CREATIVE WRITING        

Units:

Unit 1 - Introduction to Creative Writing: Building a Foundation

Unit 2 - Murder Mystery

Unit 3 - Flash Fiction

Unit 4 - Historical Fiction

Unit 5 - Character Driven

Unit 6 - Dramatic Writing: The Screenplay

Unit 7 - The Children’s Story

Unit 8 - Poetry




Unit Title

Unit 1 - Introduction to Creative Writing: Building a Foundation

Timeframe 

5 weeks

Unit Summary

“Writing is like driving at night in the fog. You can only see as far as your headlights, but you can make the whole trip that way.”

— E. L. DOCTOROW

This unit, part of a greater Creative Writing class, will focus on building a writer’s toolbox in order to write a short story, among other genres. Students will study short stories as character pieces, look at different genres of short stories (including drama, comedy, sci-fi, and even autobiographical stories), and eventually create a short story of their own.  There will be extensive focus on the writing process, with students creating many prewriting pieces (such as point of view, conflict, setting descriptions, and plot outlines), one rough draft, and one final published draft.  Students will also have at least two days to self/ peer review in class and obtain feedback on each of their rough drafts.  Lessons on grammar will be integrated into the process as well. Exercises will be done both collaboratively and individually using workshops in class.

Learning Targets

Essential Questions

  • How can language be powerful?

  • How can you use language to empower yourself?

  • How does language influence the way we think, act, and perceive the world?
  • How do authors use the resources of language to impact an audience?
  • What influences a writer to create?
  • What does conflict reveal about the author’s purpose?  
  • What factors effectively contribute to the development of a meaningful conflict?  
  • What implications do writers’ choices regarding point of view have?
  • How can a strong sense of place be established in writing pieces?

Enduring Understandings

Students will understand:

  • Resolving conflicts within storytelling is applicable to real-life conflict resolution.
  • A writer’s point of view affects storytelling.
  • Choosing the appropriate language can engage the reader.

Know

By the end of this unit, students will know

  • Developing Mood and Tone
  • The importance of word choice and how greatly it can affect the tone and mood of a story.
  • Developing Point of View
  • The various points of view that are associated with narration.  
  • The grammatically appropriate diction associated with each point of view  
  • The advantages and limitations of each point of view  
  • The most effective point of view to be used given the circumstances of one’s story
  • Developing Conflict
  • The various types of conflict.  
  • The factors that contribute to creating conflict  the various factors, such as timing, circumstances, and consequences, that can heighten the impact of a conflict.
  • Developing Setting
  • The importance of setting and its relation to the story as a whole
  • The types and functions of different settings in a story  
  • How to create settings
  • The various ways a writer can develop setting in a story.

Do

By the end of this unit, students will be able to

  • develop short pieces using workshop strategies
  • Short Pieces include:
  • Mood/Tone
  • Setting
  • Conflict
  • Point of view
  • develop one longer piece using workshop strategies

Evidence of Learning

Formative

  • Class discussions
  • Workshops
  • Exercises

Summative/ Benchmark

  • Short story using elements learned
  • Exercises in tone/mood/setting/conflict/point of view
  • Quizzes/tests

Alternative Assessments

  • Students will have choice in subject of writing during exercises and major assessments
  • Writing Portfolio (completed throughout the year)

Learning Activities

Materials / Equipment / Resources

Core Instructional

Materials and Texts

http://www.authorstream.com/Presentation/virginiawiles-547758-introduction-to-narrative/

Fiction Writer’s Workshop by Josip Novakovich

Equipment

  • Chromebooks
  • Journals

Supplemental Resources

http://iwl.me/s/b3a26720

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=U1cQMDy8itA

https://www.thebalance.com

Standards

Content Statement

Indicator

W.11-12.3. Write narratives to develop real or imagined experiences or events using effective technique, well-chosen details, and well-structured event sequences.

W.11-12.3.A. Engage and orient the reader by setting out a problem, situation, or observation and its significance, establishing one or multiple point(s) of view, and introducing a narrator and/or characters; create a smooth progression of experiences or events.

W.11-12.3.B. Use narrative techniques, such as dialogue, pacing, description, reflection, and multiple plot lines, to develop experiences, events, and/or characters.

W.11-12.3.C. Use a variety of techniques to sequence events so that they build on one another to create a coherent whole and build toward a particular tone and outcome (e.g., a sense of mystery, suspense, growth, or resolution).

W.11-12.3.D. Use precise words and phrases, telling details, and sensory language to convey a vivid picture of the experiences, events, setting, and/or characters.

W.11-12.3.E. Provide a conclusion that follows from and reflects on what is experienced, observed, or resolved over the course of the narrative.

  • Convey experiences, real or imagined
  • Use time as the deep structure of the narrative
  • Form or structure based on a progression of events that build and reflect upon each other
  • Use effective details using precise language
  • Form clear point(s) of view established through a narrator, provide characters, and present a situation
  • Distinguish and utilize narrative techniques including dialogue, description, and plot in order to develop experiences, events, and/or characters choosing words that create vivid pictures
  • Provide a conclusion to the events they set out at the beginning of their narrative
  • Include techniques for rhetorical effectiveness like the creation of tone, the plot of the narrative, and the overall coherence of the text

W.11-12.4. Produce clear and coherent writing in which the development, organization, and style are appropriate to task, purpose, and audience.

  • Determine writing task type and its appropriate organizational structure
  • Identify and understand the writing purpose
  • Determine and address the audience (intended reader) appropriately
  • Understand and utilize appropriate style
  • Understand how structure, style and rhetorical devices convey the purpose of writing

W.11-12.5. Develop and strengthen writing as needed by planning, revising, editing, rewriting, or trying a new approach, or consulting a style manual (such as MLA or APA Style),focusing on addressing what is most significant for a specific purpose and audience.

  • Create and utilize appropriate planning templates
  • Understand and practice revision techniques
  • Comprehend writing as a process
  • Plan, revise, edit, rewrite, or try a new approach, focusing on addressing what is most significant for a specific purpose or audience
  • Determine what details and/or information is most appropriate for a specific purpose
  • Understand writing as a process rather than a product

RL.11-12.3. Analyze the impact of the author’s choices regarding how to develop and relate elements of a story or drama (e.g., where a story is set, how the action is ordered, how the characters are introduced and developed).

RL.11-12.3:

  • Identify and analyze the choices made by the author including the choice of setting, plot organization and development, characterization and character interaction
  • Explain how the order in which each is presented in the text impacts the overall text
  • Analyze those choices as they pertain to the overall story

RL.11-12.5:  Analyze how an author’s choices concerning how to structure specific parts of a text (e.g., the choice of where to begin or end a story, the choice to provide a comedic or tragic resolution) contribute to its overall structure and meaning as well as its aesthetic impact.

  • Evaluate the structure of the text (ex. en media res, flashbacks, tragic elements)
  • Analyze how an author has chosen to structure a text and order events within it
  • Conclude why the author chose that structure and how it enhances the work as a whole

RL.11-12.7:  Analyze multiple interpretations of a story, drama, or poem (e.g., recorded or live production of a play or recorded novel or poetry), evaluating how each version interprets the source text. (Include at least one play by Shakespeare and one play by an American dramatist.)

  • Read and/or view different versions of the same text, recordings, film, and/or live performances
  • Compare and contrast the multiple versions
  • Evaluate the significant the differences between the multiple versions
  • Focus on significant changes to structure, order, plot, and/or character
  • Compare, contrast, and assess how various accounts of a subject are told in multiple mediums
  • Analyze how the details emphasized in each account of a subject told in different mediums affect the overall message
  • Use references to the different media to answer a question or to solve a problem

L.11-12.5. Demonstrate understanding of figurative language, word relationships, and nuances in word meanings.

L.11-12.5.A. Interpret figures of speech (e.g., hyperbole, paradox) in context and analyze their role in the text.

L.11-12.5.B. Analyze nuances in the meaning of words with similar denotations.

  • Analyze and evaluate the use of figurative language within a text, particularly hyperbole and paradox
  • Analyze and validate slight differences in the meanings of words with similar definitions (ex: saunter and walk)

21st Century Skills and Themes

Interdisciplinary Connections

Career Ready Practices

9.2 Career Awareness, Exploration, and Preparation  

History:  Students will discuss and investigate the historical context and importance of specific texts and writers.  

  • CRP1. Act as a responsible and contributing citizen and employee.
  • CRP2. Apply appropriate academic and technical skills.
  • CRP4.Communicate clearly and effectively and with reason.
  • CRP6.Demonstrate creativity and innovation.
  • CRP11. Use technology to enhance productivity.
  • CRP12.Work productively in teams while using cultural global competence.

By the end of 12th grade,

  • 9.2.12.C.1 Review career goals and determine steps necessary for attainment.
  • 9.2.12.C.2 Modify Personalized Student Learning Plans to support declared career goals.

Technology Standards - 8.1

9-12th Grade

A. Technology Operations and Concepts: Students demonstrate a sound understanding of technology concepts, systems and operations.

  • Understand and use technology systems.

8.1.12.A.1 Create a personal digital portfolio which reflects personal and academic interests, achievements, and career aspirations by using a variety of digital tools and resources.

  • Select and use applications effectively and productively.

8.1.12.A.2 Produce and edit a multi-page digital document for a commercial or professional audience and present it to peers and/or professionals in that related area for review.

D. Digital Citizenship: Students understand human, cultural, and societal issues related to technology and practice legal and ethical behavior.

  • Advocate and practice safe, legal, and responsible use of information and technology.

8.1.12.D.1 Demonstrate appropriate application of copyright, fair use and/or Creative Commons to an original work.

 

Modifications/Accommodations

IEPs

  • Projects are designed so teacher may add or omit criteria based on student needs
  • Shortened assignments
  • Extended time allotted for students
  • Modification of project dimensions or materials for students with special needs
  • Restructure lesson using UDL principles http://www.cast.org/our-work/about-udl.html#.VXmoXcD_UA
  • Structure lessons around questions that are authentic, relate to students’ interests, social/family background and knowledge of their communities
  • Provide students multiple choices for how they can represent their understandings (e.g multisensory techniques- auditory/visual aids, pictures, illustrations, graphs, charts, data tables, multimedia, modeling)
  • Provide multiple grouping opportunities for students to share their ideas and to encourage work among various backgrounds and cultures (e.g. multiple representation and multimodal experiences)
  • Mneumonic aids/devices
  • Additional time for test preparation
  • Review/testing matched to student pace
  • Test directions read/explained thoroughly
  • Oral, short-answer, modified tests
  • Emphasis on successes
  • Graphic organizers
  • Student choice of texts, projects, writing prompts, etc.
  • Collaborate with after-school programs or clubs to extend learning
  • Various online learning opportunities to reinforce skills
  • Use of leveled texts or www.rewordify.com

504s

  • Projects are designed so teacher may add or omit criteria based on student needs
  • Shortened assignments
  • Extended time is allotted for students
  • Structure lessons around questions that are authentic, relate to students’ interests, social/family background and knowledge of their communities
  • Collaborate with after-school programs or clubs to extend learning opportunities
  • Based on student needs various online learning opportunities to reinforce skills

ELLs

  • Shortened assignments
  • Extended time allotted for students
  • Visuals/video provided where possible
  • Electronic translators
  • Provide work for completion or understanding to ELL teacher to continue during ELL class

G/T

  • Projects are designed so teacher may extend criteria based on student needs
  • Structure learning around explaining or solving a social or community-based issue
  • Provide electronic games, lessons, etc. to encourage students to expand or move ahead
  • Collaborate with after-school programs or clubs to extend learning opportunities
  • Various online learning opportunities to excel


Unit Title

 Unit 2 - Murder Mystery

Timeframe 

5 weeks

Unit Summary

In this unit, students will be required to synthesize the structural components of the mystery genre so that they will be able to create their own mystery short story. Students will research how to determine whether information is relevant; to weed out “red herrings” or irrelevant information; organize thoughts; and present accurate conclusions. Students will identify the characteristics of mystery writing through research and class discussions, outline a mystery story using a graphic organizer, write and revise a mystery story independently or with a small group, and edit each other's work. Students are then given opportunities to share their mysteries and evaluate how the elements in the mystery are laid out in order to come to conclusions.

Learning Targets

Essential Questions

  • How does an author build suspense in a murder mystery?

  • How does an author use tone and mood to create the setting of a murder mystery?

Enduring Understandings

Students will understand:

  • Good writers use a repertoire of strategies that enables them to vary form and style, in order to write for different purposes, audiences, and contexts, i.e the murder mystery.

Know

By the end of this unit, students will know

  • The various elements of mystery writing, including suspense.
  • How tone/mood and word choice play an important role in mystery writing.
  • How to write a murder mystery that involves the writer’s voice.

Do

By the end of this unit, students will be able to:

  • Write a murder mystery using elements taught in class along with student research and cooperative learning group activities.
  • Analyze the roles and elements that are incorporated into mysteries (i.e.antagonist themes, internal/external conflicts,plot twist, suspense, etc.)

Evidence of Learning

Formative

  • Self-evaluation
  • Workshopping  
  • In-class discussions  

Summative/ Benchmark

  • Quizzes/Tests  
  • Journals/Reflections  
  • Student-developed work  

Alternative Assessments

  • Writing Portfolio (completed throughout the year)

Learning Activities

  • Setting The Scene- Descriptive Setting exercise
  • Show Not Tell- Point of view and character analysis exercises
  • Analyzing elements of a murder mystery through clips of the film “Clue”.
  • In groups: Students will participate in the game of clue and a classroom mystery generated by teacher.
  • Cooperative groups for mystery elements analysis.

Mini Lessons on:

  • Mystery Writing Openings
  • Crime and Clues
  • The Twist
  • Writing A Mystery Ending.

Materials / Equipment / Resources

Core Instructional

Materials and Texts

https://www.standoutbooks.com/essentials-writing-murder-mystery/

http://www.nownovel.com/blog/writing-a-mystery-novel/

http://www.readwritethink.org/files/resources/lesson_images/lesson865/organizer.pdf

Core short stories used:

Excerpts from:

“The Murders in the Rue Morgue” by Edgar Allan Poe

“The No. 1 Ladies Detective Agency”

“The Full Cupboard of Life”-Alexander McCall Smith

“The Winter Queen” Boris Akunin

“ Murder In The Billiard Room”

“Blue Murder”

“And Then There Were None” Agatha Christie

“Voodoo” Frederic Brown

“ The Long Goodbye” Raymond Chandler

“Case For The Defense” Graham Greene

Equipment

Chromebooks, journals, “Clue” film and games.

Supplemental Resources

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=B7HoiVzcKPU&feature=youtu.be

- http://www.miskatonic.org/slang.html

https://www.thebalance.com/top-rules-for-mystery-writing-1277089

http://mysterywriters.org/

The film and game “Clue”

Standards

Content Statement

Indicator

W.11-12.3. Write narratives to develop real or imagined experiences or events using effective technique, well-chosen details, and well-structured event sequences.

W.11-12.3.A. Engage and orient the reader by setting out a problem, situation, or observation and its significance, establishing one or multiple point(s) of view, and introducing a narrator and/or characters; create a smooth progression of experiences or events.

W.11-12.3.B. Use narrative techniques, such as dialogue, pacing, description, reflection, and multiple plot lines, to develop experiences, events, and/or characters.

W.11-12.3.C. Use a variety of techniques to sequence events so that they build on one another to create a coherent whole and build toward a particular tone and outcome (e.g., a sense of mystery, suspense, growth, or resolution).

W.11-12.3.D. Use precise words and phrases, telling details, and sensory language to convey a vivid picture of the experiences, events, setting, and/or characters.

W.11-12.3.E. Provide a conclusion that follows from and reflects on what is experienced, observed, or resolved over the course of the narrative.

  • Convey experiences, real or imagined
  • Use time as the deep structure of the narrative
  • Form or structure based on a progression of events that build and reflect upon each other
  • Use effective details using precise language
  • Form clear point(s) of view established through a narrator, provide characters, and present a situation
  • Distinguish and utilize narrative techniques including dialogue, description, and plot in order to develop experiences, events, and/or characters choosing words that create vivid pictures
  • Provide a conclusion to the events they set out at the beginning of their narrative
  • Include techniques for rhetorical effectiveness like the creation of tone, the plot of the narrative, and the overall coherence of the text

W.11-12.4. Produce clear and coherent writing in which the development, organization, and style are appropriate to task, purpose, and audience.

  • Determine writing task type and its appropriate organizational structure
  • Identify and understand the writing purpose
  • Determine and address the audience (intended reader) appropriately
  • Understand and utilize appropriate style
  • Understand how structure, style and rhetorical devices convey the purpose of writing

W.11-12.5. Develop and strengthen writing as needed by planning, revising, editing, rewriting, or trying a new approach, or consulting a style manual (such as MLA or APA Style),focusing on addressing what is most significant for a specific purpose and audience.

  • Create and utilize appropriate planning templates
  • Understand and practice revision techniques
  • Comprehend writing as a process
  • Plan, revise, edit, rewrite, or try a new approach, focusing on addressing what is most significant for a specific purpose or audience
  • Determine what details and/or information is most appropriate for a specific purpose
  • Understand writing as a process rather than a product

W.11-12.6. Use technology, including the Internet, to produce, share, and update individual or shared writing products in response to ongoing feedback, including new arguments or information.

  • Use technology proficiently for production, publication, and collaboration
  • Link and cite sources
  • Create shared writing products for feedback
  • Assess feedback from peers
  • Adapt writing according to feedback
  • Respond to ongoing feedback utilizing digital software

W.11-12.10. Write routinely over extended time frames (time for research, reflection, and revision) and shorter time frames (a single sitting or a day or two) for a range of tasks, purposes, and audiences.

  • Design a plan to appropriately match the task, purpose, and audience that incorporates research, reflection, and revision
  • Write routinely over shorter and extended time frames for a range of tasks, purposes, and audiences
  • Synthesize research gathered over shorter time frames into a long-term research project
  • Manage a long-term research project that incorporates research, reflection, and revision

RL.11.12.1. Cite strong and thorough textual evidence and make relevant connections to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text, including determining where the text leaves matters uncertain.

  • Make personal connections, connections to other texts, and/or global/historical connections when relevant
  • Analyze the text and identify explicit and implicit textual evidence
  • Determine the difference between strong and insufficient (unreliable) details
  • Cite evidence and use  direct quotes, paraphrase, objectively summarize (free of personal bias)
  • Draw inferences using implicit and explicit text evidence
  • Draw conclusions/make logical judgments about the information within the text on the basis of evidence and prior conclusions/prior experience
  • Support inference using several examples from the text
  • Evaluate the relationship between explicit and implicit details and how they contribute to the meaning of the text
  • Identify the moments where the author is inconclusive  or uncertain and allows the reader to draw conclusions based on textual evidence

RL.11-12.2. Determine two or more themes or central ideas of a text and analyze their development over the course of the text, including how they interact and build on one another to produce a complex account, and provide an objective summary of the text.

  • Determine two or more themes or central ideas in a text
  • Recognize supporting details for themes/central ideas
  • Analyze themes/central ideas as it develops over the course of the text
  • Make inferences through the use of details, word choice, and literary elements regarding the thematic development
  • Use the text to draw conclusions
  • Examine how the interaction of themes/central ideas create the overall meaning of the text ( and provides depth and dimension)
  • Construct an objective summary of the text
  • Examine how the interaction of themes creates the overall meaning of the text ( and provides depth and dimension and complexity)

RL.11-12.3. Analyze the impact of the author’s choices regarding how to develop and relate elements of a story or drama (e.g., where a story is set, how the action is ordered, how the characters are introduced and developed).

  • Identify and analyze the choices made by the author including the choice of setting, plot organization and development, characterization and character interaction
  • Explain how the order in which each is presented in the text impacts the overall text
  • Analyze those choices as they pertain to the overall story

RL.11-12.5:  Analyze how an author’s choices concerning how to structure specific parts of a text (e.g., the choice of where to begin or end a story, the choice to provide a comedic or tragic resolution) contribute to its overall structure and meaning as well as its aesthetic impact.

  • Evaluate the structure of the text (ex. en media res, flashbacks, tragic elements)
  • Analyze how an author has chosen to structure a text and order events within it
  • Conclude why the author chose that structure and how it enhances the work as a whole

RL.11-12.7:  Analyze multiple interpretations of a story, drama, or poem (e.g., recorded or live production of a play or recorded novel or poetry), evaluating how each version interprets the source text. (Include at least one play by Shakespeare and one play by an American dramatist.)

  • Read and/or view different versions of the same text, recordings, film, and/or live performances
  • Compare and contrast the multiple versions
  • Evaluate the significant the differences between the multiple versions
  • Focus on significant changes to structure, order, plot, and/or character
  • Compare, contrast, and assess how various accounts of a subject are told in multiple mediums
  • Analyze how the details emphasized in each account of a subject told in different mediums affect the overall message
  • Use references to the different media to answer a question or to solve a problem

RL.11-12.10. By the end of grade 12, read and comprehend literature, including stories, dramas, and poems, at the high end of the grades 12–CCR text complexity band independently and proficiently

•        Closely read various forms of literature and literary nonfiction independently, proficiently, and, fluently

•        Demonstrate comprehension of various forms of literary text by showing a steadily growing ability to discern more and make fuller use of text

•        Generate connections among ideas and between texts

•        Consider and evaluate a wider range of textual evidence

SL.11-12.1. Initiate and participate effectively in a range of collaborative discussions (one on-one, in groups, and teacher-led) with peers on grade 11 topics, texts, and issues, building on others’ ideas and expressing their own clearly and persuasively.

SL11-12.1.A. Come to discussions prepared, having read and researched material under study; explicitly draw on that preparation by referring to evidence from texts and other research on the topic or issue to stimulate a thoughtful, well reasoned exchange of ideas.

SL.11-12.1.B. Collaborate with peers to promote civil, democratic discussions and decision making, set clear goals and assessments (e.g., student-developed rubrics), and establish individual roles as needed.

SL.11-12.1.C. Propel conversations by posing and responding to questions that probe reasoning and evidence; ensure a hearing for a full range of positions on a topic or issue; clarify, verify, or challenge ideas and conclusions; and promote divergent and creative perspectives.

SL.11.12.1.D. Respond thoughtfully to diverse perspectives; synthesize comments, claims, and evidence made on all sides of an issue; resolve contradictions when possible; and determine what additional information or research is required to deepen the investigation or complete the task.

  • Effectively participate in one-on-one, group, and teacher-led discussions
  • Prepare for discussions
  • Read and research materials beforehand
  • Articulate ideas clearly and persuasively in a discussion
  • Refer to evidence from texts and other research
  • Draw from and build on the ideas of others in a discussion
  • Clarify, verify, or challenge ideas and conclusions in a discussion or collaborative activity
  • Set guidelines for class discussions
  • Establish goals and roles for group members and adhere to assigned roles
  • Participate in polite and democratic discussions and decision-making activities.
  • Self monitor the work and assign specific tasks as needed
  • Respect and promote diverse perspectives in a discussion or collaborative activity
  • Encourage others to participate in a discussion or collaborative activity
  • Discuss and question the argument and evidence
  • Make certain that a variety of possible arguments have been heard
  • Respond thoughtfully
  • Summarize where others agree and disagree with ideas and perspectives
  • Continue to propel conversations by posing and responding to questions that connect to broader ideas as well as through reflection and evaluation of others’ comments
  • Incorporate new synthesized ideas into discussion

SL.11-12.3. Evaluate a speaker’s point of view, reasoning, and use of evidence and rhetoric, assessing the stance, premises, links among ideas, word choice, points of emphasis, and tone used.

  • Evaluate whether the reasoning a speaker uses is logical/legitimate and if the evidence is relevant
  • Correlate the speaker’s argument with the student’s own
  • Identify logical fallacies, judging if any of the speaker’s reasoning is misleading
  • Engage as an active listener and participant
  • Consider and assess the speaker, argument, organization, diction, and tone.
  • Use evidence from sources/text to prove fallibility in speaker’s reasoning

SL.11-12.5. Make strategic use of digital media (e.g., textual, graphical, audio, visual, and interactive elements) in presentations to enhance understanding of findings, reasoning, and evidence and to add interest.

•        Consider, determine and apply the most strategic use of digital media

•        Engage audience and enhance their understanding of findings, reasoning, and evidence by incorporating digital media such as textual, graphical, audio, visual, or interactive elements

SL.11-12.6. Adapt speech to a variety of contexts and tasks, demonstrating a command of formal English when indicated or appropriate.

•        Assess and adapt speech delivery to audience and purpose

•        Understand the difference between formal and informal presentations and demonstrate a command of formal English

L.11-12.1. Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English grammar and usage when writing or speaking.

L.11-12.1. A. Apply the understanding that usage is a matter of convention, can change over time, and is sometimes contested.

  • Utilize and incorporate appropriate grammar and usage in writing and speaking
  • Understand that language and appropriate usage changes
  • Utilize reference materials to help maintain appropriate grammar and usage dependent on the audience and situation

L.11-12.2. Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English capitalization, punctuation, and spelling when writing.

L.11-12.2.A. Observe hyphenation conventions.

L.11-12.2.B. Spell correctly.

  • Adhere to appropriate writing conventions including capitalization, punctuation including hyphens, and spelling

L.11-12.3. Apply knowledge of language to understand how language functions in different contexts, to make effective choices for meaning or style, and to comprehend more fully when reading or listening.

L.11-12.3.A. Vary syntax for effect; apply an understanding of syntax to the study of complex texts.

  • Apply knowledge of language to understand how language functions in different situations
  • Apply knowledge of language to make effective choices to shape the meaning and style
  • Apply knowledge of language to comprehend more fully when reading, listening, or speaking
  • Consult a style manual, which conforms to discipline-specific guidelines, while writing and editing a work
  • Write using a variety of task-appropriate syntaxes

L.11-12.4. Determine or clarify the meaning of unknown and multiple-meaning words and phrases based on grades 11–12 reading and content, choosing flexibly from a range of strategies.

L.11-12.4.A. Use context (e.g., the overall meaning of a sentence, paragraph, or text; a word’s position or function in a sentence) as a clue to the meaning of a word or phrase.

L.11-12.4.B. Identify and correctly use patterns of word changes that indicate different meanings or parts of speech (e.g., conceive, conception, conceivable).

L.11-12.4.C. Consult general and specialized reference materials (e.g., dictionaries, glossaries, thesauruses), both print and digital, to find the pronunciation of a word or determine or clarify its precise meaning, its part of speech, its etymology, or its standard usage.

L.11-12.4.D. Verify the preliminary determination of the meaning of a word or phrase (e.g., by checking the inferred meaning in context or in a dictionary).

  • Use context clues to derive word meaning
  • Use knowledge of Greek and Latin affixes and roots to understand variations of word forms and patterns
  • Consult reference materials to derive word meanings and correct pronunciation of words
  • Trace the etymology of words

L.11-12.5. Demonstrate understanding of figurative language, word relationships, and nuances in word meanings.

L.11-12.5.A. Interpret figures of speech (e.g., hyperbole, paradox) in context and analyze their role in the text.

L.11-12.5.B. Analyze nuances in the meaning of words with similar denotations.

  • Analyze and evaluate the use of figurative language within a text, particularly hyperbole and paradox
  • Analyze and validate slight differences in the meanings of words with similar definitions (ex: saunter and walk)

L.11-12.6:  Acquire and use accurately grade-appropriate general academic and domain-specific words and phrases; gather vocabulary knowledge when considering a word or phrase important to comprehension or expression.

  • Acquire general academic words from content-specific written texts
  • Independently integrate general academic words and domain-specific words into reading, writing, speaking, and listening at the college and career readiness level

21st Century Skills and Themes

Interdisciplinary Connections

Career Ready Practices

9.2 Career Awareness, Exploration, and Preparation  

History:  Students will discuss and investigate the historical context and importance of specific texts and writers.  

Film: Students will be able to analyze how a director creates suspense in film.

  • CRP1. Act as a responsible and contributing citizen and employee.
  • CRP2. Apply appropriate academic and technical skills.
  • CRP4.Communicate clearly and effectively and with reason.
  • CRP6.Demonstrate creativity and innovation.
  • CRP9.Model integrity, ethical leadership and effective management.
  • CRP11. Use technology to enhance productivity.
  • CRP12.Work productively in teams while using cultural global competence.

By the end of 12th grade,

  • 9.2.12.C.2 Modify Personalized Student Learning Plans to support declared career goals.
  • 9.2.12.C.3 Identify transferable career skills and design alternate career plans.

Technology Standards - 8.1

9-12th Grade

A. Technology Operations and Concepts: Students demonstrate a sound understanding of technology concepts, systems and operations.

  • Understand and use technology systems.

8.1.12.A.1 Create a personal digital portfolio which reflects personal and academic interests, achievements, and career aspirations by using a variety of digital tools and resources.

  • Select and use applications effectively and productively.

8.1.12.A.2 Produce and edit a multi-page digital document for a commercial or professional audience and present it to peers and/or professionals in that related area for review.

D. Digital Citizenship: Students understand human, cultural, and societal issues related to technology and practice legal and ethical behavior.

  • Advocate and practice safe, legal, and responsible use of information and technology.

8.1.12.D.1 Demonstrate appropriate application of copyright, fair use and/or Creative Commons to an original work.

 

Modifications/Accommodations

IEPs

  • Projects are designed so teacher may add or omit criteria based on student needs
  • Shortened assignments
  • Extended time allotted for students
  • Modification of project dimensions or materials for students with special needs
  • Restructure lesson using UDL principles http://www.cast.org/our-work/about-udl.html#.VXmoXcD_UA
  • Structure lessons around questions that are authentic, relate to students’ interests, social/family background and knowledge of their communities
  • Provide students multiple choices for how they can represent their understandings (e.g multisensory techniques- auditory/visual aids, pictures, illustrations, graphs, charts, data tables, multimedia, modeling)
  • Provide multiple grouping opportunities for students to share their ideas and to encourage work among various backgrounds and cultures (e.g. multiple representation and multimodal experiences)
  • Mneumonic aids/devices
  • Additional time for test preparation
  • Review/testing matched to student pace
  • Test directions read/explained thoroughly
  • Oral, short-answer, modified tests
  • Emphasis on successes
  • Graphic organizers
  • Student choice of texts, projects, writing prompts, etc.
  • Collaborate with after-school programs or clubs to extend learning
  • Various online learning opportunities to reinforce skills
  • Use of leveled texts or www.rewordify.com

504s

  • Projects are designed so teacher may add or omit criteria based on student needs
  • Shortened assignments
  • Extended time is allotted for students
  • Structure lessons around questions that are authentic, relate to students’ interests, social/family background and knowledge of their communities
  • Collaborate with after-school programs or clubs to extend learning opportunities
  • Based on student needs various online learning opportunities to reinforce skills

ELLs

  • Shortened assignments
  • Extended time allotted for students
  • Visuals/video provided where possible
  • Electronic translators
  • Provide work for completion or understanding to ELL teacher to continue during ELL class

G/T

  • Projects are designed so teacher may extend criteria based on student needs
  • Structure learning around explaining or solving a social or community-based issue
  • Provide electronic games, lessons, etc. to encourage students to expand or move ahead
  • Collaborate with after-school programs or clubs to extend learning opportunities
  • Various online learning opportunities to excel


Unit Title

Unit 3 - Flash Fiction

Timeframe 

3 weeks

Unit Summary

"Our lives are as much about the unspoken as the spoken." ~G. Faulkner

 

In this unit, students will understand the nature of stories (elements of fiction), and how it can help us become better writers by being concise and clear (especially in communicating with others through our word choice and the impression we hope to leave on their minds). They will read various pieces of flash fiction and learn how to “read between the lines” of what is written and what is meant, but not written. The students will focus on a single moment, and communicate a message using breaks, pauses, and blank spaces to create various pieces of flash fiction.

Learning Targets

Essential Questions

  • How can one convey a sense of character, narrative arc and emotional resonance in 250 words, or even 50 words?

Enduring Understandings

Students will understand:

  • Young writers need to view works through a creative and constructive lens in an effort to build meaning and shape their artistic voice as a writer.
  • Writers use word choice and sensory detail to create meaning/theme/message in flash fiction pieces.

 

Know

By the end of this unit, students will know

  • The various styles/forms of flash fiction.  
  • How to identify characteristics of flash fiction.
  • The effect of word choice in flash fiction.
  • How to interpret a piece of flash fiction beyond “what it written.”
  • How to write flash fiction that involves the writer’s voice.
  • How to identify the tone/mood of a piece of flash fiction.

Do

By the end of this unit, students will be able to

  • Read flash fiction according to it’s original purpose along with applying original interpretation.
  • Write various pieces of flash fiction using specific word choice, tone, mood, style. etc...

Evidence of Learning

Formative

  • Self-evaluation
  • Workshopping  
  • In-class discussions  

Summative/ Benchmark

  • Quizzes/Tests  
  • Journals/Reflections  
  • Student-developed work  

Alternative Assessments

  • Writing Portfolio (completed throughout the year)

Learning Activities

  • Give one-Get One Activity- Introduction to Flash Fiction
  • Researching different websites in order to analyze successful flash fiction pieces-what works vs. what doesn’t.
  • Various flash fiction exercises from WriteTheWorld.com
  • Class collaboration of Animoto project.

Materials / Equipment / Resources

Core Instructional

Materials and Texts

https://docs.google.com/document/d/1NkEyOSkUYi2SqNzcFgFRGEodRNBth_EccUpGaez7i8w/edit

https://learning.blogs.nytimes.com/2013/10/03/short-and-sweet-reading-and-writing-flash-fiction/

http://fictionsoutheast.org/7-tips-for-writing-flash-fiction/

Various student samples.

Ernest Hemingway’s Flash Fiction Pieces.

Equipment

Chromebooks, journals

Supplemental Resources

Writetheworld.com

https://docs.google.com/document/d/1WvIy3ba74A_hkyU6X-eMLm70NfcyKfa96CU2Gw8okck/edit

http://www.artandwriting.org/explore/online-galleries/#writing=Flash+Fiction&art_portfolio=false&writing_portfolio=false&year=2013&state=All&awards=C&awards=B&grade=0

http://www.100wordstory.org/

http://www.npr.org/series/105660765/three-minute-fiction

http://flashfictiononline.com/main/

https://www.theguardian.com/childrens-books-site/2012/may/16/your-flash-fiction

http://topics.nytimes.com/top/features/magazine/columns/lives/index.html

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2014/06/13/flash-fiction_n_5481868.html

https://www.fodey.com/generators/newspaper/snippet.asp

http://www.imagechef.com/t/n8rm/Newspaper-Headline

Standards

Content Statement

Indicator

W.11-12.3. Write narratives to develop real or imagined experiences or events using effective technique, well-chosen details, and well-structured event sequences.

W.11-12.3.A. Engage and orient the reader by setting out a problem, situation, or observation and its significance, establishing one or multiple point(s) of view, and introducing a narrator and/or characters; create a smooth progression of experiences or events.

W.11-12.3.B. Use narrative techniques, such as dialogue, pacing, description, reflection, and multiple plot lines, to develop experiences, events, and/or characters.

W.11-12.3.C. Use a variety of techniques to sequence events so that they build on one another to create a coherent whole and build toward a particular tone and outcome (e.g., a sense of mystery, suspense, growth, or resolution).

W.11-12.3.D. Use precise words and phrases, telling details, and sensory language to convey a vivid picture of the experiences, events, setting, and/or characters.

W.11-12.3.E. Provide a conclusion that follows from and reflects on what is experienced, observed, or resolved over the course of the narrative.

  • Convey experiences, real or imagined
  • Use time as the deep structure of the narrative
  • Form or structure based on a progression of events that build and reflect upon each other
  • Use effective details using precise language
  • Form clear point(s) of view established through a narrator, provide characters, and present a situation
  • Distinguish and utilize narrative techniques including dialogue, description, and plot in order to develop experiences, events, and/or characters choosing words that create vivid pictures
  • Provide a conclusion to the events they set out at the beginning of their narrative
  • Include techniques for rhetorical effectiveness like the creation of tone, the plot of the narrative, and the overall coherence of the text

W.11-12.4. Produce clear and coherent writing in which the development, organization, and style are appropriate to task, purpose, and audience.

  • Determine writing task type and its appropriate organizational structure
  • Identify and understand the writing purpose
  • Determine and address the audience (intended reader) appropriately
  • Understand and utilize appropriate style
  • Understand how structure, style and rhetorical devices convey the purpose of writing

W.11-12.5. Develop and strengthen writing as needed by planning, revising, editing, rewriting, or trying a new approach, or consulting a style manual (such as MLA or APA Style),focusing on addressing what is most significant for a specific purpose and audience.

  • Create and utilize appropriate planning templates
  • Understand and practice revision techniques
  • Comprehend writing as a process
  • Plan, revise, edit, rewrite, or try a new approach, focusing on addressing what is most significant for a specific purpose or audience
  • Determine what details and/or information is most appropriate for a specific purpose
  • Understand writing as a process rather than a product

W.11-12.6. Use technology, including the Internet, to produce, share, and update individual or shared writing products in response to ongoing feedback, including new arguments or information.

  • Use technology proficiently for production, publication, and collaboration
  • Link and cite sources
  • Create shared writing products for feedback
  • Assess feedback from peers
  • Adapt writing according to feedback
  • Respond to ongoing feedback utilizing digital software

W.11-12.10. Write routinely over extended time frames (time for research, reflection, and revision) and shorter time frames (a single sitting or a day or two) for a range of tasks, purposes, and audiences.

  • Design a plan to appropriately match the task, purpose, and audience that incorporates research, reflection, and revision
  • Write routinely over shorter and extended time frames for a range of tasks, purposes, and audiences
  • Synthesize research gathered over shorter time frames into a long-term research project
  • Manage a long-term research project that incorporates research, reflection, and revision

RL.11.12.1. Cite strong and thorough textual evidence and make relevant connections to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text, including determining where the text leaves matters uncertain.

  • Make personal connections, connections to other texts, and/or global/historical connections when relevant
  • Analyze the text and identify explicit and implicit textual evidence
  • Determine the difference between strong and insufficient (unreliable) details
  • Cite evidence and use  direct quotes, paraphrase, objectively summarize (free of personal bias)
  • Draw inferences using implicit and explicit text evidence
  • Draw conclusions/make logical judgments about the information within the text on the basis of evidence and prior conclusions/prior experience
  • Support inference using several examples from the text
  • Evaluate the relationship between explicit and implicit details and how they contribute to the meaning of the text
  • Identify the moments where the author is inconclusive  or uncertain and allows the reader to draw conclusions based on textual evidence

RL.11-12.2. Determine two or more themes or central ideas of a text and analyze their development over the course of the text, including how they interact and build on one another to produce a complex account, and provide an objective summary of the text.

  • Determine two or more themes or central ideas in a text
  • Recognize supporting details for themes/central ideas
  • Analyze themes/central ideas as it develops over the course of the text
  • Make inferences through the use of details, word choice, and literary elements regarding the thematic development
  • Use the text to draw conclusions
  • Examine how the interaction of themes/central ideas create the overall meaning of the text ( and provides depth and dimension)
  • Construct an objective summary of the text
  • Examine how the interaction of themes creates the overall meaning of the text ( and provides depth and dimension and complexity)

RL.11-12.3. Analyze the impact of the author’s choices regarding how to develop and relate elements of a story or drama (e.g., where a story is set, how the action is ordered, how the characters are introduced and developed).

  • Identify and analyze the choices made by the author including the choice of setting, plot organization and development, characterization and character interaction
  • Explain how the order in which each is presented in the text impacts the overall text
  • Analyze those choices as they pertain to the overall story

RL.11-12.5:  Analyze how an author’s choices concerning how to structure specific parts of a text (e.g., the choice of where to begin or end a story, the choice to provide a comedic or tragic resolution) contribute to its overall structure and meaning as well as its aesthetic impact.

  • Evaluate the structure of the text (ex. en media res, flashbacks, tragic elements)
  • Analyze how an author has chosen to structure a text and order events within it
  • Conclude why the author chose that structure and how it enhances the work as a whole

RL.11-12.7:  Analyze multiple interpretations of a story, drama, or poem (e.g., recorded or live production of a play or recorded novel or poetry), evaluating how each version interprets the source text. (Include at least one play by Shakespeare and one play by an American dramatist.)

  • Read and/or view different versions of the same text, recordings, film, and/or live performances
  • Compare and contrast the multiple versions
  • Evaluate the significant the differences between the multiple versions
  • Focus on significant changes to structure, order, plot, and/or character
  • Compare, contrast, and assess how various accounts of a subject are told in multiple mediums
  • Analyze how the details emphasized in each account of a subject told in different mediums affect the overall message
  • Use references to the different media to answer a question or to solve a problem

RL.11-12.10. By the end of grade 12, read and comprehend literature, including stories, dramas, and poems, at the high end of the grades 12–CCR text complexity band independently and proficiently

•        Closely read various forms of literature and literary nonfiction independently, proficiently, and, fluently

•        Demonstrate comprehension of various forms of literary text by showing a steadily growing ability to discern more and make fuller use of text

•        Generate connections among ideas and between texts

•        Consider and evaluate a wider range of textual evidence

SL.11-12.1. Initiate and participate effectively in a range of collaborative discussions (one on-one, in groups, and teacher-led) with peers on grade 11 topics, texts, and issues, building on others’ ideas and expressing their own clearly and persuasively.

SL11-12.1.A. Come to discussions prepared, having read and researched material under study; explicitly draw on that preparation by referring to evidence from texts and other research on the topic or issue to stimulate a thoughtful, well reasoned exchange of ideas.

SL.11-12.1.B. Collaborate with peers to promote civil, democratic discussions and decision making, set clear goals and assessments (e.g., student-developed rubrics), and establish individual roles as needed.

SL.11-12.1.C. Propel conversations by posing and responding to questions that probe reasoning and evidence; ensure a hearing for a full range of positions on a topic or issue; clarify, verify, or challenge ideas and conclusions; and promote divergent and creative perspectives.

SL.11.12.1.D. Respond thoughtfully to diverse perspectives; synthesize comments, claims, and evidence made on all sides of an issue; resolve contradictions when possible; and determine what additional information or research is required to deepen the investigation or complete the task.

  • Effectively participate in one-on-one, group, and teacher-led discussions
  • Prepare for discussions
  • Read and research materials beforehand
  • Articulate ideas clearly and persuasively in a discussion
  • Refer to evidence from texts and other research
  • Draw from and build on the ideas of others in a discussion
  • Clarify, verify, or challenge ideas and conclusions in a discussion or collaborative activity
  • Set guidelines for class discussions
  • Establish goals and roles for group members and adhere to assigned roles
  • Participate in polite and democratic discussions and decision-making activities.
  • Self monitor the work and assign specific tasks as needed
  • Respect and promote diverse perspectives in a discussion or collaborative activity
  • Encourage others to participate in a discussion or collaborative activity
  • Discuss and question the argument and evidence
  • Make certain that a variety of possible arguments have been heard
  • Respond thoughtfully
  • Summarize where others agree and disagree with ideas and perspectives
  • Continue to propel conversations by posing and responding to questions that connect to broader ideas as well as through reflection and evaluation of others’ comments
  • Incorporate new synthesized ideas into discussion

SL.11-12.3. Evaluate a speaker’s point of view, reasoning, and use of evidence and rhetoric, assessing the stance, premises, links among ideas, word choice, points of emphasis, and tone used.

  • Evaluate whether the reasoning a speaker uses is logical/legitimate and if the evidence is relevant
  • Correlate the speaker’s argument with the student’s own
  • Identify logical fallacies, judging if any of the speaker’s reasoning is misleading
  • Engage as an active listener and participant
  • Consider and assess the speaker, argument, organization, diction, and tone.
  • Use evidence from sources/text to prove fallibility in speaker’s reasoning

SL.11-12.5. Make strategic use of digital media (e.g., textual, graphical, audio, visual, and interactive elements) in presentations to enhance understanding of findings, reasoning, and evidence and to add interest.

•        Consider, determine and apply the most strategic use of digital media

•        Engage audience and enhance their understanding of findings, reasoning, and evidence by incorporating digital media such as textual, graphical, audio, visual, or interactive elements

SL.11-12.6. Adapt speech to a variety of contexts and tasks, demonstrating a command of formal English when indicated or appropriate.

•        Assess and adapt speech delivery to audience and purpose

•        Understand the difference between formal and informal presentations and demonstrate a command of formal English

L.11-12.1. Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English grammar and usage when writing or speaking.

L.11-12.1. A. Apply the understanding that usage is a matter of convention, can change over time, and is sometimes contested.

  • Utilize and incorporate appropriate grammar and usage in writing and speaking
  • Understand that language and appropriate usage changes
  • Utilize reference materials to help maintain appropriate grammar and usage dependent on the audience and situation

L.11-12.2. Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English capitalization, punctuation, and spelling when writing.

L.11-12.2.A. Observe hyphenation conventions.

L.11-12.2.B. Spell correctly.

  • Adhere to appropriate writing conventions including capitalization, punctuation including hyphens, and spelling

L.11-12.3. Apply knowledge of language to understand how language functions in different contexts, to make effective choices for meaning or style, and to comprehend more fully when reading or listening.

L.11-12.3.A. Vary syntax for effect; apply an understanding of syntax to the study of complex texts.

  • Apply knowledge of language to understand how language functions in different situations
  • Apply knowledge of language to make effective choices to shape the meaning and style
  • Apply knowledge of language to comprehend more fully when reading, listening, or speaking
  • Consult a style manual, which conforms to discipline-specific guidelines, while writing and editing a work
  • Write using a variety of task-appropriate syntaxes

L.11-12.4. Determine or clarify the meaning of unknown and multiple-meaning words and phrases based on grades 11–12 reading and content, choosing flexibly from a range of strategies.

L.11-12.4.A. Use context (e.g., the overall meaning of a sentence, paragraph, or text; a word’s position or function in a sentence) as a clue to the meaning of a word or phrase.

L.11-12.4.B. Identify and correctly use patterns of word changes that indicate different meanings or parts of speech (e.g., conceive, conception, conceivable).

L.11-12.4.C. Consult general and specialized reference materials (e.g., dictionaries, glossaries, thesauruses), both print and digital, to find the pronunciation of a word or determine or clarify its precise meaning, its part of speech, its etymology, or its standard usage.

L.11-12.4.D. Verify the preliminary determination of the meaning of a word or phrase (e.g., by checking the inferred meaning in context or in a dictionary).

  • Use context clues to derive word meaning
  • Use knowledge of Greek and Latin affixes and roots to understand variations of word forms and patterns
  • Consult reference materials to derive word meanings and correct pronunciation of words
  • Trace the etymology of words

L.11-12.5. Demonstrate understanding of figurative language, word relationships, and nuances in word meanings.

L.11-12.5.A. Interpret figures of speech (e.g., hyperbole, paradox) in context and analyze their role in the text.

L.11-12.5.B. Analyze nuances in the meaning of words with similar denotations.

  • Analyze and evaluate the use of figurative language within a text, particularly hyperbole and paradox
  • Analyze and validate slight differences in the meanings of words with similar definitions (ex: saunter and walk)

L.11-12.6:  Acquire and use accurately grade-appropriate general academic and domain-specific words and phrases; gather vocabulary knowledge when considering a word or phrase important to comprehension or expression.

  • Acquire general academic words from content-specific written texts
  • Independently integrate general academic words and domain-specific words into reading, writing, speaking, and listening at the college and career readiness level

21st Century Skills and Themes

Interdisciplinary Connections

Career Ready Practices

9.2 Career Awareness, Exploration, and Preparation  

History:  Students will discuss and investigate the historical context and importance of specific texts and writers.  

  • CRP1. Act as a responsible and contributing citizen and employee.
  • CRP2. Apply appropriate academic and technical skills.
  • CRP4.Communicate clearly and effectively and with reason.
  • CRP6.Demonstrate creativity and innovation.
  • CRP9.Model integrity, ethical leadership and effective management.
  • CRP11. Use technology to enhance productivity.
  • CRP12.Work productively in teams while using cultural global competence.

By the end of 12th grade,

  • 9.2.12.C.2 Modify Personalized Student Learning Plans to support declared career goals.
  • 9.2.12.C.3 Identify transferable career skills and design alternate career plans.

Technology Standards - 8.1

9-12th Grade

A. Technology Operations and Concepts: Students demonstrate a sound understanding of technology concepts, systems and operations.

  • Understand and use technology systems.

8.1.12.A.1 Create a personal digital portfolio which reflects personal and academic interests, achievements, and career aspirations by using a variety of digital tools and resources.

  • Select and use applications effectively and productively.

8.1.12.A.2 Produce and edit a multi-page digital document for a commercial or professional audience and present it to peers and/or professionals in that related area for review.

D. Digital Citizenship: Students understand human, cultural, and societal issues related to technology and practice legal and ethical behavior.

  • Advocate and practice safe, legal, and responsible use of information and technology.

8.1.12.D.1 Demonstrate appropriate application of copyright, fair use and/or Creative Commons to an original work.

 

Modifications/Accommodations

IEPs

  • Projects are designed so teacher may add or omit criteria based on student needs
  • Shortened assignments
  • Extended time allotted for students
  • Modification of project dimensions or materials for students with special needs
  • Restructure lesson using UDL principles http://www.cast.org/our-work/about-udl.html#.VXmoXcD_UA
  • Structure lessons around questions that are authentic, relate to students’ interests, social/family background and knowledge of their communities
  • Provide students multiple choices for how they can represent their understandings (e.g multisensory techniques- auditory/visual aids, pictures, illustrations, graphs, charts, data tables, multimedia, modeling)
  • Provide multiple grouping opportunities for students to share their ideas and to encourage work among various backgrounds and cultures (e.g. multiple representation and multimodal experiences)
  • Mneumonic aids/devices
  • Additional time for test preparation
  • Review/testing matched to student pace
  • Test directions read/explained thoroughly
  • Oral, short-answer, modified tests
  • Emphasis on successes
  • Graphic organizers
  • Student choice of texts, projects, writing prompts, etc.
  • Collaborate with after-school programs or clubs to extend learning
  • Various online learning opportunities to reinforce skills
  • Use of leveled texts or www.rewordify.com

504s

  • Projects are designed so teacher may add or omit criteria based on student needs
  • Shortened assignments
  • Extended time is allotted for students
  • Structure lessons around questions that are authentic, relate to students’ interests, social/family background and knowledge of their communities
  • Collaborate with after-school programs or clubs to extend learning opportunities
  • Based on student needs various online learning opportunities to reinforce skills

ELLs

  • Shortened assignments
  • Extended time allotted for students
  • Visuals/video provided where possible
  • Electronic translators
  • Provide work for completion or understanding to ELL teacher to continue during ELL class

G/T

  • Projects are designed so teacher may extend criteria based on student needs
  • Structure learning around explaining or solving a social or community-based issue
  • Provide electronic games, lessons, etc. to encourage students to expand or move ahead
  • Collaborate with after-school programs or clubs to extend learning opportunities
  • Various online learning opportunities to excel


Unit Title

Unit 4 - Historical Fiction

Timeframe 

5 weeks

Unit Summary

In this unit, students will go through the process of gathering historical information, weaving together fact and fiction to create a plot, and then refining both content and style to fashion a unique and exciting work of fiction.

Learning Targets

Essential Questions

  • What is the relationship between fiction and truth?
  • How does a time period impact character and plot?
  • What are the elements a writer of historical fiction must know, understand, and be able to do in order to develop a quality product?
  • Does viewing and analyzing nonfiction and informational texts make us better creators of those types of texts? 

Enduring Understandings

Students will understand:

  • Authors of historical fiction blend both fact and fiction to engage their readers.
  • The setting of a story has a profound impact on its plot and characters.

Know

By the end of this unit, students will know

  • The differences between fiction and non-fiction
  • The importance of setting in a story
  • How a time period can affect a character’s behavior, morals, values...

Do

By the end of this unit, students will be able to

  • Identify elements of historical fiction
  • Analyze excerpts of historical fiction and its purpose
  • Create a powerful setting that will be the base for individual historical writing piece
  • Interweave both fiction and non-fiction into one story successfully
  • Collecting evidence about the time period using research and incorporate it into an original piece of writing
  • Formulate ideas about the time period of the text they are reading

Evidence of Learning

Formative

  • Self-evaluation
  • Workshopping  
  • In-class discussions  

Summative/ Benchmark

  • Quizzes/Tests  
  • Journals/Reflections  
  • Student-developed work  

Alternative Assessments

  • Writing Portfolio (completed throughout the year)

Learning Activities

  • Collecting evidence about the time period of the text students are writing.
  • Formulating ideas about the time period of the text students are writing.
  • Research primary and secondary sources to gather information about historical details about the setting, clothing, technology, culture, traditions, and values of the time period in which they will set their writing.
  • Listening and analyzing music of the chosen time period.

Materials / Equipment / Resources

Core Instructional

Materials and Texts

Various informational articles/videos.

http://fictionsoutheast.org/tips-and-rules-to-use-in-writing-historical-fiction/#

Equipment

Chromebooks, journals

Supplemental Resources

http://scholar.lib.vt.edu/ejournals/ALAN/fall98/brown.html

        

http://schools.nyc.gov/documents/d75/literacy/uos/middle/MS_historical_fiction.pdf

                                                

Standards

Content Statement

Indicator

W.11-12.3. Write narratives to develop real or imagined experiences or events using effective technique, well-chosen details, and well-structured event sequences.

W.11-12.3.A. Engage and orient the reader by setting out a problem, situation, or observation and its significance, establishing one or multiple point(s) of view, and introducing a narrator and/or characters; create a smooth progression of experiences or events.

W.11-12.3.B. Use narrative techniques, such as dialogue, pacing, description, reflection, and multiple plot lines, to develop experiences, events, and/or characters.

W.11-12.3.C. Use a variety of techniques to sequence events so that they build on one another to create a coherent whole and build toward a particular tone and outcome (e.g., a sense of mystery, suspense, growth, or resolution).

W.11-12.3.D. Use precise words and phrases, telling details, and sensory language to convey a vivid picture of the experiences, events, setting, and/or characters.

W.11-12.3.E. Provide a conclusion that follows from and reflects on what is experienced, observed, or resolved over the course of the narrative.

  • Convey experiences, real or imagined
  • Use time as the deep structure of the narrative
  • Form or structure based on a progression of events that build and reflect upon each other
  • Use effective details using precise language
  • Form clear point(s) of view established through a narrator, provide characters, and present a situation
  • Distinguish and utilize narrative techniques including dialogue, description, and plot in order to develop experiences, events, and/or characters choosing words that create vivid pictures
  • Provide a conclusion to the events they set out at the beginning of their narrative
  • Include techniques for rhetorical effectiveness like the creation of tone, the plot of the narrative, and the overall coherence of the text

W.11-12.4. Produce clear and coherent writing in which the development, organization, and style are appropriate to task, purpose, and audience.

  • Determine writing task type and its appropriate organizational structure
  • Identify and understand the writing purpose
  • Determine and address the audience (intended reader) appropriately
  • Understand and utilize appropriate style
  • Understand how structure, style and rhetorical devices convey the purpose of writing

W.11-12.5. Develop and strengthen writing as needed by planning, revising, editing, rewriting, or trying a new approach, or consulting a style manual (such as MLA or APA Style),focusing on addressing what is most significant for a specific purpose and audience.

  • Create and utilize appropriate planning templates
  • Understand and practice revision techniques
  • Comprehend writing as a process
  • Plan, revise, edit, rewrite, or try a new approach, focusing on addressing what is most significant for a specific purpose or audience
  • Determine what details and/or information is most appropriate for a specific purpose
  • Understand writing as a process rather than a product

W.11-12.6. Use technology, including the Internet, to produce, share, and update individual or shared writing products in response to ongoing feedback, including new arguments or information.

  • Use technology proficiently for production, publication, and collaboration
  • Link and cite sources
  • Create shared writing products for feedback
  • Assess feedback from peers
  • Adapt writing according to feedback
  • Respond to ongoing feedback utilizing digital software

W.11-12.10. Write routinely over extended time frames (time for research, reflection, and revision) and shorter time frames (a single sitting or a day or two) for a range of tasks, purposes, and audiences.

  • Design a plan to appropriately match the task, purpose, and audience that incorporates research, reflection, and revision
  • Write routinely over shorter and extended time frames for a range of tasks, purposes, and audiences
  • Synthesize research gathered over shorter time frames into a long-term research project
  • Manage a long-term research project that incorporates research, reflection, and revision

RL.11.12.1. Cite strong and thorough textual evidence and make relevant connections to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text, including determining where the text leaves matters uncertain.

  • Make personal connections, connections to other texts, and/or global/historical connections when relevant
  • Analyze the text and identify explicit and implicit textual evidence
  • Determine the difference between strong and insufficient (unreliable) details
  • Cite evidence and use  direct quotes, paraphrase, objectively summarize (free of personal bias)
  • Draw inferences using implicit and explicit text evidence
  • Draw conclusions/make logical judgments about the information within the text on the basis of evidence and prior conclusions/prior experience
  • Support inference using several examples from the text
  • Evaluate the relationship between explicit and implicit details and how they contribute to the meaning of the text
  • Identify the moments where the author is inconclusive  or uncertain and allows the reader to draw conclusions based on textual evidence

RL.11-12.2. Determine two or more themes or central ideas of a text and analyze their development over the course of the text, including how they interact and build on one another to produce a complex account, and provide an objective summary of the text.

  • Determine two or more themes or central ideas in a text
  • Recognize supporting details for themes/central ideas
  • Analyze themes/central ideas as it develops over the course of the text
  • Make inferences through the use of details, word choice, and literary elements regarding the thematic development
  • Use the text to draw conclusions
  • Examine how the interaction of themes/central ideas create the overall meaning of the text ( and provides depth and dimension)
  • Construct an objective summary of the text
  • Examine how the interaction of themes creates the overall meaning of the text ( and provides depth and dimension and complexity)

RL.11-12.3. Analyze the impact of the author’s choices regarding how to develop and relate elements of a story or drama (e.g., where a story is set, how the action is ordered, how the characters are introduced and developed).

  • Identify and analyze the choices made by the author including the choice of setting, plot organization and development, characterization and character interaction
  • Explain how the order in which each is presented in the text impacts the overall text
  • Analyze those choices as they pertain to the overall story

RL.11-12.5:  Analyze how an author’s choices concerning how to structure specific parts of a text (e.g., the choice of where to begin or end a story, the choice to provide a comedic or tragic resolution) contribute to its overall structure and meaning as well as its aesthetic impact.

  • Evaluate the structure of the text (ex. en media res, flashbacks, tragic elements)
  • Analyze how an author has chosen to structure a text and order events within it
  • Conclude why the author chose that structure and how it enhances the work as a whole

RL.11-12.7:  Analyze multiple interpretations of a story, drama, or poem (e.g., recorded or live production of a play or recorded novel or poetry), evaluating how each version interprets the source text. (Include at least one play by Shakespeare and one play by an American dramatist.)

  • Read and/or view different versions of the same text, recordings, film, and/or live performances
  • Compare and contrast the multiple versions
  • Evaluate the significant the differences between the multiple versions
  • Focus on significant changes to structure, order, plot, and/or character
  • Compare, contrast, and assess how various accounts of a subject are told in multiple mediums
  • Analyze how the details emphasized in each account of a subject told in different mediums affect the overall message
  • Use references to the different media to answer a question or to solve a problem

RL.11-12.10. By the end of grade 12, read and comprehend literature, including stories, dramas, and poems, at the high end of the grades 12–CCR text complexity band independently and proficiently

•        Closely read various forms of literature and literary nonfiction independently, proficiently, and, fluently

•        Demonstrate comprehension of various forms of literary text by showing a steadily growing ability to discern more and make fuller use of text

•        Generate connections among ideas and between texts

•        Consider and evaluate a wider range of textual evidence

SL.11-12.1. Initiate and participate effectively in a range of collaborative discussions (one on-one, in groups, and teacher-led) with peers on grade 11 topics, texts, and issues, building on others’ ideas and expressing their own clearly and persuasively.

SL11-12.1.A. Come to discussions prepared, having read and researched material under study; explicitly draw on that preparation by referring to evidence from texts and other research on the topic or issue to stimulate a thoughtful, well reasoned exchange of ideas.

SL.11-12.1.B. Collaborate with peers to promote civil, democratic discussions and decision making, set clear goals and assessments (e.g., student-developed rubrics), and establish individual roles as needed.

SL.11-12.1.C. Propel conversations by posing and responding to questions that probe reasoning and evidence; ensure a hearing for a full range of positions on a topic or issue; clarify, verify, or challenge ideas and conclusions; and promote divergent and creative perspectives.

SL.11.12.1.D. Respond thoughtfully to diverse perspectives; synthesize comments, claims, and evidence made on all sides of an issue; resolve contradictions when possible; and determine what additional information or research is required to deepen the investigation or complete the task.

  • Effectively participate in one-on-one, group, and teacher-led discussions
  • Prepare for discussions
  • Read and research materials beforehand
  • Articulate ideas clearly and persuasively in a discussion
  • Refer to evidence from texts and other research
  • Draw from and build on the ideas of others in a discussion
  • Clarify, verify, or challenge ideas and conclusions in a discussion or collaborative activity
  • Set guidelines for class discussions
  • Establish goals and roles for group members and adhere to assigned roles
  • Participate in polite and democratic discussions and decision-making activities.
  • Self monitor the work and assign specific tasks as needed
  • Respect and promote diverse perspectives in a discussion or collaborative activity
  • Encourage others to participate in a discussion or collaborative activity
  • Discuss and question the argument and evidence
  • Make certain that a variety of possible arguments have been heard
  • Respond thoughtfully
  • Summarize where others agree and disagree with ideas and perspectives
  • Continue to propel conversations by posing and responding to questions that connect to broader ideas as well as through reflection and evaluation of others’ comments
  • Incorporate new synthesized ideas into discussion

SL.11-12.3. Evaluate a speaker’s point of view, reasoning, and use of evidence and rhetoric, assessing the stance, premises, links among ideas, word choice, points of emphasis, and tone used.

  • Evaluate whether the reasoning a speaker uses is logical/legitimate and if the evidence is relevant
  • Correlate the speaker’s argument with the student’s own
  • Identify logical fallacies, judging if any of the speaker’s reasoning is misleading
  • Engage as an active listener and participant
  • Consider and assess the speaker, argument, organization, diction, and tone.
  • Use evidence from sources/text to prove fallibility in speaker’s reasoning

SL.11-12.5. Make strategic use of digital media (e.g., textual, graphical, audio, visual, and interactive elements) in presentations to enhance understanding of findings, reasoning, and evidence and to add interest.

•        Consider, determine and apply the most strategic use of digital media

•        Engage audience and enhance their understanding of findings, reasoning, and evidence by incorporating digital media such as textual, graphical, audio, visual, or interactive elements

SL.11-12.6. Adapt speech to a variety of contexts and tasks, demonstrating a command of formal English when indicated or appropriate.

•        Assess and adapt speech delivery to audience and purpose

•        Understand the difference between formal and informal presentations and demonstrate a command of formal English

L.11-12.1. Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English grammar and usage when writing or speaking.

L.11-12.1. A. Apply the understanding that usage is a matter of convention, can change over time, and is sometimes contested.

  • Utilize and incorporate appropriate grammar and usage in writing and speaking
  • Understand that language and appropriate usage changes
  • Utilize reference materials to help maintain appropriate grammar and usage dependent on the audience and situation

L.11-12.2. Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English capitalization, punctuation, and spelling when writing.

L.11-12.2.A. Observe hyphenation conventions.

L.11-12.2.B. Spell correctly.

  • Adhere to appropriate writing conventions including capitalization, punctuation including hyphens, and spelling

L.11-12.3. Apply knowledge of language to understand how language functions in different contexts, to make effective choices for meaning or style, and to comprehend more fully when reading or listening.

L.11-12.3.A. Vary syntax for effect; apply an understanding of syntax to the study of complex texts.

  • Apply knowledge of language to understand how language functions in different situations
  • Apply knowledge of language to make effective choices to shape the meaning and style
  • Apply knowledge of language to comprehend more fully when reading, listening, or speaking
  • Consult a style manual, which conforms to discipline-specific guidelines, while writing and editing a work
  • Write using a variety of task-appropriate syntaxes

L.11-12.4. Determine or clarify the meaning of unknown and multiple-meaning words and phrases based on grades 11–12 reading and content, choosing flexibly from a range of strategies.

L.11-12.4.A. Use context (e.g., the overall meaning of a sentence, paragraph, or text; a word’s position or function in a sentence) as a clue to the meaning of a word or phrase.

L.11-12.4.B. Identify and correctly use patterns of word changes that indicate different meanings or parts of speech (e.g., conceive, conception, conceivable).

L.11-12.4.C. Consult general and specialized reference materials (e.g., dictionaries, glossaries, thesauruses), both print and digital, to find the pronunciation of a word or determine or clarify its precise meaning, its part of speech, its etymology, or its standard usage.

L.11-12.4.D. Verify the preliminary determination of the meaning of a word or phrase (e.g., by checking the inferred meaning in context or in a dictionary).

  • Use context clues to derive word meaning
  • Use knowledge of Greek and Latin affixes and roots to understand variations of word forms and patterns
  • Consult reference materials to derive word meanings and correct pronunciation of words
  • Trace the etymology of words

L.11-12.5. Demonstrate understanding of figurative language, word relationships, and nuances in word meanings.

L.11-12.5.A. Interpret figures of speech (e.g., hyperbole, paradox) in context and analyze their role in the text.

L.11-12.5.B. Analyze nuances in the meaning of words with similar denotations.

  • Analyze and evaluate the use of figurative language within a text, particularly hyperbole and paradox
  • Analyze and validate slight differences in the meanings of words with similar definitions (ex: saunter and walk)

L.11-12.6:  Acquire and use accurately grade-appropriate general academic and domain-specific words and phrases; gather vocabulary knowledge when considering a word or phrase important to comprehension or expression.

  • Acquire general academic words from content-specific written texts
  • Independently integrate general academic words and domain-specific words into reading, writing, speaking, and listening at the college and career readiness level

21st Century Skills and Themes

Interdisciplinary Connections

Career Ready Practices

9.2 Career Awareness, Exploration, and Preparation  

History:  Students will discuss and investigate the historical context and importance of specific texts and writers.

  • CRP1. Act as a responsible and contributing citizen and employee.
  • CRP2. Apply appropriate academic and technical skills.
  • CRP4.Communicate clearly and effectively and with reason.
  • CRP6.Demonstrate creativity and innovation.
  • CRP9.Model integrity, ethical leadership and effective management.
  • CRP11. Use technology to enhance productivity.
  • CRP12.Work productively in teams while using cultural global competence.

By the end of 12th grade,

  • 9.2.12.C.2 Modify Personalized Student Learning Plans to support declared career goals.
  • 9.2.12.C.3 Identify transferable career skills and design alternate career plans.

Technology Standards - 8.1

9-12th Grade

A. Technology Operations and Concepts: Students demonstrate a sound understanding of technology concepts, systems and operations.

  • Understand and use technology systems.

8.1.12.A.1 Create a personal digital portfolio which reflects personal and academic interests, achievements, and career aspirations by using a variety of digital tools and resources.

  • Select and use applications effectively and productively.

8.1.12.A.2 Produce and edit a multi-page digital document for a commercial or professional audience and present it to peers and/or professionals in that related area for review.

D. Digital Citizenship: Students understand human, cultural, and societal issues related to technology and practice legal and ethical behavior.

  • Advocate and practice safe, legal, and responsible use of information and technology.

8.1.12.D.1 Demonstrate appropriate application of copyright, fair use and/or Creative Commons to an original work.

 

Modifications/Accommodations

IEPs

  • Projects are designed so teacher may add or omit criteria based on student needs
  • Shortened assignments
  • Extended time allotted for students
  • Modification of project dimensions or materials for students with special needs
  • Restructure lesson using UDL principles http://www.cast.org/our-work/about-udl.html#.VXmoXcD_UA
  • Structure lessons around questions that are authentic, relate to students’ interests, social/family background and knowledge of their communities
  • Provide students multiple choices for how they can represent their understandings (e.g multisensory techniques- auditory/visual aids, pictures, illustrations, graphs, charts, data tables, multimedia, modeling)
  • Provide multiple grouping opportunities for students to share their ideas and to encourage work among various backgrounds and cultures (e.g. multiple representation and multimodal experiences)
  • Mneumonic aids/devices
  • Additional time for test preparation
  • Review/testing matched to student pace
  • Test directions read/explained thoroughly
  • Oral, short-answer, modified tests
  • Emphasis on successes
  • Graphic organizers
  • Student choice of texts, projects, writing prompts, etc.
  • Collaborate with after-school programs or clubs to extend learning
  • Various online learning opportunities to reinforce skills
  • Use of leveled texts or www.rewordify.com

504s

  • Projects are designed so teacher may add or omit criteria based on student needs
  • Shortened assignments
  • Extended time is allotted for students
  • Structure lessons around questions that are authentic, relate to students’ interests, social/family background and knowledge of their communities
  • Collaborate with after-school programs or clubs to extend learning opportunities
  • Based on student needs various online learning opportunities to reinforce skills

ELLs

  • Shortened assignments
  • Extended time allotted for students
  • Visuals/video provided where possible
  • Electronic translators
  • Provide work for completion or understanding to ELL teacher to continue during ELL class

G/T

  • Projects are designed so teacher may extend criteria based on student needs
  • Structure learning around explaining or solving a social or community-based issue
  • Provide electronic games, lessons, etc. to encourage students to expand or move ahead
  • Collaborate with after-school programs or clubs to extend learning opportunities
  • Various online learning opportunities to excel


Unit Title

Unit 5 - Character Driven

Timeframe 

5 weeks

Unit Summary

In this unit, students will learn what makes the “why” in a story; a compelling character that drives the story forward.  Why do we care that this external plot event happened to this character? Why do we care how the character feels? Why do we care if the character does or does not reach their ultimate goal? The “why” or the “because” of the story makes it have the biggest impact possible. Students will learn to fuse plot and character together in order to create a story that feels seamless. Instead of thinking of these story elements as separate entities, they will link them together. To make a Real+Good Story, these elements must be inextricably linked or fused together so that there’s no possible way that they could exist separately with the same impact. Students will create a short story that will have the main character drive the plot instead of the other way around.

Learning Targets

Essential Questions

  • How can we create a story that focuses more on the identities of your characters—their flaws, their quirks, what makes them unique or universal?
  • How can we make the movement of a story come from the internal forces or the transformation of the characters, rather than the external forces influencing them?
  • How do authors develop characters that become alive to readers, and what role does viewpoint play in the development of characters?

Enduring Understandings

Students will understand:

  • The importance of character development/emphasis has when writing a narrative.

Know

By the end of this unit, students will know

  • The difference between a character driven and plot driven story.
  • Pacing
  • Characterization- physical and emotional
  • Character flaws
  • Which form of characterization (direct or indirect) achieves greater character development.
  • Both direct and indirect characterization elevate a text.

Do

By the end of this unit, students will be able to

  • Analyze how and why individuals, events, and ideas develop and interact over the course of a text.
  • Create a story that involves a memorable, compelling, yet believable character.

Evidence of Learning

Formative

  • Self-evaluation
  • Workshopping  
  • In-class discussions  

Summative/ Benchmark

  • Quizzes/Tests  
  • Journals/Reflections  
  • Student-developed work  

Alternative Assessments

  • Writing Portfolio (completed throughout the year)

Learning Activities

  • Read/view and analyze mentor texts
  • Mini-lessons
  • Workshopping
  • Conference with teacher
  • Peer review
  • Editing drafts
  • Published final copy

Materials / Equipment / Resources

Core Instructional

Materials and Texts

Fiction Writer’s Workshop

Equipment

Chromebooks, journals

Supplemental Resources

https://rachelgiesel.com/blog/character-driven-plot

https://mythcreants.com/blog/how-to-craft-a-character-driven-story/

http://io9.gizmodo.com/11-ways-to-write-a-character-focused-story-that-still-f-1753863350

http://www.well-storied.com/blog/character-vs-plot

https://writersblock.loft.org/2015/02/11/4028/ask_esther_writing_a_character-driven_story_and_developing_a_strong_narrative_arc

“Stranger Than Fiction” film.

Standards

Content Statement

Indicator

W.11-12.3. Write narratives to develop real or imagined experiences or events using effective technique, well-chosen details, and well-structured event sequences.

W.11-12.3.A. Engage and orient the reader by setting out a problem, situation, or observation and its significance, establishing one or multiple point(s) of view, and introducing a narrator and/or characters; create a smooth progression of experiences or events.

W.11-12.3.B. Use narrative techniques, such as dialogue, pacing, description, reflection, and multiple plot lines, to develop experiences, events, and/or characters.

W.11-12.3.C. Use a variety of techniques to sequence events so that they build on one another to create a coherent whole and build toward a particular tone and outcome (e.g., a sense of mystery, suspense, growth, or resolution).

W.11-12.3.D. Use precise words and phrases, telling details, and sensory language to convey a vivid picture of the experiences, events, setting, and/or characters.

W.11-12.3.E. Provide a conclusion that follows from and reflects on what is experienced, observed, or resolved over the course of the narrative.

  • Convey experiences, real or imagined
  • Use time as the deep structure of the narrative
  • Form or structure based on a progression of events that build and reflect upon each other
  • Use effective details using precise language
  • Form clear point(s) of view established through a narrator, provide characters, and present a situation
  • Distinguish and utilize narrative techniques including dialogue, description, and plot in order to develop experiences, events, and/or characters choosing words that create vivid pictures
  • Provide a conclusion to the events they set out at the beginning of their narrative
  • Include techniques for rhetorical effectiveness like the creation of tone, the plot of the narrative, and the overall coherence of the text

W.11-12.4. Produce clear and coherent writing in which the development, organization, and style are appropriate to task, purpose, and audience.

  • Determine writing task type and its appropriate organizational structure
  • Identify and understand the writing purpose
  • Determine and address the audience (intended reader) appropriately
  • Understand and utilize appropriate style
  • Understand how structure, style and rhetorical devices convey the purpose of writing

W.11-12.5. Develop and strengthen writing as needed by planning, revising, editing, rewriting, or trying a new approach, or consulting a style manual (such as MLA or APA Style),focusing on addressing what is most significant for a specific purpose and audience.

  • Create and utilize appropriate planning templates
  • Understand and practice revision techniques
  • Comprehend writing as a process
  • Plan, revise, edit, rewrite, or try a new approach, focusing on addressing what is most significant for a specific purpose or audience
  • Determine what details and/or information is most appropriate for a specific purpose
  • Understand writing as a process rather than a product

W.11-12.6. Use technology, including the Internet, to produce, share, and update individual or shared writing products in response to ongoing feedback, including new arguments or information.

  • Use technology proficiently for production, publication, and collaboration
  • Link and cite sources
  • Create shared writing products for feedback
  • Assess feedback from peers
  • Adapt writing according to feedback
  • Respond to ongoing feedback utilizing digital software

W.11-12.10. Write routinely over extended time frames (time for research, reflection, and revision) and shorter time frames (a single sitting or a day or two) for a range of tasks, purposes, and audiences.

  • Design a plan to appropriately match the task, purpose, and audience that incorporates research, reflection, and revision
  • Write routinely over shorter and extended time frames for a range of tasks, purposes, and audiences
  • Synthesize research gathered over shorter time frames into a long-term research project
  • Manage a long-term research project that incorporates research, reflection, and revision

RL.11.12.1. Cite strong and thorough textual evidence and make relevant connections to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text, including determining where the text leaves matters uncertain.

  • Make personal connections, connections to other texts, and/or global/historical connections when relevant
  • Analyze the text and identify explicit and implicit textual evidence
  • Determine the difference between strong and insufficient (unreliable) details
  • Cite evidence and use  direct quotes, paraphrase, objectively summarize (free of personal bias)
  • Draw inferences using implicit and explicit text evidence
  • Draw conclusions/make logical judgments about the information within the text on the basis of evidence and prior conclusions/prior experience
  • Support inference using several examples from the text
  • Evaluate the relationship between explicit and implicit details and how they contribute to the meaning of the text
  • Identify the moments where the author is inconclusive  or uncertain and allows the reader to draw conclusions based on textual evidence

RL.11-12.2. Determine two or more themes or central ideas of a text and analyze their development over the course of the text, including how they interact and build on one another to produce a complex account, and provide an objective summary of the text.

  • Determine two or more themes or central ideas in a text
  • Recognize supporting details for themes/central ideas
  • Analyze themes/central ideas as it develops over the course of the text
  • Make inferences through the use of details, word choice, and literary elements regarding the thematic development
  • Use the text to draw conclusions
  • Examine how the interaction of themes/central ideas create the overall meaning of the text ( and provides depth and dimension)
  • Construct an objective summary of the text
  • Examine how the interaction of themes creates the overall meaning of the text ( and provides depth and dimension and complexity)

RL.11-12.3. Analyze the impact of the author’s choices regarding how to develop and relate elements of a story or drama (e.g., where a story is set, how the action is ordered, how the characters are introduced and developed).

  • Identify and analyze the choices made by the author including the choice of setting, plot organization and development, characterization and character interaction
  • Explain how the order in which each is presented in the text impacts the overall text
  • Analyze those choices as they pertain to the overall story

RL.11-12.5:  Analyze how an author’s choices concerning how to structure specific parts of a text (e.g., the choice of where to begin or end a story, the choice to provide a comedic or tragic resolution) contribute to its overall structure and meaning as well as its aesthetic impact.

  • Evaluate the structure of the text (ex. en media res, flashbacks, tragic elements)
  • Analyze how an author has chosen to structure a text and order events within it
  • Conclude why the author chose that structure and how it enhances the work as a whole

RL.11-12.7:  Analyze multiple interpretations of a story, drama, or poem (e.g., recorded or live production of a play or recorded novel or poetry), evaluating how each version interprets the source text. (Include at least one play by Shakespeare and one play by an American dramatist.)

  • Read and/or view different versions of the same text, recordings, film, and/or live performances
  • Compare and contrast the multiple versions
  • Evaluate the significant the differences between the multiple versions
  • Focus on significant changes to structure, order, plot, and/or character
  • Compare, contrast, and assess how various accounts of a subject are told in multiple mediums
  • Analyze how the details emphasized in each account of a subject told in different mediums affect the overall message
  • Use references to the different media to answer a question or to solve a problem

RL.11-12.10. By the end of grade 12, read and comprehend literature, including stories, dramas, and poems, at the high end of the grades 12–CCR text complexity band independently and proficiently

•        Closely read various forms of literature and literary nonfiction independently, proficiently, and, fluently

•        Demonstrate comprehension of various forms of literary text by showing a steadily growing ability to discern more and make fuller use of text

•        Generate connections among ideas and between texts

•        Consider and evaluate a wider range of textual evidence

SL.11-12.1. Initiate and participate effectively in a range of collaborative discussions (one on-one, in groups, and teacher-led) with peers on grade 11 topics, texts, and issues, building on others’ ideas and expressing their own clearly and persuasively.

SL11-12.1.A. Come to discussions prepared, having read and researched material under study; explicitly draw on that preparation by referring to evidence from texts and other research on the topic or issue to stimulate a thoughtful, well reasoned exchange of ideas.

SL.11-12.1.B. Collaborate with peers to promote civil, democratic discussions and decision making, set clear goals and assessments (e.g., student-developed rubrics), and establish individual roles as needed.

SL.11-12.1.C. Propel conversations by posing and responding to questions that probe reasoning and evidence; ensure a hearing for a full range of positions on a topic or issue; clarify, verify, or challenge ideas and conclusions; and promote divergent and creative perspectives.

SL.11.12.1.D. Respond thoughtfully to diverse perspectives; synthesize comments, claims, and evidence made on all sides of an issue; resolve contradictions when possible; and determine what additional information or research is required to deepen the investigation or complete the task.

  • Effectively participate in one-on-one, group, and teacher-led discussions
  • Prepare for discussions
  • Read and research materials beforehand
  • Articulate ideas clearly and persuasively in a discussion
  • Refer to evidence from texts and other research
  • Draw from and build on the ideas of others in a discussion
  • Clarify, verify, or challenge ideas and conclusions in a discussion or collaborative activity
  • Set guidelines for class discussions
  • Establish goals and roles for group members and adhere to assigned roles
  • Participate in polite and democratic discussions and decision-making activities.
  • Self monitor the work and assign specific tasks as needed
  • Respect and promote diverse perspectives in a discussion or collaborative activity
  • Encourage others to participate in a discussion or collaborative activity
  • Discuss and question the argument and evidence
  • Make certain that a variety of possible arguments have been heard
  • Respond thoughtfully
  • Summarize where others agree and disagree with ideas and perspectives
  • Continue to propel conversations by posing and responding to questions that connect to broader ideas as well as through reflection and evaluation of others’ comments
  • Incorporate new synthesized ideas into discussion

SL.11-12.3. Evaluate a speaker’s point of view, reasoning, and use of evidence and rhetoric, assessing the stance, premises, links among ideas, word choice, points of emphasis, and tone used.

  • Evaluate whether the reasoning a speaker uses is logical/legitimate and if the evidence is relevant
  • Correlate the speaker’s argument with the student’s own
  • Identify logical fallacies, judging if any of the speaker’s reasoning is misleading
  • Engage as an active listener and participant
  • Consider and assess the speaker, argument, organization, diction, and tone.
  • Use evidence from sources/text to prove fallibility in speaker’s reasoning

SL.11-12.5. Make strategic use of digital media (e.g., textual, graphical, audio, visual, and interactive elements) in presentations to enhance understanding of findings, reasoning, and evidence and to add interest.

•        Consider, determine and apply the most strategic use of digital media

•        Engage audience and enhance their understanding of findings, reasoning, and evidence by incorporating digital media such as textual, graphical, audio, visual, or interactive elements

SL.11-12.6. Adapt speech to a variety of contexts and tasks, demonstrating a command of formal English when indicated or appropriate.

•        Assess and adapt speech delivery to audience and purpose

•        Understand the difference between formal and informal presentations and demonstrate a command of formal English

L.11-12.1. Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English grammar and usage when writing or speaking.

L.11-12.1. A. Apply the understanding that usage is a matter of convention, can change over time, and is sometimes contested.

  • Utilize and incorporate appropriate grammar and usage in writing and speaking
  • Understand that language and appropriate usage changes
  • Utilize reference materials to help maintain appropriate grammar and usage dependent on the audience and situation

L.11-12.2. Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English capitalization, punctuation, and spelling when writing.

L.11-12.2.A. Observe hyphenation conventions.

L.11-12.2.B. Spell correctly.

  • Adhere to appropriate writing conventions including capitalization, punctuation including hyphens, and spelling

L.11-12.3. Apply knowledge of language to understand how language functions in different contexts, to make effective choices for meaning or style, and to comprehend more fully when reading or listening.

L.11-12.3.A. Vary syntax for effect; apply an understanding of syntax to the study of complex texts.

  • Apply knowledge of language to understand how language functions in different situations
  • Apply knowledge of language to make effective choices to shape the meaning and style
  • Apply knowledge of language to comprehend more fully when reading, listening, or speaking
  • Consult a style manual, which conforms to discipline-specific guidelines, while writing and editing a work
  • Write using a variety of task-appropriate syntaxes

L.11-12.4. Determine or clarify the meaning of unknown and multiple-meaning words and phrases based on grades 11–12 reading and content, choosing flexibly from a range of strategies.

L.11-12.4.A. Use context (e.g., the overall meaning of a sentence, paragraph, or text; a word’s position or function in a sentence) as a clue to the meaning of a word or phrase.

L.11-12.4.B. Identify and correctly use patterns of word changes that indicate different meanings or parts of speech (e.g., conceive, conception, conceivable).

L.11-12.4.C. Consult general and specialized reference materials (e.g., dictionaries, glossaries, thesauruses), both print and digital, to find the pronunciation of a word or determine or clarify its precise meaning, its part of speech, its etymology, or its standard usage.

L.11-12.4.D. Verify the preliminary determination of the meaning of a word or phrase (e.g., by checking the inferred meaning in context or in a dictionary).

  • Use context clues to derive word meaning
  • Use knowledge of Greek and Latin affixes and roots to understand variations of word forms and patterns
  • Consult reference materials to derive word meanings and correct pronunciation of words
  • Trace the etymology of words

L.11-12.5. Demonstrate understanding of figurative language, word relationships, and nuances in word meanings.

L.11-12.5.A. Interpret figures of speech (e.g., hyperbole, paradox) in context and analyze their role in the text.

L.11-12.5.B. Analyze nuances in the meaning of words with similar denotations.

  • Analyze and evaluate the use of figurative language within a text, particularly hyperbole and paradox
  • Analyze and validate slight differences in the meanings of words with similar definitions (ex: saunter and walk)

L.11-12.6:  Acquire and use accurately grade-appropriate general academic and domain-specific words and phrases; gather vocabulary knowledge when considering a word or phrase important to comprehension or expression.

  • Acquire general academic words from content-specific written texts
  • Independently integrate general academic words and domain-specific words into reading, writing, speaking, and listening at the college and career readiness level

21st Century Skills and Themes

Interdisciplinary Connections

Career Ready Practices

9.2 Career Awareness, Exploration, and Preparation  

History:  Students will discuss and investigate the historical context and importance of specific texts and writers.

Psychology:  Students will investigate character motivations.

  • CRP1. Act as a responsible and contributing citizen and employee.
  • CRP2. Apply appropriate academic and technical skills.
  • CRP4.Communicate clearly and effectively and with reason.
  • CRP6.Demonstrate creativity and innovation.
  • CRP9.Model integrity, ethical leadership and effective management.
  • CRP11. Use technology to enhance productivity.
  • CRP12.Work productively in teams while using cultural global competence.

By the end of 12th grade,

  • 9.2.12.C.2 Modify Personalized Student Learning Plans to support declared career goals.
  • 9.2.12.C.3 Identify transferable career skills and design alternate career plans.

Technology Standards - 8.1

9-12th Grade

A. Technology Operations and Concepts: Students demonstrate a sound understanding of technology concepts, systems and operations.

  • Understand and use technology systems.

8.1.12.A.1 Create a personal digital portfolio which reflects personal and academic interests, achievements, and career aspirations by using a variety of digital tools and resources.

  • Select and use applications effectively and productively.

8.1.12.A.2 Produce and edit a multi-page digital document for a commercial or professional audience and present it to peers and/or professionals in that related area for review.

D. Digital Citizenship: Students understand human, cultural, and societal issues related to technology and practice legal and ethical behavior.

  • Advocate and practice safe, legal, and responsible use of information and technology.

8.1.12.D.1 Demonstrate appropriate application of copyright, fair use and/or Creative Commons to an original work.

 

Modifications/Accommodations

IEPs

  • Projects are designed so teacher may add or omit criteria based on student needs
  • Shortened assignments
  • Extended time allotted for students
  • Modification of project dimensions or materials for students with special needs
  • Restructure lesson using UDL principles http://www.cast.org/our-work/about-udl.html#.VXmoXcD_UA
  • Structure lessons around questions that are authentic, relate to students’ interests, social/family background and knowledge of their communities
  • Provide students multiple choices for how they can represent their understandings (e.g multisensory techniques- auditory/visual aids, pictures, illustrations, graphs, charts, data tables, multimedia, modeling)
  • Provide multiple grouping opportunities for students to share their ideas and to encourage work among various backgrounds and cultures (e.g. multiple representation and multimodal experiences)
  • Mneumonic aids/devices
  • Additional time for test preparation
  • Review/testing matched to student pace
  • Test directions read/explained thoroughly
  • Oral, short-answer, modified tests
  • Emphasis on successes
  • Graphic organizers
  • Student choice of texts, projects, writing prompts, etc.
  • Collaborate with after-school programs or clubs to extend learning
  • Various online learning opportunities to reinforce skills
  • Use of leveled texts or www.rewordify.com

504s

  • Projects are designed so teacher may add or omit criteria based on student needs
  • Shortened assignments
  • Extended time is allotted for students
  • Structure lessons around questions that are authentic, relate to students’ interests, social/family background and knowledge of their communities
  • Collaborate with after-school programs or clubs to extend learning opportunities
  • Based on student needs various online learning opportunities to reinforce skills

ELLs

  • Shortened assignments
  • Extended time allotted for students
  • Visuals/video provided where possible
  • Electronic translators
  • Provide work for completion or understanding to ELL teacher to continue during ELL class

G/T

  • Projects are designed so teacher may extend criteria based on student needs
  • Structure learning around explaining or solving a social or community-based issue
  • Provide electronic games, lessons, etc. to encourage students to expand or move ahead
  • Collaborate with after-school programs or clubs to extend learning opportunities
  • Various online learning opportunities to excel


Unit Title

Unit 6 - Dramatic Writing: The Screenplay

Timeframe 

5 weeks

Unit Summary

Screenwriting provides writers the opportunity to develop short scripts while increasing use/knowledge of individual voice and screenwriting technical skills. Students will focus on dialogue writing, tone, creating character, mood, and conflict, and creating a story arc that encompasses elements of a plotline. Screenwriting will also help students to determine essential and non-essential elements of a story. It is recommended that students read short model scripts to familiarize them with stage direction. It is also recommended that students view movies based upon short scripts. Students will integrate unity, character, and plot in scripting dramatic presentations. This unit will include a workshop of student pitches, treatments, screenplays, and synopses.  Students will be required to write a short 2-3 scene script in cooperative groups.

Learning Targets

Essential Questions

  • How do effective writers hook and hold their readers when writing a screenplay?
  • How can short story writing be transferred successfully into a script?
  • What is similar and different in script writing and narrative writing in conveying character, setting, theme, mood, and plot development?
  • How does dialogue function differently in screenwriting and narrative writing?

Enduring Understandings

Students will understand:

  • Film reflects the morals and value of its society.
  • Film is an influential part of our culture.
  • Film uses the techniques and devices of literature.
  • Effective dialogue is a tool needed for characterization and plot development.  
  • Effective stage direction in scriptwriting helps augment character, plot, & visual presentation.
  • How to use fundamental writing elements to: establish a strong, compelling mood,create credible characters and dialogue, a tight structure and eliminate non-essentials, and a theme relative to the plot.

Know

By the end of this unit, students will know

  • screenwriting terminology, such as "high concept," "dialogue" and "parenthetical."
  • how to evaluate a story for its storytelling potential.
  • how to analyze camera angles/shots.
  • the importance of dialogue.
  • how to develop a backstory that includes character, plot, conflict etc…
  • how to interrelate all environments, situations, and characters when creating dramatic presentations.

Do

By the end of this unit, students will be able to

  • Create a movie’s "high concept."
  • Correctly format a screenplay.
  • Include a conflict, compelling characters, setting, etc in a screenplay.
  • Create appropriate character dialogue and physical attributes within a dramatic presentation. PLOT Create linear and nonlinear plot structures
  • Effectively use screenwriting techniques to guide dialogue and action.

Evidence of Learning

Formative

  • Self-evaluation
  • Workshopping  
  • In-class discussions  

Summative/ Benchmark

  • Quizzes/Tests  
  • Journals/Reflections  
  • Student-developed work  

Alternative Assessments

  • Writing Portfolio (completed throughout the year)

Learning Activities

  • Compare/contrast narrative writing models with script writing models.
  • Write one scene in both narrative and script format.
  • View a segment of a movie, and write a script based upon it. Include dialogue, stage direction, sound and music cues, etc…
  • Brainstorm and create at least 4 scenes of an original screenplay with cooperative group.
  • Participate in “MOSCARS” awards day where student vote on different categories pertaining to script writing.

Materials / Equipment / Resources

Core Instructional

Materials and Texts

“How to Write a Screenplay: Introduction to Screenwriting”:

http://thescriptlab.com/screenwriting

Various informational articles/videos

https://www.celtx.com/index.html

Powerpoint and slide mini lessons created by teacher

Equipment

Chromebooks, Screenplay Scripts

Supplemental Resources

                                  http://www.intergalacticmedicineshow.com/cgi-bin/mag.cgi?vol=mette_ivie_harrison&do=columns&article=046

http://johnaugust.com/library

http://www.scriptologist.com/Directory/Filmmaking/Screenplays/screenplays.html

http://www.wordplayer.com/

https://www.edutopia.org/randy-nelson-school-to-career-video

Youtube videos of cast reads, interviews with screenwriters…

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XZszextv6yE

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Uwtf_tpVras

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hAUW6cgBcko

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QOH-57idFOQ

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QdPufb1IBS4

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lPRvmv8G2Ak

Standards

Content Statement

Indicator

W.11-12.3. Write narratives to develop real or imagined experiences or events using effective technique, well-chosen details, and well-structured event sequences.

W.11-12.3.A. Engage and orient the reader by setting out a problem, situation, or observation and its significance, establishing one or multiple point(s) of view, and introducing a narrator and/or characters; create a smooth progression of experiences or events.

W.11-12.3.B. Use narrative techniques, such as dialogue, pacing, description, reflection, and multiple plot lines, to develop experiences, events, and/or characters.

W.11-12.3.C. Use a variety of techniques to sequence events so that they build on one another to create a coherent whole and build toward a particular tone and outcome (e.g., a sense of mystery, suspense, growth, or resolution).

W.11-12.3.D. Use precise words and phrases, telling details, and sensory language to convey a vivid picture of the experiences, events, setting, and/or characters.

W.11-12.3.E. Provide a conclusion that follows from and reflects on what is experienced, observed, or resolved over the course of the narrative.

  • Convey experiences, real or imagined
  • Use time as the deep structure of the narrative
  • Form or structure based on a progression of events that build and reflect upon each other
  • Use effective details using precise language
  • Form clear point(s) of view established through a narrator, provide characters, and present a situation
  • Distinguish and utilize narrative techniques including dialogue, description, and plot in order to develop experiences, events, and/or characters choosing words that create vivid pictures
  • Provide a conclusion to the events they set out at the beginning of their narrative
  • Include techniques for rhetorical effectiveness like the creation of tone, the plot of the narrative, and the overall coherence of the text

W.11-12.4. Produce clear and coherent writing in which the development, organization, and style are appropriate to task, purpose, and audience.

  • Determine writing task type and its appropriate organizational structure
  • Identify and understand the writing purpose
  • Determine and address the audience (intended reader) appropriately
  • Understand and utilize appropriate style
  • Understand how structure, style and rhetorical devices convey the purpose of writing

W.11-12.5. Develop and strengthen writing as needed by planning, revising, editing, rewriting, or trying a new approach, or consulting a style manual (such as MLA or APA Style),focusing on addressing what is most significant for a specific purpose and audience.

  • Create and utilize appropriate planning templates
  • Understand and practice revision techniques
  • Comprehend writing as a process
  • Plan, revise, edit, rewrite, or try a new approach, focusing on addressing what is most significant for a specific purpose or audience
  • Determine what details and/or information is most appropriate for a specific purpose
  • Understand writing as a process rather than a product

W.11-12.6. Use technology, including the Internet, to produce, share, and update individual or shared writing products in response to ongoing feedback, including new arguments or information.

  • Use technology proficiently for production, publication, and collaboration
  • Link and cite sources
  • Create shared writing products for feedback
  • Assess feedback from peers
  • Adapt writing according to feedback
  • Respond to ongoing feedback utilizing digital software

W.11-12.10. Write routinely over extended time frames (time for research, reflection, and revision) and shorter time frames (a single sitting or a day or two) for a range of tasks, purposes, and audiences.

  • Design a plan to appropriately match the task, purpose, and audience that incorporates research, reflection, and revision
  • Write routinely over shorter and extended time frames for a range of tasks, purposes, and audiences
  • Synthesize research gathered over shorter time frames into a long-term research project
  • Manage a long-term research project that incorporates research, reflection, and revision

RL.11.12.1. Cite strong and thorough textual evidence and make relevant connections to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text, including determining where the text leaves matters uncertain.

  • Make personal connections, connections to other texts, and/or global/historical connections when relevant
  • Analyze the text and identify explicit and implicit textual evidence
  • Determine the difference between strong and insufficient (unreliable) details
  • Cite evidence and use  direct quotes, paraphrase, objectively summarize (free of personal bias)
  • Draw inferences using implicit and explicit text evidence
  • Draw conclusions/make logical judgments about the information within the text on the basis of evidence and prior conclusions/prior experience
  • Support inference using several examples from the text
  • Evaluate the relationship between explicit and implicit details and how they contribute to the meaning of the text
  • Identify the moments where the author is inconclusive  or uncertain and allows the reader to draw conclusions based on textual evidence

RL.11-12.2. Determine two or more themes or central ideas of a text and analyze their development over the course of the text, including how they interact and build on one another to produce a complex account, and provide an objective summary of the text.

  • Determine two or more themes or central ideas in a text
  • Recognize supporting details for themes/central ideas
  • Analyze themes/central ideas as it develops over the course of the text
  • Make inferences through the use of details, word choice, and literary elements regarding the thematic development
  • Use the text to draw conclusions
  • Examine how the interaction of themes/central ideas create the overall meaning of the text ( and provides depth and dimension)
  • Construct an objective summary of the text
  • Examine how the interaction of themes creates the overall meaning of the text ( and provides depth and dimension and complexity)

RL.11-12.3. Analyze the impact of the author’s choices regarding how to develop and relate elements of a story or drama (e.g., where a story is set, how the action is ordered, how the characters are introduced and developed).

  • Identify and analyze the choices made by the author including the choice of setting, plot organization and development, characterization and character interaction
  • Explain how the order in which each is presented in the text impacts the overall text
  • Analyze those choices as they pertain to the overall story

RL.11-12.5:  Analyze how an author’s choices concerning how to structure specific parts of a text (e.g., the choice of where to begin or end a story, the choice to provide a comedic or tragic resolution) contribute to its overall structure and meaning as well as its aesthetic impact.

  • Evaluate the structure of the text (ex. en media res, flashbacks, tragic elements)
  • Analyze how an author has chosen to structure a text and order events within it
  • Conclude why the author chose that structure and how it enhances the work as a whole

RL.11-12.7:  Analyze multiple interpretations of a story, drama, or poem (e.g., recorded or live production of a play or recorded novel or poetry), evaluating how each version interprets the source text. (Include at least one play by Shakespeare and one play by an American dramatist.)

  • Read and/or view different versions of the same text, recordings, film, and/or live performances
  • Compare and contrast the multiple versions
  • Evaluate the significant the differences between the multiple versions
  • Focus on significant changes to structure, order, plot, and/or character
  • Compare, contrast, and assess how various accounts of a subject are told in multiple mediums
  • Analyze how the details emphasized in each account of a subject told in different mediums affect the overall message
  • Use references to the different media to answer a question or to solve a problem

RL.11-12.10. By the end of grade 12, read and comprehend literature, including stories, dramas, and poems, at the high end of the grades 12–CCR text complexity band independently and proficiently

•        Closely read various forms of literature and literary nonfiction independently, proficiently, and, fluently

•        Demonstrate comprehension of various forms of literary text by showing a steadily growing ability to discern more and make fuller use of text

•        Generate connections among ideas and between texts

•        Consider and evaluate a wider range of textual evidence

SL.11-12.1. Initiate and participate effectively in a range of collaborative discussions (one on-one, in groups, and teacher-led) with peers on grade 11 topics, texts, and issues, building on others’ ideas and expressing their own clearly and persuasively.

SL11-12.1.A. Come to discussions prepared, having read and researched material under study; explicitly draw on that preparation by referring to evidence from texts and other research on the topic or issue to stimulate a thoughtful, well reasoned exchange of ideas.

SL.11-12.1.B. Collaborate with peers to promote civil, democratic discussions and decision making, set clear goals and assessments (e.g., student-developed rubrics), and establish individual roles as needed.

SL.11-12.1.C. Propel conversations by posing and responding to questions that probe reasoning and evidence; ensure a hearing for a full range of positions on a topic or issue; clarify, verify, or challenge ideas and conclusions; and promote divergent and creative perspectives.

SL.11.12.1.D. Respond thoughtfully to diverse perspectives; synthesize comments, claims, and evidence made on all sides of an issue; resolve contradictions when possible; and determine what additional information or research is required to deepen the investigation or complete the task.

  • Effectively participate in one-on-one, group, and teacher-led discussions
  • Prepare for discussions
  • Read and research materials beforehand
  • Articulate ideas clearly and persuasively in a discussion
  • Refer to evidence from texts and other research
  • Draw from and build on the ideas of others in a discussion
  • Clarify, verify, or challenge ideas and conclusions in a discussion or collaborative activity
  • Set guidelines for class discussions
  • Establish goals and roles for group members and adhere to assigned roles
  • Participate in polite and democratic discussions and decision-making activities.
  • Self monitor the work and assign specific tasks as needed
  • Respect and promote diverse perspectives in a discussion or collaborative activity
  • Encourage others to participate in a discussion or collaborative activity
  • Discuss and question the argument and evidence
  • Make certain that a variety of possible arguments have been heard
  • Respond thoughtfully
  • Summarize where others agree and disagree with ideas and perspectives
  • Continue to propel conversations by posing and responding to questions that connect to broader ideas as well as through reflection and evaluation of others’ comments
  • Incorporate new synthesized ideas into discussion

SL.11-12.3. Evaluate a speaker’s point of view, reasoning, and use of evidence and rhetoric, assessing the stance, premises, links among ideas, word choice, points of emphasis, and tone used.

  • Evaluate whether the reasoning a speaker uses is logical/legitimate and if the evidence is relevant
  • Correlate the speaker’s argument with the student’s own
  • Identify logical fallacies, judging if any of the speaker’s reasoning is misleading
  • Engage as an active listener and participant
  • Consider and assess the speaker, argument, organization, diction, and tone.
  • Use evidence from sources/text to prove fallibility in speaker’s reasoning

SL.11-12.5. Make strategic use of digital media (e.g., textual, graphical, audio, visual, and interactive elements) in presentations to enhance understanding of findings, reasoning, and evidence and to add interest.

•        Consider, determine and apply the most strategic use of digital media

•        Engage audience and enhance their understanding of findings, reasoning, and evidence by incorporating digital media such as textual, graphical, audio, visual, or interactive elements

SL.11-12.6. Adapt speech to a variety of contexts and tasks, demonstrating a command of formal English when indicated or appropriate.

•        Assess and adapt speech delivery to audience and purpose

•        Understand the difference between formal and informal presentations and demonstrate a command of formal English

L.11-12.1. Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English grammar and usage when writing or speaking.

L.11-12.1. A. Apply the understanding that usage is a matter of convention, can change over time, and is sometimes contested.

  • Utilize and incorporate appropriate grammar and usage in writing and speaking
  • Understand that language and appropriate usage changes
  • Utilize reference materials to help maintain appropriate grammar and usage dependent on the audience and situation

L.11-12.2. Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English capitalization, punctuation, and spelling when writing.

L.11-12.2.A. Observe hyphenation conventions.

L.11-12.2.B. Spell correctly.

  • Adhere to appropriate writing conventions including capitalization, punctuation including hyphens, and spelling

L.11-12.3. Apply knowledge of language to understand how language functions in different contexts, to make effective choices for meaning or style, and to comprehend more fully when reading or listening.

L.11-12.3.A. Vary syntax for effect; apply an understanding of syntax to the study of complex texts.

  • Apply knowledge of language to understand how language functions in different situations
  • Apply knowledge of language to make effective choices to shape the meaning and style
  • Apply knowledge of language to comprehend more fully when reading, listening, or speaking
  • Consult a style manual, which conforms to discipline-specific guidelines, while writing and editing a work
  • Write using a variety of task-appropriate syntaxes

L.11-12.4. Determine or clarify the meaning of unknown and multiple-meaning words and phrases based on grades 11–12 reading and content, choosing flexibly from a range of strategies.

L.11-12.4.A. Use context (e.g., the overall meaning of a sentence, paragraph, or text; a word’s position or function in a sentence) as a clue to the meaning of a word or phrase.

L.11-12.4.B. Identify and correctly use patterns of word changes that indicate different meanings or parts of speech (e.g., conceive, conception, conceivable).

L.11-12.4.C. Consult general and specialized reference materials (e.g., dictionaries, glossaries, thesauruses), both print and digital, to find the pronunciation of a word or determine or clarify its precise meaning, its part of speech, its etymology, or its standard usage.

L.11-12.4.D. Verify the preliminary determination of the meaning of a word or phrase (e.g., by checking the inferred meaning in context or in a dictionary).

  • Use context clues to derive word meaning
  • Use knowledge of Greek and Latin affixes and roots to understand variations of word forms and patterns
  • Consult reference materials to derive word meanings and correct pronunciation of words
  • Trace the etymology of words

L.11-12.5. Demonstrate understanding of figurative language, word relationships, and nuances in word meanings.

L.11-12.5.A. Interpret figures of speech (e.g., hyperbole, paradox) in context and analyze their role in the text.

L.11-12.5.B. Analyze nuances in the meaning of words with similar denotations.

  • Analyze and evaluate the use of figurative language within a text, particularly hyperbole and paradox
  • Analyze and validate slight differences in the meanings of words with similar definitions (ex: saunter and walk)

L.11-12.6:  Acquire and use accurately grade-appropriate general academic and domain-specific words and phrases; gather vocabulary knowledge when considering a word or phrase important to comprehension or expression.

  • Acquire general academic words from content-specific written texts
  • Independently integrate general academic words and domain-specific words into reading, writing, speaking, and listening at the college and career readiness level

21st Century Skills and Themes

Interdisciplinary Connections

Career Ready Practices

9.2 Career Awareness, Exploration, and Preparation  

History:  Students will discuss and investigate the historical context and importance of specific texts and writers.  

Film: Students will be able to analyze how a director creates suspense in film.

  • CRP1. Act as a responsible and contributing citizen and employee.
  • CRP2. Apply appropriate academic and technical skills.
  • CRP4.Communicate clearly and effectively and with reason.
  • CRP6.Demonstrate creativity and innovation.
  • CRP9.Model integrity, ethical leadership and effective management.
  • CRP11. Use technology to enhance productivity.
  • CRP12.Work productively in teams while using cultural global competence.

By the end of 12th grade,

  • 9.2.12.C.2 Modify Personalized Student Learning Plans to support declared career goals.
  • 9.2.12.C.3 Identify transferable career skills and design alternate career plans.

Technology Standards - 8.1

9-12th Grade

A. Technology Operations and Concepts: Students demonstrate a sound understanding of technology concepts, systems and operations.

  • Understand and use technology systems.

8.1.12.A.1 Create a personal digital portfolio which reflects personal and academic interests, achievements, and career aspirations by using a variety of digital tools and resources.

  • Select and use applications effectively and productively.

8.1.12.A.2 Produce and edit a multi-page digital document for a commercial or professional audience and present it to peers and/or professionals in that related area for review.

D. Digital Citizenship: Students understand human, cultural, and societal issues related to technology and practice legal and ethical behavior.

  • Advocate and practice safe, legal, and responsible use of information and technology.

8.1.12.D.1 Demonstrate appropriate application of copyright, fair use and/or Creative Commons to an original work.

 

Modifications/Accommodations

IEPs

  • Projects are designed so teacher may add or omit criteria based on student needs
  • Shortened assignments
  • Extended time allotted for students
  • Modification of project dimensions or materials for students with special needs
  • Restructure lesson using UDL principles http://www.cast.org/our-work/about-udl.html#.VXmoXcD_UA
  • Structure lessons around questions that are authentic, relate to students’ interests, social/family background and knowledge of their communities
  • Provide students multiple choices for how they can represent their understandings (e.g multisensory techniques- auditory/visual aids, pictures, illustrations, graphs, charts, data tables, multimedia, modeling)
  • Provide multiple grouping opportunities for students to share their ideas and to encourage work among various backgrounds and cultures (e.g. multiple representation and multimodal experiences)
  • Mneumonic aids/devices
  • Additional time for test preparation
  • Review/testing matched to student pace
  • Test directions read/explained thoroughly
  • Oral, short-answer, modified tests
  • Emphasis on successes
  • Graphic organizers
  • Student choice of texts, projects, writing prompts, etc.
  • Collaborate with after-school programs or clubs to extend learning
  • Various online learning opportunities to reinforce skills
  • Use of leveled texts or www.rewordify.com

504s

  • Projects are designed so teacher may add or omit criteria based on student needs
  • Shortened assignments
  • Extended time is allotted for students
  • Structure lessons around questions that are authentic, relate to students’ interests, social/family background and knowledge of their communities
  • Collaborate with after-school programs or clubs to extend learning opportunities
  • Based on student needs various online learning opportunities to reinforce skills

ELLs

  • Shortened assignments
  • Extended time allotted for students
  • Visuals/video provided where possible
  • Electronic translators
  • Provide work for completion or understanding to ELL teacher to continue during ELL class

G/T

  • Projects are designed so teacher may extend criteria based on student needs
  • Structure learning around explaining or solving a social or community-based issue
  • Provide electronic games, lessons, etc. to encourage students to expand or move ahead
  • Collaborate with after-school programs or clubs to extend learning opportunities
  • Various online learning opportunities to excel


Unit Title

Unit 7 - The Children’s Story

Timeframe 

4 weeks

Unit Summary

This unit will allow students to explore the genre of children’s storytelling and identify elements critical to making a story interesting, relatable, and understandable to a younger audience. In this lesson students plan, write, illustrate, and publish their own children's picture books. First, students will review illustrated children's books to gain an understanding of the creative process and the elements that help make a children's book successful. Next, students will use graphic organizers to brainstorm ideas for the character, setting, and conflict of their own stories. Students then pitch their stories to their peers and use peer feedback as they develop their stories. Students create storyboards to plan the relationship between the illustrations and text. Finally, students will use a variety of methods to bind their books in an attractive manner and present their books to the class during “Cafe Day”. Students also have the option of creating their children’s story on one of the many websites provided by the teacher or thought of by the student.

Learning Targets

Essential Questions

  • How can you use modern society's values to create a children's story that both entertains and teaches a lesson?
  • Why is word choice especially important in children’s books?

Enduring Understandings

Students will understand:

  • Children’s books reflect the values of society

Know

By the end of this unit, students will know

  • The skills needed to develop character, setting, plot, conflicts and resolution, chronology and cause and effect relationships while also learning to critique modern society and its values.
  • How to apply knowledge of theme in literary works.
  • Resolving conflicts within storytelling is applicable to real-life conflict resolution.
  • A writer’s point of view affects storytelling.
  • Choosing the appropriate language can engage the reader.
  • Strong children’s stories have:

                -Well-developed themes

                -Engaging plots

                -Suitable structure

                -Memorable characters o

                -Well-chosen settings

                -Attractive style

  • Illustration and color add interest for younger audiences and make a story easier to follow.  
  • How to critically view a variety of popular children’s stories/authors.  
  • How to identify popular themes/characters/elements in children’s writing.  

Do

By the end of this unit, students will be able to

  • Analyze children’s stories
  • Create a sample piece of writing for children

Evidence of Learning

Formative

  • Class discussions
  • Workshops
  • Exercises

Summative/ Benchmark

  • Original Children’s Story created on Storybird, StoryJumper, Inkle, Tikatok, Little Bird Tales, mixbook, etc...

Alternative Assessments

  • Students will have choice in subject of writing during exercises and major assessments.
  • Writing Portfolio (completed throughout the year)

Learning Activities

  • Have students read aloud to others their favorite childhood story/book and analyze why they loved it.
  • Brainstorm and complete graphic organizers in preparation of creation of original children’s story.
  • Create a children’s book and incorporate age appropriate language, word choice, theme, rhyme, rhythm and illustration.
  • Research: (If board approved) Take a field trip to a local elementary school to read stories and talk to children about what type of books they like and why.
  • Mini lesson on theme and the importance of it in a children's story/fairytale.
  • Mini lesson on word choice and the importance of it in a children's story/fairytale.

Materials / Equipment / Resources

Core Instructional

Materials and Texts

“Children’s Writing Resources, Strategies and Tools”: http://www.ebookcrossroads.com/childrens-writing.html

“On Writing Well” by William Zinsser

Equipment

Chromebooks, journals, children’s stories etc...

Supplemental Resources

http://www.readwritethink.org/classroom-resources/lesson-plans/children-picture-book-project-1022.html

“Caldecott Medal & Honor Books, 1938-Present”:

http://www.ala.org/alsc/awardsgrants/bookmedia/caldecottmedal/caldecotth onors/caldecottmedal  

“The 50 Best Books for Kids”:

http://www.timeout.com/new-york-kids/things-todo/the-50-best-books-for-kids?cmpid=ppcaw-Kids-Books

“Basic Writing Tips for Children’s Writers”: http://www.right-writing.com/childrenbasictips.html

 “Children’s Books Editing and Proofreading”: http://www.wordsru.com/childrensbook-editing.php  

 “Finding Your Voice as a Children’s Writer”: http://www.writingworld.com/children/voice.shtml

 

“Five Tips for Writing Children’s Literature”: http://www.writersdigest.com/writingarticles/by-writing-genre/young-adultchildrens/five_tips_for_writing_childrens_literature  

“Getting Started Writing Children’s Books”: http://www.writersdigest.com/qp7- migration-books/you-can-write-childrens-books-excerpt  

“How to Write and Publish Children’s Books”: http://www.bethanyroberts.com/ForWriters.htm

 “Understanding Children’s Writing Genres”: http://www.fictionfactor.com/children/kidsgenres.html  

“Writing for Children”: http://www.write101.com/chn.htm  

“Writing Tips for Children’s Writers”: http://www.bethanyroberts.com/writing_picture_books.htm

 

“Writing Tips on Writing for Children”: http://www.bethanyroberts.com/writing_for_children_tips.htm

 

“Writing Your Story: Tips on How to Write Children’s Stories”: http://www.aaronshep.com/kidwriter/Tips.html

Standards

Content Statement

Indicator

W.11-12.3. Write narratives to develop real or imagined experiences or events using effective technique, well-chosen details, and well-structured event sequences.

W.11-12.3.A. Engage and orient the reader by setting out a problem, situation, or observation and its significance, establishing one or multiple point(s) of view, and introducing a narrator and/or characters; create a smooth progression of experiences or events.

W.11-12.3.B. Use narrative techniques, such as dialogue, pacing, description, reflection, and multiple plot lines, to develop experiences, events, and/or characters.

W.11-12.3.C. Use a variety of techniques to sequence events so that they build on one another to create a coherent whole and build toward a particular tone and outcome (e.g., a sense of mystery, suspense, growth, or resolution).

W.11-12.3.D. Use precise words and phrases, telling details, and sensory language to convey a vivid picture of the experiences, events, setting, and/or characters.

W.11-12.3.E. Provide a conclusion that follows from and reflects on what is experienced, observed, or resolved over the course of the narrative.

  • Convey experiences, real or imagined
  • Use time as the deep structure of the narrative
  • Form or structure based on a progression of events that build and reflect upon each other
  • Use effective details using precise language
  • Form clear point(s) of view established through a narrator, provide characters, and present a situation
  • Distinguish and utilize narrative techniques including dialogue, description, and plot in order to develop experiences, events, and/or characters choosing words that create vivid pictures
  • Provide a conclusion to the events they set out at the beginning of their narrative
  • Include techniques for rhetorical effectiveness like the creation of tone, the plot of the narrative, and the overall coherence of the text

W.11-12.4. Produce clear and coherent writing in which the development, organization, and style are appropriate to task, purpose, and audience.

  • Determine writing task type and its appropriate organizational structure
  • Identify and understand the writing purpose
  • Determine and address the audience (intended reader) appropriately
  • Understand and utilize appropriate style
  • Understand how structure, style and rhetorical devices convey the purpose of writing

W.11-12.5. Develop and strengthen writing as needed by planning, revising, editing, rewriting, or trying a new approach, or consulting a style manual (such as MLA or APA Style),focusing on addressing what is most significant for a specific purpose and audience.

  • Create and utilize appropriate planning templates
  • Understand and practice revision techniques
  • Comprehend writing as a process
  • Plan, revise, edit, rewrite, or try a new approach, focusing on addressing what is most significant for a specific purpose or audience
  • Determine what details and/or information is most appropriate for a specific purpose
  • Understand writing as a process rather than a product

W.11-12.6. Use technology, including the Internet, to produce, share, and update individual or shared writing products in response to ongoing feedback, including new arguments or information.

  • Use technology proficiently for production, publication, and collaboration
  • Link and cite sources
  • Create shared writing products for feedback
  • Assess feedback from peers
  • Adapt writing according to feedback
  • Respond to ongoing feedback utilizing digital software

W.11-12.10. Write routinely over extended time frames (time for research, reflection, and revision) and shorter time frames (a single sitting or a day or two) for a range of tasks, purposes, and audiences.

  • Design a plan to appropriately match the task, purpose, and audience that incorporates research, reflection, and revision
  • Write routinely over shorter and extended time frames for a range of tasks, purposes, and audiences
  • Synthesize research gathered over shorter time frames into a long-term research project
  • Manage a long-term research project that incorporates research, reflection, and revision

RL.11.12.1. Cite strong and thorough textual evidence and make relevant connections to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text, including determining where the text leaves matters uncertain.

  • Make personal connections, connections to other texts, and/or global/historical connections when relevant
  • Analyze the text and identify explicit and implicit textual evidence
  • Determine the difference between strong and insufficient (unreliable) details
  • Cite evidence and use  direct quotes, paraphrase, objectively summarize (free of personal bias)
  • Draw inferences using implicit and explicit text evidence
  • Draw conclusions/make logical judgments about the information within the text on the basis of evidence and prior conclusions/prior experience
  • Support inference using several examples from the text
  • Evaluate the relationship between explicit and implicit details and how they contribute to the meaning of the text
  • Identify the moments where the author is inconclusive  or uncertain and allows the reader to draw conclusions based on textual evidence

RL.11-12.2. Determine two or more themes or central ideas of a text and analyze their development over the course of the text, including how they interact and build on one another to produce a complex account, and provide an objective summary of the text.

  • Determine two or more themes or central ideas in a text
  • Recognize supporting details for themes/central ideas
  • Analyze themes/central ideas as it develops over the course of the text
  • Make inferences through the use of details, word choice, and literary elements regarding the thematic development
  • Use the text to draw conclusions
  • Examine how the interaction of themes/central ideas create the overall meaning of the text ( and provides depth and dimension)
  • Construct an objective summary of the text
  • Examine how the interaction of themes creates the overall meaning of the text ( and provides depth and dimension and complexity)

RL.11-12.3. Analyze the impact of the author’s choices regarding how to develop and relate elements of a story or drama (e.g., where a story is set, how the action is ordered, how the characters are introduced and developed).

  • Identify and analyze the choices made by the author including the choice of setting, plot organization and development, characterization and character interaction
  • Explain how the order in which each is presented in the text impacts the overall text
  • Analyze those choices as they pertain to the overall story

RL.11-12.5:  Analyze how an author’s choices concerning how to structure specific parts of a text (e.g., the choice of where to begin or end a story, the choice to provide a comedic or tragic resolution) contribute to its overall structure and meaning as well as its aesthetic impact.

  • Evaluate the structure of the text (ex. en media res, flashbacks, tragic elements)
  • Analyze how an author has chosen to structure a text and order events within it
  • Conclude why the author chose that structure and how it enhances the work as a whole

RL.11-12.7:  Analyze multiple interpretations of a story, drama, or poem (e.g., recorded or live production of a play or recorded novel or poetry), evaluating how each version interprets the source text. (Include at least one play by Shakespeare and one play by an American dramatist.)

  • Read and/or view different versions of the same text, recordings, film, and/or live performances
  • Compare and contrast the multiple versions
  • Evaluate the significant the differences between the multiple versions
  • Focus on significant changes to structure, order, plot, and/or character
  • Compare, contrast, and assess how various accounts of a subject are told in multiple mediums
  • Analyze how the details emphasized in each account of a subject told in different mediums affect the overall message
  • Use references to the different media to answer a question or to solve a problem

RL.11-12.10. By the end of grade 12, read and comprehend literature, including stories, dramas, and poems, at the high end of the grades 12–CCR text complexity band independently and proficiently

•        Closely read various forms of literature and literary nonfiction independently, proficiently, and, fluently

•        Demonstrate comprehension of various forms of literary text by showing a steadily growing ability to discern more and make fuller use of text

•        Generate connections among ideas and between texts

•        Consider and evaluate a wider range of textual evidence

SL.11-12.1. Initiate and participate effectively in a range of collaborative discussions (one on-one, in groups, and teacher-led) with peers on grade 11 topics, texts, and issues, building on others’ ideas and expressing their own clearly and persuasively.

SL11-12.1.A. Come to discussions prepared, having read and researched material under study; explicitly draw on that preparation by referring to evidence from texts and other research on the topic or issue to stimulate a thoughtful, well reasoned exchange of ideas.

SL.11-12.1.B. Collaborate with peers to promote civil, democratic discussions and decision making, set clear goals and assessments (e.g., student-developed rubrics), and establish individual roles as needed.

SL.11-12.1.C. Propel conversations by posing and responding to questions that probe reasoning and evidence; ensure a hearing for a full range of positions on a topic or issue; clarify, verify, or challenge ideas and conclusions; and promote divergent and creative perspectives.

SL.11.12.1.D. Respond thoughtfully to diverse perspectives; synthesize comments, claims, and evidence made on all sides of an issue; resolve contradictions when possible; and determine what additional information or research is required to deepen the investigation or complete the task.

  • Effectively participate in one-on-one, group, and teacher-led discussions
  • Prepare for discussions
  • Read and research materials beforehand
  • Articulate ideas clearly and persuasively in a discussion
  • Refer to evidence from texts and other research
  • Draw from and build on the ideas of others in a discussion
  • Clarify, verify, or challenge ideas and conclusions in a discussion or collaborative activity
  • Set guidelines for class discussions
  • Establish goals and roles for group members and adhere to assigned roles
  • Participate in polite and democratic discussions and decision-making activities.
  • Self monitor the work and assign specific tasks as needed
  • Respect and promote diverse perspectives in a discussion or collaborative activity
  • Encourage others to participate in a discussion or collaborative activity
  • Discuss and question the argument and evidence
  • Make certain that a variety of possible arguments have been heard
  • Respond thoughtfully
  • Summarize where others agree and disagree with ideas and perspectives
  • Continue to propel conversations by posing and responding to questions that connect to broader ideas as well as through reflection and evaluation of others’ comments
  • Incorporate new synthesized ideas into discussion

SL.11-12.3. Evaluate a speaker’s point of view, reasoning, and use of evidence and rhetoric, assessing the stance, premises, links among ideas, word choice, points of emphasis, and tone used.

  • Evaluate whether the reasoning a speaker uses is logical/legitimate and if the evidence is relevant
  • Correlate the speaker’s argument with the student’s own
  • Identify logical fallacies, judging if any of the speaker’s reasoning is misleading
  • Engage as an active listener and participant
  • Consider and assess the speaker, argument, organization, diction, and tone.
  • Use evidence from sources/text to prove fallibility in speaker’s reasoning

SL.11-12.5. Make strategic use of digital media (e.g., textual, graphical, audio, visual, and interactive elements) in presentations to enhance understanding of findings, reasoning, and evidence and to add interest.

•        Consider, determine and apply the most strategic use of digital media

•        Engage audience and enhance their understanding of findings, reasoning, and evidence by incorporating digital media such as textual, graphical, audio, visual, or interactive elements

SL.11-12.6. Adapt speech to a variety of contexts and tasks, demonstrating a command of formal English when indicated or appropriate.

•        Assess and adapt speech delivery to audience and purpose

•        Understand the difference between formal and informal presentations and demonstrate a command of formal English

L.11-12.1. Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English grammar and usage when writing or speaking.

L.11-12.1. A. Apply the understanding that usage is a matter of convention, can change over time, and is sometimes contested.

  • Utilize and incorporate appropriate grammar and usage in writing and speaking
  • Understand that language and appropriate usage changes
  • Utilize reference materials to help maintain appropriate grammar and usage dependent on the audience and situation

L.11-12.2. Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English capitalization, punctuation, and spelling when writing.

L.11-12.2.A. Observe hyphenation conventions.

L.11-12.2.B. Spell correctly.

  • Adhere to appropriate writing conventions including capitalization, punctuation including hyphens, and spelling

L.11-12.3. Apply knowledge of language to understand how language functions in different contexts, to make effective choices for meaning or style, and to comprehend more fully when reading or listening.

L.11-12.3.A. Vary syntax for effect; apply an understanding of syntax to the study of complex texts.

  • Apply knowledge of language to understand how language functions in different situations
  • Apply knowledge of language to make effective choices to shape the meaning and style
  • Apply knowledge of language to comprehend more fully when reading, listening, or speaking
  • Consult a style manual, which conforms to discipline-specific guidelines, while writing and editing a work
  • Write using a variety of task-appropriate syntaxes

L.11-12.4. Determine or clarify the meaning of unknown and multiple-meaning words and phrases based on grades 11–12 reading and content, choosing flexibly from a range of strategies.

L.11-12.4.A. Use context (e.g., the overall meaning of a sentence, paragraph, or text; a word’s position or function in a sentence) as a clue to the meaning of a word or phrase.

L.11-12.4.B. Identify and correctly use patterns of word changes that indicate different meanings or parts of speech (e.g., conceive, conception, conceivable).

L.11-12.4.C. Consult general and specialized reference materials (e.g., dictionaries, glossaries, thesauruses), both print and digital, to find the pronunciation of a word or determine or clarify its precise meaning, its part of speech, its etymology, or its standard usage.

L.11-12.4.D. Verify the preliminary determination of the meaning of a word or phrase (e.g., by checking the inferred meaning in context or in a dictionary).

  • Use context clues to derive word meaning
  • Use knowledge of Greek and Latin affixes and roots to understand variations of word forms and patterns
  • Consult reference materials to derive word meanings and correct pronunciation of words
  • Trace the etymology of words

L.11-12.5. Demonstrate understanding of figurative language, word relationships, and nuances in word meanings.

L.11-12.5.A. Interpret figures of speech (e.g., hyperbole, paradox) in context and analyze their role in the text.

L.11-12.5.B. Analyze nuances in the meaning of words with similar denotations.

  • Analyze and evaluate the use of figurative language within a text, particularly hyperbole and paradox
  • Analyze and validate slight differences in the meanings of words with similar definitions (ex: saunter and walk)

L.11-12.6:  Acquire and use accurately grade-appropriate general academic and domain-specific words and phrases; gather vocabulary knowledge when considering a word or phrase important to comprehension or expression.

  • Acquire general academic words from content-specific written texts
  • Independently integrate general academic words and domain-specific words into reading, writing, speaking, and listening at the college and career readiness level

21st Century Skills and Themes

Interdisciplinary Connections

Career Ready Practices

9.2 Career Awareness, Exploration, and Preparation  

Art:  Students will analyze the role of images in children’s literature.

  • CRP1. Act as a responsible and contributing citizen and employee.
  • CRP2. Apply appropriate academic and technical skills.
  • CRP4.Communicate clearly and effectively and with reason.
  • CRP6.Demonstrate creativity and innovation.
  • CRP9.Model integrity, ethical leadership and effective management.
  • CRP11. Use technology to enhance productivity.
  • CRP12.Work productively in teams while using cultural global competence.

By the end of 12th grade,

  • 9.2.12.C.2 Modify Personalized Student Learning Plans to support declared career goals.
  • 9.2.12.C.3 Identify transferable career skills and design alternate career plans.

Technology Standards - 8.1

9-12th Grade

A. Technology Operations and Concepts: Students demonstrate a sound understanding of technology concepts, systems and operations.

  • Understand and use technology systems.

8.1.12.A.1 Create a personal digital portfolio which reflects personal and academic interests, achievements, and career aspirations by using a variety of digital tools and resources.

  • Select and use applications effectively and productively.

8.1.12.A.2 Produce and edit a multi-page digital document for a commercial or professional audience and present it to peers and/or professionals in that related area for review.

D. Digital Citizenship: Students understand human, cultural, and societal issues related to technology and practice legal and ethical behavior.

  • Advocate and practice safe, legal, and responsible use of information and technology.

8.1.12.D.1 Demonstrate appropriate application of copyright, fair use and/or Creative Commons to an original work.

 

Modifications/Accommodations

IEPs

  • Projects are designed so teacher may add or omit criteria based on student needs
  • Shortened assignments
  • Extended time allotted for students
  • Modification of project dimensions or materials for students with special needs
  • Restructure lesson using UDL principles http://www.cast.org/our-work/about-udl.html#.VXmoXcD_UA
  • Structure lessons around questions that are authentic, relate to students’ interests, social/family background and knowledge of their communities
  • Provide students multiple choices for how they can represent their understandings (e.g multisensory techniques- auditory/visual aids, pictures, illustrations, graphs, charts, data tables, multimedia, modeling)
  • Provide multiple grouping opportunities for students to share their ideas and to encourage work among various backgrounds and cultures (e.g. multiple representation and multimodal experiences)
  • Mneumonic aids/devices
  • Additional time for test preparation
  • Review/testing matched to student pace
  • Test directions read/explained thoroughly
  • Oral, short-answer, modified tests
  • Emphasis on successes
  • Graphic organizers
  • Student choice of texts, projects, writing prompts, etc.
  • Collaborate with after-school programs or clubs to extend learning
  • Various online learning opportunities to reinforce skills
  • Use of leveled texts or www.rewordify.com

504s

  • Projects are designed so teacher may add or omit criteria based on student needs
  • Shortened assignments
  • Extended time is allotted for students
  • Structure lessons around questions that are authentic, relate to students’ interests, social/family background and knowledge of their communities
  • Collaborate with after-school programs or clubs to extend learning opportunities
  • Based on student needs various online learning opportunities to reinforce skills

ELLs

  • Shortened assignments
  • Extended time allotted for students
  • Visuals/video provided where possible
  • Electronic translators
  • Provide work for completion or understanding to ELL teacher to continue during ELL class

G/T

  • Projects are designed so teacher may extend criteria based on student needs
  • Structure learning around explaining or solving a social or community-based issue
  • Provide electronic games, lessons, etc. to encourage students to expand or move ahead
  • Collaborate with after-school programs or clubs to extend learning opportunities
  • Various online learning opportunities to excel


Unit Title

Unit 8 - Poetry

Timeframe 

4 weeks

Unit Summary

Students will be able to independently use their learning to find their own unique poetic voice/style and make meaning of the world around them as poets/artists. Students will create various styles of poems using both google docs and I-movie.

Learning Targets

Essential Questions

  • Can poetry be an effective and powerful form of expression in addition to an accurate portrayal of a person, place, thing, or idea?
  • How does reading poetry beyond a simple analysis (or breaking down of meaning) shape a poet’s voice, style, and writing? What can we learn about ourselves through reading/writing poetry?
  • How do you read a poem? Is there a “correct” way to read a poem?  How do poets break boundaries of structure to open new ways of viewing/reading/writing poetry?
  • How does an understanding of the different styles and their characteristics (forms, conventions, etc.) help the reader better comprehend the meaning of work?
  • How does word choice and figurative language simultaneously create emotion while affecting meaning/theme/message?  Is a poem a poem without figurative language? What constitutes “a poem”?
  • Do specific poetic forms limit a writer’s creativity or expand their ability to express and develop ideas?

Enduring Understandings

Students will understand:

  • Various styles of poetry have different forms and conventions.
  • Poets use figurative language and word choice to create meaning/theme/message.
  • Young writers need to view works through a creative and constructive lens in an effort to build meaning and shape their artistic voice as a poet.
  • Conventional reading methods may not always apply to reading poetry and risks in reading and writing poetry can lead to deeper insights.

Know

By the end of this unit, students will know

  • The various styles/forms of poetry.  
  • How to identify characteristics of each form.
  • The effect of figurative language in a poem.
  • How to identify various types of figurative language.  T
  • The effect of word choice in a poem.
  • How to interpret a poem beyond “what it means.”  how to “talk” about and critique poetry.
  • How to write a poem that involves the poet’s voice. 

Do

By the end of this unit, students will be able to

  • Read poetry according to it’s original purpose along with applying original interpretation.
  • Write various forms of poetry using specific word choice, pattern, style. etc...

Evidence of Learning

Formative

  • Self-evaluation
  • Workshopping  
  • In-class discussions  

Summative/ Benchmark

  • Quizzes/Tests  
  • Journals/Reflections  
  • Student-developed work/poetry  (I-movie, portfolio)

Alternative Assessments

  • Students are open to use an alternative website to I-movie to create their poem.
  • Writing Portfolio (completed throughout the year)

Learning Activities

  • Poem and poet presentations - students research and talk about poet’s background and influences as well as verbal poem explication (highlighting figurative language, style, form, word choice, etc.)
  • Ekphrastic Poetry- Ekphrastic poetry describes a visual image or work of art. (Paintings or drawings could also be used.) Choose two different photographs from National Geographic’s online Photo of The Day galleries. Project them one at a time for everyone to see, and give five to ten minutes for free writing. Suggest some elements they could write about.
  • Poetry Word Splash
  • Imitating forms and structures of poetry -  Define and show examples of poetic writing technique (terms, characteristics of form, style, etc.)
  • Read, compare and discuss a wide range of poems, analyzing tones and themes (both in whole-class and small-group settings).
  • Finding Great Poetry- students find at least 5 poems that speak to them to share with the class.
  • Poetry collection - students read various poems and select and copy poems into folder. They can then write reflection piece on favorite (5) poems.  
  • Creating Poems from various favorite works of literature - students write a black-out poem.
  • Poem Reconstruction- students will reconstruct a poem (pre-cut by teacher) line by line to reflect the original poet’s style based on background knowledge of poet/poet’s style, form, etc.
  • Memorize and Deliver a poem
  • Produce an IMOVIE  on original poem “Where I’m From”.
  • Perform a Slam Poem or Cipher (prerecorded or live).
  • Peer review of “Write The World” Poetry from students around the world.
  • Attend a poetry festival (if board approved)

Materials / Equipment / Resources

Core Instructional

Materials and Texts

“The Art and Craft of Poetry by Michael J. Bugeja

Equipment

Chromebooks, Various novels

Supplemental Resources

Various informational articles, tutorials, and websites showing successful examples of poetry.

www.Poets.org

https://www.poetryfoundation.org/

http://www.bcactionpoet.org/index.html

http://www.loc.gov/poetry/180/

“Eating Poetry” by Mark Strand

http://www.sccs.swarthmore.edu/users/99/jrieffel/poetry/strand/eating.html

“Introduction to Poetry” by Billy Collins

http://www.loc.gov/poetry/180/001.html

https://prezi.com/6_qqgltcotp6/creative-writing-poetry-unit/

Standards

Content Statement

Indicator

W.11-12.3. Write narratives to develop real or imagined experiences or events using effective technique, well-chosen details, and well-structured event sequences.

W.11-12.3.A. Engage and orient the reader by setting out a problem, situation, or observation and its significance, establishing one or multiple point(s) of view, and introducing a narrator and/or characters; create a smooth progression of experiences or events.

W.11-12.3.B. Use narrative techniques, such as dialogue, pacing, description, reflection, and multiple plot lines, to develop experiences, events, and/or characters.

W.11-12.3.C. Use a variety of techniques to sequence events so that they build on one another to create a coherent whole and build toward a particular tone and outcome (e.g., a sense of mystery, suspense, growth, or resolution).

W.11-12.3.D. Use precise words and phrases, telling details, and sensory language to convey a vivid picture of the experiences, events, setting, and/or characters.

W.11-12.3.E. Provide a conclusion that follows from and reflects on what is experienced, observed, or resolved over the course of the narrative.

  • Convey experiences, real or imagined
  • Use time as the deep structure of the narrative
  • Form or structure based on a progression of events that build and reflect upon each other
  • Use effective details using precise language
  • Form clear point(s) of view established through a narrator, provide characters, and present a situation
  • Distinguish and utilize narrative techniques including dialogue, description, and plot in order to develop experiences, events, and/or characters choosing words that create vivid pictures
  • Provide a conclusion to the events they set out at the beginning of their narrative
  • Include techniques for rhetorical effectiveness like the creation of tone, the plot of the narrative, and the overall coherence of the text

W.11-12.4. Produce clear and coherent writing in which the development, organization, and style are appropriate to task, purpose, and audience.

  • Determine writing task type and its appropriate organizational structure
  • Identify and understand the writing purpose
  • Determine and address the audience (intended reader) appropriately
  • Understand and utilize appropriate style
  • Understand how structure, style and rhetorical devices convey the purpose of writing

W.11-12.5. Develop and strengthen writing as needed by planning, revising, editing, rewriting, or trying a new approach, or consulting a style manual (such as MLA or APA Style),focusing on addressing what is most significant for a specific purpose and audience.

  • Create and utilize appropriate planning templates
  • Understand and practice revision techniques
  • Comprehend writing as a process
  • Plan, revise, edit, rewrite, or try a new approach, focusing on addressing what is most significant for a specific purpose or audience
  • Determine what details and/or information is most appropriate for a specific purpose
  • Understand writing as a process rather than a product

W.11-12.6. Use technology, including the Internet, to produce, share, and update individual or shared writing products in response to ongoing feedback, including new arguments or information.

  • Use technology proficiently for production, publication, and collaboration
  • Link and cite sources
  • Create shared writing products for feedback
  • Assess feedback from peers
  • Adapt writing according to feedback
  • Respond to ongoing feedback utilizing digital software

W.11-12.10. Write routinely over extended time frames (time for research, reflection, and revision) and shorter time frames (a single sitting or a day or two) for a range of tasks, purposes, and audiences.

  • Design a plan to appropriately match the task, purpose, and audience that incorporates research, reflection, and revision
  • Write routinely over shorter and extended time frames for a range of tasks, purposes, and audiences
  • Synthesize research gathered over shorter time frames into a long-term research project
  • Manage a long-term research project that incorporates research, reflection, and revision

RL.11.12.1. Cite strong and thorough textual evidence and make relevant connections to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text, including determining where the text leaves matters uncertain.

  • Make personal connections, connections to other texts, and/or global/historical connections when relevant
  • Analyze the text and identify explicit and implicit textual evidence
  • Determine the difference between strong and insufficient (unreliable) details
  • Cite evidence and use  direct quotes, paraphrase, objectively summarize (free of personal bias)
  • Draw inferences using implicit and explicit text evidence
  • Draw conclusions/make logical judgments about the information within the text on the basis of evidence and prior conclusions/prior experience
  • Support inference using several examples from the text
  • Evaluate the relationship between explicit and implicit details and how they contribute to the meaning of the text
  • Identify the moments where the author is inconclusive  or uncertain and allows the reader to draw conclusions based on textual evidence

RL.11-12.2. Determine two or more themes or central ideas of a text and analyze their development over the course of the text, including how they interact and build on one another to produce a complex account, and provide an objective summary of the text.

  • Determine two or more themes or central ideas in a text
  • Recognize supporting details for themes/central ideas
  • Analyze themes/central ideas as it develops over the course of the text
  • Make inferences through the use of details, word choice, and literary elements regarding the thematic development
  • Use the text to draw conclusions
  • Examine how the interaction of themes/central ideas create the overall meaning of the text ( and provides depth and dimension)
  • Construct an objective summary of the text
  • Examine how the interaction of themes creates the overall meaning of the text ( and provides depth and dimension and complexity)

RL.11-12.3. Analyze the impact of the author’s choices regarding how to develop and relate elements of a story or drama (e.g., where a story is set, how the action is ordered, how the characters are introduced and developed).

  • Identify and analyze the choices made by the author including the choice of setting, plot organization and development, characterization and character interaction
  • Explain how the order in which each is presented in the text impacts the overall text
  • Analyze those choices as they pertain to the overall story

RL.11-12.5:  Analyze how an author’s choices concerning how to structure specific parts of a text (e.g., the choice of where to begin or end a story, the choice to provide a comedic or tragic resolution) contribute to its overall structure and meaning as well as its aesthetic impact.

  • Evaluate the structure of the text (ex. en media res, flashbacks, tragic elements)
  • Analyze how an author has chosen to structure a text and order events within it
  • Conclude why the author chose that structure and how it enhances the work as a whole

RL.11-12.7:  Analyze multiple interpretations of a story, drama, or poem (e.g., recorded or live production of a play or recorded novel or poetry), evaluating how each version interprets the source text. (Include at least one play by Shakespeare and one play by an American dramatist.)

  • Read and/or view different versions of the same text, recordings, film, and/or live performances
  • Compare and contrast the multiple versions
  • Evaluate the significant the differences between the multiple versions
  • Focus on significant changes to structure, order, plot, and/or character
  • Compare, contrast, and assess how various accounts of a subject are told in multiple mediums
  • Analyze how the details emphasized in each account of a subject told in different mediums affect the overall message
  • Use references to the different media to answer a question or to solve a problem

RL.11-12.10. By the end of grade 12, read and comprehend literature, including stories, dramas, and poems, at the high end of the grades 12–CCR text complexity band independently and proficiently

•        Closely read various forms of literature and literary nonfiction independently, proficiently, and, fluently

•        Demonstrate comprehension of various forms of literary text by showing a steadily growing ability to discern more and make fuller use of text

•        Generate connections among ideas and between texts

•        Consider and evaluate a wider range of textual evidence

SL.11-12.1. Initiate and participate effectively in a range of collaborative discussions (one on-one, in groups, and teacher-led) with peers on grade 11 topics, texts, and issues, building on others’ ideas and expressing their own clearly and persuasively.

SL11-12.1.A. Come to discussions prepared, having read and researched material under study; explicitly draw on that preparation by referring to evidence from texts and other research on the topic or issue to stimulate a thoughtful, well reasoned exchange of ideas.

SL.11-12.1.B. Collaborate with peers to promote civil, democratic discussions and decision making, set clear goals and assessments (e.g., student-developed rubrics), and establish individual roles as needed.

SL.11-12.1.C. Propel conversations by posing and responding to questions that probe reasoning and evidence; ensure a hearing for a full range of positions on a topic or issue; clarify, verify, or challenge ideas and conclusions; and promote divergent and creative perspectives.

SL.11.12.1.D. Respond thoughtfully to diverse perspectives; synthesize comments, claims, and evidence made on all sides of an issue; resolve contradictions when possible; and determine what additional information or research is required to deepen the investigation or complete the task.

  • Effectively participate in one-on-one, group, and teacher-led discussions
  • Prepare for discussions
  • Read and research materials beforehand
  • Articulate ideas clearly and persuasively in a discussion
  • Refer to evidence from texts and other research
  • Draw from and build on the ideas of others in a discussion
  • Clarify, verify, or challenge ideas and conclusions in a discussion or collaborative activity
  • Set guidelines for class discussions
  • Establish goals and roles for group members and adhere to assigned roles
  • Participate in polite and democratic discussions and decision-making activities.
  • Self monitor the work and assign specific tasks as needed
  • Respect and promote diverse perspectives in a discussion or collaborative activity
  • Encourage others to participate in a discussion or collaborative activity
  • Discuss and question the argument and evidence
  • Make certain that a variety of possible arguments have been heard
  • Respond thoughtfully
  • Summarize where others agree and disagree with ideas and perspectives
  • Continue to propel conversations by posing and responding to questions that connect to broader ideas as well as through reflection and evaluation of others’ comments
  • Incorporate new synthesized ideas into discussion

SL.11-12.3. Evaluate a speaker’s point of view, reasoning, and use of evidence and rhetoric, assessing the stance, premises, links among ideas, word choice, points of emphasis, and tone used.

  • Evaluate whether the reasoning a speaker uses is logical/legitimate and if the evidence is relevant
  • Correlate the speaker’s argument with the student’s own
  • Identify logical fallacies, judging if any of the speaker’s reasoning is misleading
  • Engage as an active listener and participant
  • Consider and assess the speaker, argument, organization, diction, and tone.
  • Use evidence from sources/text to prove fallibility in speaker’s reasoning

SL.11-12.5. Make strategic use of digital media (e.g., textual, graphical, audio, visual, and interactive elements) in presentations to enhance understanding of findings, reasoning, and evidence and to add interest.

•        Consider, determine and apply the most strategic use of digital media

•        Engage audience and enhance their understanding of findings, reasoning, and evidence by incorporating digital media such as textual, graphical, audio, visual, or interactive elements

SL.11-12.6. Adapt speech to a variety of contexts and tasks, demonstrating a command of formal English when indicated or appropriate.

•        Assess and adapt speech delivery to audience and purpose

•        Understand the difference between formal and informal presentations and demonstrate a command of formal English

L.11-12.1. Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English grammar and usage when writing or speaking.

L.11-12.1. A. Apply the understanding that usage is a matter of convention, can change over time, and is sometimes contested.

  • Utilize and incorporate appropriate grammar and usage in writing and speaking
  • Understand that language and appropriate usage changes
  • Utilize reference materials to help maintain appropriate grammar and usage dependent on the audience and situation

L.11-12.2. Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English capitalization, punctuation, and spelling when writing.

L.11-12.2.A. Observe hyphenation conventions.

L.11-12.2.B. Spell correctly.

  • Adhere to appropriate writing conventions including capitalization, punctuation including hyphens, and spelling

L.11-12.3. Apply knowledge of language to understand how language functions in different contexts, to make effective choices for meaning or style, and to comprehend more fully when reading or listening.

L.11-12.3.A. Vary syntax for effect; apply an understanding of syntax to the study of complex texts.

  • Apply knowledge of language to understand how language functions in different situations
  • Apply knowledge of language to make effective choices to shape the meaning and style
  • Apply knowledge of language to comprehend more fully when reading, listening, or speaking
  • Consult a style manual, which conforms to discipline-specific guidelines, while writing and editing a work
  • Write using a variety of task-appropriate syntaxes

L.11-12.4. Determine or clarify the meaning of unknown and multiple-meaning words and phrases based on grades 11–12 reading and content, choosing flexibly from a range of strategies.

L.11-12.4.A. Use context (e.g., the overall meaning of a sentence, paragraph, or text; a word’s position or function in a sentence) as a clue to the meaning of a word or phrase.

L.11-12.4.B. Identify and correctly use patterns of word changes that indicate different meanings or parts of speech (e.g., conceive, conception, conceivable).

L.11-12.4.C. Consult general and specialized reference materials (e.g., dictionaries, glossaries, thesauruses), both print and digital, to find the pronunciation of a word or determine or clarify its precise meaning, its part of speech, its etymology, or its standard usage.

L.11-12.4.D. Verify the preliminary determination of the meaning of a word or phrase (e.g., by checking the inferred meaning in context or in a dictionary).

  • Use context clues to derive word meaning
  • Use knowledge of Greek and Latin affixes and roots to understand variations of word forms and patterns
  • Consult reference materials to derive word meanings and correct pronunciation of words
  • Trace the etymology of words

L.11-12.5. Demonstrate understanding of figurative language, word relationships, and nuances in word meanings.

L.11-12.5.A. Interpret figures of speech (e.g., hyperbole, paradox) in context and analyze their role in the text.

L.11-12.5.B. Analyze nuances in the meaning of words with similar denotations.

  • Analyze and evaluate the use of figurative language within a text, particularly hyperbole and paradox
  • Analyze and validate slight differences in the meanings of words with similar definitions (ex: saunter and walk)

L.11-12.6:  Acquire and use accurately grade-appropriate general academic and domain-specific words and phrases; gather vocabulary knowledge when considering a word or phrase important to comprehension or expression.

  • Acquire general academic words from content-specific written texts
  • Independently integrate general academic words and domain-specific words into reading, writing, speaking, and listening at the college and career readiness level

21st Century Skills and Themes

Interdisciplinary Connections

Career Ready Practices

9.2 Career Awareness, Exploration, and Preparation  

Art: Students will be able to analyze a piece of art and use it as inspiration for their own poetry.

  • CRP1. Act as a responsible and contributing citizen and employee.
  • CRP2. Apply appropriate academic and technical skills.
  • CRP4.Communicate clearly and effectively and with reason.
  • CRP6.Demonstrate creativity and innovation.
  • CRP9.Model integrity, ethical leadership and effective management.
  • CRP11. Use technology to enhance productivity.
  • CRP12.Work productively in teams while using cultural global competence.

By the end of 12th grade,

  • 9.2.12.C.2 Modify Personalized Student Learning Plans to support declared career goals.
  • 9.2.12.C.3 Identify transferable career skills and design alternate career plans.

Technology Standards - 8.1

9-12th Grade

A. Technology Operations and Concepts: Students demonstrate a sound understanding of technology concepts, systems and operations.

  • Understand and use technology systems.

8.1.12.A.1 Create a personal digital portfolio which reflects personal and academic interests, achievements, and career aspirations by using a variety of digital tools and resources.

  • Select and use applications effectively and productively.

8.1.12.A.2 Produce and edit a multi-page digital document for a commercial or professional audience and present it to peers and/or professionals in that related area for review.

D. Digital Citizenship: Students understand human, cultural, and societal issues related to technology and practice legal and ethical behavior.

  • Advocate and practice safe, legal, and responsible use of information and technology.

8.1.12.D.1 Demonstrate appropriate application of copyright, fair use and/or Creative Commons to an original work.

 

Modifications/Accommodations

IEPs

  • Projects are designed so teacher may add or omit criteria based on student needs
  • Shortened assignments
  • Extended time allotted for students
  • Modification of project dimensions or materials for students with special needs
  • Restructure lesson using UDL principles
  • Structure lessons around questions that are authentic, relate to students’ interests, social/family background and knowledge of their communities
  • Provide students multiple choices for how they can represent their understandings (e.g multisensory techniques- auditory/visual aids, pictures, illustrations, graphs, charts, data tables, multimedia, modeling)
  • Provide multiple grouping opportunities for students to share their ideas and to encourage work among various backgrounds and cultures (e.g. multiple representation and multimodal experiences)
  • Mneumonic aids/devices
  • Additional time for test preparation
  • Review/testing matched to student pace
  • Test directions read/explained thoroughly
  • Oral, short-answer, modified tests
  • Graphic organizers
  • Student choice of texts, projects, writing prompts, etc.
  • Collaborate with after-school programs or clubs to extend learning
  • Various online learning opportunities to reinforce skills
  • Use of leveled texts or www.rewordify.com

504s

  • Projects are designed so teacher may add or omit criteria based on student needs
  • Shortened assignments
  • Extended time is allotted for students
  • Structure lessons around questions that are authentic, relate to students’ interests, social/family background and knowledge of their communities
  • Collaborate with after-school programs or clubs to extend learning opportunities
  • Based on student needs various online learning opportunities to reinforce skills

ELLs

  • Shortened assignments
  • Extended time allotted for students
  • Visuals/video provided where possible
  • Electronic translators
  • Provide work for completion or understanding to ELL teacher to continue during ELL class

G/T

  • Projects are designed so teacher may extend criteria based on student needs
  • Structure learning around explaining or solving a social or community-based issue
  • Provide electronic games, lessons, etc. to encourage students to expand or move ahead
  • Collaborate with after-school programs or clubs to extend learning opportunities
  • Various online learning opportunities to excel