCTIONAL MATH 1                                        SP247

All Year - 1 Credit – 9, 10

Prerequisite: Approval of Director of Special Education and parent permission.

Course Description: This course integrates the foundational concepts of algebra, geometry, and statistics.  In this course, students will focus on linear and exponential relationships as well as geometric relationships. Major concepts include: representing/analyzing data, solving linear equations and inequalities, graphing linear and exponential functions, transformational geometry, congruence, and angle relationships. Students will work toward completion of course goals consistent with their IEP goals.

INSTRUCTIONAL MATH 2                                        SP220

All Year - 1 Credit – 10, 11

Prerequisite: Approval of Director of Special Education and parent permission.

Course Description: This course is designed for students who have completed Instructional Math 1 and to develop a deeper understanding of the foundational concepts of algebra, geometry, and probability. In this course students will extend their knowledge from Math 1 to quadratic models. Other major concepts include: rational exponents, similarity, right triangle trigonometry, probability, volume, and properties of circles. Students will work toward completion of course goals consistent with their IEP goals.

INSTRUCTIONAL MATH 3                                        SP257

All Year - 1 Credit – 11, 12

Prerequisite: Approval of Director of Special Education and parent permission.

Course Description: This course is designed to develop a deeper understanding of the underlying concepts of algebra, geometry and statistics. As the third course in the integrated sequence, this course will afford the student opportunities for engaging in activities that will facilitate the transition to more abstract ways of thinking. Units include: exponential and logarithmic functions, polynomials, circles and trigonometry, applied geometry, and inferential statistics. Students will work toward completion of course goals consistent with their IEP goals.

INSTRUCTIONAL CONSUMER MATH                                        SP245

All Year - 1 Credit – 11, 12.  Fulfills Personal Finance Graduation Requirement; This class fulfills the state requirement of Consumer Economics. Must pass both semesters.

Prerequisite: Approval of Director of Special Education and parent permission.

Course Description: This course is designed to be an extension of the instructional math courses students have completed their freshman through junior years.  The emphasis of this class will be consumer math.  Topics discussed will be: supply and demand, checking accounts, consumer credit, employment, insurance, and financial living expenses.  Students will leave this course with a greater understanding of how mathematics is applied in the real world.  Students will work toward completion of course goals consistent with their IEP goals.

INSTRUCTIONAL HEALTH                                        SP262

Either Semester - .50 Credit – 9, 10, 11, 12

Prerequisite: Approval of Director of Special Education and parent permission. 

Course Description: This class is designed to meet state health goals and learning outcomes, as well as graduation requirements. Methods and materials are meant to meet each student's individual educational needs while providing instruction in the required areas of mental and physical health and wellbeing. Students will work toward completion of course goals consistent with their IEP goals.

LEARNING SKILLS CENTER                                        SP2611/SP2613

Either Semester - .25 Credit - Elective - 9, 10, 11, 12. May be repeated.

Prerequisites: Approval of Director of Special Education and parent permission.

Course Description: This course is offered to special education students. The intent of the Learning Skills Center is to assist students with organization, test taking, and support in all related academic areas.  Students will work toward completion of course goals consistent with their IEP goals.

INSTRUCTIONAL LIFE MANAGEMENT                                        SP269

All Year-1 Credit - 9, 10, 11, 12.  Fulfills Personal Finance Graduation Requirement; This class fulfills the state requirement of Consumer Economics. . Must pass both semesters.

Prerequisite: Approval of Director of Special Education and parent permission.

Course Description: Students will reflect on themselves in order to learn skills that will prepare them for post-secondary life. Topics covered in this course include:  interpersonal skills, conflict resolution, goal setting, employment basics, budgeting, and healthy lifestyle choices.  Students will work toward completion of course goals consistent with their IEP goals.

VOCATIONAL CAREERS 1                                        SP278

All Year - 1 Credit – 9, 10

Prerequisite: Approval of Director of Special Education and parent permission.sic

Course Description: This course focuses on the development of pre-vocational skills. Students will be introduced to the world of work.  Job skills, resumes, and other work related activities will help students to focus on their careers of interest and understand what skills they will need to bring to the workplace to be successful. Students will work toward completion of course goals consistent with their IEP goals.

VOCATIONAL CAREERS 2 TOPICS IN TRANSITION                        SP267

All Year - 1 Credit – 10, 11, 12

Prerequisite: Approval of Director of Special Education and parent permission.

Course Description: Designed to give the student basic pre-vocational skills.  This course will include an appropriate on-campus job.  During this class students will participate in the vocational assessment program at the Lake County High School Technology Campus.  Course may be repeated for credit.  Students will work toward completion of course goals consistent with their IEP goals.

COOPERATIVE WORK EXPERIENCE                                        SP279

Variable Schedule and Credit

Prerequisite: Approval of Director of Special Education and parent permission.

Course Description: Provides on-the-job training.  Course can be repeated for credit.  Students will work toward completion of course goals consistent with their IEP goals.

EDUCATIONAL LIFE SKILLS

The ELS program is a small group instructional program for students in grades 9-12. The program is designed to meet the needs of students with moderate to severe cognitive needs. Students in this program require a curriculum that focuses on functional life skills. The design is an individualized, modified curriculum that is based on Illinois Learning Standards.  Students will receive instruction in academic, community, and vocational skills. Instructional services are planned and implemented by the team to support the student’s daily educational program and achievement of individualized goals.

SUPPORTED INSTRUCTIONAL PROGRAM

The SIP program is a cross-categorical, small group instructional program for students grades 9-12. The program is designed to meet the needs of students who have moderate cognitive and specific learning needs and who require a highly supportive instructional setting. Opportunities are provided within the community to practice skills taught within the educational setting. Skills presented in this program focus on a modified curriculum based on Illinois Learning Standards. Instruction and therapies (speech/language, occupational therapy, physical therapy, social work, etc.) are delivered in small and large group situations based on individual needs. Students in this program are integrated into the general education programs with support as appropriate. 

TEACHING APPROPRIATE BEHAVIOR PROGRAM COURSES

The Teaching Appropriate Behavior Program adapts regular level courses to materials and methods appropriate to the individual student.

Courses Offered:

TAB Language Arts                        TAB Science                        TAB Reading                                        TAB Learning Skills Center                TAB Math                        TAB Vocational Careers

TAB Social Studies                        TAB Family & Consumer Science

VISUAL AND PERFORMING ARTS

The Visual and Performing Arts Department provides students with the opportunity to grow artistically and to develop the skills necessary to express themselves creatively through the arts.  Students are encouraged to find their own modes of self-expression by developing their creativity in art, music, and drama.

We believe the arts are an important part of a well-rounded education, and we welcome students of all ability levels to explore the arts with us.                                                                                                                                    

Andrew Stout, Department Head
847-731-9492 – stouta@zbths.org

INTRODUCTION TO ART                                        VP701

Either Semester – .50 Credit – Elective – 9, 10, 11, 12

Course Description: This is a lab class designed for students interested in learning basic skills in art.  Areas of study include two-dimensional and three-dimensional work in drawing, painting, ceramics, and jewelry.  Students work with various art media, including pencil, colored pencil, marker, Tempera paint, clay and metal. This course is helpful for students who are not sure which material they prefer.

INTEGRATED INTRO TO ART                                        VP7611/VP7613

Either Semester – .50 Credit – Elective – 10, 11, 12

Course Description:  Integrated art is designed for students in the Supported Instructional Program (SIP) and for sophomores, juniors, and seniors who are thinking about becoming teachers and/or plan on working with people with disabilities. Sophomore, junior and senior classmates will act as student leaders for their assigned peer students  enrolled in this course. Student leaders will provide assistance to their peer students before, during, and after class. Activities are designed to aid the peer student in the development of social skills, art and artistry  This is a lab class designed for students interested in learning basic skills in the various areas of art.

3-D SCULPTURE 1                                        VP714

Either Semester - .50 Credit – Elective – 9, 10, 11, 12

Helpful Course: Introduction to Art.

Course Description: This is a lab class designed for students interested in working three-dimensionally. Students work with various media, including metal, wood, clay, plaster, textiles and paper. Areas of study include design, ceramics, printmaking, textiles, and jewelry.

3-D SCULPTURE 2                                        VP715

Either Semester – .50 Credit – Elective – 10, 11, 12

Prerequisite: 3-D Sculpture 1

Course Description: This is a lab class designed for students interested in advanced three-dimensional study.  Students complete longer term, more extensive, and more sophisticated three-dimensional art pieces using various media.  This course may be repeated for elective credit.

INTRODUCTION TO STUDIO ART:PORTFOLIO PREPARATION        VP717

All Year - 1 Credit - (Grade Weighted) - Elective – 11

Helpful Courses: Introduction to Art, Drawing and Painting 1, 2, Ceramics, 3-D Sculpture 1, 2, Jewelry.

Course Description: This course is preparatory for the senior year when AP Art students prepare their art portfolios. In this class students choose to work on projects for their Drawing Portfolio, 2-D Design Portfolio, or 3-D Design Portfolio. Emphasis is placed on drawing skills and spatial relationships, and studio skills through a variety of media. Sketchbook drawing homework is assigned weekly.

AP STUDIO ART                                        VP718

All Year – 1 Credit (Grade Weighted) – Elective – 12

Prerequisites: Introduction to AP Studio Art OR written approval from instructor.

Helpful Courses: Drawing and Painting 1, 2; Ceramics; 3-D Sculpture 1, 2; Jewelry.

Fees: See page 11 for AP Examination requirement at no cost.

Course Description: This course is for students preparing an art portfolio (Drawing, 2-D Design or 3-D Design) for the AP Studio Art exam. The course is individualized to student needs. Students prepare and submit an outline of proposed projects of their choice to be completed. The teacher acts as a resource to students as they progress with their projects. This course focuses on experimentation, investigation, and process.

CERAMICS 1                                        VP703

Either Semester – .50 Credit – Elective – 9, 10, 11, 12

Helpful Course: Introduction to Art

Course Description: This is a lab class designed for students interested in working with clay.  Students experience hand-building, sculpture, wheel throwing, and glazing techniques. They also build useful and ornamental objects.

CERAMICS 2                                        VP7041/VP7043

Either Semester – .50 Credit – Elective – 10, 11, 12

Prerequisite: Ceramics 1

Course Description: This is a lab class designed for students who want to expand their hand-building skills in clay.  In this course, special emphasis is placed on improved techniques of wheel throwing.  Students build more sophisticated objects. Students may repeat this class for elective credit.

DIGITAL PHOTOGRAPHY                                                        VP716

Either Semester - .50 Credit - Elective – 11, 12

Fees: Fee card as needed

Course Description: Students will have the opportunity to discover the world of Digital Photography and Photographic Art. Students will use Adobe Photoshop and Adobe Lightroom to digitally process and edit photographs for both print and online use. This course will familiarize students with digital photographic equipment, materials, methods, and processes, while helping students learn and apply basic elements of art and the principles of design. Areas of composition of pictures, creative techniques, studio portrait photography and introducing the different artistic ways of photography will be included.

DRAWING 1                                        VP707

Either Semester – .50 Credit – Elective – 9, 10, 11, 12

Prerequisite (9, 10, 11): Introduction to Art.

Course Description: This is a lab class designed for students interested in expanding and improving their drawing skills.  Experiences include work in pencil, colored pencil, pastel, scratchboard and ink.  Sketchbook drawing homework is assigned weekly.

DRAWING 2                                        VP7081/VP7083

Either Semester – .50 Credit – Elective – 10, 11, 12

Prerequisite: Drawing 1

Course Description: This is a lab class designed for students interested in advanced drawing skills.  Students explore studies in still life, landscape, portraiture, and perspective. Students also use printmaking techniques to create multiples of their images.  Sketchbook drawing homework will be assigned weekly.  This course may be repeated for elective credit.

JEWELRY 1                                        VP709

Either Semester - .50 Credit – Elective – 9, 10, 11, 12

Helpful Course: Introduction to Art

Course Description: This is a lab class designed for students interested in developing skills in jewelry-making with metals and craft jewelry. Students learn techniques in sawing, soldering, leatherworking, clay, wire, and needleworking. Students will design and build useful and ornamental objects in this class. 

JEWELRY 2                                                                        VP7101/VP7103

Either Semester – .50 Credit – Elective – 10, 11, 12

Prerequisite: Jewelry 1

Course Description: This is a lab class designed for students interested in building on skills learned in Jewelry 1 to create more elaborate, advanced jewelry. Students may repeat this course for elective credit. 

PAINTING 1                                                                        VP711

Either Semester – .50 Credit – Elective – 9, 10, 11, 12

Helpful Courses: Introduction to Art and Drawing 1.

Course Description: This is a lab class designed for students interested in expanding and improving their painting skills.  Students work in both abstract and realistic styles using watercolor, acrylic, and tempera paints. Sketch/Paint book homework is assigned.

PAINTING 2                                                                        VP7121/VP7123

Either Semester – .50 Credit – Elective – 10, 11, 12

Prerequisite: Painting 1

Course Description: This is a lab class designed for students interested in advanced painting skills.  Students explore studies in both abstract and realistic painting, using watercolor, tempera and acrylic paint. Sketch/Paint book homework is assigned. Students may repeat this course for elective credit.

ART SEMINAR                                        TBA

Either Semester - .50 Credit - Elective – 11, 12. May be repeated for a total of one (1.0) credit.

Prerequisite: Written approval from instructor and Division Chair.

Course Description: This is a lab class designed for students wishing independent study in a specialized art area.  The student and instructor establish course objectives and assessments.

ACTING 1                                        VP720

Either Semester – .50 Credit – Elective – 9, 10, 11, 12

Fees: Required field trip fees

Course Description: This is a lab course for beginning acting students that explores the performer's skills to create believable action, develop concentration, and strengthen imagination. Skills developed include: voice, movement, facial expression, and character development. Students are expected to perform regularly in front of the class, and to take part in peer review. Acting 1, 2, and 3 students may be members of the same class.  Attendance at the Fine Arts Festival is mandatory. Students will be given dates ahead of time.

ACTING 2                                        VP721

Either Semester – .50 Credit – Elective – 9, 10, 11, 12

Prerequisite: Acting 1

Fees: Required field trip fees

Course Description:  This is a lab course for intermediate acting students that uses scripted material to improve the actor’s voice and movement, with an emphasis on character development. Students are expected to perform regularly in front of the class, and to take part in peer review. Acting 1, 2, and 3, and Acting Seminar students may be members of the same class, but with a differentiated curricular focus.  Attendance at the Fine Arts Festival is mandatory. Students will be given dates ahead of time.

ACTING 3                                        VP7221

Either Semester – .50 Credit – Elective – 10, 11, 12

Prerequisite: Acting 1, 2

Fees: Required field trip fees

Course Description: This is a lab course for intermediate acting students that use scripted material to improve the actor’s voice and movement, with an emphasis on character and full play development. This course helps students develop research and analysis skills as they focus on creating believable characters and movement. Acting 2, Acting 3, and Acting Seminar students may be members of the same class, but with a differentiated curricular focus.  Attendance at the Fine Arts Festival is mandatory. Students will be given dates ahead of time.

ACTING SEMINAR                                        TBA

Either Semester – .50 Credit – Elective – 10, 11, 12

Prerequisite: Acting 1, 2. Student must have written approval from the instructor and Division Chair.

Fees: Required field trip fees

Course Description: A lab course for advanced acting students who wish to further their skills in vocal and body interpretation of a script or to try their hand at directing. Students in this course may be assigned a full play for direction. This course may be repeated. Attendance at the Fine Arts Festival is mandatory. Students will be given dates ahead of time. Seminar students must be approved by the instructor prior to enrollment in the course.

INTRODUCTION TO THEATRICAL PRODUCTION                                VP758

Either Semester – .50 Credit – Elective – 9, 10, 11, 12

Fees: Required field trip fees

Course Description: This is a hands-on working lab class that introduces students to the non-acting areas of theater including set, lights, costume, makeup, and publicity.  Students are required to complete designs and projects related to a specific play. Acting students generally find this course of particular value. Students will use tools, try out makeup, and will be required to try a variety of activities.  Attendance at the Fine Arts Festival is mandatory. Students will be given dates ahead of time.

THEATRICAL PRODUCTION SEMINAR                                        VP759

Either Semester – .50 Credit – Elective – 9, 10, 11, 12

Fees: Required field trip fees

Course Description: This hands-on lab course is for the student who wishes to focus on a singular area of theatrical production design (set, lights, sound, costume, or make-up). The student will work with a mentor teacher to create and execute the design work for one of our ZB Encore Players Productions.  The student will practice design and revision, as well as work on a production team. Students in this course are expected to be self-motivated, able to work independently and meet hard deadlines.  Seminar students must be approved by the instructor prior to enrollment in the course.

BEGINNING BAND                                        VP762

All Year – 1 Credit – Elective – 9, 10, 11, 12

Prerequisites: 1) Junior High Band experience/Junior High instructor recommendation.  Prior experience playing a woodwind, brass, or percussion instrument. 2) Instructor approval.

Fees:Activity fee to cover some supplies and uniform items. Students will need to supply their own instrument and supplies, but there are a limited number of school-owned instruments available.

Course Description: Beginning Band is a year-long course designed for students wishing to learn an instrument for the first time, or students who had less than 3 years of playing experience prior to high school and wish to refine their skills. Students will select woodwind, brass, or percussion instruments, work through a beginning band method book in large group, small group, and individual settings, and eventually reach proficiency for placement in a full band class. Students who do not already own an instrument will be able to rent one from the school.

INTERMEDIATE BAND                                         VP730

All Year – 1 Credit – Elective – 9, 10 , 11, 12

Prerequisites: 1) Junior High Band experience/Junior High instructor recommendation.  Prior experience playing a woodwind, brass, or percussion instrument. 2) Instructor approval.

Fees:Annual fee for band program supplies

Course Description: This co-curricular ensemble focuses on the fundamentals of technique and musicianship.  These fundamentals include instrument care, posture and playing position, embouchure, breath control, tone production, intonation, and fingerings.  The techniques of ensemble and full band performance are stressed.  Upon completion of this course, students may audition for a more advanced band.  Music performed by this group is primarily grade 2.5 and 3 level on a scale from 0-6.  Required performances occur outside of the school day and include concerts, music festivals, football games, and pep band games. Students in this course receive a PE waiver for the Fall semester. 

Students may repeat this course for elective credit with consent of instructor.

CONCERT BAND                                        VP732

All Year – 1 Credit – Elective –  9, 10, 11, 12

Prerequisites: Audition or Instructor Approval.

Fees: Activity fee to cover some supplies and uniform items. Students will need to supply their own instrument and supplies, but there are a limited number of school-owned instruments available.

Course Description: This co-curricular ensemble gives particular attention to the fundamentals of large ensemble performance and the continued development of technical skills. Rehearsal techniques, tone production, aural and perceptual skills, and basic music theory are stressed. In addition to several formal concerts, members are required to participate in marching performances, various school/community activities, and sectionals. Music performed by this group is primarily grade 3 and 4 level on a scale from 0-6. Upon completion of this course, students may audition for Symphonic Band. Required performances occur outside of the school day and include concerts, music festivals, football games, and pep band games. Students in this course receive a PE waiver for the Fall semester. Percussionists in Concert Band and Symphonic Band should register for VP731 Percussion Class.

Students may repeat this course for elective credit with consent of instructor.

SYMPHONIC BAND                                        VP733

All Year – 1 Credit – Elective – 9, 10, 11, 12

Prerequisites: Musical audition based on note accuracy, rhythmic accuracy, tone quality, and musicianship and instructor approval.

Fees: Activity fee to cover some supplies and uniform items. Students will need to supply their own instrument and supplies, but there are a limited number of school-owned instruments available.

Course Description: This is an advanced level instrumental ensemble which gives particular attention to the fundamentals of chamber and large ensemble performance and the continued development of technical skills. Rehearsal techniques, tone production, aural and perceptual skills, and basic music theory are stressed. In addition to several formal concerts, members are required to participate in marching performances, various school/community activities, and sectionals. Music performed by this group is primarily grade 4.5 and higher on a scale from 0-6. Also, members have the opportunity to participate in numerous district, state, and college sponsored music festivals, concerts, and contests. Participants in Percussion, Concert Bands, or Symphonic Band may waive one semester of the physical education semester graduation requirement per year.

Percussionists in Symphonic Band should register for Percussion VP731 instead of this course.
Students may repeat this course for elective credit with consent of instructor.

PERCUSSION                                                                        VP731

All Year – 1 Credit – Elective – 9, 10, 11, 12

Prerequisites: Junior High Band experience/Junior High Band Director recommendation and consent of instructor required for students with no prior experience.

Fees: Activity fee to cover some supplies and uniform items. Students will need to supply their own instrument and supplies, but there are a limited number of school-owned instruments available.

Course Description:  This is an intermediate and advanced level instrumental ensemble that gives particular attention to the fundamentals of large ensemble performance and the continued development of technical skills. Rehearsal techniques, tone production, aural and perceptual skills, and basic music theory are stressed. In addition to several formal concerts, members are required to participate in marching performances, various school/community activities, and sectionals. During First Quarter, all students are members of the Marching Band Drumline and rehearse as a group each day. For Second, Third, and Fourth Quarters, students in this class are a member of either the Concert Band or Symphonic Band and rehearse individual band music as well as small and large percussion ensemble music. Only students who play percussion should register for this section. All woodwind and brass players should register for either VP732 or VP733. Participants in Percussion, Symphonic Band, or Wind Ensemble may waive one semester of the physical education semester graduation requirement per year.  *Students may repeat this course for elective credit with consent of instructor..

BEGINNING GUITAR                                                        VP7381/VP7383

Either Semester – .50 Credit – Elective – 9, 10, 11, 12

Fees: Students are required to purchase one Guitar book and guitar picks.

Course Description: This course provides basic instruction in the fundamentals of acoustic guitar combined with the study of musical notation, style, and form for guitar. Students may repeat this course for elective credit with consent of the instructor.

PIANO 1                                                                        VP760

Either Semester – .50 Credit – Elective – 9, 10, 11, 12

Fees: Students will be required to purchase one piano workbook.

Course Description: Piano 1 is available to all students in Grades 9 through 12 enrolled at Zion-Benton Township High School. This course is a beginner's class designed for students who wish to develop basic piano playing skills. Time in class will be spent learning both traditional piano literature and popular music by playing alone and with others. Students will learn to read standard music notation, read chords and chord charts, create original compositions for piano, and develop effective technique for successful piano performance. This course may be taken as an introductory course leading to AP Music Theory.

PIANO 2                                                                        VP7631/VP7632

Either Semester – .50 Credit – Elective – 9, 10, 11, 12

Prerequisite: Piano 1 or equivalent (determined by instructor)

Fees: Students will be required to purchase one piano workbook.

Course Description: Piano 2 is available to all students in Grades 9 through 12 enrolled at Zion-Benton Township High School.  This course is an intermediate class designed for students who wish to develop piano playing skills beyond Introduction to Piano.Time in class will be spent learning both traditional piano literature and popular music by playing alone and with others.  An extra focus will be on ensemble playing and pop song lead sheets. 

MUSIC PRODUCTION                                                        VP757

Either Semester – .50 Credit – Elective – 9, 10, 11, 12

Course Description: Students will learn how to use the computer, music synthesizer, and music software to listen, perform, and compose music. They will experience increases in computer knowledge, musical notation and composition and digital sequencing. Students will have the opportunity to create multimedia presentations using music, images, and video. This course may be taken as an introductory course leading to AP Music Theory.

AP MUSIC THEORY                                                                VP756

All Year – 1 Credit (Grade Weighted) – Elective – 10, 11, 12

Prerequisite: See page 11.

Fees: See page 11 for AP Examination requirement at no cost.

Course Description: The AP Music Theory course roughly parallels the content of a first-year undergraduate music theory course. Significant critical, analytical, and creative thinking skills are fostered in the course, especially those involving the roles of texture, harmonic progression, formal structure, and style in composed music. AP examination questions emphasize the synthesis of musical knowledge into usable musical understanding. This course is recommended for students who are interested in a career in music, or those who have a strong aptitude and wish to take the AP Music Theory Exam for college credit.

BEGINNING TREBLE CHOIR                                                VP734

All Year – 1 Credit – Elective – 9

Course Description: This is the initial choral experience for all freshman girls and girls from other grades who are new to singing. Emphases are placed on fundamentals of vocal technique and music literacy (understanding music notation). The goal of the course is to provide each student with a wide variety of experiences so she has a solid musical foundation on which to build. The ensemble will be exposed to a variety of treble choir literature and will also have extensive study in pitch and rhythmic notation, solfeggio, sight-reading, ear training, and tone production. Attendance at all concerts is required.

CONCERT CHOIR                                                                VP736

All Year – 1 Credit – Elective – 9, 10

Prerequisite: Approval of instructor

Course Description: Concert choir is designed to be a mixed ensemble. It is open to sophomore girls and freshman and sophomore boys. The course aims to improve each student’s singing skills and overall musicianship. The Concert Choir will study and perform a wide variety of choral literature for mixed choruses and will have considerable study in sight-reading, solfeggio, ear training, and other experiences to improve musical literacy. Attendance at all concerts is required.

ADVANCED TREBLE CHOIR                                                VP735

All Year – 1 Credit – Elective – 11, 12

Prerequisite: Audition required.  Admission based on vocal quality, musicianship, and voicing needed for choral balance.

Course Description: Advanced Treble Choir is open to junior and senior women. Students in this class study and perform advanced treble-voiced literature of a variety of styles and historical periods. Tone production of the maturing female voice and choral musicianship is focused on in this class. The curriculum includes an emphasis on musicianship skills such as sight-reading, solfeggio, ear training, and vocal independence. Advanced Treble Choir performs in school and in the community frequently during the year. Students enrolled in this course have the opportunity to audition for the extracurricular Vocal Jazz Ensemble. Students are encouraged to audition for the ILMEA Illinois All-State Chorus in the fall to enhance their musical development. Attendance at all concerts is required.

CHAMBER SINGERS                                                        VP737

All Year - 1 Credit – Elective – 11, 12

Prerequisite: Audition required.  Admission based on vocal quality, musicianship, and voicing needed for choral balance.

Fees: Required field trip fees and purchase of performance attire may be required.

Course Description: Chamber Singers is the top-level mixed chorus musical offering at ZBTHS. Chamber Singers is made up of singers from grades 11 and 12, and participation in this choir is determined by audition. The repertoire ranges from Renaissance to 20th century, sacred to secular, and a cappella to a varied means of accompaniment. In addition to the literature being prepared for performance, there will be extensive work in further developing each student’s singing, sight-reading, solfeggio, and tonal memory skills. The Chamber Singers perform in the school and in the community frequently during the year. Students enrolled in this course have the opportunity to audition for the extracurricular Vocal Jazz Ensemble, and students are encouraged to audition for the ILMEA Illinois All-State Chorus in the fall to enhance their musical development. Attendance at all concerts is required.

MUSIC SEMINAR                                        TBA

Either Semester – .50 Credit – Elective – 10, 11, 12 (May be repeated)

Prerequisite: Written approval of Music teacher and Division Chair.

Course Description: This course is designed for students wishing to obtain specialized Music credit.  It includes an in-depth project in the seminar area of study. Students may repeat this course for elective credit with the consent of the instructor. Students interested in the following careers should consider the course: Music Education, Special Education, and Music Performance (instrumental or vocal).

WORLD LANGUAGE

In our society, the study of a second language is an important life skill to acquire not only for college purposes, but also for career development as well as for cultural enrichment. The opportunity to enroll in French, German, or Spanish and ASL further enhances communication skills in a verbal/non-verbal and written format. In acquiring a language, students learn to adapt to different cultures and experience literature, art, music and history. Although it is recommended that students be reading at or above grade level in order to succeed in a second language class, attitude, motivation and personal goals are often more important in determining a student’s rate of success.      

Dr. Jasey Kolarik, Department Head
847-731-9540 –kolarikj@zbths.org

FRENCH 1                                        WL351 - NCAA

All Year - 1 Credit – Elective - 9, 10, 11, 12

Prerequisite: The student should be reading at or above grade level.

Course Description: An introductory course in French that develops the skills of listening, speaking, reading, and writing. Emphasis is on speaking and listening using the communicative approach to teaching. Students have the opportunity to speak and hear French in class on a daily basis as they interact with classmates and the teacher. Course content will be presented through a variety of materials in the target language. Culture is an integral part of this course. Regular homework can be expected.

FRENCH 2                                        WL352 – NCAA

All Year - 1 Credit – Elective – 10, 11, 12

Prerequisite: French 1 and teacher recommendation.

Course Description: In this course students continue their study of the French language and of the target language culture. Emphasis is on speaking and listening using the communicative approach to teaching. Students have the opportunity to speak and hear French in class on a daily basis as they interact with classmates and the teacher. Course content will be presented through a variety of materials in the target language. Culture is an integral part of this course. This program provides students with the tools and the confidence to express themselves in French. Regular homework can be expected.

FRENCH 3                                        WL353 – NCAA

All Year - 1 Credit (Grade Weighted) - Elective – 11, 12

Prerequisite: French 2 and teacher recommendation.

Fees: Workbook to be purchased at schedule pickup (Approximately $15).

Course Description: French 3 is designed for students who have successfully completed two years studying the rudiments of the French language and francophone culture. The goal of this course is to guide students as they transition from beginning French towards an intermediate level of language acquisition and proficiency. Class will be conducted in French.  Students will continue to develop communication skills in French. Students will also further their study of French vocabulary and grammar and francophone culture as well as improve their reading comprehension and writing skills in French. Cultural enrichment is offered via music, videos, articles, and other authentic materials pertinent to the current topics of study. Daily homework can be expected

FRENCH 4                                        WL354 – NCAA

All Year - 1 Credit (Grade Weighted) – Elective – 11, 12

Prerequisite: French 3 and teacher recommendation.

Fees: Readers, possible field trip fee, exceptional students may choose to do extra preparation outside of class in order to prepare for the AP French Language Exam.

Course Description: French 4 is designed for students who have successfully completed three years of French study and who are interested in deepening their understanding of the French language and francophone culture. The goal of this course is to guide students as they proceed to a higher level of language acquisition and proficiency. Class will be conducted in French so as to give students the best possible advantage as they strive to comprehend and communicate in French. Students will continue to deepen their knowledge of the French language via activities involving vocabulary, grammar, reading, writing, and speaking. Students will read various forms of literature such as novels, short stories, and magazine articles. Students will also focus on the art, geography, and history of francophone countries and regions. Cultural enrichment is offered on a daily basis via music, videos, articles, movies, and other materials pertinent to the current topics of study. Students may choose to do extra work outside of class in order to prepare for the AP French Language exam.  Daily homework can be expected.

GERMAN 1                                        WL361 – NCAA

All Year - 1 Credit-Elective - 9, 10, 11, 12

Prerequisite: The student should be reading at or above grade level..

Course Description: This is an introductory course in German that develops the skills of listening, speaking, reading, and writing. Emphasis is on speaking and listening using the communicative approach to teaching. Students have the opportunity to speak and hear German in class on a daily basis as they interact with classmates and the teacher. Course content will be presented through a variety of materials in the target language. Culture is an integral part of this course. Regular homework can be expected.

GERMAN 2                                        WL362 – NCAA

All Year - 1 Credit - Elective – 10, 11, 12

Prerequisite: German 1 and teacher recommendation.

Course Description: In this course students continue their study of the German language and of the target language culture. Emphasis is on speaking and listening using the communicative approach to teaching. Students have the opportunity to speak and hear German in class on a daily basis as they interact with classmates and the teacher. Course content will be presented through a variety of materials in the target language. Culture is an integral part of this course. This program provides students with the tools and the confidence to express themselves in German. Regular homework can be expected.

GERMAN 3                                        WL363 – NCAA

All Year - 1 Credit (Grade Weighted) - Elective – 11, 12.  Students may repeat this class once.

Prerequisite: German 2 and teacher recommendation.

Fees: Exceptional students may choose to do extra preparation outside of class in order to prepare forthe AP German Language Exam. Workbook to be purchased at schedule pickup and/or novel, required purchase (approximately $15-$30).  Possible field trip fee.

Course Description: This course is the continuation of the study of German speaking countries and their language. Major grammatical points and vocabulary not covered in German 1 and 2 will be covered through a variety of speaking and writing projects leading to fluency in the target language and a broadened knowledge of the cultures of German speaking cultures. Classes will be conducted entirely in German unless the instructor feels the need to facilitate  understanding of grammatical points in English. Students will also have oral presentations and a variety of written projects, which will encourage creative use of the target language and culture.  Course content will be presented through a variety of materials:  textbook, worksheets, aural and visual aids (tapes, films, slides) and by practical experience. Cultural topics covered will include, but not be limited to, geography, history, music, customs, and contemporary life in German, Austrian, and Swiss society. Note: In order to accommodate both German 3 and 4 students, the curriculum will be on a two-year rotation. Preparation for the optional Advanced Placement Exam is provided. Daily homework can be expected.

GERMAN 4                                        WL364 – NCAA

All Year - 1 Credit (Grade Weighted) - Elective –12.  Students may repeat this class once.

Prerequisite: German 3 and teacher recommendation.

Fees: Exceptional students may choose to do extra preparation outside of class in order to prepare for the AP German Language Exam. Workbook to be purchased at schedule pickup and/or novel, required purchase (approximately $15-$30). Possible field trip fee.

Course Description: This course is the continuation of the study of German speaking countries and their language. Major grammatical points and vocabulary not covered previously will be covered through a variety of speaking and writing projects leading to fluency in the target language and a broadened knowledge of the cultures of German speaking cultures. Classes will be conducted entirely in German unless the instructor feels the need to facilitate understanding of grammatical points in English. Students will also have oral presentations and a variety of written projects, which will encourage creative use of the target language and culture. Course content will be presented through a variety of materials: textbook, worksheets, aural and visual aids (tapes, films, slides) and by practical experience. Cultural topics covered will include, but not be limited to, geography, history, music, customs, and contemporary life in German, Austrian, and Swiss society. Note:  In order to accommodate both German 3 and 4 students, the curriculum will be on a two-year rotation. Preparation for the optional Advanced Placement Exam is provided. Daily homework can be expected.

SPANISH 1                                        WL371 – NCAA

All Year - 1 Credit - Elective - 9, 10, 11, 12

Prerequisite: The student should be reading at or above grade level.  This course is for students beginning their study of the Spanish language. It is NOT intended for students who communicate with their family in Spanish. Este curso es para estudiantes que no hablan español en su casa; es un curso principiante del idioma español..

Course Description: This is an introductory course in Spanish that develops the skills of listening, speaking, reading, and writing. Emphasis is on speaking and listening using the communicative approach to teaching. Students have the opportunity to speak and hear Spanish in class on a daily basis as they interact with classmates and the teacher. Course content will be presented through a variety of materials in the target language. Culture is an integral part of this course. Regular homework can be expected.

SPANISH 2                                        WL372 – NCAA

All Year - 1 Credit – Elective – 10, 11, 12

Prerequisite: Spanish 1 and teacher recommendation.

Course Description: In this course students continue their study of the Spanish language and of the target language culture. Emphasis is on speaking and listening using the communicative approach to teaching. Students have the opportunity to speak and hear Spanish in class on a daily basis as they interact with classmates and the teacher. Course content will be presented through a variety of materials in the target language. Culture is an integral part of this course. This program provides students with the tools and the confidence to express themselves in Spanish. Regular homework can be expected.

SPANISH 3                                        WL373 – NCAA

All Year - 1 Credit (Grade Weighted) - Elective – 11, 12

Prerequisite: Spanish 2 or Heritage Speakers Level 2

Fees: Possible field trip fee.

Course Description: This course is a continued study of the Spanish language and culture.  The remaining major grammatical topics are covered to facilitate fluency in speaking and writing.  All classes are conducted in Spanish, including the regular use of popular music. Students are expected to speak in Spanish during class. Various writing projects and oral presentations are integral parts of the curriculum.  A more intensive study of cultural topics and history will be included. Frequent homework can be expected.

SPANISH 4                                        WL374 – NCAA

All Year - 1 Credit (Grade Weighted) - Elective - 12

Prerequisite: Spanish 3 or Heritage Speakers Level 2

Fees: Exceptional students may choose to do extra preparation outside of class in order to prepare for the AP Spanish Language Exam. Paperback. Possible field trip fee.

Course Description: Communication is conducted in Spanish.  Students will continue to develop listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills.  Various writing projects and oral presentations are integral parts of the curriculum. Course content will be presented through textbook and supplemental materials and aural and visual aids (CD’s and videos). Areas of concentration include Spanish Art with an Internet project related to the artist as part of the curriculum. Other areas include: cultural topics, history and geography of Spain and Latin America, and music and contemporary life in Hispanic countries.  Students will read a classic adaptation of “Don Quijote de la Mancha” and various Hispanic short stories. Students will have the opportunity to partake in the “World Language Fair.” Preparation for the optional Advanced Placement Spanish Language Exam is provided. Daily homework can be expected.

AP SPANISH LANGUAGE AND CULTURE                                        WL370 – NCAA

All Year - 1 Credit (Grade Weighted) - Elective – 10, 11,12

Prerequisite: Heritage Speakers Level 2, Spanish 4, or Division Chair Approval  

Fees:.See page 10 for AP Examination requirement at no cost. Paperback. Possible field trip fee.

Course Description: The AP Spanish Language and Culture course emphasizes communication (understanding and being understood by others) by applying interpersonal, interpretive, and presentational skills in real-life situations. This includes vocabulary usage, language control, communication strategies, and cultural awareness. This course strives not to overemphasize grammatical accuracy at the expense of communication. To best facilitate the study of language and culture, the course is taught almost exclusively in Spanish. The AP Spanish Language and Culture course engages students in an exploration of culture in both contemporary and historical contexts. The course develops students’ awareness and appreciation of cultural products, practices, and perspectives.

AP Spanish Literature and Composition                                        WL377

All Year - 1 Credit (Grade Weighted)

Elective – 10, 11, 12

Prerequisite: AP Spanish Language and Culture or Division Chair Approval. See page 11.

Fees: See page 10 for AP Examination requirement at no cost. Paperback. Possible field trip fee.

Course Description: AP Spanish Literature is equivalent to a college-level introductory survey course of literature written in Spanish. Students continue to develop their interpretive, interpersonal, and presentational skills in the Spanish language as well as critical reading and analytical writing as they explore short stories, novels, plays, essays, and poetry from Spain, Latin America, and U.S. Hispanic authors along with other non-required texts.

HERITAGE SPEAKERS, LEVEL 1                                        WL375 – NCAA

All Year – 1 Credit – Elective - 9, 10, 11, 12

Prerequisite: Students comprehend spoken Spanish and desire to develop their language skills in Spanish. An oral placement test is required to determine academic level.

Course Description: Heritage Speakers provides tools for deeper understanding of the Spanish language. Spanish is one of the top global languages. Students will study various Spanish-speaking countries and peoples to better understand their diverse cultures and idioms. Students will also begin to describe themselves and their daily routine, family and friends, and personal preferences. They will learn to speak, listen, read, and write Spanish with their classmates through paired practice, small group work, and role plays. By the end of this course, students will have been introduced to skills, knowledge, and attitudes that will help them live thoroughly and work productively in an increasingly Spanish speaking global society.

ESPAÑOL de HERENCIA HISPANA, NIVEL 1                                WL375 – NCAA

Todo el año - 1 Crédito - Electivo - 9, 10, 11, 12

Prerequisitos: Los estudiantes comprenden el español hablado y desean desarrollar sus habilidades en español. Se hace una prueba de aptitud oralmente para determinar colocación de nivel.

Descripción del curso: La clase español de herencia hispana provee unidades temáticas y utensilios para obtener un aprendizaje profundo del idioma español. El idioma español es una de las lenguas más hablada globalmente. Los estudiantes estudiarán varios países y gente hispanohablantes para mejor entender sus diversas culturas y modismos. Los alumnos, también, describirán ellos mismos y sus vidas cotidianas, sus familias y amigos; sus preferencias propios. Los estudiantes aprenderán cómo hablar español más claro, distinguir dialectos junto con sus modismos y escribir mejor en español. Se utilizará grupos pequeños y compañeros para realizar tareas y proyectos. Al final del curso; habilidades, conocimiento y actitudes se han sido introducidos a los estudiantes para ayudarles vivir profundamente  y trabajar productivamente en una sociedad global hispanohablante.

HERITAGE SPEAKERS, LEVEL 2                                        WL376 – NCAA

All Year - 1 Credit - Elective - 9, 10, 11, 12

Prerequisite: Fluent Spanish speaking and comprehension skills with moderate reading and writing skills. An oral and written placement test or instructor’s permission.

Course Description: This course is designed for those students who are able to speak and understand Spanish comfortably but need to develop further their reading and writing skills. An emphasis will be placed on learning correct grammar and proper writing skills while continuing the development of overall language fluency. Reading comprehension will be emphasized through extensive reading activities.

ESPAÑOL de HERENCIA HISPANA, NIVEL 2                                WL376 – NCAA

Todo el año - 1 Crédito - Electivo - 9, 10, 11, 12

Prerequisitos: Hablar y entender el español con fluidez. Tener conocimiento en la lectura y escritura. Una evaluación oral para determinar el nivel de aptitud o permiso previo del /a instructor/a.

Descripción del curso: Este curso está diseñado para aquellos estudiantes que hablan y entienden el español moderadamente pero necesitan desarrollarlo más, especialmente la lectura y escritura. Se pondrá un énfasis en aprender la manera correcta de escribir el lenguaje, incluyendo la gramática. Se continuará el desarrollo total del idioma. Los alumnos leerán pasajes largos para enfatizar la comprensión y fluidez de lectura.

AMERICAN SIGN LANGUAGE 1 (ASL1)                                         WL381 – NCAA

All Year - 1 Credit – Elective - 9, 10, 11, 12 

Course Description: This course provides students with an introduction to American Sign Language and to the culture of deaf people in America. Course emphasis will be on learning to understand signed conversation and properly signing conversational interactions. Students gain insight into American deaf culture and history is provided through class discussion, text materials, audio-visual presentations, and guest presenters. Students explore a variety of career options that require, or would benefit from, ability to communicate easily with deaf persons. This course may fulfill the foreign language entrance requirement for some colleges.

AMERICAN SIGN LANGUAGE 2 (ASL2)                                        WL382 – NCAA

All Year - 1 Credit – Elective - 10, 11, 12

Prerequisite: ASL 1

Course Description: This course is a continuation of the study of American Sign Language, the language used by deaf people in the United States. Students will also learn about deaf culture, since a language cannot be separated from its culture. In addition, this course may provide a less traditional language option for students who desire to pursue a language in high school. This course may fulfill the world language entrance requirement for some colleges. 

AMERICAN SIGN LANGUAGE 3 (ASL3)                                        WL383 – NCAA

All Year - 1 Credit – Elective - 11, 12

Prerequisite: ASL 2

Course Description: This is a full-year course designed to provide students with the opportunity to advance their studies of American Sign Language. The study of American Sign Language is a cumulative experience beginning with students developing competent signing vocabulary, participating in exchanges, and developing an understanding of communication styles and grammatical structures. In this course, emphasis is placed on improving speed, fluency, expression, and grammar in order to develop independent conversation skills. This course will also introduce deaf idioms and their use within Deaf culture. Students will be encouraged to interact with Deaf people in social contexts and a variety of other situations.

AMERICAN SIGN LANGUAGE 4 (ASL4)                                        WL384 – NCAA Pending

All Year - 1 Credit – Elective - 11, 12

Prerequisite: ASL 3

Course Description: This is a full-year course designed to provide students with the opportunity to advance their studies of American Sign Language. The study of American Sign Language is a cumulative experience beginning with students developing competent signing vocabulary, participating in exchanges, and developing an understanding of communication styles and grammatical structures. In this course, emphasis is placed on improving speed, fluency, expression, and grammar in order to develop independent conversation skills. This course will also introduce deaf idioms and their use within Deaf culture. Students will be encouraged to interact with Deaf people in social contexts and a variety of other situations.

WORLD LANGUAGE SEMINAR                                         TBA

Either Semester - .50 Credit - Elective – 11, 12

Students may repeat this class once.

Prerequisite:  Must have written teacher and Division Chair approval.

Course Description: Designed for students wishing to obtain specialized World Language credit. Includes an in-depth project in the seminar area of study.

LAKE COUNTY TECH CAMPUS

The Lake County Tech Campus is an extension of the 22 high schools in Lake and McHenry counties and enjoys a strong partnership with the College of Lake County, offering many dual credit courses.

Training at the Tech Campus is “hands on”. Students gain skills by actually doing the work. Projects belong to real customers and the quality of students’ work is measured against industry standards. Student-oriented enterprises in Cosmetology, Automotive Service, Collision Repair and other programs provide real-world training that can lead directly to employment.

Learning at the Tech Campus is individualized. Students applying should be able to demonstrate 10th grade reading and math readiness. Students identify their career goals and receive guidance and instruction from their instructor as to how to reach those goals. The instructor is guided by current business and industry practices.

The Tech Campus strives to be a “School of Opportunity” offering excellence in teaching, technology, and partnerships. All classes and fees are subject to change.

Ana Peterson, LCTC Coordinator

847-731-9342 - ana.peterson@zb126.org

CYBERSECURITY                                        TC697

All Year – 3.0 Credits – Elective – 11, 12

Recommended: Mobile Apps & Coding

Fees: To be determined by Lake County Tech Campus

Course Description: Mobile Media Programmers become creative coders competent in applying interactive principles and theories to mobile and 3D game development. Students learn to think and act as innovators, adept at using a variety of technologies and processes to express ideas and solve gaming and mobile media design problems, as well as execute security measures to keep data secure.  We prepare students to develop software applications and other interactive media for mobile devices such as: smartphone, tablets, and 3-D Game Applications that can run on a variety of platforms.

AUTOMOTIVE COLLISION REPAIR                                        TC659/6591

All Year - 3.0 Credits - Elective – 11, 12

Recommended: Metals 1 & 2

Fees: To be determined by Lake County Tech Campus

Course Description: This program provides students with the fundamental skills of the automotive collision repair industry. Instruction in the program emphasizes both the repair and the refinishing skills associated with restoring a damaged automobile to factory specifications. Using an industry-endorsed curriculum, students will develop core skills in automobile construction, sheet metal damage repair, MIG welding, and basic refinishing. Upon mastery of the skills in core areas, students will gain skills in damage estimating, shop management, heavy collision repair, and finish matching.

AUTOMOTIVE SERVICE                                        TC670/6702

All Year – 3.0 Credits - Elective – 11, 12

Recommended: Power Mechanics

Fees: To be determined by Lake County Tech Campus 

Course Description: This program will provide students with a solid foundation of skills to enter the automotive service industry. Training in the program emphasizes the development of skills in the core service areas utilizing factory procedures and industry standards in the school’s fully operational repair shop. Instruction will feature training on brakes, steering and suspension, electrical systems, and engine performance. Upon successful completion of this program, students will be prepared to take the ASE (Automotive Service Excellence) certification exams in the areas emphasized in the program.

BIOMEDICAL SCIENCE I                                        TC640

   All Year - 3.0 Credits - Elective – 11, 12

Recommended: Human Anatomy & Physiology

Fees: To be determined by Lake County Tech Campus

Course Description: Students will get an introduction to biomedical science through exciting hands-on projects and problems that focus on these semester topics. 

Sem. I—Principles of Biomedical Science

Students will study various health conditions including heart disease, diabetes and sickle-cell disease, among others. They will work to investigate the causes of these diseases and how they may ultimately lead to illness and harm. This course covers topics related to human physiology and medicine, and serves as a basis for all other Biomedical Sciences courses.

Sem. II—Human Body Systems

Students will explore the human body and discover how all systems relate and connect to each other. Students design experiments, investigate the structures and functions of the human body, and use data acquisition software to monitor body functions, such as muscle movement, reflect and voluntary action, and respiration. Students will build organs and tissues on a skeletal model, perform four organ dissections, examine medical cases, and help solve medical mysteries.

BIOMEDICAL SCIENCE II                                        TC642

   All Year - 3.0 Credits - Elective – 12

Prerequisite: Biomedical Science I

Fees: To be determined by Lake County Tech Campus

Course Description: Students will study the pathology and treatment plan of various diseases. Students will then complete a culminating project addressing challenges in our current health system. 

Sem. I—Medical Intervention

Students will investigate how to prevent, diagnose, and treat diseases. They will explore how to detect and fight infection, screen and evaluate the code in human DNA, evaluate cancer treatment options, and prevail when the organs of the body begin to fail. Examining real-world cases, students are exposed to a range of interventions related to immunology, surgery, genetics, pharmacology, medical devices, and diagnostics.

Sem. II—Biomedical Innovation

Students design innovative solutions for the most pressing health challenges of the 21st century. Students address topics ranging from public health and biomedical engineering to clinical medicine and physiology. Students will work on an independent project with a mentor or advisor from a university, medical facility, or research institution.

CERTIFIED NURSE ASSISTING                                        TC653

All Year - 3.0 Credits - Elective - 12

Recommended: Medical Assisting or Biomedical Science

Fees: To be determined by Lake County Tech Campus

Course Description: This program is designed to prepare students for employment as nurse assistants and for future entry into nursing education programs. This program leads to a CNA certification. Training will include the development of basic nursing and cardiopulmonary resuscitation skills through lecture, laboratory demonstrations, laboratory practice, and clinical experience. Instruction in this program includes a minimum of forty clinical hours held in long-term facilities in the community. Upon successful completion of this program, students will be eligible to take the written examination for the nurse assistant state certification.

COMPUTER INTEGRATED MANUFACTURING (CIM) & CIVIL ENGINEERING AND ARCHITECTURE (CEA)                                        TC694

   All Year - 3.0 Credits - Elective – 11, 12

Prerequisite: Engineering Technology or Robotics & Automation  

Recommended: Pre-Architecture, 3D Modeling, or Engineering and Architecture

Course Description: Students are encouraged to pursue side projects in their spare time focusing on these semester topics.

Sem. I—Computer Integrated Manufacturing 

Students learn about the history of manufacturing, robotics and automation, manufacturing processes, computer modeling, manufacturing equipment, and flexible manufacturing systems.  Students will continue to build systems using the Vex Robotics materials and RobotC software.  Students will learn to program and operate a CNC machine.

Sem. II—Civil Engineering Architecture

Students learn about various aspects of civil engineering and architecture and apply their knowledge to the design and development of residential and commercial properties and structures.  In addition, students use Revitt 3D design software to design and document solutions for major course projects.

COMPUTER SUPPORT SERVICES                                                 TC680/6801

All Year - 3.0 Credits - Elective – 11, 12

Recommended:  Math 1 & 2

Fees:  To be determined by Lake County Tech Campus

Course Description:  This program will prepare students for careers in the computer field. Students will install, maintain, upgrade, and repair computer hardware & software on workstations and network systems. This program will prepare students for the A+ Certification Exam.  Upon successful completion of this program, students will be able to diagnose hardware or software failures and perform the actions necessary to correct the problems based on knowledge of the system’s operation.

CONSTRUCTION SKILLS & MANAGEMENT                                TC682/6822

All Year – 3.0 Credits - Elective – 11, 12

Recommended: Math 1 & 2, Woods, Electricity and Electronics, or 3D Modeling

Fees: To be determined by Lake County Tech Campus 

Course Description: This course provides students with an introduction to careers in the field of architecture, construction contracting, and civil engineering technology, including surveying.  The program offers an overview and analysis of conventional construction methods with a focus on carpentry, HVAC, electrical, plumbing, environmental impacts on construction and overall construction safety.  The hands-on use of building materials and tools in various construction systems is emphasized, including basic design of temporary structures.  To further enrich students' experience, case studies and guest speakers are utilized to expose students to various professions and careers in the field.  The course also provides students with resources for interdisciplinary academic success.  In the second year, students will be involved in all phases of planning and scheduling from the process of listing and sequencing to the development of the more complicated critical path network.safety, oxy-fuel welding and burning, GMAW, FCAW, SMAW, GTAW, plasma arc cutting, and automatic shape cutting. Layout and fit-up, blueprint reading, and weld symbols are used to fabricate a variety of metal projects.  The American Welding Society (AWS) recognizes the Tech Campus Welding program as an AWS SENSE Member.

COSMETOLOGY                                        TC657/6572

All Year – 4.0 Credits – Elective – 11, 12 - must be taken for 2 years

Recommended: Math 1 & 2, Chemistry

Fees: To be determined by Lake County Tech Campus

Course Description: The Tech Campus offers a Cosmetology program that includes nail technology. Students will acquire the 1500 hours of experience required for licensing while learning how to perform shampoos, make-overs, facials, hair-styling, manicuring, sculptured nails, permanent waving, hair coloring, and cutting. Students will also learn 21st Century soft skills like putting together a resume and cover letter. Following the lab phase of the program, students will reinforce their training by working on clients in the Tech Campus Creations Salon.

CRIMINAL JUSTICE                                        TC 690

All Year - 3.0 Credits - Elective - 12

Prerequisite: Clean discipline record and a police background check.

Fees: To be determined by Lake County Tech Campus

Course Description: This program prepares students for a career in the Criminal Justice field. Using constitution and current laws, students will gain the police skills and legal knowledge needed to take a case from investigations to arrests and through the court trial process, finishing with corrections.  Additional areas of interest will include current and past court cases, along with role play opportunities.  Students will be put through police scenarios and mock trials to ensure they know every aspect of the criminal justice system.

CULINARY ARTS                                                                TC656/6562

All Year - 3.0 Credits - Elective – 11, 12

Recommended: Introduction to Foods & Nutrition, Menu Planning & Entertainment.

Fees: To be determined by Lake County Tech Campus

Course Description: This program provides students with college level technical skills in food production and food operations and will prepare students for higher education in Hospitality and Culinary Management. Students will gain skills and knowledge in cold and hot food preparation, nutrition, baking, pastry, menu planning, sanitation, equipment operation, inventory control, purchasing, and front -of - the-house customer service skills. Skills will be practiced in planning, organizing, and preparing culinary creations for special events, competitions and the Tech Campus Deli.

EARLY EDUCATION AND TEACHING                                        TC655/6551

All Year - 3.0 Credits - Elective – 11, 12

Recommended: Early Childhood Studies; Family Relations and Parenting; Introduction to Teaching

Fees: To be determined by Lake County Tech Campus

Course Description: This program is designed to prepare students for a variety of careers serving children. Students will develop skills to plan and implement age-appropriate activities in one of the two operating preschool labs. These skills include developing educational activities for the preschool children in creative arts, math, science, music, and language. Instruction will focus on the positive guidance of child behavior and all aspects of their development.

EMERGENCY MEDICAL SERVICES                                        TC651

All Year - 3.0 Credits - Elective – 12

Prerequisite: Math 1 & 2, Chemistry or concurrent enrollment in Chemistry

Fees: To be determined by Lake County Tech Campus

Course Description: This program prepares students to take the licensure examination of the Illinois Department of Public Health to become an EMT-B.  Activities include clinical experiences in a hospital emergency room and ride-alongs with local Fire/EMS departments. Students will learn American Heart Association Healthcare Provider CPR, patient assessment, stabilization, and initial pre-hospital medical treatment of injured and ill patients.

ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGY (IED/POE)                                TC692

   All Year - 3.0 Credits - Elective – 11, 12

Prerequisite: Passed Math 1 & 2 with a “C” or higher

Recommended: Pre-Architecture, 3D Modeling, or Engineering and Architecture

Course Description: Students are encouraged to pursue side projects in their spare time focusing on these semester topics.

Sem. I—Introduction to Engineering Design

Discover the roles of an engineer and engineering technician in taking an idea from design to manufacturing or production. Using Inventor- 3D design software from AutoDesk – work on projects, activities, and problems that have global and human impacts.  Working in teams, students will design and improve products, document solutions, and communicate to others.  Students will learn to use 3D Printers and a Laser Engraver.  This course includes about 70% computer work and 30% hands-on activities.  

Sem. II—Principles of Engineering

Master basic concepts needed to continue your education in engineering or engineering technology – then apply them! Students will build simple and compound machines, electric circuits, power systems, hydraulic systems, and control systems that include Vex robotics materials and RobotC software. This course includes about 60% hands-on projects and 40% computer work and engineering math applications.  

FIREFIGHTING                                                                TC686

All Year - 3.0 Credits - Elective – 11, 12

Recommended: Math 1 & 2

Helpful Course: Chemistry

Fees: To be determined by Lake County Tech Campus

Course Description: This program is designed to prepare students for entry-level firefighter positions. Skills taught are: understanding fire chemistry, wearing personal protective clothing, identifying ropes, tying knots, using fire extinguishers, performing forcible entry, carrying and raising ladders, operating self-contained breathing apparatus, employing search and rescue techniques, working with ventilation tools, and practicing hose evolutions on an operating fire engine. Leadership and communication skills help prepare the student for future certification.

GAME PROGRAMMING AND VIRTUALIZATION                        TC679

All Year – 3.0 Credits – Elective – 11, 12

Fees: To be determined by Lake County Tech Campus

Course Description: This program is designed to provide instruction in the computer science field. Students will be able to develop video games and professional programs using realistic hands-on interdisciplinary exercises. The game programming curriculum will focus on industry standard coding languages. Additional training will cover 2D and 3D animation. Additionally, students will work with virtual reality technologies providing experience in virtualizations allowing complex data or situations in a simulated real-world application.

INDUSTRIAL TECHNOLOGY                                         TC111/111

All Year – 3.0 Credits - Elective – 11, 12

Fees: To be determined by Lake County Tech Campus 

Course Description: This program focuses on preparing students to work in the modern Manufacturing Environment. The program helps develop hands-on skills in maintenance, repair, and operation of machinery in high technology industrial settings. Students will gain hands-on experience in Hydraulics, Machine Alignment, electricity, and mechanical fundamentals. This is a great opportunity for students interested in working in the Manufacturing companies, construction companies, welding/fabrication shops, and machine shops.  

LAW ENFORCEMENT AND CRIME SCENE INVESTIGATION                TC6901

All Year – 3.0 Credits - Elective – 11, 12

Prerequisite: Clean discipline record and a police background check.

Fees: To be determined by Lake County Tech Campus

Course Description: This program prepares students for careers in the policing field. The class will focus on police procedures that are standard to a new police officer and the steps that are necessary to continue on in this career. The class will also explore basic crime scene investigation, Interview and interrogation methods, and a study of criminal investigation

MEDICAL ASSISTING                                                        TC564

All Year - 3.0 Credits - Elective – 11, 12

Recommended: Math 1 & 2, Biology

Fees: To be determined by Lake County Tech Campus

Course Description: This program introduces students to a wide variety of careers in the allied health field including medical lab technician, medical assistant, and medical office professional. Training will include medical terminology, communication, body structure and function, vital sign measurement, principles of infection control, medical instrumentation, pharmacy technology, medical office assistant certification procedures, and microscope usage.

MULTIMEDIA DESIGN                                                        TC663/6632

All Year - 3.0 Credits - Elective – 11, 12

Recommended: Printing, Graphic Arts and Design, and/or Photography

Fees: To be determined by Lake County Tech Campus

Course Description: This program prepares students for a variety of design careers in photography, desktop publishing, graphic design, entry-level animation, and digital film editing. Students will design and produce a variety of print and digital media utilizing a variety of software applications including but not limited to: Adobe Illustrator, Adobe Photoshop, Adobe InDesign and Adobe Premier.

WELDING & FABRICATION                                        TC667/6671

All Year - 3.0 Credits - Elective – 11, 12

Recommended: Metals 1 & 2, Machine Trades Blueprint Reading

Fees: To be determined by Lake County Tech Campus

Course Description: This program provides hands-on experiences gained from extensive practice and application of knowledge in shop safety, oxy-fuel welding and burning, GMAW, FCAW, SMAW, GTAW, plasma arc cutting, and automatic shape cutting. Layout and fit-up, blueprint reading, and weld symbols are used to fabricate a variety of metal projects. The American Welding Society (AWS) recognizes the Tech Campus Welding program as an AWS SENSE Member.


CAREER CLUSTERS

Opportunities after high school are endless for those who prepare well.  Students who plan their high school years wisely and take advantage of the learning opportunities extended to them during high school are better able to determine their college and career pursuits with confidence.  In addition, those students who apply themselves in high school by taking and completing challenging courses position themselves well to take advantage of a variety of college and career opportunities upon graduation.  

The following pages provide students with a better understanding of the various careers that are available today.  Careers are listed by “cluster” so that students may explore a wide range of options associated with their interests.  Information regarding which high school courses students should take to prepare well for a particular field and various associated college majors and programs are also included.

CLUSTERS


CAREER CLUSTER: Agriculture, Food & Natural Resources

Careers

Architect

Builder

Carpenter

Civil Engineer

Construction

Contractor

Foreman/Manager

Demolition Engineer

Drafter

Drywaller

Electrician

Electrical Systems Tech

Equipment Material Manager

HVAC Mechanic

Plumber

Project Inspector
Roofer

Sheet Metal Worker

Tile Setter

9th grade

10th grade

11th grade

12th grade

Required Courses

English 1

Math 1 (or higher)

Biology

Social Studies

PE, Health

English 2

Math 2 (or higher)

Chemistry

Continental Studies

PE

Personal Finance

English 3

Math 3 (or higher)

Earth Science

US History

PE

English Elective

Government

PE

Recommended or related pathway courses offered at ZB

Woods 1 & 2

Metals 1 & 2

3-D Modeling

Pre-Architecture

Electronics 1 & 2

Woods 1 & 2

Metals 1 & 2

3-D Modeling

Pre-Architecture

Electronics 1 & 2

Personal Finance

Woods 1 & 2

Metals 1 & 2

3-D Modeling

Pre-Architecture

Electronics 1 & 2

Engin/Architecture

Intro to Carpentry

Applied Math

Personal Finance

DC Machine Trades

   Blueprint Reading

Microsoft Office

  Specialist Prep.

Woods 1 & 2

Metals 1 & 2

3-D Modeling

Pre-Architecture

Electronics 1 & 2

Engin/Architecture

Intro to Carpentry

Applied Math

Pre-Calculus

Pre-Calculus

   Honors

AP Calculus

AP Physics

Personal Finance

DC Machine Trades

  Blueprint Reading

Microsoft Office

  Specialist Prep

Tech Campus related pathway courses

Construction Skills

   & Management

Computer Integrated

   Manufacturing & Civil

   Civil Engin/Architecture

Welding & Fabrication

Engin. Technology

Construction Skills

   & Management

Computer Integrated

   Manufacturing &

   Civil Engin/Architecture

Welding & Fabrication

Engin. Technology

4 year College Majors

Architecture/Building Sciences

Architectural Drafting

Architectural Engineering

Architectural History/Critic

Architectural Tech

Architect

Building Construction

Building Management

Civil Engineering

Construction Management

Drafting/Design Tech

Energy Management

Landscape Architecture

Mechanical Drafting

CLC Programs

Architectural Tech

CAD Drafting Tech

Civil Engineering Tech

Construction Management Tech

Electrical Engineering Tech

HVAC Tech

Welding


CAREER CLUSTER: Architecture & Construction

Careers

Architect

Builder

Carpenter

Civil Engineer

Construction

Contractor

Foreman/Manager

Demolition Engineer

Drafter

Drywaller

Electrician

Electrical Systems Tech

Equipment Material Manager

HVAC Mechanic

Plumber

Project Inspector
Roofer

Sheet Metal Worker

Tile Setter

9th grade

10th grade

11th grade

12th grade

Required Courses

English 1

Math 1 (or higher)

Biology

Social Studies

PE, Health

English 2

Math 2 (or higher)

Chemistry

Continental Studies

PE

Personal Finance

English 3

Math 3 (or higher)

Physics

US History

PE

English Elective

Government

PE

Recommended or related pathway courses offered at ZB

Woods 1 & 2

Metals 1 & 2

3-D Modeling

Pre-Architecture

Electronics 1 & 2

Woods 1 & 2

Metals 1 & 2

3-D Modeling

Pre-Architecture

Electronics 1 & 2

Personal Finance

Woods 1 & 2

Metals 1 & 2

3-D Modeling

Pre-Architecture

Electronics 1 & 2

Engin/Architecture

Intro to Carpentry

Applied Math

Personal Finance

DC Machine Trades

   Blueprint Reading

Microsoft Office

  Specialist Prep.

Woods 1 & 2

Metals 1 & 2

3-D Modeling

Pre-Architecture

Electronics 1 & 2

Engin/Architecture

Intro to Carpentry

Applied Math

Pre-Calculus

Pre-Calculus

   Honors

AP Calculus

AP Physics

Personal Finance

DC Machine Trades

  Blueprint Reading

Microsoft Office

  Specialist Prep

Tech Campus related pathway courses

Construction Skills

   & Management

Computer Integrated

   Manufacturing & Civil

   Civil Engin/Architecture

Welding & Fabrication

Engin. Technology

Construction Skills

   & Management

Computer Integrated

   Manufacturing &

   Civil Engin/Architecture

Welding & Fabrication

Engin. Technology

4 year College Majors

Architecture/Building Sciences

Architectural Drafting

Architectural Engineering

Architectural History/Critic

Architectural Tech

Architect

Building Construction

Building Management

Civil Engineering

Construction Management

Drafting/Design Tech

Energy Management

Landscape Architecture

Mechanical Drafting

CLC Programs

Architectural Tech

CAD Drafting Tech

Civil Engineering Tech

Construction Management Tech

Electrical Engineering Tech

HVAC Tech

Welding


CAREER CLUSTER: Arts, Audio Visual Technology & Communication

Careers

Acting

Art Director

Artist

Audio Video Operator

Broadcast Technician

Computer Animator

Editor

Fashion Designer

Furnishing Coordinator

Interior Design

Journalist

Musician

Publisher

Producer

Radio & Television Announcer

Reporter

Researcher

Writer

9th grade

10th grade

11th grade

12th grade

Required Courses

English 1

Math 1 (or higher)

Biology

Social Studies

PE, Health

English 2

Math 2 (or higher)

Chemistry

Continental Studies

PE

Personal Finance

English 3

Math 3 (or higher)

Physics, Earth Science

US History

PE

English Elective

Government

PE

Recommended or related pathway courses offered at ZB

Yearbook

Journalism

Intro to Television

Television

Intro to Art

3D Sculpture 1 & 2

Ceramics 1 & 2

Graph Art Design
 1 & 2

Drawing 1 & 2

Jewelry 1 & 2

Painting 1 & 2

Acting 1 & 2

Beginning Guitar

Symphonic Band

Percussion

Concert Band 1 & 2

Beginning Treble Choir

Concert Choir

Sweet Harmony
  Singers

Chamber Singers

Music Production

Intro to Theatrical Production

Theatrical Production Seminar

Introduction to Piano

Yearbook

Journalism

Intro to Television

Television

ZB TV Media Prod

Intro to Art

3D Sculpture 1 & 2

Ceramics 1 & 2

Graph Art Design
 1 & 2

Drawing 1 & 2

Jewelry 1 & 2

Painting 1 & 2

Acting 1, 2, 3

Beginning Guitar

Symphonic Band

Percussion

Concert Band 1 & 2

Concert Choir

Music Production

Intro to Theatrical

  Production

Theatrical Production

  Seminar

Introduction to Piano

Journalism

Yearbook

Creative Writing    1 & 2

Rhetoric & Comp

Public Speaking

Digital Media

Photography

Intro to Art

3D Sculpture 1 & 2

Ceramics 1 & 2

Graph Art Design   1 & 2

Drawing 1 & 2

Jewelry 1 & 2

Painting 1 & 2

Acting 1, 2, 3

Beginning Guitar

Symphonic Band

Percussion

Concert Band 1 & 2

Adv. Treble Choir

Chamber Singers

AP Music Theory

Music Production

Microsoft Office

  Specialist Prep.

Intro to Theatrical

  Production

Theatrical Production

  Seminar

Introduction to Piano

AP Studio Art

Journalism

Yearbook

Creative Writing 1&2

Rhetoric & Comp

Public Speaking

Digital Media

Photography

Intro to Art

3D Sculpture 1 & 2

Ceramics 1 & 2

Graph Art Design
 1 & 2

Drawing 1 & 2

Jewelry 1 & 2

Painting 1 & 2

Acting 1, 2, 3

Beginning Guitar

Symphonic Band

Percussion

Concert Band 1 & 2

Adv. Treble Choir

Chamber Singers

AP Music Theory

Music Production

Intro to Theatrical Production

Theatrical Production Seminar

Introduction to Piano

Tech Campus related pathway courses

Multimedia Design

Multimedia Design

4 year college majors

Acting

Applied Arts

Cinematography

Creative Writing

Commercial Photography

Fashion/Apparel Design

Film/Cinema/Video Studies

Graphic Design

Illustration

Journalism

Interior Design

Music

Music Technology

Publishing

Photographic & Film

Radio & Television

Radio, Television & Digital Communication

Speech Communications

Technical & Business Writing

Theater

Visual Performing Arts

Video Technology

CLC Programs

English

Journalism

Art

Theater

Music

Digital Media & Design

Digital A/V Production & Editing

Technical Communication

CAREER CLUSTER: Business, Management, Marketing & Finance

Careers

Actuary

Administrative Assistant

Advertising Sales

Auditor

Business Consultant

Certified Public Accountant

Corporate Trainer

Economist

Logistics/Supply Chain Manager Entrepreneur

Finance Director

Human Resources Manager

Office Manager

Personnel Recruiter

Public Relations Manager

Sales Representative

Wholesale/Retail Buyer

Marketing Analyst

9th grade

10th grade

11th grade

12th grade

Required Courses

English 1

Math 1 (or higher)

Biology

Social Studies

PE, Health

English 2

Math 2 (or higher)

Chemistry

Continental Studies

PE

Personal Finance

English 3

Math 3 (or higher)

Physics, Earth Science

US History

PE

English Elective

Government

PE

Recommended or related pathway courses offered at ZB

Business Concepts

Public Speaking

Business Concepts

Personal Finance

Sociology

Accounting

Sports & Entertainment Marketing

Owning &

  Operating a Bus.

Business Concepts

Business Law

Mobil Apps &

  Coding

Public Speaking

Life Management

Introduction to Business

Personal Finance

Microsoft Office

  Specialist Prep

Pre-Calculus

Pre-Calculus
  Honors

AP Calculus

AP Statistics

Applied Math

Psychology 1 & 2

Sociology 1 & 2

AP Psychology

Accounting

Sports & Entertainment Marketing

Owning &

  Operating a Bus.

Business Concepts

Business Law

Mobile Apps &

  Coding

Public Speaking

Life Management

Introduction to Business

Personal Finance

Microsoft Office

  Specialist Prep.

Tech Campus related courses

Multimedia Design

Multimedia Design

4 year College Majors

Actuarial Science

Accounting

Advertising

Arts Management

Business Administration

Entrepreneurship

Human Resources

Finance

International Business

Marketing

Public Relations &
  Communication

Purchasing/Procurement

Logistics/Supply Chain Management Info Systems

Operations Management

Organizational Behavior

Organizational Leadership

CLC Programs

Accounting

Administrative Office Systems

Supervision

Small Business Management

Sales

Marketing


CAREER CLUSTER: Education & Training

Careers

Administrator

Child Care Worker

Coach

College/University

   Faculty

Counselor

Curriculum Director

Elementary Teacher

Middle School Teacher

High School Teacher

Principal

Special Education Teacher

Librarian

Paraprofessional Educator

9th grade

10th grade

11th grade

12th grade

Required Courses

English 1

Math 1 (or higher)

Biology

Social Studies

PE, Health

English 2

Math 2 (or higher)

Chemistry

Continental Studies

PE

Personal Finance

English 3

Math 3 (or higher)

Physics, Earth Science

US History

PE

English Elective

Government

PE

Recommended or related pathway courses offered at ZB

Family Relations

  & Parenting

Early Child. Studies

Integrated PE

Life Management

Microsoft Office

  Specialist Prep

Sociology 1 & 2

Family Relations

  & Parenting

Early Child. Studies

Integrated PE

Life Management

Microsoft Office

  Specialist Prep

Introduction to

  Teaching

Family Relations

  & Parenting

Early Child. Studies

Applied Math

Pre-Calculus

Calculus

AP Calculus

Sociology 1 & 2

Psychology 1 & 2

AP Psychology

Public Speaking

Integrated PE

Life Management

Microsoft Office

  Specialist Prep

Introduction to

  Teaching

Tech Campus related pathway courses

Early Education and Teaching

Early Education and Teaching

4 year college majors

Education

Early Childhood Education

Educational Administration

Elementary Education

Coaching

Kindergarten/Preschool Education

School Library Specialist/Science

Special Education Teaching

Secondary Education

CLC Programs

Early Childhood Education

Paraprofessional Education

Human Services

Library Technical Assistant


CAREER CLUSTER: Health Science

Careers

Athletic Trainer

Biostatistician

Dental Assist./Hygienist

EMT/Paramedic

Health Administrator

Geneticist

Health Information Coder

Laboratory Technician

Nutritionist/Dietician

Occupational Therapist

Optometrist

Research Scientist

Phlebotomist

Physician

Physician’s Assistant

Radiographer

Physical Therapist

Registered Nurse

Required Courses

9th grade

10th grade

11th grade

12th grade

English 1

Math 1 (or higher)

Biology

Social Studies

PE, Health

English 2

Math 2 (or higher)

Chemistry

Continental Studies

PE

Personal Finance

English 3

Math 3 (or higher)

Physics, AP Biology, AP Chemistry

US History

PE

English Elective

Government

PE

AP Biology, AP Chemistry

Recommended or related pathway courses offered at ZB

Introduction Foods

  & Nutrition
Menu Planning

  & Entertaining

Family Relations

  & Parenting

Early Child. Studies Integrated PE

Introduction Foods

  & Nutrition
Menu Planning

  & Entertaining Family Relations

  & Parenting

Early Child. Studies

Sociology 1 & 2

Integrated PE

Human Anatomy & Physiology

Introduction Foods

  & Nutrition
Menu Planning

  & Entertaining Family Relations

  & Parenting

Early Child. Studies

Sociology 1 & 2

Human Anatomy & Physiology

Psychology 1 & 2

AP Psychology

AP Biology

AP Chemistry

AP Physics

Applied Math

Pre-Calculus

Pre-Calculus
  Honors

AP Calculus

Integrated PE

Tech Campus related pathway courses

Medical Assisting

Certified Nurse
  Assisting\

Biomedical Science

Medical Assisting

Certified Nurse
  Assisting

Emergency
  Medical Services

Biomedical Science

4 year college majors

Athletic Training

Audiology

Bioethics

Biotechnology

Clinical Nutrition/Dietetics

Clinical Lab Science

Cognitive Psychology

Genetic Counseling

Health Administration

Hospital/Care Administration

Kinesiology/Movement
  Science

Nursing

Occupational Therapy

Pharmaceutical Science Public Health

Physical Therapy

CLC Programs

Nursing

Phlebotomy Technician

Surgical Technician

Dental Hygiene

Emergency Medical Technician Personal Trng.
Health Information Technician

Pharmaceutical Technician

Wellness Coach

Medical Imaging

Medical Assisting

Massage Therapy


CAREER CLUSTER: Hospitality

Careers

Baker

Caterer

Concierge

Convention Services Manager

Event Planner

Executive Chef

Facilities Manager

Hotel Management

Restaurant Owner/Manager

Tour & Travel Guide

Travel Agent

9th grade

10th grade

11th grade

12th grade

Required Courses

English 1

Math 1 (or higher)

Biology

Social Studies

PE, Health

English 2

Math 2 (or higher)

Chemistry

Continental Studies

PE

Personal Finance

English 3

Intro to Data Science or Math 3 (or higher)

Physics, Earth Science

US History

PE

English Elective

Government

PE

Recommended or related pathway courses offered at ZB

Business Concepts

Sports & Entertainment Marketing

Introduction Foods

  & Nutrition
Menu Planning

  & Entertaining

Business Concepts

Sports & Entertainment Marketing

Introduction Foods

  & Nutrition
Menu Planning

  & Entertaining

Business Law

Business Concepts

Introduction to Business (Dual Credit)

Owning &

  Operating a Bus.

Marketing

Mobil Apps &

  Coding

Sports & Entertainment Marketing

Microsoft Office

  Specialist Prep

Introduction Foods

  & Nutrition
Menu Planning

  & Entertaining

Business Law

Business Concepts

Introduction to Business (Dual Credit)

Owning &

  Operating a Bus.

Marketing

Mobil Apps &

  Coding

Sports & Entertainment Marketing

Microsoft Office

  Specialist Prep

Tech Campus related pathway courses

Culinary Arts

Culinary Arts

4 year college majors

Facilities Planning & Management

Natural Resources Recreation & Tourism

Hospitality & Culinary Management

Culinary Arts

CLC Programs

Hospitality & Culinary Management

Baking and Pastry Assistant

Professional Cook

Professional Chef

Hospitality Supervisor

Hospitality Manager


CAREER CLUSTER: Human Services

Careers

Community Service Dir.

Cosmetologist

Director of Child Care
  Facility

 

Emergency Relief Worker

Massage Therapy

Personal Fitness Trainer

Licensed Professional
  Counselor

School Counselor/
  Psychologist

Social Worker

9th grade

10th grade

11th grade

12th grade

Required Courses

English 1

Math 1(or higher)

Biology

Social Studies

PE, Health

English 2

Math 2 (or higher)

Chemistry

Continental Studies

PE

Personal Finance

English 3

Intro to Data Science or Math 3 (or higher)

Physics

US History

PE

English Elective

Government

PE

Recommended or related pathway courses offered at ZB

Spanish 1

Spanish 2

Athletic Training

Integrated PE

Family Relations

  & Parenting

Early Child. Studies

AP Spanish Language and Culture

AP Spanish Literature and Composition

Spanish 3

Sociology 1 & 2

Athletic Training

Integrated PE

Family Relations

  & Parenting

Early Child. Studies

AP Spanish Language and Culture

AP Spanish Literature and Composition

Microsoft Office

  Specialist Prep

Introduction to

  Teaching

Spanish 4

AP Spanish Language and Culture

AP Spanish Literature and Composition

Psychology 1 & 2

Sociology 1 & 2

Athletic Training

Integrated PE

Family Relations

  & Parenting

Early Child. Studies

Microsoft Office

  Specialist Prep.

Introduction to

  Teaching

Tech Campus related pathway courses

Cosmetology

Early Education and Teaching

Cosmetology

Early Education and Teaching

4 year college majors

Child Development

Family & Community Services

Family & Consumer Sciences

Mental Health Counseling

Social Work

Psychologist

Sociology

Athletic Trainer

Wellness

CLC Programs

Social Work

Children Adolescents

Adult Services

Massage Therapy

Alcohol, Substance Abuse & Addictive Disorders

Correctional Counseling

Trauma, Prevention and Victim Services


CAREER CLUSTER: Information Technology

Careers

Animator

Database Administrator

Data Systems Design

Game Developer

IT Engineer

Computer Forensics

Media Specialist

Network Administrator

Network Security Analyst

Telecommunications Network

   Tech

PC Support Specialist

Programmer

Software Application Specialist

Systems Administrator

Web Architect/Designer

9th grade

10th grade

11th grade

12th grade

Required Courses

English 1

Math 1 (or higher)

Biology

Social Studies

PE, Health

English 2

Math 2 (or higher)

Chemistry

Continental Studies

PE

Personal Finance (Class of 2023 & 2024)

English 3

Math 3 (or higher)

Physics

US History

PE

English Elective

Government

PE

Recommended or related pathway courses offered at ZB

Electronics 1 & 2

Electronics 1 & 2

Electronics 1 & 2

Sociology 1 & 2

Microsoft Office

  Specialist Prep

Electronics 1 & 2

Applied Math

Pre-Calculus

Pre-Calculus
  Honors

AP Calculus

AP Computer

  Science

Sociology 1 & 2

Psychology 1 & 2

AP Psychology

Public Speaking

Microsoft Office

  Specialist Prep

Tech Campus related pathway courses

Game Programming
  and Virtualization

Computer Support
  Services

Multimedia Design

3D Gaming and

  Cybersecurity

Game Programming
  and Virtualization

Computer Support
  Services

Multimedia Design

Robotics and Automation

3D Gaming and

  Cybersecurity

4 year College Majors

Computer Forensics

Artificial Intelligence

Computer Info Systems

Computer Engineering

Computer Programming

Computer Science

Computer Software Applications

Digital Arts

Game/Interactive Media Design

Information Technology

CLC Programs

Digital Media

Web Programmer

Computer forensics

Network Administration

Security Administration

Office Application Specialist

Desktop Support Tech

C++ Programming

Game Development

Cisco Networking


CAREER CLUSTER: Law & Public Safety

Careers

Corporate Security Manager            

Firefighter                                           Lawyer

Corrections Officer                           Hazardous Materials
  Responder
         

Paralegal
Court Reporter                                  Homeland Security                             Park Ranger

Detective

Immigration Officer                          

Police Officer
Emergency Medical Technician                                               Judge                                                  Probation/Parole Officer    

9th grade

10th grade

11th grade

12th grade

Required Courses

English 1

Math 1 (or higher)

Biology

Social Studies

PE, Health

English 2

Math 2 (or higher)

Chemistry

Continental Studies

PE

Personal Finance

English 3

Math 3 (or higher)

Physics

US History

PE

English Elective

Government

PE

Recommended or related pathway courses offered at ZB

Spanish 1

Spanish 2

AP Spanish Language and Culture

AP Spanish Literature and Composition

Spanish 3

Public Speaking
Forensic Science

Business Law

Sociology 1 & 2

AP Spanish Language and Culture

AP Spanish Literature and Composition

Microsoft Office

  Specialist Prep

Spanish 4

AP Spanish Language and Culture

AP Spanish Literature and Composition

Psychology 1 & 2

AP Psychology

Sociology 1 & 2

Public Speaking
Forensic Science

Business Law

Sociology 1 & 2

Microsoft Office

  Specialist Prep.

Tech Campus related pathway courses

Criminal Justice

Law Enforcement and Crime Scene Investigation

Firefighting

Medical Assisting

Criminal Justice

Law Enforcement and Crime Scene Investigation

Emergency
 Medical Services

Firefighting

Medical Assisting

4 year college majors

Corrections

Criminal Justice

Criminology

Cyber/Computer Forensics

Energy, Environment, &
  Natural Resource Law

Fire Science

Fire Service Administration

Forensic Science and Technology
Health Law
Homeland Security
Law

CLC Programs

Criminal Justice

Paralegal Studies

Emergency Medical Technician

Fire Science Technician

Administrative Leadership

Office Professional

Correctional Counseling

Trauma/Victim Services


CAREER CLUSTER: Manufacturing

Careers

CNC Operator                               Health & Safety Rep                               Manufacturing

   Technician

Design Engineer

Industrial Machinery
  Mechanic          

Mechanic            

Production Manager    
Environmental Engineer

   Inspector

Quality Control Technician

Foundry Worker                            Labor Relations Manager                       Safety Engineer
Freight, Stock, Material
  Mover    
Machinist                                                Welder  

9th grade

10th grade

11th grade

12th grade

Required Courses

English 1

Math 1 (or higher)

Biology

Social Studies

PE, Health

English 2

Math 2 (or higher)

Chemistry

Continental Studies

PE

Personal Finance

English 3

Math 3 (or higher)

Physics

US History

PE

English Elective

Government

PE

Recommended or related pathway courses offered at ZB

3-D Modeling

Pre-Architecture

Electricity &
  Electronics 1 & 2

Metals 1 & 2

Power Mechanics
  1 & 2

Woods 1 & 2

3-D Sculpture 1

Engineering &
  Architecture

3-D Sculpture 2

DC Machine Trades

  Blueprint Reading

Intro to Carpentry,
  Building Trades &
  Construction

Microsoft Office

  Specialist Prep

DC Machine Trades

  Blueprint Reading

Applied Math

Intro to Carpentry,
  Building Trades &
  Construction

Microsoft Office

  Specialist Prep

DC Machine Trades

  Blueprint Reading

Applied Math

Tech Campus related pathway courses

Computer Integrated

  Manufacturing &

  Civil Engineering &

  Architecture

Construction Skills

  & Management

Welding &
 Fabrication

Engin. Technology

Laser Technology

Computer Integrated

  Manufacturing &

  Civil Engineering

  & Architecture

Construction Skills

  & Management

Engin. Technology

Welding &
 Fabrication

Laser Technology

4 year college majors

Apparel & Textiles
   Design

Computer Engineering
  Tech

Engineering

Industrial Technology

Laser & Optical
  Technology
Manufacturing Engineering

Mechanical Engineering

Metallurgical Technology

Nuclear Power Technology

Occupational Safety &
  Technology
Plastics & Polymer
  Engineering

Robotics Technology

Industrial Engineer

CLC Programs

Business Administration

Mechanical Engineering Technology

Welding

Construction Management Technician

CNC Programming

CAD Drafting Technician

Electrical Engineer Technician


CAREER CLUSTER: Science, Technology, Engineering & Mathematics

Careers

Actuary

Geneticist

Photonics Tech

Anthropologist

Electrical Engineer

Physicist

Archeologist

Math/Science Teacher

Statistician

Astronomer

Mechanical Engineer

Chemist

Meteorologist

9th grade

10th grade

11th grade

12th grade

Required Courses

English 1

Math 1 (or higher)

Biology

Social Studies

PE, Health

English 2

Math 2 (or higher)

Chemistry

Continental Studies

PE

Personal Finance

English 3

Math 3 (or higher)

Physics

US History

PE

English Elective

Government

PE

Recommended or related pathway courses offered at ZB

Business Concepts

3-D Modeling

Electricity &
  Electronics 1 & 2

Engineering &
  Architecture

Pre-Calculus

Pre-Calculus Honors

AP Calculus

Astronomy

Forensic Science

Environmental
  Ecology 1 & 2

AP Environmental
   Science

Accounting

Microsoft Office

  Specialist Prep

AP Statistics

Pre-Calculus

Pre-Calculus Honors

AP Calculus

Astronomy

Forensic Science

Environ Ecology
  1 & 2

AP Environmental
  Science

AP Biology

AP Chemistry

AP Physics

AP Environmental
   Science

AP Computer

  Science

Accounting

Microsoft Office

  Specialist Prep.

Tech Campus related pathway courses

Laser Technology

Computer Integrated

  Manufacturing &

  Civil Engineering &

  Architecture

Engin. Technology

Laser Technology

Computer Integrated

  Manufacturing &

  Civil Engineering &  Architecture

Engin. Technology

4 year college majors

Actuarial Science

Astronomy

Behavioral Sciences

Biology

Chemical Engineering

Engineering

Ecology

Marine Biology

Mathematics

Robotics

Pharmacology

Physics

Radiation Biology

Botany

Genetics

Geological & Earth Sciences

Nanotechnology

Natural Sciences

Nutrition Sciences

Oceanography

CLC Programs

Chemistry

Biology

Physics

Mathematics

Engineering

Photonics

Mechanical Engineering

Wireless Networking Security

Fiber Optics Technician

Nanoscience


CAREER CLUSTER: Service Technologies

Careers

Automotive Mechanic

Electrician

Plumber

Automotive Repair

General Contractor

Roofer

Avionics Technician

HVAC Mechanic

Sheet Metal Worker

Carpenter

Locomotive Engineer

Drywall Installer

Painter

9th grade

10th grade

11th grade

12th grade

Required Courses

English 1

Math 1 (or higher)

Biology

Social Studies

PE, Health

English 2

Math 2 (or higher)

Chemistry

Continental Studies

PE

Personal Finance (Class of 2023 & 2024)

English 3

Math 3 (or higher)

Physics

US History

PE

English Elective

Government

PE

Recommended or related pathway courses offered at ZB

3-D Modeling

Pre-Architecture

Electricity &
  Electronics 1 & 2

Metals 1 & 2

Power Mechanics
  1 & 2

Woods 1 & 2

Painting 1 & 2

Engineering &
  Architecture

Electricity &
  Electronics 1 & 2

Metals 1 & 2

Power Mechanics
  1 & 2

Woods 1 & 2

Painting 1 & 2

Applied Math

Microsoft Office

  Specialist Prep

Intro to Carpentry

Engineering &
  Architecture

Electricity &
  Electronics 1 & 2

Metals 1 & 2

Power Mechanics    1 & 2

Woods 1 & 2

Painting 1 & 2

Applied Math

Microsoft Office

  Specialist Prep

Intro to Carpentry

Engineering &
  Architecture

Electricity &
  Electronics 1 & 2

Metals 1 & 2

Power Mechanics
  1 & 2

Woods 1 & 2

Painting 1 & 2

Tech Campus related pathway courses

Auto Collision Repair

Automotive Service

Construction Skills

  & Management

Welding &
 Fabrication
Machining

  Technology

Auto Collision
 Repair

Automotive Service

Construction Skills

  & Management

Welding &
 Fabrication

Machining

  Technology

4 year college majors

Electrical Engineering

CLC Programs

Automotive Collision Repair

Automotive Technology

Heating, Ventilation & Air Conditioning

Electrical Engineering Technology


Zion-Benton Township High School District 126

Board of Education

Jerry Nordstrom, President

Jorge Nieto, Vice President

Patricia Stephen, Secretary

Christopher Benitez, Member

Kathy Champine, Member

William King, Member

Shawn White, Member

ZBTHS District 126 Office

One Z-B Way

3901 W. 21st Street

Zion, IL 60099

847-731-9792

Fax: 847-731-4441

www.zbths.org

Zion-Benton Township High School Office

One Z-B Way

3901 W. 21st Street

Zion, IL 60099

847-731-9300

Fax: 847-731-4440

Web Page: www.zb126.org

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