Course Number: HIS 203

Course Title: Western Civilization I

Term: Fall 2017

Time: Tuesdays and Thursdays 9:00-10:15 AM

Fr. Peter Samuel Kucer, MSA STD

pkucer@holyapostles.edu

  1. COURSE DESCRIPTION

                Students will study Western Civilization from pre-historical times through the Protestant Reformation.

2        ENVISIONED LEARNING OUTCOMES

  1. COURSE SCHEDULE

Week 1: Man and Civilization

                Tuesday, August 29th

  1. Syllabi Review
  2. Assignment of Presentations
  3.  The term paper is due on November 21st right after class begins.  The highest grade a later term paper can receive is an 80%. The term paper is to be 6-9 pages in length. 5 percentage points will be deducted for each page below or above the requested length.

                        4. Lecture on Kucer’s Chapter 1 “Man and Civilization”

                Thursday, August 31st

  1. Lecture on Kucer’s Chapter 1 “Man and Civilization”
  2. In Class Work on Assignment – Prepare for Quiz 1 and Answer Questions from Sources for Western Society Chapter 1 “Origins to 1200 BC”. The teacher will tell you which sections to respond to.

Week 2: Jewish Civilization

                Tuesday, September 5th 

                        1. Hand in Chapter Answers

                        2. Quiz 1

                        3. Lecture 2 on Kucer’s Chapter 2 “Jewish Civilization”

                Thursday, September 7th 

                        1. Lecture 2 on Chapter 2

                        2. In Class work on Assignment – Prepare for Quiz 2 and Answer Questions from Sources for Western Society Chapter 2 “Small Kingdoms and Mighty Empires in the Near East 1200-510 BC” The teacher will tell you which sections to respond to.

Week 3: Jewish Culture

                Tuesday, September 12th 

  1. Hand in Chapter Answers
  2. Quiz 2
  3. Lecture 3 on Kucer’s Chapter 3 “Jewish Culture”        

                Thursday, September 14th 

                        1. Lecture 3 on Chapter 3

                        2. In Class work on Assignment – Prepare for Quiz 3 and Answer Questions from Chapter 2 “Small Kingdoms and Mighty Empires in the Near East 1200-510 BC” The teacher will tell you which sections to respond to.

Week 4: Greek Civilization

                Tuesday, September 19th 

                        1. Hand in Chapter Answers

                        2. Quiz 3

                        3. Lecture 3 on Kucer’s Chapter 4 “Greek Civilization”

                Thursday, September 21st 

                        1. Lecture 4 on Chapter 4

                        2. In Class work on Assignment – Prepare for Quiz 4 and Answer Questions from Chapter 3 “The Development of Greek Society and Culture (c. 3000-338 BC)” The teacher will tell you which sections to respond to.

Week 5: Greek Culture

                Tuesday, September 26th 

                        1. Hand in Chapter Answers

                        2. Quiz 4

                        3. Lecture on Kucer’s Chapter 5 “Greek Culture”

                Thursday, September 28th 

                        1. Lecture 5 on Chapter 5

                        2. In Class work on Assignment – Prepare for Quiz 5 and Answer Questions from Chapter 4 “Life in the Hellenistic World” The teacher will tell you which sections to respond to

Week 6: Roman Civilization

                Tuesday, October 3rd 

                        1. Hand in Chapter Answers

                        2. Lecture 6 on Chapter 6 “Roman Civilization”

                Thursday, October 5th 

                        1. Lecture 6 on Chapter 6

                        2. In Class work on Assignment – Prepare for Quiz 6 and Answer Questions from Chapter 5 “The Rise of Rome (c. 1000-27 BC)” The teacher will tell you which sections to respond to.

Week 7: Midterm Week

                Tuesday, October 10th 

                        1. Quiz 6

                        2. Student Presentations

                Thursday, October 12th 

                        1. Student Presentations (See Rubrics)

                        2. The term paper is due on November 21st right after class begins.  Late papers will be automatically marked down one letter grade. The term paper is to be 6-9 pages in length. 5 percentage points will be deducted for each page below or above the requested length.

Week 8: Roman Culture

                Tuesday, October 17th 

                        1. Lecture 7 on Chapter 7 “Roman Culture”

                Thursday, October 19th 

                        1. Lecture 7 on Chapter 7

                        2. In Class work on Assignment – Prepare for Quiz 7 and Answer Questions from Chapter 6 “The Roman Empire (27 BC-284 AD)”. The teacher will tell you which sections to respond to.

Week 9: Early Christian Civilization

                Tuesday, October 24th 

  1. Hand in Chapter Answers
  2. Quiz 7

                        3. Lecture 8 on Chapter 8 “Early Christian Civilization”

                Thursday, October 26th 

                        1. Lecture 8 on Chapter 8

                        2. In Class work on Assignment – Prepare for Quiz 8 and Answer Questions from Chapter 6 “The Roman Empire (27 BC-284 AD)”. The teacher will tell you which sections to respond to.

Week 10: Fall of Rome and the Rise of Christianity

                Tuesday, October 31st 

                        1. Hand in Chapter Answers

                        2. Quiz 8

                        3. Lecture 9 on Chapter 9 “Fall of Rome and the Rise of Christianity”

                Thursday, November 2nd 

                        1. Lecture 9 on Chapter 9

                        2. In Class work on Assignment – Prepare for Quiz 9 and Answer Questions from Chapter 7 “Late Antiquity (250-600 AD)” The teacher will tell you which sections to respond to.

Week 11: Medieval World

                Tuesday, November 7th 

                        1. Hand in Chapter Answers

                        2. Quiz 9

                        3. Lecture 10 on Chapter 10 “Medieval World”

                Thursday, November 9th 

                        1. Lecture 10 on Chapter 10

                        2. In Class work on Assignment – Prepare for Quiz 10 and Answer Questions from Chapter 8 “Europe in the Early Middle Ages (600-1000)”, Chapter 9 “State and Church in the High Middle Ages” Chapter 10 “Life in Villages and Cities of the High Middle Ages” Chapter 11 “The Later Middle Ages (1300-1450)” The teacher will tell you which sections to respond to.

Week 12: Renaissance

                Tuesday, November 14th 

                        1. Hand in Chapter Answers

                        2. Quiz 10

                        3. Lecture 11 on Chapter 11 “Renaissance”

                Tuesday, November 16th 

                        1. Lecture 11 on Chapter 11

                        2. In Class work on Assignment – Prepare for Quiz 11 and Answer Questions from Chapter 12 “European Society in the Age of the Renaissance (1350-1550)” Chapter 14 “European Exploration and Conquest (1450-1650)” The teacher will tell you which sections to respond to.

Week 13: Fragmentation

                Tuesday, November 21st 

  1. Hand in Chapter Answers
  2. Terms Papers are due on November 21st right after class begins. (Late papers will automatically receive one grade lower.) The term paper is to be 6-9 pages in length. 5 percentage points will be deducted for each page below or above the requested length.

                        2. Quiz 11

                        3. Lecture 12 on Chapter 12 “Fragmentation”

                        4. In Class work on Assignment – Prepare for Quiz 12 and Answer Questions from Chapter 13 “Reformations and Religious Wars (1500-1600)” The teacher will tell you which sections to respond to.

                Thursday, November 23rd 

                        Thanksgiving Break – No Class

Week 14: ---------------------------

                Tuesday, November 28th 

                        1. Hand in Chapter Answers

                        2. Quiz 12

                        3. (Possibly Some End of Term Presentations)

                Thursday, November 30th 

                        1. Student Evaluations (Possibly Some End of Term Presentations)

Week 15: Final Exam

                Tuesday, December 5th – Friday, December 7th 

  1. End of Term Presentations.
  1. COURSE REQUIREMENTS

  1. Quizzes: 20%
  2. Chapter Questions: 20%

3. Presentation 1: 10%

4. Presentation 2: 10%

5. Paper: 40% (due on Tuesday, November 21st - The highest grade a late term paper can receive is an 80%.) The term paper is to be 6-9 pages in length. 5 percentage points will be deducted for each page below or above the requested length.

Note well: Unless there is a sufficient reason, the highest grade any late assignment can receive is an 80%.        

  1. REQUIRED READINGS:

John P. McKay, Clare Haru Crowston, Merry E. Wiesner-Hanks, and Joe Perry. Sources for Western Society Volume 1 From Antiquity to the Enlightenment. Boston: Bedford/St. Martin's, 2014. $ Kindle $1767; $ 36.99 ISBN-13: 978-1457615191 ISBN-10 1457615193

6.  EVALUATION

(Basis of evaluation with explanation regarding the nature of the assignment and the percentage of the grade assigned to each item below). Students who have difficulty with research and composition are encouraged to pursue assistance with the Online Writing Lab (available at http://www.holyapostles.edu/owl).

GRADING SCALE:

A 94-100; A- 90-93; B+ 87-89; B 84-86; B- 80-83; C+ 77-79; C 74-76; C- 70-73 D 60-69; F 59 and below

Chapter Questions Rubric

5 Points

3 Points

2 Points

1 Points

Grammar

Questions contain less than 2 errors total.

Questions contain between 3 and 5 errors total.

Questions contain 5-10 errors total.

Questions contain more than 10 total errors.

Complete Answers

All answers use key words from the question and are answered in complete sentences where the student does not merely quote from the text but describes in his or her own words the essence of the text and provides grounds and warrants for the claims.

Answers use key words from the question and are answered in complete sentences but are primarily quotations of the text and/or do not provide grounds and warrants for one question.

An answer or answers either do not use key words from the question or are not answered in complete sentences and/or do not provide grounds and warrants for more than one question.  

An answer or answers do not use key words from the question and are not answered in complete sentences and/or do not provide grounds and warrants for all or almost all questions.

Accuracy

All questions are answered accurately, using details from the primary text.

One question has not been answered accurately.

Two questions have not been answered accurately.

Three or more questions have not been answered accurately.

WCIV I Research Paper Rubric

Writing and Expression

Outcome: An ability to use important conventions of research writing, including the use of a clear thesis, effective paragraphing, & an organizational pattern, effective transitions that develops an idea over the course of the research paper rather than simply listing supporting ideas.

5 Points

4 Points

3 Points

2 Points

Thesis

The statement is clear and offers a very specific idea that clearly sets the topic & limits its scope.

The statement is clear and sets out a clear topic, but might not clearly limit its scope.

The statement is clear, but offers only a vague or general point that may be taken in many directions.

The statement does not offer a clear point that can be developed.

Paragraph effectiveness

Each paragraph has a central stated or clearly implied point and develops it with clear details.  Each has an explicit or clearly implied connection to earlier paragraphs & the overall point of the essay.

Each paragraph has a central stated or clearly implied point and develops it with clear details.

Each paragraph has a central stated or implied point and the details in the paragraph are relevant to that point, though they may comprise a list rather than a development of the point.

Paragraphs lack a central stated or implied point.

Organization & Transition  

Transitions are fully developed and the paper fully develops a point.

Transitions move beyond the simple use of transition phrases and the paper demonstrates some attempt to develop and build a point rather than simply list ideas.

Inconsistent use of transition; or, transitions are provided, but tend to be mechanical.  The paper is organized simplistically – for instance, points are simply added to one another.

Little or no sense of transitions; connections between paragraphs and the overall organization of the paper is unclear.

Research

Outcome: An ability to use language that generally conveys meaning to readers & contains few errors; an ability to ethically & accurately use Turabian format when  citing sources.

5 Points

4 Points

3 Points

2 Points

Correctness

Free of errors.

Few errors – fewer than one per page.

Errors may appear (fewer than three per page), but do not impede meaning.

Errors impede meaning or are too numerous – more than three per page.

Style

Meaning is very clear and the writer’s language enhances reader’s understanding.

Meaning is clear and the writer’s language is competent.

Meaning is sometimes clear to readers, but not consistently.

Meaning is unclear. Sentences may be wordy and/or vocabulary is limited or incorrectly used.

Use of Turabian/Chicago Format – See the HACS Style Sheet

All quotes are correctly introduced; quotes and paraphrases are correctly cited and formatted. The works cited page is correctly formatted and includes all resources.

All quotes are correctly introduced.  Only one or two citations for quotes or paraphrases are missing or incorrectly formatted, and/or the works cited page has minor formatting issues but includes all resources in the correct order.

Quotes are often not correctly introduced.  Only quotes (not paraphrases) are cited; or the works cited page completely disregards Turabian format.

Quotes are not correctly introduced.  Many citations are missing and may be incorrectly formatted OR there is no works cited page.

WCIV I Presentation Rubric

 

Exemplary (4)

Proficient (3)

Developing (2)

Beginning (1)

Organization

Organizational pattern (specific introduction that provides in advance the logical steps the presentation will take, conclusion, sequenced material within the body, and transitions) is clearly and consistently observable, is skillful, and makes the content of the presentation cohesive.

Organizational pattern (specific introduction and conclusion, sequenced material within the body, and transitions) is clearly and consistently observable within the presentation.

Organizational pattern (specific introduction and conclusion, sequenced material within the body, and transitions) is intermittently observable within the presentation.

Organizational pattern (specific introduction and conclusion, sequenced material within the body, and transitions) is not observable within the presentation.

Language/Delivery

Language choices are imaginative, memorable, and compelling, and enhance the effectiveness of the presentation. Language facilitates retention and attention by being unique to the oral channel. Language in presentation is appropriate to audience.

Delivery techniques (posture, gesture, eye contact, and vocal expressiveness, lack of filler words “ums, ah, you know etc.” ) make the presentation compelling, and speaker appears polished and confident. Delivery appears natural and purposeful. There are no signs of speech anxiety.

Language choices are thoughtful and generally support the effectiveness of the presentation. Language includes choices that reflect an orally communicated message as opposed to a written message. Language in presentation is appropriate to audience.

Delivery techniques (posture, gesture, eye contact, and vocal expressiveness) make the presentation interesting, and speaker appears comfortable. Delivery generally appears natural and purposeful. Signs of speech anxiety are minimal and, if present, disappear as the speech begins.

Language choices are mundane and commonplace, and partially support the effectiveness of the presentation. Language helps minimally in promoting retention and attention of the audience. Language in presentation is appropriate to audience.

Delivery techniques (posture, gesture, eye contact, and vocal expressiveness) make the presentation understandable but delivery sometimes lacks purpose and, at times, appears rehearsed. Speaker appears tentative with signs of speech anxiety present intermittently.

Language choices are unclear and minimally support the effectiveness of the presentation. Language does not reflect the uniqueness of the oral channel. Language in presentation is not appropriate to audience.

Delivery techniques (posture, gesture, eye contact, and vocal expressiveness) detract from the understandability of the presentation. Delivery choices lack purpose and virtually any appearance of being natural. The speaker appears uncomfortable, being controlled by speech anxiety.

Central Message

Central message is compelling (precisely stated, appropriately repeated, memorable, and strongly supported.) Message is appropriate for purpose, context, and audience.

Central message is clear and consistent with the supporting material. Message is generally appropriate for purpose, context, and audience.

Central message is basically understandable but is not often repeated and is not memorable. Message may fall short of adhering to purpose, and lacks a consistent appropriateness for context and/or audience

Central message can be deduced, but is not explicitly stated in the presentation. Message is not clearly in line with purpose and lacks a consistent appropriateness to audience and context.

Time

Ten Minutes

 One minute below.

Two minutes below.

Three minutes below.

Oral Presentation Requirements and Rubric

        The two oral presentations are to be accompanied by outlines. The format of the outline is as follows.

Introduction

        The introduction needs to be written out with a minimum of ten grammatically correct sentences. In the introduction, you are to present your topic and the steps by which you will talk on your topic.

Body

        You only need to outline the body of your presentation, but grammar still will be corrected.

        Direct quotes need to be fully written out and properly footnoted. Include at least three direct quotes, preferably from primary sources.

Conclusion

        The conclusion needs to be written out in at least ten sentences. In the conclusion, you are to summarize and make a synthesis of your presentation steps.

Bibliography

        In Turabian format and a minimum of 5 sources with at least one primary source.

Outline Rubric

15 Points

12 Points

10 Points

8 Point

Introduction

In at least ten written out sentences, the main idea is introduced, and clearly stated, and the steps you will take are presented.

Although a main idea is clearly stated in the introduction, it is not the main idea present in the presentation.

The main idea is presented in an unclear, confusing manner.

The main idea is missing in the introduction.

Body

The essential supporting ideas are presented in a logical order.

Some essential supporting ideas are missing.

Those presented are explained in a logical order.

The essential supporting ideas are presented but an illogical, random manner.

Only some essential ideas are presented. These are presented in an illogical, random manner.

Conclusion

The main idea is restated in at least 10 sentences in a complementary but different way than it was in the introduction.

The main idea is restated but almost exactly as it was in the introduction.

The main idea is not restated in the conclusion.

A conclusion is missing.

Grammar

Error-free grammar and error-free citations/bibliography.

Very few (1-3) errors and those that appear do not obscure meaning.

Some (4-7) errors or lack of clarity of expression.

Many (over 7) errors.

7. DISABILITIES ACCOMMODATIONS POLICY

Holy Apostles College & Seminary is committed to the goal of achieving equal educational opportunities and full participation in higher education for persons with disabilities who qualify for admission to the College. Students enrolled in online courses who have documented disabilities requiring special accommodations should contact Bob Mish, the Director of Online Student Affairs, at rmish@holyapostles.edu or 860-632-3015. In all cases, reasonable accommodations will be made to ensure that all students with disabilities have access to course materials in a mode in which they can receive them. Students who have technological limitations (e.g., slow Internet connection speeds in convents) are asked to notify their instructors the first week of class for alternative means of delivery.

8. ACADEMIC HONESTY POLICY

Students at Holy Apostles College & Seminary are expected to practice academic honesty.

Avoiding Plagiarism

In its broadest sense, plagiarism is using someone else's work or ideas, presented or claimed as your own.  At this stage in your academic career, you should be fully conscious of what it means to plagiarize. This is an inherently unethical activity because it entails the uncredited use of someone else's expression of ideas for another's personal advancement; that is, it entails the use of a person merely as a means to another person’s ends.

Students, where applicable:

Consequences of Academic Dishonesty:

Because of the nature of this class, academic dishonesty is taken very seriously.  Students participating in academic dishonesty may be removed from the course and from the program.

9. Multiple Submissions Policy

Any work done for academic credit, in addition to its accurately representing Church teaching, should serve as a substantive demonstration of a student's having been intellectually formed by the class for which he or she is writing. To that end, students may not make multiple submissions of their academic work without first seeking permission from the course professor to whom they desire to submit their work and sharing with that course professor the original work and any comments made on it by the professor to whom it was originally submitted. In the case where the work intended for submission will be sent to two or more course professors for credit in the same semester, permission must be granted in advance by all course professors who will be receiving it. Work that is substantially the same content presented in different formats (e.g., once as an essay for one class and then as a PowerPoint for a different class) is also considered a multiple submission. Violations of this policy may lead to a faculty member’s not accepting for credit the work a student has submitted.

Please note:  Above copy taken from the Handbook for Commuter Students page 11

Additional copy on website:  Academic Policies and Regulations page 19B

10. ATTENDANCE POLICY

        Students are expected to attend all classes unless they have been excused.

11. INCOMPLETE POLICY

An Incomplete is a temporary grade assigned at the discretion of the faculty member. It is typically allowed in situations in which the student has satisfactorily completed major components of the course and has the ability to finish the remaining work without re-enrolling, but has encountered extenuating circumstances, such as illness, that prevent his or her doing so prior to the last day of class.

To request an incomplete, students must first download a copy of the Incomplete Request Form. This document is located within the Shared folder of the Files tab in Populi. Secondly, students must fill in any necessary information directly within the PDF document. Lastly, students must send their form to their professor via email for approval. “Approval” should be understood as the professor responding to the student’s email in favor of granting the “Incomplete” status of the student.

Students receiving an Incomplete must submit the missing course work by the end of the sixth week following the semester in which they were enrolled. An incomplete grade (I) automatically turns into the grade of “F” if the course work is not completed.

Students who have completed little or no work are ineligible for an incomplete. Students who feel they are in danger of failing the course due to an inability to complete course assignments should withdraw from the course.

A “W” (Withdrawal) will appear on the student’s permanent record for any course dropped after the end of the first week of a semester to the end of the third week. A “WF” (Withdrawal/Fail) will appear on the student’s permanent record for any course dropped after the end of the third week of a semester and on or before the Friday before the last week of the semester.

12. PRESENTATION TOPICS

Pre-Midterm Topics

Cuneiform

Nebuchadnezzar

Cyrus the Great

Herodotus

Polybius (Greek Historian)

Socrates

Pericles

The Peloponnesian War

Thucydides

Ancient Greek Theatre

Classical Greek Art

Hellenistic Art

Ancient Greek Olympic Games

Ancient City of Sparta

Ancient City of Athens

Draco

Pericles

Athenian Golden Age

Xenophon

Virgil

Ovid

Sophists

Greek Mythology

Roman Mythology

Alexander the Great Hannibal

Julius Caesar

Emperor Justinian

William the Conqueror

Charlemagne

Boethius

Beowulf

King Arthur (Sir Gawain and the Green Knight)

Dante

Chaucer


Post-Midterm Topics

Cimabue

        Giotto

        Duccio di Buoninsegna

        Simone Martini

        Fra Angelico

        Melchior Broederlam

        Jan van Eyck

        Rogier van der Weyden

        Hugo van der Goes

        Robert Campin

        Hieronymus Bosch

        Ambrogio Lorenzetti

        Masaccio

        Paolo Uccello

        Donatello

        Botticelli

        Domenico Ghirlandaio

        Fra Filippo Lippi

        Pietro Perugino

        Luca Signorelli

        Leonardo da Vinci

        Michelangelo

        Raphael

        Titian

        Giovanni Bellini

        Antonio Allegri da Correggio

        Matthias Grünewald

        Pieter Saenredam

        Lucas Cranach the Elder

        Albrecht Dürer

        Albrecht Altdorfer

        Hans Holbein the Younger

        Pieter Aertsen

        Pieter Breugel the Elder

        El Greco Doménikos Theotokópoulos

Petrarch

Isabella I

Ferdinand II

Bartolomeu Dias

Vasco de Gama

Ferdinand Magellan

John Cabot

Christopher Columbus

Machiavelli

Boccaccio

Artemisia Gentileschi

Christopher Columbus


Fr. Peter Samuel Kucer, MSA, STD, is the Academic Dean of Holy Apostles College and Seminary and an Assistant Professor.  He completed his STD in Systematic Theology from the Catholic University of America in January, 2012.  His interests include the relationship of Catholic doctrine to history, politics, economics and scientific reasoning.  While teaching he is studying these relationships from the standpoint of stability and change.  Another relationship that is of great interest to him is between Catholicism and Judaism again from the standpoint of continuity and change.