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2022-2023 Bloomfield Curriculum K-5 Handbook
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Bloomfield Hills Schools

UPDATED August 2022

7273 Wing Lake Road

Bloomfield Hills, Michigan 48301

248.341.5000

www.bloomfield.org

Board of Education

2022

Howard Baron

Jennifer Cook

Lisa Efros

Paul Kolin

Siva Kumar

Michelle Southward

John VanGemert

Patrick Watson, Superintendent

Todd Bidlack, Assistant Superintendent for Learning Services

Keith McDonald, Assistant Superintendent for Human Resources

Tina Kostiuk, Assistant Superintendent for Finance & Operations


Welcome to the Bloomfield Hills Schools

This handbook has been created to provide guidance and understanding for all community members interested in engaging with Bloomfield Hills Schools learning community.  While this handbook is comprehensive in nature, it will be updated as new information, programming and opportunities develop.

We are committed to providing the comprehensive and rigorous education our students and families expect from Bloomfield Hills Schools.  Our elementary schools are outstanding places to learn and grow and we are confident as partners in education, your child will thrive!

Bloomfield Hills Schools provide an equitable, caring, and safe learning environment where students are encouraged to be intellectually curious and academically ambitious. Leveraging the power of technology and community,  Our classrooms promote curiosity, engagement, and agency for all learners.  We strive for each student to achieve their highest aspirations.

Table of Contents

Campus Overviews         3

Sample Daily Schedule         4

 

Elementary Curriculum Descriptions & Key Concepts         5

Special Education and Supports        12

Academic Interventions & Extensions        13

Frequently Asked Questions        14


K-5 Elementary Experiences:

Conant, Eastover, Lone Pine, Way


Elementary Campus Information

Conant Elementary:  Principal Robert Phelps

4100 West, Quarton Rd, Bloomfield Hills, MI 48302 248-341-7000

Eastover Elementary:  Principal Harleen Singh

1101 Westview Rd, Bloomfield Hills, MI 48304   248.341-7100  

Lone Pine Elementary:  Principal Dr. Mary Hilberry

3100 Lone Pine Rd, West Bloomfield Township, MI 48323   248.341-7300    

Way Elementary:  Interim Principal

765 W Long Lake Rd, Bloomfield Twp, MI 48302  248.341-7800    

Elementary Overview

Grades DK - 5 SAMPLE Daily Learning Schedule

Check-In - Start of Day

Morning Meeting & Connections

Mathematics

60 minutes

Mathematicians use processes and strategies to build computational and analytical skills.  Strong number sense is built through making connections across concepts, sharing mathematical thinking with peers, and revising and expanding their own understanding.

Movement for Focus

Students may have a quick stretch or learning game in their classroom or may move to playgrounds for physical and/or social engagement

Reading Workshop

90 minutes

Readers receive direct, explicit instruction to support fluency, accuracy, comprehension, and analysis.  Phonics, word study, vocabulary, independent, small group, whole group, and book club work are all embedded into daily workshop routines.

Unified Arts /Co-Curricular Classes

30-60 minutes

Art, Physical Education, Media, Music, Spanish, STEAM

Lunch/Recess  

Writing Workshop

60 min

Writers receive direct, explicit instruction to support composition, sense of audience, and purpose, structure, volume, and analysis.  Grammar, vocabulary, independent, small group, whole group, and partnership work are all embedded into daily workshop routines

Science

45 minutes

Scientists explore earth, life, and physical sciences through classroom investigations and refine their understanding by creating models, conjecture, and connections.  Driving question boards capture how understanding evolves throughout a course of study.

Movement for Focus

Students may have a quick stretch or learning game in their classroom or may move to playgrounds for physical and/or social engagement

Social Studies

45 minutes

Social Scientists explore the five strands of economics, history, government, geography, and civic engagement through inquiry.  Asking questions, perspective taking, reasoning with evidence, and taking responsible action are at the heart of instruction.

Closing

Learning Reflection & End of Day Routines

Elementary Curriculum Descriptions & Key Concepts

Developmental Kindergarten

*Eastover, Lone Pine, and Way Elementary

Our youngest learners are introduced to school routines, including reading and writing workshops where they explore and make sense of the relationship between letters and sounds, enjoy read-alouds, rhyming and song.  Young readers look for patterns and relationships while building confidence with letter-sound relationships, rhyme, syllabication, and beginning-level high-frequency words. Comprehension skills are addressed through discussions about the books read.  Writers use a combination of drawing, dictation, and writing to convey their thoughts on paper while building confidence that their lives are full of stories. Upper and lowercase letter use and developmental spelling  are practiced as students document events from their lives, label their drawings, create books, express their opinions, and start to write stories.  Mathematicians focus on foundational number skills of counting, identifying, and comparing numbers and shapes. Simple addition and subtraction skills are introduced while students practice one-to-one correspondence.  Students  identify, classify, and sort objects and shapes.  The Developmental Kindergarten curriculum prepares students for KINDERGARTEN in the following school year.

Math Semester 1

Math Semester 2

  • Recognizing Numbers 0 to 5
  • Compare Numbers 0 to 5
  • Numbers 6 to 10
  • Compare Numbers 0 to 10
  • Classify and Count Data

  • Understand Addition
  • Understand Subtraction
  • Count Numbers to 20
  • Count Numbers to 50
  • Identify and Describe Shapes
  • Analyze, Compare, and Create Shapes
  • Describe and Compare Measurable Attributes

Reading Semester 1

Reading Semester 2

  • We are Readers
  • Emergent Reading: Looking Closely at Familiar Texts
  • Super Powers: Reading with Print Strategies and Sight Word Power
  • Super Powers: Reading with Print Strategies and Sight Word Power
  • Growing Expertise in Little Books: Reading for Information
  • Giving the Gift of Reading

Writing Semester 1

Writing Semester 2

  • Launching the Writing Workshop
  • Show and Tell: From Labels to Pattern Books

  • Writing for Readers
  • Persuasive Writing of All Kinds
  • All About Books

Science

Social Studies

Concepts are often alternated by unit or concept at this grade level as well as integrated with play and literacy

  • Plant and Animal Needs
  • Weather and Seasons

  • Who am I and where do I live? (History)
  • How Do I Get Along With Others? (Civics and Government)
  • How do we help each other get what we need?  (Economics)

Kindergarten

Kindergarten readers are introduced to the reader’s workshop and explore and make sense of the world of reading with practice in letter-sound relationships, rhyme, syllabication, and beginning level high-frequency words. Comprehension skills are addressed through discussions about the books read.  Writers use a combination of drawing, dictation, and writing to convey their thoughts on paper while building confidence that their lives are full of stories. Upper and lowercase letter use, kindergarten spelling, and complete sentences are practiced as students document events from their lives, label their drawings, create how-to books, express their opinions, and start to write stories.  Mathematicians focus on foundational number skills of counting, identifying, and comparing numbers. Simple addition and subtraction skills are introduced.  Students also identify, classify, and sort objects and shapes.

Math Semester 1

Math Semester 2

  • Numbers 0 to 5
  • Compare Numbers 0 to 5
  • Numbers 6 to 10
  • Compare Numbers 0 to 10
  • Classify and Count Data
  • Understand Addition
  • Understand Subtraction
  • More Addition and Subtraction
  • Count Numbers to 20
  • Compose and Decompose Numbers 11 to 19
  • Count Numbers to 100
  • Identify and Describe Shapes
  • Analyze, Compare, and Create Shapes
  • Describe and Compare Measurable Attributes

Reading Semester 1

Reading Semester 2

  • We are Readers
  • Emergent Reading: Looking Closely at Familiar Texts
  • Super Powers: Reading with Print Strategies and Sight Word Power
  • Bigger Books, Bigger Reading Muscles
  • Becoming Avid Readers
  • Growing Expertise in Little Books: Reading for Information
  • Giving the Gift of Reading

Writing Semester 1

Writing Semester 2

  • Launching the Writing Workshop
  • Show and Tell: From Labels to Pattern Books
  • Writing for Readers
  • How-to Books: Writing to Teach Others
  • Persuasive Writing of All Kinds
  • All About Books

Science

Social Studies

Concepts are often alternated by unit or concept at this grade level as well as integrated with play and literacy

  • Plant and Animal Needs
  • Weather and Seasons
  • Forces and Engineering

  • Who am I and where do I live? (History)
  • How Do I Get Along With Others? (Civics and Government)
  • Where do I live and how do I meet my needs and wants? (Geography and Economics)
  • How do we help each other get what we need?  (Economics)


First Grade

First-grade readers continue to increase their accuracy and fluency skills while reading fiction and nonfiction books. First graders work to strengthen their understanding of phonics and increase their bank of high-frequency words. Students show their comprehension by using key details to retell what they have read and making simple connections.

Writers continue to practice and reinforce their handwriting and letter formation skills. Mini-Lessons are taught to help writers create more focused writing pieces that start to show evidence of the three parts (beginning, middle, end) of writing pieces by including simple introductions and conclusions. The use of details and sequencing are also taught to extend their writing of small moment narratives, how-to books, opinion, and nonfiction pieces.  Mathematicians continue to increase fluency and problem-solving work. Addition, Subtraction, Number identification, counting, and writing continue beyond 100.  Beginning measurement and time skills are also introduced.

Math Semester 1

Math Semester 2

  • Solve Addition and Subtraction Problems to 10
  • Fluently Add and Subtract Within 10
  • Addition Facts to 20: Use Strategies
  • Subtraction Facts to 20: Use Strategies
  • Work with Addition and Subtraction Equations
  • Represent and Interpret Data
  • Extend the Counting Sequence
  • Understand Place Value
  • Compare Two-Digit Numbers
  • Use Models and Strategies to Add Tens and Ones
  • Use Models and Strategies to Subtract Tens
  • Measure Lengths
  • Time
  • Reason with Shapes and Their Attributes
  • Equal Shares of Circles and Rectangles

Reading Semester 1

Reading Semester 2

  • Avid Readers
  • Building Good Reading Habits
  • Word Detectives
  • Learning About the World: Reading Nonfiction
  • Readers Have Big Jobs to Do: Fluency, Phonics, and Comprehension
  • Meeting Characters and Learning Lessons: A Study of Story Elements
  • Reading Nonfiction Cover to Cover: Nonfiction Book Clubs

Writing Semester 1

Writing Semester 2

  • Small Moments: Writing with Focus, Detail, and Dialogue
  • Writing How-to Books
  • Persuasive Writing of all Kinds
  • Nonfiction Chapter Books
  • Writing Reviews
  • From Scenes to Series: Writing Fiction
  • Independent Writing Projects

Science

Social Studies

Concepts are often alternated by unit or concept at this grade level as well as integrated with play and literacy

  • Plant and Animal Survival
  • Sun, Moon, and Stars
  • Light and Sound

  • Why are families and schools important? (History)
  • How do citizens shape a community? (Civics and Government)
  • How does where we live affect how we live? (Geography)
  • How do families meet their wants and needs where they live? (Economics)
  • How do place and time connect our past to the present? (History)

Second Grade

Second-grade students are familiar with the routines of reading and writing workshops and work in collaboration with others to extend their work as readers and writers.  Fluency, accuracy, and pacing continue to increase as readers progress through more complex texts. Vocabulary continues to be extended and the use of root words is introduced. Fiction and non-fiction texts are read as readers begin to ask and answer questions about the text and identify main ideas and story elements. Writers continue to experience fiction, opinion, and non-fiction writing opportunities that build on the foundational skills from previous lessons. Students continue to edit and revise their own writing with growing confidence around punctuation, grammar, and convention. Second graders begin to add and subtract basic facts mentally. Word problems continue to be used to practice addition and subtraction skills. Place value and number identification extend to include three and four-digit numbers. Measurement and time skills are extended and simple fractions are introduced.

Math Semester 1

Math Semester 2

  • Fluently Add and Subtract Within 20
  • Work with Equal Groups
  • Add Within 100 Using Strategies
  • Fluently Add Within 100
  • Subtract Within 100 Using Strategies
  • Fluently Subtract Within 100
  • More Solving Problems Involving Addition and Subtraction
  • Work with Time and Money
  • Numbers to 1,000
  • Add Within 1,000 Using Models and Strategies
  • Subtract Within 1,000 Using Models and Strategies
  • Measuring Length
  • More Addition, Subtraction, and Length
  • Graphs and Data
  • Shapes and Their Attributes

Reading Semester 1

Reading Semester 2

  • Meeting Characters and Learning Lessons
  • Growing Word Solving Muscles
  • Second Grade Reading Growth Spurts
  • Becoming Experts: Reading Nonfiction
  • Becoming Experts: Reading Nonfiction
  • Bigger Books Mean Amping Up Reading Power
  • Series Book Clubs
  • Reading Nonfiction Cover to Cover: Nonfiction Book Clubs

Writing Semester 1

Writing Semester 2

  • Narrative Writing Small Moments OR From Scenes to Series
  • Poetry: Big Thoughts Small Packages
  • The How-To Guide to Nonfiction Writing

  • The How-To Guide to Nonfiction Writing
  • Lessons from the Masters: Improving Narrative Craft
  • Writing About Reading
  • Nonfiction Writing Projects

Science

Social Studies

Concepts are often alternated by unit or concept at this grade level as well as integrated with play and literacy

  • Animal Biodiversity
  • Plant Adaptations
  • Erosion & Earth’s Surface
  • Properties & Phases of Matter

  • What makes a place a community and why do people live there? (Geography)
  • Why is the past worth preserving? (History) Pocketful of History
  • Where is my community and how is it affected by the environment? (Geography)
  • How do citizens live together in a community? (Civics and Government)
  • How do the economic choices people make impact their community? (Economics)
  • How can citizens solve problems in their community? (Public Discourse, Decision Making, and Civic Participation)

Third Grade

Third-grade readers utilize the workshop model to investigate the things that strong readers do so they can practice and emulate those things in their own reading lives.  Reading for a variety of purposes throughout the year, 3rd graders investigate the text features common in a variety of genres.  Setting purpose and identifying key features within a genre are some of the tools third-grade readers use to grow their reading comprehension skills.  Similarly, third-grade writers utilize the workshop model to explore various reasons for writing.  Utilizing mentor texts to further investigate features of different writing genres and techniques, writers add facts and supporting details when writing nonfiction pieces and add figurative language and dialogue to enhance their fiction writing. In third-grade math, students work to increase their computational skills, learn how to check their work, and solve word problems.  Students practice adding and subtracting big numbers to ensure computational fluency, and then they build upon these skills by looking at patterns within repeated addition/subtraction to grow their multiplication and division computational skills.  A significant portion of the third-grade math course is dedicated to understanding and solving multiplication and division problems.   Students learn to collect and analyze their own data, as well as how to analyze data and graphs in order to answer higher-order thinking questions about data and graphs.

Math Semester 1

Math Semester 2

  • Understand Multiplication and Division of Whole Numbers
  • Multiplication Facts: Use Patterns
  • Apply Properties: Multiplication Facts for 3, 4, 6, 7, 8
  • Use Multiplication to Divide: Division Facts
  • Fluently Multiply and Divide Within 100
  • Connect Area to Multiplication and Addition
  • Represent and Interpret Data
  • Use Strategies and Properties to Add and Subtract
  • Fluently Add and Subtract Within 1,000
  • Multiply by Multiples of 10
  • Use Operations with Whole Numbers to Solve Problems
  • Understand Fractions as Numbers
  • Fraction Equivalence and Comparison
  • Solve Time, Capacity, and Mass Problems
  • Attributes of Two-Dimensional Shapes
  • Solve Perimeter Problems

Reading Semester 1

Reading Semester 2

  • Building a Reading Life
  • Reading to Learn: Grasping Main Ideas and Text Structures
  • Mystery: Foundational Skills in Disguise
  • Character Studies
  • Character Studies
  • Research Clubs: Elephants, Penguins, and Frogs, Oh My!
  • Social Issue Book Clubs Across Fiction and Nonfiction
  • Learning through Reading: Countries Around the World

Writing Semester 1

Writing Semester 2

  • Narrative Writing Small Moments
  • Poetry: Big Thoughts Small Packages
  • The How-To Guide to Nonfiction Writing

  • Literary Essay
  • Writing about Research
  • Social Issue Book Clubs Across Fiction and Nonfiction
  • Learning through Reading: Countries Around the World

Science

Social Studies

  • Animal Survival & Heredity
  • Plant Life Cycle & Heredity
  • Weather & Climate
  • Forces, Motion, & Magnets

  • How does the geography of Michigan affect how people live? (Geography)
  • How has Michigan's past shaped the present? (History)
  • Are cars the only good or service that "drives" the economy in Michigan? (Economics)
  • How has Michigan grown over time? (History, Economics, and Geography)
  • How does the government in Michigan work to meet the needs of citizens? (Civics and Government)
  • Explore public issues in Michigan that influence the daily lives of its citizens. (Public Discourse, Decision Making, and Civic Participation)

Fourth Grade

Fourth-grade readers work all year to develop and refine strong reading habits.  Their reading journey includes fiction books where they learn to stop and jot their thoughts and connections as they read.  These jottings are revisited to help readers form theories about what information the author is trying to convey to help understand text analysis and character development.  Informational reading also continues to be important, where note-taking skills are taught for better understanding.  Book clubs and collaborative group work also play a role in reading experiences.  Writers continue to work in the three areas of writing: narrative, nonfiction, and opinion. The use of main ideas and supporting details is an ongoing goal in all fourth-grade writing work.  The use of figurative language and dialogue is introduced and encouraged to bring writing to life.  The use of paragraphs to organize writing pieces as well as correct spelling and grammar are key components of the revising and editing phases in the writing process. Math instruction revisits and extends students’ knowledge and understanding of place value and its significance in the use of all 4 operations.  Place value work includes reading and writing numbers to the millions and rounding numbers.  Addition and subtraction fluency is emphasized by using numbers up to millions.  Multiplication skills are strengthened with work in multiplying a single-digit factor by factors up to thousands as well as double-digit by double-digit numbers and division extends beyond basic facts to include single-digit divisors and two, three, or four-digit dividends.

Math Semester 1

Math Semester 2

  • Generalize Place Value Understanding
  • Fluently Add and Subtract Multi-Digit Whole Numbers
  • Use Strategies and Properties to Multiply by 1-Digit Numbers
  • Use Strategies and Properties to Multiply by 2-Digit Numbers
  • Use Strategies and Properties to Divide by 1-Digit Numbers
  • Use Operations with Whole Numbers to Solve Problems
  • Factors and Multiples
  • Extend Understanding of Fraction Equivalence and Ordering
  • Understanding Addition and Subtraction of Fractions
  • Extend Multiplication Concepts to Fractions
  • Represent and Interpret Data on Line Plots
  • Understand and Compare Decimals
  • Measurement: Find Equivalence in Units of Measure
  • Algebra: Generate and Analyze Patterns
  • Geometric Measurement: Understand Concepts of Angles and Angle Measurement
  • Lines, Angles, and Shapes

Reading Semester 1

Reading Semester 2

  • Interpreting Characters: The Heart of the Story
  • Reading the Weather, Reading the World
  • Detail and Synthesis
  • Reading History: The American Revolution
  • Reading History: The American Revolution
  • Historical Fiction Book Clubs
  • Reading with the Lens of Power and Perspective

Writing Semester 1

Writing Semester 2

  • The Arc of Story: Writing Realistic Fiction
  • Boxes and Bullets: Personal and Persuasive Essays
  • The Literary Essay: Writing about Fiction
  • Bringing History to Life
  • Bringing History to Life
  • Historical Fiction Writing
  • Writing in Pictures

Science

Social Studies

  • Rock Cycle & Earth's Processes
  • Sound, Waves, & Communication
  • Human Body, Senses, & the Brain
  • Energy, Motion, & Electricity

  • Why do social scientists study people and places? (Disciplinary Literacy in SS and Foundations of SS)
  • Why do people create governments? (Government and Civics)
  • How is the past connected to the present in Michigan? (History)
  • How does where people live affect how they live? (Geography)
  • How and why are places, goods, services, and people connected with one another? (Economics)
  • Explore public policy issues, analyze various perspectives, and generate possible resolutions. (Public Discourse, Decision Making, and Civic Participation)

Fifth Grade

Fifth graders maintain their independent reading skills and continue to work through text complexities as they read. They continue to work to strengthen their thinking skills as readers, addressing text interpretation and analysis as well as identifying multiple main ideas and their supporting details.  5th graders are independent and fluent writers who continue to work with nonfiction, opinion, and fiction forms of writing. Writing pieces are varied and include essays, research, history and stories. Writing work is strengthened through the use of figurative language, increased vocabulary, strong word choice and details.  Mathematicians apply and extend understanding from previous work in all four operations using multi-digit whole numbers, decimals, and fractions. Problem-solving includes interpreting numerical expressions and analyzing patterns and relationships. Measurement conversion, data interpretation, and use of graphs are also addressed.

Math Semester 1

Math Semester 2

  • Understand Place Value
  • Add and Subtract Decimals to Hundredths
  • Fluently Multiply Multi-Digit Whole Numbers
  • Use Models and Strategies to Multiply Decimals
  • Use Models and Strategies to Divide Whole Numbers
  • Use Models and Strategies to Divide Decimals
  • Use Equivalent Fractions to Add and Subtract Fractions
  • Apply Understanding of Multiplication to Multiply Fractions
  • Apply Understanding of Division to Divide Fractions
  • Understand Volume Concepts
  • Convert Measurements
  • Represent and Interpret Data
  • Write and Interpret Numerical Expressions
  • Graph Points on the Coordinate Plane
  • Algebra: Analyze Patterns and Relationships
  • Geometric Measurement: Classify Two-Dimensional Figures

Reading Semester 1

Reading Semester 2

  • Maintaining an Independent Reading Life
  • Tackling Complexity: Moving Up Levels of Nonfiction
  • Interpretation Book Clubs: Analyzing Themes
  • Argument and Advocacy: Researching Debatable Issues
  • Argument and Advocacy: Researching Debatable Issues
  • Fantasy Book Clubs: The Magic of Themes and Symbols
  • Reading in the Content Areas OR Learning through reading: Westward Expansion

Writing Semester 1

Writing Semester 2

  • Narrative Craft
  • Journalism
  • Literary Essay: Opening Texts and Seeing More
  • The Research-Based Argument Ess
  • The Research-Based Argument Essay
  • Graphic Novels OR Fantasy Writing
  • The Lens of History: Research Reports
  • Shaping Texts: From Essay and Narrative to Memoir

Science

Social Studies

  • Ecosystems & the Food Web
  • Sun, Moon, Stars, & Planets
  • Water Cycle & Earth's Systems
  • Chemical Reactions & Properties of Matter

  • What was life like in North America and Africa before European exploration? (History and Geography)
  • Three Worlds Meet (History and Economics)
  • What role did geography play in the colonial settlement pattern? (Geography and Economics)
  • Life in Colonial America (History and Economics)
  • Road to the Revolution  (History/Government)
  • The American Revolution (History, Government, and Economics)
  • A New Nation (History, Government, and Economics)

Special Education Supports


In addition to the content outlined in sections below, the following applies to students with IEPs:

Bloomfield Hills Schools is committed to providing free appropriate public education (FAPE) opportunities for students with disabilities and will align with Oakland County Health Department recommendations. Questions about the IEP and 504 processes should be directed to the building principal of the campus to which your child is assigned.

K-5 Resource Room and Ancillary Supports

Supports will be scheduled annually in collaboration with special education and general education staff in accordance with the IEP.  

Ancillary Services

Ancillary services are provided by Bloomfield Hills staff including speech, OT, PT, Social Work, and ASL. Case managers collaborate across the school year with each student’s identified special education teacher and parent/guardian to schedule direct (individualized or small group) or consultative services.

Leveling System Defined

Special Education services are designed and provided by Bloomfield Hills staff to meet each learner within their zone of development and to offer support and scaffolds within each identified area of challenge or strength.  This means that students may be in one setting for math instruction and another for science.  Decisions made regarding the level of support required will be determined by the IEP and subsequent annual reviews.  

Academic Interventions & Extensions


In addition to the content outlined within our curriculum, the following applies to students needing to be further supported or challenged:

Bloomfield Hills Schools is committed to providing both the appropriate support and stretch for students in all academic areas.  There are periods of time for all learners when particular skills may need a bit of reinforcement or reteaching.  There also may be stretches of time that learning can be extended beyond a particular set of grade-level standards in order to provide the appropriate level of challenge for each learner.

Our Building Instructional Teams work in collaboration with classroom teachers, specialists, and building administration to review student data, including the “Maximizing Academic Potential” documentation.  This process is employed when students are in need of additional reinforcements or extensions.  Questions about the processes should be directed to the building principal of the campus to which your child is assigned.

Reading and Math Intervention

Learning Specialists and Interventionists at each campus support reading and math in push-in and pull-out models of intervention.  Students may receive Reading Recovery, Leveled Literacy Intervention, Math Recovery, extended time with a literacy or math group to support a particular skill set or even to take an assessment in a quiet setting.  

Our learning specialists and interventionists work in close concert with our classroom teachers to design ‘just right’ supports for individuals as well as small groups of students.  

Academic Extension

Learning Specialists at each campus work in close concert with classroom teachers to design ‘just right’ extensions for individuals as well as small groups of students that are exceeding the grade level understanding within a particular skill or unit. Specialized  projects, maker’s challenges, independent study/research projects, book clubs, math olympiad, geo bee,  and chess club are a few examples of possible extension programming.

Math Grade Up Process

Students in grades 1-5 that wish to advance a full year in mathematics may take an assessment to demonstrate mastery of the next year’s Michigan Academic Standards in mathematics.  Following a successful assessment, students are then scheduled for the next grade-level math course.  Grade-up assessments are offered each spring and prior to the start of school at all campuses.

FAQs


Student Cohorts and Teacher Placement

Q:          Can my student be placed with other students we request?

A:        We welcome any additional information a parent might want to provide regarding peers, this feedback is sought each spring via a letter from the building administrator.  

Q:          How will class placements be shared?  

A:        Following annual online registration, class placements are updated in the parent portal during the third week of August.  An annual “Meet the Teacher” occurs prior to the first day of school, please watch your inbox for this year’s date and time.     

Instructional Materials & Supplies

Q:        What materials will be utilized?

A:        Kindergarten and First-grade students use iPads to support instruction and practice within the classroom and at home.  Second through Fifth grade students use Chromebooks.

        

        Grade level supply lists will also be provided so students can gather any preferred supplies.

Student Work & Communication of Learning

Q:        How will students receive feedback related to their learning?  How will assignments be communicated?

A:        Communication and learning feedback with students takes place in many different ways.  Daily class meetings and lessons where teachers and students goal set together is routine in our classrooms.  Google Classroom is another tool used to share classroom updates and important information for the home/school connection.  Some of your child’s learning experiences are formally submitted for feedback while others are intended as practice.  Report cards are posted at the end of each semester (January and June)

Q:        How will student work be assessed to check for understanding?

A:        Quizzes and tests are one way to check for understanding.  Projects and quick checks (exit tickets, sticky notes,digital tools, etc) are also forms of ongoing assessment.  Reading, Writing, and Math journals are used regularly and are a good way to talk with your child about what they’re learning.

Q:        How will parents and teachers communicate about student progress?

A:        A strong partnership between school and home is a proven element of success.  Please reach out via email or phone for direct communication with your child’s teacher or building staff. In addition, parent-teacher conferences are held in the fall and spring.