Course Number: SAI 222

Course Title: Christian Arts Through the Ages

Professor: Dr. Marguerite Mullee

mmullee@holyapostles.edu                                                                                203.313.4036 (cell)

1. COURSE DESCRIPTION

This course explores different forms of Christian Art, from its stylistic beginnings in early Jewish and Roman art through to the present. Students will learn to appreciate, identify and interpret sacred art and to observe how art changes and reflects the context of the time - theological, historical, philosophical and cultural

2. ENVISIONED LEARNING OUTCOMES

     Students will be able to demonstrate an understanding of the evolution of Christian Art

     Students will be able to analyze the formal qualities of a work of art and place it in its historical      and social context

     Students will cultivate, through a range of Christian artistic objects and traditions, an appreciation of art forms

3. COURSE SCHEDULE

Week 1: Sacred Art/Introduction to Jewish Art

Lecture: Engaging with Art

Art Examples

Reading: Jewish Representational Art (pdf)

Assignments:

Discussion: What Does Art Mean to You?

Begin Journal entries

Week 2: Early Christian Art, Part 1

Lecture: Music and Greek Thought; Early Christian Music

Art Examples

Reading: Understanding Early Christian Art, Robin Margaret Jensen, pp 32-63 (link)

Assignments:

Reaction Paper to reading

Journal

Week 3: Early Christian Art, Part 2

Commentary: Early Christian Architecture

Art Examples

Reading: Architecture and Liturgy, Jennifer Freeman (included)

Assignments:

Art Example - create word web

Journal

Week 4: Illumination

Lecture and Art Examples

Readings: Illuminated Manuscripts (link)

Essay and examples: Book of Kells

Assignments:

Viewing Art

Quiz 1

Journal

Week 5: Early Medieval Art

Lectures: Fall of Rome and Changes in Society

Art Examples

Reading: Medieval Sculpture at the Metropolitan 800 - 1400 (included)

Assignments:

Quiz 2

Discussion: Dark Ages?

Journal

Week 6: High Middle Ages/Romanesque and Gothic Art

Lecture: Romanesque Architecture, Gothic Architecture, Gothic painting, Sculpture and Metalwork, Frescoes

Art examples

Reading: Romanesque Architecture - Metropolitan Museum of Art (link)

Assignments:

Essay: Compare Romanesque and Gothic Architecture

Journal

Week 7: Late Middle Ages

Lecture: Changes in society

Art examples

Reading: Italian Painting of the Later Middle Ages (link)

Assignments:

Reaction paper to reading

Quiz 3

Journal

Final Project Assignment ( 5 page paper, due Dec. 7)

Week 8:Early Renaissance

Lectures: The Reformation and Counter-Reformation

Art examples

Reading: “Florence” from Italian Renaissance Resources (link)

Assignments:

Journal

Discussion: Middle Ages and Renaissance

Week 9: Italian Renaissance

Lecture: Florence, Rome and Venice

Art Examples

Reading: ”Venice” from Italian Renaissance Resources (link)

“Bellini’s Luminous Madonnas” from Italian Renaissance Resources (link)

“Raphael’s Madonnas” from Italian Renaissance Resources (link)

Assignments:

Quiz 4

Essay: Leonardo da Vinci

Word Web 2

Journal

Week 10: Northern Renaissance

Lecture: The Renaissance in Northern Europe

Art Examples

Reading: From exhibition catalogue from the Metropolitan Museum of Art: From Van Eyck to Bruegel:

Maryan W. Ainsworth, "The Business of Art: Patrons, Clients and Art Markets" pp 23-37

Maryan W. Ainsworth, "Religious Painting from about 1420 to 1500: In the Eye of the Beholder" pp 79-85

Maryan W. Ainsworth, "Robert Campin and Assistant: The Annunciation Triptych pp 89 - 96

Assignments:

Essay on Word Web

Journal

Week 11: Southern Baroque

Lecture: The Art of Italy and Spain

Art Examples

Readings: Esperanca Camara, “Introduction to Baroque Art in Europe” (link)

Jean Sorabella, “”Baroque Rome” (link)

Assignments:

Quiz 5

Journal

Week 12: Northern Baroque

Lecture: The Baroque in Northern Europe

Art Examples

Reading: “Protestant Reformation Art” (link)

Assignments:

DIscussion: Compare Southern and Northern Baroque Art

Quiz 6

Journal

Week 13: Eighteenth Century Classical

Lecture: The Enlightenment

Art Examples

Readings: William Newton, “Sacred Art in Sardonic Times” (link)

Michael Prodger, “The Grand Gestures Hiding in Parisian Churches” (link)

Assignments:

Journal

Week 14: 19th Century Romanticism

Lecture: Era of Revolutions

Art Examples

Readings: Christopher Dawson, “Christianity and the Romantic Movement” (link)

Joyce C. Polistena, “The Unknown Delacroix: The Religious Imagination of a Romantic Painter” (link)

Assignments:

Discussion: Sacred Art in a Secular World

Final Quiz

Journal

Week 15: 20th and 21st Centuries

Lecture: Modern Art

Art Examples: Alexandra Alexa “From Matisse to Turrell, 8 Artists Who Designed Transcendent Chapels” (link)

Reading: Michael D. O’Brien, “The Decline and Renewal of Christian Art” (link)

Assignments:

Journal

Final Project Due

 COURSE REQUIREMENTS

5. REQUIRED READINGS and RESOURCES

6. SUGGESTED READINGS and RESOURCES:

7. EVALUATION

(Basis of evaluation with explanation regarding the nature of the assignment and the percentage of the grade assigned to each item below). Students who have difficulty with research and composition are encouraged to pursue assistance with the Online Writing Lab (available at http://www.holyapostles.edu/owl).

GRADING SCALE:

A 94-100; A- 90-93; B+ 87-89; B 84-86; B- 80-83; C+ 77-79; C 74-76; C- 70-73 60-69; F 59 and below

[The grading rubric below is optional for faculty to include or modify. A rubric is a helpful tool for ensuring that students know a professor’s expectations. It’s also an easy way to score any assignment. Please note that there are two sample rubrics – one for graduate students and another for undergraduate students. If you’re teaching a 100-400 level course, use the undergraduate rubric. If you’re teaching a 500-level course, retain both since you’ll evaluate students at their appropriate degree program level depending upon whether they’re undergraduate or graduate. If you’re teaching a 600-+ level course, use the graduate rubric.]

Undergraduate Rubric

Grading Rubric for the Blog Entries (BE) and Discussion Board (DB) Postings

1 (F)

2 (D)

3 (C)

4 (B)

5 (A)

CONTENT

Absence of Understanding

Posting shows no awareness of the concepts addressed in the topic by shifting off-topic

Misunderstanding

Posting demonstrates a misunderstanding of the basic concepts addressed in the topic through an inability to re-explain them

Adequate Understanding

Posting demonstrates an adequate understanding of the basic concepts addressed in the topic by a re-explanation of them

Solid understanding

Posting demonstrates an understanding of the basic concepts addressed in the topic and uses that understanding effectively in the examples it provides

Insightful understanding

Posting demonstrates an understanding of the basic concepts of the topic through the use of examples and by making connections to other concepts

WRITING & EXPRESSION

Incomplete writing

Posting is only partially written or fails to address the topic

Writing difficult to understand, serious improvement needed

Posting touches only on the surface of the topic and proceeds to talk about something else; confusing organization or development; little elaboration of position; insufficient control of sentence structure and vocabulary; unacceptable number of errors in grammar, mechanics, and usage

Acceptable writing, but could use some sharpening of skill

Posting is an uneven response to parts of the topic; somewhat conventional treatment;  satisfactory organization, but more development needed; adequate syntax and diction, but could use more vigor; overall control of grammar, mechanics, and usage, but some errors

Solid writing with something interesting to say

Posting is an adequate response to the topic; some depth and complexity in treatment; persuasive organization and development, with suitable reasons and examples;  level-appropriate syntax and diction;  mastery of grammar, mechanics, and usage, with hardly any error

command-level writing, making a clear impression

Posting is a thorough response to the topic; thoughtful and insightful examination of issues; compelling organization and development ; superior syntax and diction; error-free grammar, mechanics, and usage

RESEARCH

Missing Research

Paper shows no evidence of research: citation of sources missing.

Inadequate research and/or documentation

Over-reliance on few sources; spotty documentation of facts in text; pattern of citation errors.

Weak research and/or documentation

Inadequate number or quality of sources; many facts not referenced; several errors in citation format.

Adequate research and documentation but needs improvement

Good choice of sources but could be improved with some additions or better selection; did not always cite sources.

Solid research and documentation

A number of relevant scholarly sources revealing solid research; sources appropriately referenced in paper; only a few minor citation errors.


COMMUNITY INTERACTION (50-word response)

Inadequate response

Response merely provides laudatory encouragement for original post, e.g., “Excellent post! You really have thought of something there.”

Poor response

Response misses the point of the original posting or merely summarizes original posting to which it responds.

Acceptable response

Response makes a contribution to the posting to which it responds.

Individually-conscious contributory response

Response makes a contribution to the posting to which it responds and fosters its development.

Community-conscious contributory response

Response makes a contribution to the learning community and fosters its development.

Graduate Rubric

Grading Rubric for the Major Papers

0 pts. – Paper
Posting;

3 pts. – Paper
Posting;

6 pts. – Paper
Posting;

9 pts. – Paper
Posting;

12 pts. – Paper
Posting;

15 pts. – Paper
Posting;

CONTENT

Absence of Understanding

Analysis shows no awareness of the discipline or its methodologies as they relate to the topic.

Lack of Understanding

Analysis seems to misunderstand some basic concepts of the discipline or lacks ability to articulate them.

Inadequate understanding

Analysis is sometimes unclear in understanding or articulating concepts of the discipline.

Adequate understanding

Analysis demonstrates an understanding of basic concepts of the discipline but could express them with greater clarity.

Solid Understanding

Analysis demonstrates a clear understanding and articulation of concepts with some sense of their wider implications.

Insightful understanding

Analysis clearly demonstrates an understanding and articulation of concepts of the discipline as they relate to the topic; highlights connections to other concepts; integrates concepts into wider contexts.

RESEARCH

Missing Research

Paper shows no evidence of research: citation of sources missing.

Inadequate research and/or documentation

Over-reliance on few sources; spotty documentation of facts in text; pattern of citation errors.

Weak research and/or documentation

Inadequate number or quality of sources; many facts not referenced; several errors in citation format.

Adequate research and documentation but needs improvement

Good choice of sources but could be improved with some additions or better selection; did not always cite sources; too many citation errors.

Solid research and documentation

A number of relevant scholarly sources revealing solid research; sources appropriately referenced in paper; only a few minor citation errors.

Excellent critical research and documentation

Critically selected and relevant scholarly sources demonstrating extensive, in-depth research; sources skillfully incorporated into paper at all necessary points; all citations follow standard bibliographic format.

WRITING & EXPRESSION

Incomplete writing

Analysis is only partially written or completely misses the topic.

Writing difficult to understand, serious improvement needed

Analysis fails to address the topic; confusing organization or development; little elaboration of position; insufficient control of sentence structure and vocabulary; unacceptable number of errors in grammar, mechanics, and usage.

Episodic writing, a mix of strengths and weaknesses.

Analysis noticeably neglects or misinterprets the topic; simplistic or repetitive treatment, only partially-internalized; weak organization and development, some meandering; simple sentences, below-level diction; distracting errors in grammar, mechanics, and usage.

Acceptable writing, but could use some sharpening of skill

Analysis is an uneven response to parts of the topic; somewhat conventional treatment; satisfactory organization, but more development needed; adequate syntax and diction, but could use more vigor; overall control of grammar, mechanics, and usage, but some errors.

Solid writing, with something interesting to say.

Analysis is an adequate response to the topic; some depth and complexity in treatment; persuasive organization and development, with suitable reasons and examples; level-appropriate syntax and diction; mastery of grammar, mechanics, and usage, with hardly any error.

Command-level writing, making a clear impression

Analysis is a thorough response to the topic; thoughtful and insightful examination of issues; compelling organization and development; superior syntax and diction; error-free grammar, mechanics, and usage.

8. DISABILITIES ACCOMMODATIONS POLICY

Holy Apostles College & Seminary is committed to the goal of achieving equal educational opportunities and full participation in higher education for persons with disabilities who qualify for admission to the College. Students enrolled in online courses who have documented disabilities requiring special accommodations should contact Bob Mish, the Director of Online Student Affairs, at rmish@holyapostles.edu or 860-632-3015. In all cases, reasonable accommodations will be made to ensure that all students with disabilities have access to course materials in a mode in which they can receive them. Students who have technological limitations (e.g., slow Internet connection speeds in convents) are asked to notify their instructors the first week of class for alternative means of delivery.

9. ACADEMIC HONESTY POLICY

Students at Holy Apostles College & Seminary are expected to practice academic honesty.

Avoiding Plagiarism

In its broadest sense, plagiarism is using someone else's work or ideas, presented or claimed as your own.  At this stage in your academic career, you should be fully conscious of what it means to plagiarize. This is an inherently unethical activity because it entails the uncredited use of someone else's expression of ideas for another's personal advancement; that is, it entails the use of a person merely as a means to another person’s ends. Plagiarism includes: 1. Directly quoting without acknowledging the source. 2. Changing a few words of a text without indicating this was done and/or not acknowledging the source. 3. Not acknowledging that the structure of ideas or logic is from another author. 4. Not acknowledging a unique image (including analogies, similes, metaphors etc.) is from a particular document or author.

Students, where applicable:

·     Should identify the title, author, page number/webpage address, and publication date of works when directly quoting small portions of texts, articles, interviews, or websites.

·     Students should not copy more than two paragraphs from any source as a major component of papers or projects.

·     Should appropriately identify the source of information when paraphrasing (restating) ideas from texts, interviews, articles, or websites.

·     Should follow the Holy Apostles College & Seminary Stylesheet (available on the Online Writing Lab’s website at http://www.holyapostles.edu/owl/resources).

Consequences of Academic Dishonesty:

Because of the nature of this class, academic dishonesty is taken very seriously.  Students caught plagiarizing will receive a zero for the assignment, and may be withdrawn from the class and/or expelled from Holy Apostles.

10. ATTENDANCE POLICY

Even though you are not required to be logged in at any precise time or day, you are expected to login several times during each week. Because this class is being taught entirely in a technology-mediated forum, it is important to actively participate each week in the course. In a traditional classroom setting for a 3-credit course, students would be required, per the federal standards, to be in class three 50-minute sessions (or 2.5 hours a week) and prepare for class discussions six 50-minute sessions (or 5 hours) a week. Expect to devote at least nine 50-minute sessions (or 7.5 quality hours) a week to this course. A failure on the student’s part to actively participate in the life of the course may result in a reduction of the final grade.

11. INCOMPLETE POLICY

An Incomplete is a temporary grade assigned at the discretion of the faculty member. It is typically allowed in situations in which the student has satisfactorily completed major components of the course and has the ability to finish the remaining work without re-enrolling, but has encountered extenuating circumstances, such as illness, that prevent his or her doing so prior to the last day of class.

To request an incomplete, distance-learning students must first download a copy of the Incomplete Request Form. This document is located within the Shared folder of the Files tab in Populi. Secondly, students must fill in any necessary information directly within the PDF document. Lastly, students must send their form to their professor via email for approval. “Approval” should be understood as the professor responding to the student’s email in favor of granting the “Incomplete” status of the student.

Students receiving an Incomplete must submit the missing course work by the end of the sixth week following the semester in which they were enrolled. An incomplete grade (I) automatically turns into the grade of “F” if the course work is not completed.

Students who have completed little or no work are ineligible for an incomplete. Students who feel they are in danger of failing the course due to an inability to complete course assignments should withdraw from the course.

A “W” (Withdrawal) will appear on the student’s permanent record for any course dropped after the end of the first week of a semester to the end of the third week. A “WF” (Withdrawal/Fail) will appear on the student’s permanent record for any course dropped after the end of the third week of a semester and on or before the Friday before the last week of the semester.

12. ABOUT YOUR PROFESSOR

https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/MbpZ7OvgZ3q5rEFu2eZLexqBgNsdMi33eCJETRSAby7QWPHQDlQAeypDlF35YyvY9e9rLEXNhm-hfEP1cMA5rehbtIEVTNWobuL2jQUumxNfnC6CKNPZeLV7YiqJYIHnBtZswgC9Marguerite  Mullee is a conductor, singer and teacher. After receiving her doctorate in Conducting and Vocal Pedagogy from Columbia University, Dr. Mullee continued her teaching interests as professor of liturgical music at Holy Apostles College and Seminary. She has also been professor of music at the Brooklyn-Queens Conservatory graduate division, Gateway Community College (CT),   and guest lecturer at the University of Connecticut and Manhattanville College (NY).

She also serves as Music Director at St. Michael’s Church in Litchfield CT, music consultant at Our Lady of Grace Monastery in Guilford CT and pre-concert lecturer for the Metropolitan Opera HD broadcasts at the Warner Theater in Torrington CT.

She has conducted many choral and instrumental groups, including the Kent Singers (CT), Naugatuck Community Choir (CT), Joyful Noise (founder, NY), Random Choristers (NY), Millenium Orchestra (NY) and church choirs in New York and Connecticut.  Dr. Mullee was the conductor and a singer for music in the King of Kings re-release on DVD as well as a creative consultant in Gregorian Chant for the documentary film Sounds Sacred produced by Pia Lindstrom and Barbara Rick. In 2008, she received a Statement of Recognition for Musical Excellence in CT from Governor M. Jodi Rell.

In demand as a workshop presenter and lecturer, Dr. Mullee has presented pre-concert lectures for her own concerts and those of others, including the Waterbury Symphony (CT) and Caramoor (NY). She has given chant workshops and master classes in voice in many churches, schools (Portsmouth RI, Dover NY, Kent CT), in monasteries (NY, NJ, MA, CT, RI) and at Adelynrood Retreat Center (MA), Wisdom House (CT) and Northern Westchester Center for the Arts (NY). In addition, she presents chant workshops at St. Michael’s Litchfield and in Tuscany, Italy. Dr. Mullee has been a guest lecturer at the Stratford Shakespeare Festival in Ontario (2014) and had the honor presenting the annual Thomas Aquinas lecture in Sacred Music at UConn Storrs (2014).