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UHS Course Catalog
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This is a graphic of the Logo for University High School, part of Ferndale Public Schools, in partnership with Wayne State University.

Course Catalog

Ferndale Public Schools Mission

To provide all our students with quality educational programs
while promoting the values of diversity and responsible citizenship.

University High School Mission & Vision

UHS Vision Statement

We are a rigorous, innovative college preparatory school, with a curriculum organized around college preparedness and careers for the 21st century. UHS offers students a dynamic learning environment where multiple modes of instructional strategies are used to prepare students to meet the ever-growing challenges of college and the professional world. UHS has a 9-16 vision, where we measure our success by the percentage of students we graduate from college. The UHS staff strives to create a culture where students learn to be self-motivated learners and are respectful, professional, and invested in their education. Students and teachers work together to create a safe and caring learning environment.

UHS Mission Statement

The mission of University High School is to provide a physically and emotionally safe environment where students become prepared for success in college and 21st century careers.

About University High School

University High School is a four year public high school with a rigorous curriculum. UHS is in partnership with Wayne State University and is focused on success for all students through equitable access to multiple pathways.

Average class size: 28

Student/Teacher ratio: 25:1

Total Professional teaching staff: 21+ 5 support positions

Maximum School Size: 550 students

Administrative Team

David Gardner - Principal

Julie Patterson - Assistant Principal

Office Staff

Sue Sabbag – Secretary

Patti Skop – Secretary

Counseling Staff & College Support Team

Patricia Tootikian-Hachigian – Counselor

Kirsten Riley-Social Worker

Gena Clay – Restorative Practice Coach

Eric Royal – College Success Advisor

Joshua Nicks – Student Support Coach

University High School Behavior Expectations

At University High School, our behavior reflects a dedication to academics and respect for the learning environment.

To that end we remember that:

Ferndale Public Schools Attendance Policy

School Attendance Policy

It is imperative that students be in attendance each school day in order not to miss a significant portion of their education. Important learning results from active participation in classroom and other school activities that cannot be replaced by individual study.

The school is also concerned about helping students develop a high quality work ethic that will be a significant factor in their success with future employers. One of the most important work habits that employers look for in hiring and promoting a worker is dependability in coming to work every day and on time. This is a habit the School wants to help students develop as early as possible in their school careers.

Truancy

Unexcused absence from school (truancy) is not acceptable. Students who are truant will be expected to make up all schoolwork missed in order to receive credit. After 10 days of truancy in any grading period, a student will be considered a “habitual truant” which can result in:

Excused Absences

Students may be excused from school for one of the following reasons and will be provided an opportunity to make up missed schoolwork and/or tests:

Students with a health condition that causes repeated absence are to provide the school office with an explanation of the condition from a registered physician.

Parents must provide an explanation for their child’s absence by no later than 48 hours after the absence. They are to call the school office (Attendance Office at the High School) and explain the reason for the absence. If the absence can be foreseen and the “good cause” is approved by the Principal, the parent should arrange to discuss the matter as many days as possible before the absence will occur, so that arrangements can be made to assist the student in making up the missed school work.

Students who are excusably absent for more than 10 days in a grading period, regardless of the reasons, will be considered “frequently absent.” If there is a pattern of frequent absence for “illness,” the parents will be required to provide a statement from a physician describing the health condition that is causing the frequent illness and the treatment that is being provided to rectify the condition. Without such a statement, the student’s permanent attendance record will indicate “frequent unexplained illness.”

During the next grading period, “frequently-absent” students will be placed on “attendance watch” to monitor whether or not the pattern continues. If it continues, students may be denied opportunities to participate in non-curricular school activities and events, and notations will be made on their transcripts concerning frequent absence from school. Such a report may be provided to postsecondary institutions and/or possible employers.

Unexcused Absences

Any student who is absent from school for all or any part of the day without a legitimate excuse shall be considered truant and the student and parents will be subject to the truancy laws of the State.

If students under the age of 16 are truant for more than ten (10) consecutive or fifteen (15) total days of truancy during a semester, they will be considered “habitual” truants and will be reported to the proper authorities.

Students who are Unexcused Absent will be expected to make up all schoolwork missed in order to receive credit.

Notification of Absence

If students are going to be absent, parents/guardians must contact the school within 48 hours of the absence and provide an explanation. If prior contact is not possible, the parents should provide a written excuse or phone call as soon as possible. When no excuse is provided, the absence will be unexcused and the student will be considered truant. If the absence of a student appears to be questionable or excessive, the school staff will try to help parents improve their child’s attendance.

The skipping of classes or any part of the school day will result in students not being permitted to make up classwork. Disciplinary action will follow.

Suspension from School

Absence from school due to suspension shall be considered an authorized absence, neither excused nor unexcused.

A suspended student will be responsible for making up school work lost due to suspension. It is recommended that a student complete missed assignments during the suspension and turn them in to the teacher upon returning to school. Students should utilize Canvas to access their school work.  Paper assignments may be requested from the teacher and picked up in the office.  Make up of missed tests may be scheduled when the student returns to school.

The student will be given credit for properly completed assignments and a grade on any made-up tests.

Vacations during the School Year

Parents are encouraged not to take their child out of school for vacations. When a family vacation must be scheduled during the school year, the parents should discuss the matter with the Principal and the student’s teacher(s) ahead of time to make necessary arrangements. It may be possible for the student to receive certain assignments that are to be completed during the trip. Students who are absent due to a vacation will be expected to make up all schoolwork missed in order to receive credit.

Graduation Requirements

English Language Arts

4 credits

Mathematics

4 credits

Science

3 credits

Social Studies

3 credits

World Languages

2 credits

Health

0.5 credits

Physical Education

0.5 credits

College Preparation

2 credits

Digital Media/Art

1 credits

Computer Education

1 credits

Electives

3 credits

Total

24 credits

Graduation Recognition

Students who graduate with a cumulative grade point 3.25-3.49 will be recognized as Cum Laude.

 Students who graduate with a cumulative grade point 3.50-3.74 will be recognized as Summa Cum Laude.

Students who graduate with a cumulative grade point 3.75-4.0 will be recognized as Magna Cum Laude.

Grading Systems

There are two grading scales utilized by teachers at UHS.  Grading scales are established by the teacher at their discretion.

Letter Grades

Traditional Grading Scale

Standards Based Grading Scale*

A

100%-90%

100%-87.5%

B

89%-80%

87.4%-68.8%

C

79%-70%

68.7%-43.8%

D

69%-60%

43.7%-25.0%

E

Below 60%

24.9%-0%

G = Pass

60% and up

25% and up

H = Fail

Below 60%

Below 24.9%

C = Credit

60% and up

25% and up

NC = No Credit

Below 60%

Below 24.9%

W = Withdraw

Only given with counselor approval

*Standards Based Grading means that the percent earned in the class represents the level of mastery in the course that the student has achieved.

Special Programs

ACE

ACE – The Accelerated College Experience is offered through Oakland Community College. Students earn a free associates degree. The ACE program is available for Juniors.

C2 Pipeline

C2 Pipeline – Our afterschool enrichment program provides free food, supervision and enrichment activities for all grade levels.

OSTC

OSTC – Oakland Skills Technical Campus offers vocational and technical programs and is available by application for Juniors and Seniors.

Dual Enrollment

Dual Enrollment – Completed through Wayne State University, the Dual Enrollment program allows students of University High School to  take college courses at UHS and earn college credit.

Guardians desiring dual enrollment for their child should schedule an appointment with a counselor or administrator to work out a plan of work for their child. 

Center for Advanced Studies and the Arts (CASA)

CASA – Center for Advanced Studies and the Arts offers students the opportunity to take advanced placement classes that are not offered at University High School. The following criteria must be met in order for a student to attend CASA:

Guardians desiring CASA enrollment for their child should schedule an appointment with a counselor or administrator to work out a plan of work for their child. 

Course Placement

All freshmen entering University High School begin their course of study with Biology, English 9, Algebra I, US History, PE/Health, Computer Applications, and College Preparatory Course 1. 

Students will begin their language study with Spanish 1 in 10th grade, unless placement is achieved into a higher-level Spanish based on a placement test taken in the first week of school.

Standard Career Plan

Below is a standard career plan for a UHS Student:

9th Grade

10th Grade

11th Grade

12th Grade

  • CPC 9
  • CPC 10
  • CPC 11
  • CPC 12
  • English 9-1 and 9-2
  • English 9-1 and English 9-2 Honors
  • Strategic Reading 9-1 and Strategic Reading 9-2
  • English 10-1 and 10-2
  • English 10-1 Honors and English 10-2 Honors
  • English 11-1 and 11-2
  • English 11-1 Honors and English 11-2 Honors
  • Senior Composition 12-1 and 12-2
  • Extended Algebra 1A and 1B
  • Algebra 1A and 1B
  • Extended Algebra 1C and 1D
  • Geometry 1 and 2
  • Algebra 2A and 2B
  • Algebra 2A and 2B Honors
  • Geometry 1 and 2
  •  Precalculus 1 and 2
  • US History  1 and 2
  • World History 1 and 2
  • Economics & Civics
  • Elective
  • Biology 1 and 2
  • Chemistry 1 and 2
  • Conceptual Physics 1 and 2
  • Elective
  • Phys Ed & Health
  • Spanish 1A and 1B
  • Spanish 2A and 2B
  • Spanish 2A Honors and 2B Honors
  • Elective
  • Computer Applications (Highly Recommended)
  • Art Foundations 1 and 2
  • Digital Media 1 and 2
  • Elective
  • Elective

* Note, required classes above are in bold type

Students who begin their studies at University High School after the first semester of their freshman year will be placed in classes based on their high school transcript from their previous school.

English Department

Department Mission

The mission of the University High School English Department is to help students become effective readers and writers through the study of a variety of literary genres. Students will gain a deeper understanding of literary styles and stories, as well as gain exposure to a variety of different cultures. Students will write extensively and become proficient in the four main writing genres.

Available English Courses and Credits

English 9-1

0.5 credits

English 9-1

0.5 credits

English 9-2 Honors

0.5 credits

Strategic Reading 9-1

0.5 credits

Strategic Reading 9-2

0.5 credits

English 10-1

0.5 credits

English 10-2

0.5 credits

English 10-1 Honors

0.5 credits

English 10-2 Honors

0.5 credits

English 11-1

0.5 credits

English 11-2

0.5 credits

English 11-1 Honors

0.5 credits

English 11-2 Honors

0.5 credits

Senior Composition 12-1

0.5 credits

Senior Composition 12-2

0.5 credits

Creative Writing 1*

0.5 credits

Creative Writing 2*

0.5 credits

Horror Lit 1*

0.5 credits

Horror Lit 2*

0.5 credits

Credits Required for Graduation: 4.0 

*Elective courses are not necessarily offered during all semesters.  Offerings are based on student interest.  

Course Descriptions

English 9-1 and 9-2

Length: One semester each        

Prerequisites: None

Suggested Courses: None

Required for graduation or elective: Required

The English 9-1 and 9-2 curriculum introduces students to the study of literature and writing through the examination of a variety of literary genres and writing styles following the Common Core State Standards for English Language Arts. The course begins with a Launching Unit focused on personal narrative and creating a writing community. The narrative reading and literary essay units focus on the skills of reading strategies, characterization, motivation, and literary analysis. Students will then move on to the independent reading unit, where they will self-select a text, track their own reading progress, and learn to set reading goals. In the research editorial unit, students will learn to craft an editorial to support a claim(s) in an analysis of substantive topics or texts using valid reasoning and relevant and sufficient evidence.

English 9-2 Honors

Length: One semester        

Prerequisites: Passing grade in English 9-1 and Teacher Recommendation

Suggested Courses: None

Required for graduation or elective: Required

Students are introduced to the study of literature and writing through the examination of a variety of literary genres and writing styles following the Common Core State Standards for English Language Arts. The course begins with a Launching Unit focused on personal narrative and creating a writing community. The narrative reading and literary essay units focus on the skills of reading strategies, characterization, motivation, and literary analysis. Students will then move on to the independent reading unit, where they will self-select a text, track their own reading progress, and learn to set reading goals. In the research editorial unit, students will learn to craft an editorial to support a claim(s) in an analysis of substantive topics or texts using valid reasoning and relevant and sufficient evidence. In addition, the honors section of English 9-2 includes a study of Shakespeare’s Romeo and Juliet, additional independent reading responsibilities, and a higher level of rigor for all assignments and assessments in preparation for Advanced Placement course work in the senior year.

Strategic Reading 9-1 and 9-2

Length: One semester each        

Prerequisites: None

Suggested Courses: None

Required for graduation or elective: Elective

Strategic Reading is intended to support students in English Language Arts to help them improve both their reading and writing skills in an authentic, differentiated way. The course will be based on two key elements: reading apprenticeship to build reading skills while honoring student choice and voice and writing workshop to help individualize writing interventions and supports based on each students’ needs. A cornerstone of the course will be independent reading which will allow for differentiation and reflection by each student on their identity as a reader. The course will also include units designed to support reading and writing across the curriculum including science and history.

English 10-1 and 10-2

Length: One semester each        

Prerequisites: Passing grade in English 9-1 and 9-2

Suggested Courses: None

Required for graduation or elective: Required

The English 10 course is designed for students who have successfully completed the English 9-1 and 9-2 coursework. Students will utilize Common Core curriculum beginning with establishing a reader’s/writer’s notebook, analyzing a novel and writing a literary analysis essay, beginning narrative reading and analysis along with reading various slave narratives and creating a multi-genre project. Students will then move to a nonfiction independent reading unit, informational reading and writing units and an argument study. Students will also study how American literary and cultural identities are formed through the reading of immigrant literature through short stories, poetry, and novels.

English 10-1 Honors and 10-2 Honors

Length: One semester each

Prerequisites: Passing grade in English 9-1 and 9-2 and Teacher Recommendation

Suggested Courses: None

Required for graduation or elective: Required

The English 10 Honors course is designed for students who have successfully completed the English 9-1 and English 9-2 Honors courses. To stay in the honors class, students must complete a summer reading project before returning to school in the fall. Students will utilize Common Core curriculum beginning with establishing a reader’s/writer’s notebook, analyzing a novel and writing a literary analysis essay, beginning narrative reading and analysis along with reading various slave narratives and creating a multi-genre project. Students will then move to a nonfiction independent reading unit, informational reading and writing units, and an argument study. Students will also study how American literary and cultural identities are formed through the reading of immigrant literature through short stories, poetry, and novels. The honors curriculum will follow the standard of the English 10-1 and 10-2 curriculum with the addition of two novels, a full slave narrative piece, and various shorter works.

English 11-1 and 11-2

Length: One semester each        

Prerequisites: Passing grade in English 9 and 10

Suggested Courses: None

Required for graduation or elective: Required

The English 11 course is designed for students who have successfully completed the English 10 courses.  In this course, students will be asked to learn collaboratively in a writing and reading community and further their study of the Common Core State Standards for English Language Arts. This course begins with examining how identities are created and influenced by examining both themselves and other memoirists. Students will continue analyzing character identity and practicing reading strategies by selecting their own creative non-fiction novel. In the following narrative reading unit and literary essay unit, students will focus on characteristics of satire pieces and the implications of their historical, cultural, literary context. Lastly, students study foundational documents in the informational reading and writing units, reflecting on their historical concepts and current significance. This course requires that students complete vocabulary and grammar exercises, as well as focus on a variety of written genres, specifically the expository and narrative forms.

English 11-1 Honors and 11-2 Honors

Length: One semester each        

Prerequisites: Passing grade in English 9 and 10 and Teacher Recommendation

Suggested Courses: None

Required for graduation or elective: Required

The English 11-1 Honors and 11-2 Honors courses are designed for students who have successfully completed the English 10-1 Honors and 10-2 Honors courses, or have been recommended for the honors section by their English 10-2 instructor. To stay in the honors class, students must complete a summer reading project before returning to school in the fall. The year begins with the study of culture-as-it-could-be through a study of students’ summer reading science fiction novels. This course then focuses on the study of literature and cultures around the world and a study of the different literary styles that emerge as a result of an author’s cultural context. The first semester of this course focuses on a study of the culture of self and narrative writing, the culture of women around the world and using the feminist lens in literary analysis, and an exploration of cultural conflict and cultural resilience through the study of the Holocaust. Students will read a variety of stories, novels, and poetry in their study of world literature. This course also requires that students engage in online discussion boards and complete at least one essay, oral presentation, and group project per unit. 

The English 11-2 Honors course is designed for students who have successfully completed the English 11-1 Honors course. This course continues the first semester study of cultures around the world and the ways in which literature is shaped by an author’s context. The course begins with a research essay on a topic from the Holocaust, a continuation of the cultural conflict unit study. Students will write a five-to-seven page research paper using in-text citations and an MLA works cited page. Students will also present their findings in a presentation form. Students will then explore cultural conflict in Africa and imperialism in literature. Students will end the year exploring the concept of the tragic hero through a study of Greek and Shakespearean tragedy. Students will continue to read a variety of stories, novels, and poetry in their study of world literature. This course also requires that students engage in online discussion boards and complete at least one essay, oral presentation, and group project per unit.

Senior Composition 12-1 and 12-2

Length: One semester each        

Prerequisites: Passing grade in English 9, 10, and 11

Suggested Courses: None

Required for graduation or elective: Required

The Senior Composition 12-1 course is designed for students who have successfully completed an eleventh grade English course. The senior composition format is writing intensive and focused on student centered topics. Students will write four essays per unit covering varying topics using the four types of writing: narrative, expository, descriptive, and persuasive. The topics will be teacher generated but student centered and vary depending on student demographic and current events. There will also be extensive teacher, peer, and personal evaluation and revision of each composition. Students will work closely with a selected group throughout the course with whom they will share their biweekly writing assignments. One person from the group will be selected to read aloud each class session and provide feedback. The goal is for students to be extremely well versed in prewriting, drafting, and revision by the close of the course. There will be a narrative text with each of the first three units that discusses a specific theme and will be the subject of class and group discussions as well as Socratic seminars and debates. Finally students will complete daily grammar and sentence structure lessons from the Killgallon text that will be kept in a journal. By the close of the course each student will submit one revised composition of the twelve assigned to be combined in a class composition book.

The Senior Composition 12-2 course is designed for students who have successfully completed Senior Composition 12-1.  Students will consider their study of the written form from the 12-1 course and will continue to write four essays per unit using the four types of writing: narrative, expository, descriptive, and persuasive. There will be extensive teacher, peer, and personal evaluation and revision of each composition. The course will culminate in a multimedia movie project and written essay assignment, dedicated to the final revision of one of the students’ twelve composition assignments that will be submitted for the bound class composition book. Students will complete an extensive multimedia/movie project that tells a narrated documentary style story. The subject of the documentary will be chosen at the students’ discretion but must be approved by the instructor. The final composition submission and the multimedia/movie project will make up the final assignments for the unit and the course. Finally students will complete daily grammar and sentence structure lessons from the Killgallon text that will be kept in a journal. 

Creative Writing 1 and 2

Length: One semester        

Prerequisites: Passing grade in English 9, 10, and 11

Suggested Courses: None

Required for graduation or elective: Elective

Creative Writing will allow the English student with an interest in writing to experiment with personal expression and short creative forms such as descriptions, narratives, dialogues, character sketches, and poetry. Students will also be required to read independently and to write two major book reviews. In addition, students must be willing to share their work with classmates and the teacher. Students will be expected to come to class prepared and willing to write every day. A writing portfolio will be compiled of major writing assignments and students will utilize the workshop model when drafting, revising, and publishing.

Horror Lit. 1 and 2 

Length: One semester each

Prerequisites: Passing grade in English 9, 10, and 11

Suggested Courses: None

Required for graduation or elective: Elective

The spooky, the scary, and the unexplainable will be common threads through the reading and writing practice in this course as well as the inspiration for various discussions, presentations and creative projects. This course spans multiple genres (e.g., novels, short stories, poetry, plays, films and other visual art).  The course will  begin with a look at the traditional forms and key elements of the masterpieces of Romantic Literature with Edgar Allan Poe’s short stories.  From there, an exploration of how the genre evolved with the classic Henry James, and the trailblazing Octavia Butler, which will inevitably lead to the King of Horror: Stephen King.   Finally, students end the semester with a modern novel study with local author, Josh Malerman.

Mathematics Department

Department Mission

The mission of the University High School Mathematics Department is to provide an educational experience in mathematics that prepares students for successful roles in post-secondary education. This is accomplished through teachers’ commitments to excellent teaching, a well-designed curriculum, and a supportive environment for all to ensure our students take pride and ownership in their education with a high level of accuracy, quality,and responsibility.

Available Mathematics Courses and Credits

Extended Algebra 1A

0.5 credits

Extended Algebra 1B

0.5 credits

Extended Algebra 1C

0.5 credits

Extended Algebra 1D

0.5 credits

Algebra 1A

0.5 credits

Algebra 1B

0.5 credits

Geometry 1

0.5 credits

Geometry 2

0.5 credits

Algebra 2A

0.5 credits

Algebra 2B

0.5 credits

Algebra 2A Honors

0.5 credits

Algebra 2B Honors

0.5 credits

Pre-Calculus A

0.5 credits

Pre-Calculus B

0.5 credits

Credits Required for Graduation: 4.0

*Elective courses are not necessarily offered during all semesters.  Offerings are based on student interest.  

Course Descriptions

Extended Algebra 1A and 1B

Length: One semester each

Prerequisites: None

Suggested courses: None

Required for graduation or elective: Required

This course and Extended Algebra 1C and 1D  cover all material and practices of Algebra 1A and 1B extended over a 2-year period. Building off the notions of functions first introduced in middle school, Extended Algebra IA and 1B begin with a general exploration of integers, rational numbers, operations and expressions and the coordinate plane. In the process of modeling, students use tables, graphs, and equations to solve problems. The course continues with a unit on bivariate statistics where students not only study categorical data but also use scatter plots and their knowledge of functions to fit functions to data. As in all mathematics courses, the Standards for Mathematical Practice are the “processes and proficiencies” by which all other mathematics standards are taught.

Extended Algebra 1C and 1D

Length: One semester each

Prerequisites: None

Suggested courses: None

Required for graduation or elective: Required

This course and Extended Algebra 1A and 1B cover all material and practices of Algebra 1A and 1B extended over a 2-year period. Building off the notions of function first introduced in middle school, ExtendedAlgebra IC and 1D begin with a general exploration of functions and tools that students use to study specific functions in more depth throughout the course. Students model linear, exponential, quadratic, and polynomial functions. In the process of modeling, students use tables, graphs, and equations to solve problems. As in all mathematics courses, the Standards for Mathematical Practice are the “processes and proficiencies” by which all other mathematics standards are taught.

Algebra 1A and 1B

Length: One semester each

Prerequisites: Pre-Algebra or equivalent 8th grade Math

Suggested courses: None

Required for graduation or elective: Required

Building off the notions of function first introduced in middle school, Algebra IA and 1B begin with a general exploration of functions and tools that students use to study specific functions in more depth throughout the course. Students model linear, exponential, quadratic, and polynomial functions. In the process of modeling, students use tables, graphs, and equations to solve problems. The course concludes with a culminating unit on bivariate statistics where students not only study categorical data but also use scatter plots and their knowledge of functions to fit functions to data. As in all mathematics courses, the Standards for Mathematical Practice are the “processes and proficiencies” by which all other mathematics standards are taught.

Geometry 1 and 2

Length: One semester each

Prerequisites: Algebra 1A and 1B recommended

Suggested courses: None

Required for graduation or elective: Required

This course satisfies the Geometry requirement established by the State of Michigan.  It is based on the Common Core State Standards and the Standards for Mathematical Practices. This course follows Algebra 2.  The content of this course will include: foundations of geometry, parallel and perpendicular lines, triangle congruence, special properties of triangles, quadrilaterals, transformations, similarity, trigonometry, arcs and angles of circles, area and measurement, and surface area and volume.

Algebra 2A and 2B

Length: One semester each

Prerequisites: Algebra 1A and Algebra 1B recommended

Suggested courses: None

Required for graduation or elective: Required

The study of functions that began in eighth grade and Algebra I continues in Algebra 2, as students connect familiar linear and exponential functions to make sense of sequences and series. In addition, students are introduced to functions that have new features like limiting end behaviors, asymptotes, amplitude, and periodicity (i.e., rational, logarithmic, and trigonometric functions). Quadratic functions provide a context for students to work with complex numbers.

Algebra 2A and 2B Honors

Length: One semester each

Prerequisites: Algebra 1A and Algebra 1B recommended

Suggested courses: None

Required for graduation or elective: Required

The study of functions that began in eighth grade and Algebra I continues in Algebra 2, as students connect familiar linear and exponential functions to make sense of sequences and series. In addition, students are introduced to functions that have new features like limiting end behaviors, asymptotes, amplitude, and periodicity (i.e., rational, logarithmic, and trigonometric functions). Quadratic functions and conic sections provide a context for students to work with complex numbers, examine new features like the focus and directrix, and make connections between algebraic and geometric representations.

Students also engage in a more mathematically sophisticated study of statistics and probability that began in middle school. Students continue to summarize, represent, and interpret one variable statistics. In addition, they make inferences and justify conclusions from surveys, experiments, and observational studies. They work with independent and conditional probability, use rules to compute probabilities, and use probability to evaluate outcomes of decisions.

Pre-Calculus A and B

Length: One semester each

Prerequisites: Algebra 2B

Suggested courses: None

Required for graduation or elective: Required

Precalculus combines the trigonometric, geometric, and algebraic techniques needed to prepare students for the study of calculus, and strengthens students’ conceptual understanding of problems and mathematical reasoning in solving problems. Facility with these topics is especially important for students intending to study calculus, physics, and other sciences, and/or engineering in college.

For this Precalculus course, instructional time will focus on four critical areas: (1) extend work with complex numbers; (2) expand understanding of logarithms and exponential functions; (3) use characteristics of polynomial and rational functions to sketch graphs of those functions; and (4) perform operations with vectors.


Science & S.T.E.M. Department

Department Mission

We aim to have students develop their critical thinking skills. We want all students to be able to defend their ideas using evidence and reasoning. We strive to adequately prepare students for success in science courses, in the college setting.

Available Science Courses & Credits

Biology 1

0.5 credits

Biology 2

0.5 credits

Chemistry 1

0.5 credits

Chemistry 2

0.5 credits

Conceptual Physics 1

0.5 credits

Conceptual Physics 2

0.5 credits

Forensics 1*

0.5 credits

Forensics 2*

0.5 credits

Sports Science 1*

0.5 credits

Sports Science 2*

0.5 credits

Innovative Vehicle Design (IVD) 1*

0.5 credits

Innovative Vehicle Design (IVD) 2*

0.5 credits

Environmental Science 1*

0.5 credits

Environmental Science 2*

0.5 credits

Credits Required for Graduation: 3.0

*Elective courses are not necessarily offered during all semesters.  Offerings are based on student interest.  


Course Descriptions

Biology 1 and 2

Length: One semester each

Prerequisites: None

Suggested courses: None

Required for graduation or elective: Required

The Biology course covers two semesters. The course begins with a detailed review of math and graphing skills needed in science, as well as the scientific method. Other topics covered throughout the year are cells (structure and function), Photosynthesis and Cellular Respiration, Mitosis and Meiosis, DNA, Genetics, Ecology and Evolution. The course includes lab work that emphasizes skills that are used in science and the real-world (such as problem solving). Students read a variety of articles and short stories to gain skill in understanding different types of writing. The second semester includes the writing of a research paper. The students are taken through the steps of scientific research and write a formal paper in APA style.

Chemistry 1 and 2

Length: One semester each

Prerequisites: None

Suggested courses: Biology 1 and 2

Required for graduation or elective: Required

The chemistry course spans two semesters and covers topics including the nature of matter, properties of matter, significant figures, the scientific model, S/I conversions, the periodic table, atomic structure, mol conversions, mol calculations, electron configuration, trends in the periodic table, chemical bonding, molecular geometry, chemical names and formulas, oxidation numbers, chemical equations, empirical formulas, chemical reactions, stoichiometry, acid/base chemistry, oxidation reduction reactions and a host of other topics.

Conceptual Physics 1 and 2

Length: One semester each

Prerequisites: None

Suggested courses: Chemistry 1 & 2

Required for graduation or elective: Recommended

Conceptual Physics focuses on understanding the world around us and how entities behave and interact. The first semester focuses on kinematics which is the study of motion. During the second semester we will consider what causes motion (dynamics) along with a mix of other physics topics including energy, momentum, and collisions.

Throughout physics, the goal is to apply the math and science learned in class to real life situations. We will analyze a variety of scenarios including race cars, roller coasters, space stations, high speed collisions, and more. Through this analysis we will strive to answer questions such as: “How do roller coasters work?”; “How far can you shoot a potato cannon?”; “Could race cars drive upside down in a tunnel?”; “Why do you only hear bass (deep sounds) when a car pulls up next to you?”; “Why are digital music and video better?”; and others.

Forensics 1 and 2

Length: One semester each

Prerequisites: None

Suggested courses: None

Required for graduation or elective: Elective

This is a year long course though the two semesters do not need to be taken in order. The course examines how science and the law work together. Both physical and biological aspects of Forensic Science are explored. Topics covered include: Fingerprints, Trace Evidence, Handwriting Analysis, Firearm and Toolmarks, DNA Analysis, Serology, Toxicology and Crime Scene Processing. This class is filled with labs and in class work. Labs are done on every topic. Case studies are read and examined to see how techniques discussed are used to solve real crimes.

Sport Science 1 and 2

Length: One semester each

Prerequisites: None

Suggested courses: None

Required for graduation or elective: Elective

Sport Science looks at the role science plays in a variety of sports. The course integrates concepts from physics, biology and chemistry as it delves into how the human body works as a machine along with different equipment to allow someone to be successful in their athletic pursuits. Throughout the course students will learn about how the different systems of the body contribute to movement. They will learn how physics can explain what efficient movement looks like. And they will look at how engineering and medicine both help keep athletes safe during a variety of events.

Innovative Vehicle Design (IVD) 1 and 2 

Length: One semester each

Prerequisites: Teacher recommendation

Suggested courses: None

Required for graduation or elective: Elective

IVD (Innovative Vehicle Design) has been one of the most visible and successful programs of our school. The goal is to create a transportation idea and take it from the design board to the test track, within one school year. The results of this student driven process are then measured against other teams (local and national) to determine category champions. The success of the program has spurred even greater change among the club and its members.

Environmental Science 1 and 2

Length: One semester each

Prerequisites: None

Suggested courses: None

Required for graduation or elective: Elective

This science course will introduce students to ecological concepts, environmental problems, their effect on us, and possible solutions. Making decisions based on stewardship and sustainability in order to protect our environment and its resources will be stressed. This interdisciplinary course will involve concepts from biology, chemistry, physical science, and other science disciplines. Students will learn by a variety of methods, including readings outside class, the Internet, laboratory experiments, group work, discussion, and student projects. Topics covered will include, but are not limited to, the global environmental picture, biodiversity, population dynamics, food production and distribution, ecosystems, water and air pollution, ozone depletion, and global warming. Local environmental issues will be emphasized.

Social Studies Department

Department Mission

It is necessary to prepare our students for successful, post-secondary, educational experiences. They will need to acquire academic and character traits which will help them be successful college students. We accept as essential our role to model and develop the knowledge, skills and dispositions that will result in graduates who are responsible citizens, problem solvers, and lifelong learners, across the five disciplines of Social Studies (Civics, Economics, Geography, Government, and History).

Available Social Studies Courses and Credits

U.S. History 1

0.5 credits

U.S. History 2

0.5 credits

World History 1

0.5 credits

World History 2

0.5 credits

Civics

0.5 credits

Economics

0.5 credits

Social Justice 1*

0.5 credits

Social Justice 2*

0.5 credits

World Religions 1*

0.5 credits

World Religions 2*

0.5 credits

Psychology*

0.5 credits

Sociology*

0.5 credits

Credits Required for Graduation: 3.0

*Elective courses are not necessarily offered during all semesters.  Offerings are based on student interest.  

Course Descriptions

U.S. History 1 and 2

Length: One semester each

Prerequisites: None

Suggested course:        None

Required for graduation or elective: Required

The course is the organized study of the significant people and events that make up American history since 1877.  Moreover, during this course, the students will make a determined inquiry into why these events and people are significant. Through inquiry, these historical people and events in our history attain relevance for the students, and thereby facilitate their broader understandings. The constant change which hallmarks the growth of our country makes this a fresh and exciting course for young minds.

World History 1 and 2

Length: One semester each

Prerequisites: None

Suggested course:        None

Required for graduation or elective: Required

This class examines the development of mankind over many areas and regions of the Earth. Examining these interactions between man and earth, striving to meet the basic needs that ensure man’s survival, serves to illustrate the commonality of our many cultures. It is worthwhile noting the obvious differences or specialized needs of these cultures as they interact.

Civics

Length: One semester

Prerequisites: None

Suggested courses: None

Required for graduation or elective: Required

Civics is the study of the rights and duties of citizenship. This is an especially important subject in the United States, where citizens' participation has been essential in maintaining our system of government, since the founding of the country more than 200 years ago.  This course will apply information to current events and situations happening in our city, state, country, and world.

Economics

Length: One semester

Prerequisites: None

Suggested courses: None

Required for graduation or elective: Required

The Economics course will introduce students to economic theory, different types of economies, the American economic system, the forces of supply and demand, as well as an examination of our nation’s economic health. 

Social Justice 1 and 2

Length: One semester each

Prerequisites: None

Suggested course:        None

Required for graduation or elective: Elective

This two semester course is designed to introduce students to social justice issues and assist them in discovering their ability to create positive change in their own world. Students will critically analyze various social movements related to race, ethnicity, class, gender, sexual orientation, religious oppression, ableism, and ageism. Students will also explore and discuss how these concepts influence human understanding, relationships, and behavior for centuries. Students will understand how individuals operate within community contexts created through interactions and relationships structured by sociability, belonging, and responsibility. This course will encourage students to think critically and expansively about the social world and the conditions of humanity. Social Justice will provide a foundation for students to explore social justice concepts, issues, and remedies, thereby developing the necessary tools and information to see inequality and injustice and address historical and contemporary issues relevant to students’ present day lives.

Each semester of this two semester course has been designed to be taken sequentially, but there is no requirement to do so.  Students who take only one semester (first or second), or who begin the course in the second semester and then go on to first semester in a subsequent year of school will still receive an enriching experience and a deeper understanding of Social Justice.

World Religion 1 and 2

Length: One semester each

Prerequisites: None

Suggested course:        None

Required for graduation or elective: Elective

This World Religions course will provide the opportunity for students to gain an in-depth insight into the diversity of religions throughout the world.  We will examine many of the major religions practiced throughout the world as well as a few of the minor ones.  Students will learn to recognize and find meaning in a variety of religious expressions.  Primary source documents will be used throughout.  The study of World Religions will help students understand the basic elements of all religions and the needs a religion fulfills in human nature.  Attitudes of respect and appreciation for religious diversity are strongly encouraged throughout the course.  This course will not promote the observance of any faith, nor deny any participant the right to maintain his or her personal beliefs about religion.  If a student, or a student’s parents/guardians are uncomfortable with candid discussions about potentially controversial subjects, it is recommended that the student NOT take this course.

Psychology and Sociology

Length: One semester each

Prerequisites: None

Suggested course:        None

Required for graduation or elective: Elective

Psychology is an elective class that studies behavior and the human mind. Themes taught include history and research methods, social psychology, biological bases of behavior, sensation and perception, states of consciousness, learning and memory, cognition, motivation, emotion, health and stress, development, personality theory, and abnormal psychology.  

Sociology is the 2nd course in the series and studies groups and human interactions.  Group dynamics, interpersonal relationships, and societal interactions are the focus of this fascinating course.  

Spanish Department

Department Mission

To promote diversity and responsible citizenship by introducing our students to the Spanish language and culture.

Available Spanish Courses and Credits

Spanish 1A

0.5 credits

Spanish 1B

0.5 credits

Spanish 2A

0.5 credits

Spanish 2B

0.5 credits

Spanish 2A Honors

0.5 credits

Spanish 2B Honors

0.5 credits

Spanish 3A*

0.5 credits

Spanish 3B*

0.5 credits

Credits Required for Graduation: 2.0

*Elective courses are not necessarily offered during all semesters.  Offerings are based on student interest.  

Course Descriptions

Spanish 1A and 1B

Length: One semester each

Prerequisites: None

Suggested courses: None

Required for graduation or elective: Required

Spanish 1A and 1B introduces students to the Spanish language and culture. To develop language proficiency students communicate verbally and in writing through familiar topics focusing on themselves and the world in which they live which includes family, school, and friends. Students broaden their cultural knowledge by exploring the regions of the world where Spanish is spoken. Through new information and insights into cultures, customs and traditions of the Spanish-speaking world, students begin to demonstrate respect for other cultures and begin to recognize differences and similarities between their own culture and other cultures. 

Spanish 2A and 2B

Length: One semester each

Prerequisites: Passing grade in Spanish 1A and 1B or teacher recommendation

Suggested courses: None

Required for graduation or elective: Required

Spanish 2A and 2B is designed for students who have successfully completed Spanish  or its equivalent. Students review and expand their knowledge of Spanish language and culture on topics focusing on: people and places in the community, school, home, ordering food, transportation, taking care of health concerns, workplaces and professions, and leisure activities. Students expand their cultural understanding through comparing and contrasting their life in Ferndale and life in Spain and Mexico. As students broaden and deepen their insights into culture and language, they learn to demonstrate respect for other cultures.

Spanish 2A and 2B Honors

Length: One semester each

Prerequisites: Passing grade in Spanish 1A & 1B and Teacher recommendation

Suggested courses: None

Required for graduation or elective: Required

Spanish 2A and 2B Honors high school courses are designed for students who excelled in Spanish 1 or its equivalent. Students review and expand their knowledge of Spanish language and culture on topics focusing on: people and places in the community, school, home, ordering food, transportation, taking care of health concerns, workplaces and professions, and leisure activities. Students expand their cultural understanding through comparing and contrasting their life in Ferndale and life in Spain and Mexico. As students broaden and deepen their insights into culture and language, they learn to demonstrate respect for other cultures.

Spanish 3A and 3B

Length: One semester each

Prerequisites: Passing grade in Spanish 1A, 1B, 2A, and 2B

Suggested courses: None

Required for graduation or elective: Required

This project-based course is for students who have completed the required 2 years of Spanish and want to keep studying the culture. Emphasis will be placed on the many traditions, holidays, celebrations and other non-language aspects of Hispanic culture. The course will explore the music, art, cinema, cuisine, and both current and historical events of the Spanish-speaking world.

Physical Education & Health Department

Department Mission

The physical education department at University High School will work toward every student understanding that there are many different ways to lead a healthy, active lifestyle.

Available Physical Education and Health Courses and Credits

Health

0.5 credits

Physical Education

0.5 credits

Exercise Fitness 1*

0.5 credits

Exercise Fitness 2*

0.5 credits

Team Sports*

0.5 credits

Credits Required for Graduation: 1.0 (0.5 Physical Education and 0.5 Health)

*Elective courses are not necessarily offered during all semesters.  Offerings are based on student interest.  

Course Descriptions

Physical Education

Length: One semester

Prerequisites: None

Suggested courses: None

Required for graduation or elective: Required

The physical education classes at University High School are designed to expose our students to many activities that they can transfer to a lifetime of activity. Approximately thirty minutes of each class will be spent in a weight room learning the proper way to use free weights, machines, and body weight to improve strength, endurance, and flexibility. Approximately thirty minutes will be spent on team building skills that do not involve sports. These activities will encourage students to work together toward a common goal. The rest of the class time will be spent on team sports. The students are expected to understand the rules and basic skills of the sports that are covered.

Health

Length: One semester

Prerequisites: None

Suggested courses: None

Required for graduation or elective: Required

Health class examines the fundamental principles essential to positive holistic living. Current issues and topics from all major areas of health education, including physical, mental, and social well-being. Connections from our world are examined through the scope of the classroom, in order to gain a greater understanding of the human body and how to increase total health.

Exercise Fitness 1 and 2

Length: One semester each

Prerequisites: Passing grade in Physical Education

Suggested courses: None

Required for graduation or elective: Elective

This class continues to expose our students to many activities that they can transfer to a lifetime of activity. Approximately thirty minutes of each class will be spent in a weight room using free weights, machines, and body weight to improve strength, endurance, and flexibility. Approximately thirty minutes will be spent on team building skills that do not involve sports. These activities will encourage students to work together toward a common goal. The rest of the class time will be spent on team sports. The students are expected to understand the rules and skills of the sports that are covered.

Team Sports

Length: One semester

Prerequisites: Passing Grade Physical Education

Suggested courses: None

Required for graduation or elective: Elective

This is an elective course for students who have completed their basic physical education requirement and have an interest in competitive activities in an intramural setting. This co-ed class places emphasis on the quality of individual skill for evaluation. Respect for classmates, rules, equipment, and demonstration of good sportsmanship and safety should be present in all activities. These activities include basketball, volleyball, floor hockey, wiffle ball, softball, soccer, speedball, pickle ball and touch football. This course may be repeated for credit.

Business, Marketing, & Technology Department

Department Mission

To prepare students for college and career success in the Business, Marketing, and Technology career pathways.

Available Business, Marketing, and Technology Courses and Credits

Computer Applications I

0.5 credits

Computer Applications 2

0.5 credits

Digital Media 1

0.5 credits

Digital Media 2

0.5 credits

Personal Finance I*

0.5 credits

Personal Finance 2*

0.5 credits

Marketing I*

0.5 credits

Marketing 2*

0.5 credits

Entrepreneurship I*

0.5 credits

Entrepreneurship 2*

0.5 credits

Leadership 1*

0.5 credits

Leadership 2*

0.5 credits

Credits Required for Graduation: 2.0

*Elective courses are not necessarily offered during all semesters.  Offerings are based on student interest.  

Course Descriptions

Computer Applications 1 and 2

Length: One semester each

Prerequisites: None

Suggested courses: None

Required for graduation or elective: Recommended

This course is designed for students in their freshman /sophomore years without computer credit. The goal of this class is to teach basic computer literacy skills necessary for high school success. Students will learn email basics, basic keyboarding and the entire Google platform. Digital citizenship will also be explored in detail as well as online safety and social networking.

Digital Media 1 and 2

Length: One semester each

Prerequisites: Computer Applications 1 and 2

Suggested courses: None

Required for graduation or elective: Required (or Art Foundations)

This course is intended to be taken in the sophomore/ junior year. Visual literacy is becoming increasingly essential in this digital era. Digital Media class is designed to supply students with the tools needed to create dynamic media such as HTML web pages. Students will explore the origins of the Internet and the World Wide Web.  Students will also create audio podcasts using software such as Audacity. Students will create and edit sound and develop voice-overs. This is a project based class.

Students will also be introduced to basic HTML programming and web page creation. Each student will create a functional HTML webpage. Students will also be learning advanced presentation skills. Technology current events will be explored in detail.

Personal Finance 1 and 2 

Length: One semester each

Prerequisites: None

Suggested courses: None

Required for graduation or elective: Elective

This course prepares students for moving out of their parents’ house and into the real world. Personal finance teaches students how to manage their finances to build personal wealth. Topics such as investing, saving, budgeting, understanding credit, and handling student loans will be covered. Students will also learn about paying taxes, buying insurance, banking, saving for retirement, and buying a house. This class may be the most useful class you’ll ever take!

Marketing 1 and 2

Length: One semester each

Prerequisites: None

Suggested courses: None

Required for graduation or elective: Elective

Marketing is the study of how goods and services get from the producer to the consumer. Business firms engaged in marketing must decide what the consumers would like to buy and how to go about promoting and distributing the product or service in a way that will earn the largest profit possible. The topics that will be studied include marketing, product development, promotion, selling, advertising, pricing, and distribution.

Entrepreneurship 1 and 2

Length: One semester each

Prerequisites: None

Suggested courses: None

Required for graduation or elective: Elective

This course provides students with an opportunity to explore the foundations of entrepreneurship that will benefit students in their professional lives whether they ultimately decide to become entrepreneurs or not. The course uses a project-based learning format that encourages critical thinking, problem solving, time-management, reasoning with evidence, and clear communication of ideas - all skills that are essential to success in college and career. For students who wish to become Entrepreneurs, this course will guide them through developing ideas and writing a business plan to secure financing for that business. In semester two, this course guides students through creating and executing a marketing plan for their small business including promotional and advertising activities.  

Leadership 1 and 2

Length: One semester each

Prerequisites: Minimum GPA and Faculty Recommendation

Suggested courses: None

Required for graduation or elective: Elective

This elective course is designed to provide growth, enrichment, and leadership opportunities to high achievers at University High School. This course incorporates standards from Science, ELA, Social Studies, Math, Technology, and Career Readiness to enrich and broaden the skills and abilities of our high achievers. The goal of the course is to meet the needs of our best and brightest and give them additional opportunities to develop outside of the core academic classroom. The course incorporates leadership training, project-based learning, individual research and exploration, and field-based opportunities to expand students’ horizons and push them to their fullest potential. This multi-age course is repeatable for credit. Faculty recommendation and grade point average minimums are required for enrollment.

Visual Arts Department

Department Mission

To support students in reaching their personal and creative potential through a rigorous and relevant arts focused education.

Available Visual Arts Courses and Credits

Art Foundations I

0.5 credits

Art Foundations 2

0.5 credits

Design 1*

0.5 credits

Design 2*

0.5 credits

Sculpture 1*

0.5 credits

Sculpture 2*

0.5 credits

Drawing and Painting 1*

0.5 credits

Drawing and Painting 2*

0.5 credits

Credits Required for Graduation: 1.0

*Elective courses are not necessarily offered during all semesters.  Offerings are based on student interest.  

Course Descriptions

Art Foundations 1 and 2

Length: One semester each

Prerequisites: None

Suggested courses: None

Required for graduation or elective: Required (or Digital Media 1 and 2)

Art Foundations focuses on various media forms. Students will have an opportunity to work with drawing, painting, sculpture, and more. This course encourages care in the creative process, experimentation, and growth. Students will get a chance to make art, as well as look at it to try to discover meaning.

Recommended for students who are interested in trying a variety of materials and for those looking to express themselves in a creative way.

Design 1 and 2

Length: One semester each

Prerequisites: Art Foundations or Teacher Recommendation

Suggested courses: None

Required for graduation or elective: Elective

This class is designed with problem-solving students in mind that have an eye for well-designed products.  Those enrolled in this course will  examine social, economic, and market needs and brainstorm ways to create the best possible solutions in the form of products. Students will design products based on aesthetics, function, and branding. Projects will include, but are not limited to, shoe design, automotive design, interior design, and product design.

Recommended for students interested in fashion (shoe, clothing) design, architecture, and more.

Sculpture 1 and 2

Length: One semester each

Prerequisites: Art Foundations or Teacher Recommendation

Suggested courses: None

Required for graduation or elective: Elective

This course is great for students who enjoy working with their hands and creating something out of nothing.  Students will have an opportunity to create sculptures out of paper, cardboard, clay, and fibers. After trying a variety of materials, students will have an opportunity to choose which material they would like to continue working with. This course encourages problem-solving, student choice, and personal expression.

Drawing and Painting 1 and 2

Length: One semester each

Prerequisites: Art Foundations or Teacher Recommendation

Suggested courses: None

Required for graduation or elective: Elective

This course explores  detail and color. Drawing/Painting builds skills that will allow for precision drawing, mixing colors, and understanding how different colors work together. This course is recommended for students interested in illustration, makeup art, architecture, and more.

Performing and Media Arts Department

Department Mission

To support students in reaching their personal, creative and academic potential through a rigorous and relevant performing and media arts focused education.

Available Performing and Media Arts Courses and Credits

Movie Making and Broadcasting I*

0.5 credits

Movie Making and Broadcasting 2*

0.5 credits

Public Speaking 1*

0.5 credits

Public Speaking 2*

0.5 credits

Theater 1*

0.5 credits

Theater 2*

0.5 credits

*Elective courses are not necessarily offered during all semesters.  Offerings are based on student interest.  

Course Descriptions

Movie Making and Broadcasting 1 and 2

Length: One semester each

Prerequisites: None

Suggested courses: None

Required for graduation or elective: Elective

This is an introductory course to the many facets of film, broadcasting and related media practices.  Basic video, audio and editing practices are taught along with emphasis on journalistic, technical and performance-based skills associated with the various formats of multimedia production.  The class operates in dual capacities; both as a video production facility for live and pre-recorded broadcast formats, along with film study and analysis.  Those who are interested in production, on-camera talent, film study and other aspects of video/film production are encouraged to take this course.  Writing, performing, editing, running of filmmaking equipment, and other related activities are part of daily/weekly coursework.  A professional attitude and aptitude are expected at all times.  This course can be repeated for credit multiple years.

Public Speaking 1 and 2

Length: One semester each

Prerequisites: None

Suggested courses: None

Required for graduation or elective: Elective

Public Speaking is designed to develop effective presentational skills, critical thinking and astute listening. Skill areas stressed are developing and organizing speech content, effective delivery of presentations, critical thinking, and active listening.

Theater 1 and 2

Length: One semester each

Prerequisites: None

Suggested courses: None

Required for graduation or elective: Elective

Theater is an acting class that involves pantomime, improvisation, interpretive scenes and discussions and performances in order to satisfy the aesthetic, intellectual and emotional needs of both participant and spectator. Personal growth is assured as students gain confidence and poise from activities in teamwork, analysis, organization and presentation. Communication skills are developed. Appreciation of Theater and the art of acting will also be encouraged. Students will develop memorization skills as they prepare for scene presentations. Students will have three major scenes to present, an original script and script analysis.  Daily participation is vital to learning and developing skills for performance, group work and class success.

College Preparatory Class (CPC)

Class Mission

The CPC class at University High School will prepare students for success in college with a focus on study skills and high-stakes assessment preparation skills.  Students who enter University High School after the first semester of their freshman year may have college preparatory class credits waived through consultation with a counselor/administrator. 

Available CPC Courses and Credits

College Prep 1

0.25 credits

College Prep 2

0.25 credits

College Prep 3

0.25 credits

College Prep 4

0.25 credits

College Prep 5

0.25 credits

College Prep 6

0.25 credits

Mastery Project 1

0.25 credits

Mastery Project 2

0.25 credits

Credits Required for Graduation: 2.0

Course Descriptions

College Prep 1 and 2

Length: One semester each

Prerequisites: None

Suggested courses: None

Required for graduation or elective: Required

The College Prep Class (CPC) is designed to prepare students for success in college. In the first year of CPC, students develop study skills crucial to success in high school and beyond. Students will focus on soft skills development and personal responsibility. Students are also introduced to persuasive writing and complete practice essays throughout the year. Social-Emotional Learning concepts, goal setting, and advising are also part of this course.

College Prep 3 and 4

Length: One semester each

Prerequisites: None

Suggested courses: None

Required for graduation or elective: Required

The College Prep Class (CPC) is designed to prepare students for success in college. In the second year of CPC, students are introduced to general test-taking strategies. Specific strategies for each SAT subject area are also covered. Students gain experience with the SAT test via practice tests and strategy-specific test sets. Students also enhance their persuasive writing abilities throughout the year. Social-Emotional learning, advising, and mentoring are also incorporated into the CPC course.

College Prep 5 and 6

Length: One semester each

Prerequisites: None

Suggested courses: None

Required for graduation or elective: Required

The College Prep Class (CPC) is designed to prepare students for success in college. In the third year of CPC, students enhance their test-taking strategies and learn additional specific test strategies. Specific strategies for each SAT subject area are practiced.  Students gain experience with the SAT test via practice tests and strategy-specific test sets. Students also enhance their persuasive writing abilities throughout the year. After the winter testing for juniors, students then focus on college entrance, college and scholarship searches, and preparation for senior year.

Mastery Project 1 and 2

Length: One semester each

Prerequisites: None

Suggested courses: None

Required for graduation or elective: Required

Mastery is designed to prepare students for success in college.  Students also enhance their persuasive writing abilities throughout the year. Students focus on college entrance, college and scholarship searches, and the culmination of senior year. Additionally, students conference with their teachers weekly on grade performance and set goals to accomplish. To assist in accomplishing these goals, biweekly opportunities are given for students to travel to the necessary teachers in order for re-teaching material, additional practices, and makeup assignments.

Elective Selection

Sophomore Year

Select 1

Junior Year

Select 1

Senior Year

Select 4

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