SAN ANDREAS LAW ENFORCEMENT: STANDARD OPERATING PROCEDURES.

                                     

1- San Andreas Law Enforcement Standard Operating Procedures.

(a) Values.

(b) Law Enforcement Officer Requirement:

(c) Patrol Standards.

(d) Law Enforcement officer Conduct.

(e) Training Locations.

(f) Grooming Policy.

(g) Police Equipment.

(h)  Officer Scene Control and Management Responsibilities.

(j) De-escalation of Scene.

(k)  Escalation of Use of Force.

(l) Aided Persons.

(m) Traffic Accidents and Traffic Control.

(n)  Fire Scene.

(o) Water Rescue.

(p)   Mobilizations.

(q) Fixed Post.

(r) Foot Post.

(s)  Vertical Patrol.

(t)   Issuing of Citations.

(u)   Partners and Ride Alongs.

(v) Probable Cause/Reasonable Suspicion and Detainment.

(w)  Radio Codes and Radio Traffic.

(x) Reports.

(y) Roll Call.

(z)  Zone and Patrol Coverage.

(a.1)  Field Training and Evaluations.

(b.1) CONDUCT AND DISCIPLINARY ACTION

(c.1) Prohibited Conduct.

SAN ANDREAS STATE TROOPERS DEPARTMENT

1- The Mission Statement of the San Andreas State Troopers.

2- Rank Structure of the San Andreas State Troopers

3- Uniform and Equipment Structure of the San Andreas State Troopers.

4- Vehicle and Weapon Structure of the San Andreas State Troopers.

5- San Andreas State Troopers Station Locations.

6- San Andreas State Troopers Patrol Districts.

S.W.A.T. DEPARTMENT

1- DEFINITION OF S.W.A.T.

2- PURPOSE OF S.W.A.T.

3- SCOPE

4- S.W.A.T. TEAM CONFIGURATION

5- AGENCY POLICY GOVERNING SWAT TEAMS

6- OPERATIONAL PLANNING

7- SWAT TEAM AUGMENTATION

8- MULTI-JURISDICTIONAL SWAT OPERATIONS

9- UNIFORM,WEAPONS,VEHICLE STRUCTURE

AIR SUPPORT UNIT

1-POLICY

2-TYPES OF AERIAL OPERATIONS

3-SAFETY PRECAUTIONS

4-SCHEDULING OF FLIGHTS

5-PATROL AND OTHER OPERATIONAL PROCEDURES

6-EMERGENCY LANDING INVOLVING INJURY OR SEVERE PROPERTY DAMAGE

7-EMERGENCY LANDING WITH NO INJURY OR SEVERE DAMAGE TO PROPERTY

8-UNIFORM

FEDERAL AGENT

1-PURPOSE

2-FEDERAL DEPARTMENT REQUIREMENTS TO APPLY

3-FEDERAL REQUIREMENTS

4-FEDERAL DIVISIONS

5-JURISDICTIONS

6-DAILY TASKS OF A FEDERAL AGENT

7-VEHICLES/EQUIPMENT

8-UNIFORM  

1- San Andreas Law Enforcement Standard Operating Procedures.

  1. Values.

                  In partnership with the community, we pledge to:

  1. Law Enforcement Officer Requirement:

 

    (c) Patrol Standards.

     (d) Law Enforcement officer Conduct.

   

     (e) Training Locations.

     (f) Grooming Policy.

 

    (g) Police Equipment.

     (h)  Officer Scene Control and Management Responsibilities.

     (i)  Threat Assessment.

     (j) De-escalation of Scene.

     (k)  Escalation of Use of Force.

    (l) Aided Persons.

     (m) Traffic Accidents and Traffic Control.

 

     (n)  Fire Scene.

      (o) Water Rescue.

     (p)   Mobilizations.

    (q) Fixed Post.

    (r) Foot Post.

    (s)  Vertical Patrol.

    (t)   Issuing of Citations.

    (u)   Partners and Ride Alongs.

    (v) Probable Cause/Reasonable Suspicion and Detainment.

           known to the member of the service would make an ordinarily prudent and

           cautious police officer under the circumstances believe criminal activity is at hand.

           The officer must have a particularized and objective basis for suspecting the

            person stopped of the criminal conduct. The officer must be able to articulate

            specific facts establishing justification for the stop; hunches or gut feelings are not

            Sufficient.

 

     (w)  Radio Codes and Radio Traffic.

    (x) Reports.

   (y) Roll Call.

 

    (z)  Zone and Patrol Coverage.

     (a.1)  Field Training and Evaluations.

   (b.1) CONDUCT AND DISCIPLINARY ACTION

   (c.1) Prohibited Conduct.

SAN ANDREAS STATE TROOPERS DEPARTMENT.

1- The Mission Statement of the San Andreas State Troopers.

 

2- Rank Structure of the San Andreas State Troopers.

The Director of Operations (DoO) is the highest-ranking officer in the State Department. As a General Manager of the Police Department, the DoO is responsible for the planning, efficient administration and operation of the State Department under the authority of the Board of State Commissioners. In this capacity, the DoO directs, plans, and coordinates the enforcement of the penal divisions of the City Charter, the ordinances of the City, and the laws of the state and nation for the purpose of protecting persons and property and for the preservation of the peace of the community. The DoO is responsible for testifying before the City Council, the state and national legislative bodies on law enforcement matters of importance to the City of San Andreas; and, proposing new or amending existing legislation which could have an impact on law enforcement.

The DoO attends the State Commission meetings to keep that body informed about any              issue related to the Department’s operations and to respond to citizens’ complaints or concerns.  Also, the DoO acts on all matters related to disciplinary issues and recommends awards for exemplary conduct of the Department’s sworn and civilian employees. In addition, the DoO makes presentations to private citizens community groups, religious organizations, schools, and the business and industrial community to promote the goals and missions of the Police Department and to solicit their input in making the City of San Andreas a safe place in which to live, visit and conduct business. During a state of emergency such as civil disturbance in the City, the DoO assumes a leadership role in planning, coordinating and directing all activities aimed at restoring peace in the state or otherwise returning conditions to normal.

The Assistant Director is the second highest rank in the State Department and reports directly to the Director of Operations. The Assistant Director can be promoted from the rank of Captain or Colonel.

In addition to carrying out specific bureau duties, the Assistant Director may assume the duties of the Director of Operations in his absence and perform related functions in that capacity.

Specifically, the Assistant Director oversees and directs the activities of patrol officers assigned within his/her Bureau; the officers who investigate crimes committed citywide such as, homicide, robbery, auto theft, forgery, criminal conspiracy, and bunco; police officers assigned to traffic enforcement and accident investigation; personnel responsible for all operations of recruitment, promotions, training, deployment, background investigation, and maintenance of personnel records. Also, the Assistant Director represents the Department at community and business meetings to promote the Department’s missions and goals in order to foster mutual trust between the community and the Department. In addition, the Assistant Director acts as a Chief of Staff to the Office of the Chief of State and keeps the Colonel informed of all operational activities on a day-to-day basis.

The Colonel acts as the Assistant Commanding Officer at the four geographic Bureaus and Operations-Headquarters Bureau. They act as commanding officers for Community Affairs, Uniformed Services, Juvenile Services, Criminal Intelligence, Personnel, Training, Administrative, and Transit Groups. Each of these Groups are subdivided into more specialized divisions such as Burglary/Auto Theft, Crime Suppression, Labor Relations, Civil Disputes, and Robbery/Homicide. Each Division is under the command of a Captain. Additionally, Colonel rank personnel occupy positions as the Ombudsperson, Governmental Liaison, Employee Relations Administrator, and Department Commander; a staff level officer assigned to oversee night-time operations citywide. The duties of the Colonel are dependent upon his/her assignment to a specific bureau and may include: overseeing and directing the activities of patrol officers within geographic Areas; coordinating officers’ investigative efforts within the City; and, exercising functional supervision over officers engaged in traffic enforcement functions. In addition, the Colonel maintains contact with civic leaders and community groups within their geographic bureaus to promote the goals and missions of the State Department to encourage neighborhood watch safety programs and to generate input from citizens to establish mutual trust between police officers and the community. Also, the Colonel is responsible for ensuring compliance with Department policies and procedures by personnel under his/her supervision; conducting audits of operations; and making recommendations to higher management for improving productivity and increasing efficiency. Further, the Colonel may act as a Director’s Duty Officer during off-hours or an Assistant Director in his/her absence and carry out duties specified by the Director of Operations. Police Colonels are promoted from the rank of a Police Captain.

The Police Captain is assigned within the State Department to geographic areas, officer divisions, and specialized divisions. As a Commanding Officer of a patrol, the Captain is responsible for the following duties: inspecting and overseeing the functions of the patrol officers to ensure compliance with the Department policies, procedures, regulations and standards; supervising the administrative and support functions of non-sworn personnel; inspecting personnel, facilities, and tactics for safety and/or training needs; maintaining liaison with numerous municipal, government, and civic organizations, and private citizens to establish and maintain rapport to facilitate Department’s functions and to promote neighborhood safety and community policing programs. In addition to carrying out the aforementioned duties, Captains can apply to be a Air Support Unit and also be assigned to specialized divisions such as Robbery/Homicide, Juvenile Services, Burglary/Auto Theft, Financial Crimes, Civil Disputes, and Transit are responsible for unique duties characteristic of each division. In addition, a Captain performs administrative duties such as reviewing correspondence, budget requests, Air Unit and activity reports; interviewing and hiring sworn and civilian personnel for their division; acting as a Director’s Duty Officer (off-hours); teaching classes at the State Academy; and assuming the responsibilities of a State Colonel in his/her absence. As a Captain you are eligible to apply for the FIB or FEDERAL DEPARTMENT.

The State Lieutenant rank within the State Department is assigned as Officer-in-Charge of various law enforcement and administrative functions. Lieutenants are generally assigned as watch commanders or administrative lieutenants at the geographic Area level. The Lieutenant may assist officer divisions, commanding officers, or act as Section Officers-in-Charge of various specialized entities throughout the Department. The Lieutenant assigned to geographic patrol and officer divisions is responsible for supervising patrol sergeants and police officers who carry out day-to-day, routine crime suppression and investigative functions. In this capacity, the Lieutenant is an assistant to the Captain and acts as a Commanding Officer in the Captain’s absence. Specifically, the Lieutenant ensures appropriate and sufficient deployment of officers depending upon crime trends in his/her geographic area; responds to scenes of serious crimes such as officer-involved shooting, homicide, major robbery and theft; reviews and ensures complete and accurate follow-up investigations; and, keeps the Captain informed of issues of concern within his/her command. In addition, a Police Lieutenant may apply to be S.W.A.T. Certified and be assigned to any one of the following specialized divisions: Personnel, Commission Investigation, Communications, Public Affairs, Juvenile, Jail, Traffic, Court Liaison, Community Relations, Training, Legal Affairs, S.W.A.T. Unit, etc. The Lieutenant ensures appropriate and timely training of the subordinates; the inspection of personnel, equipment and facilities to ensure compliance with the Department’s policies and procedures; conducts interviews of sworn and civilian personnel; attends community meetings to promote Department’s goals and missions and community safety programs; teaches classes at the State Academy; and performs other related duties. Lieutenants assigned to specialized divisions perform unique duties characteristic of each division such as Juvenile Narcotics, Child Abuse,  D.A.R.E., Burglary/Auto Theft, Financial Crimes, Transit, Labor Relations, Civil Disputes, Crime Suppression and S.W.A.T. Depending upon the division of assignment, each Lieutenant supervises the activities of his/her subordinates; coordinates specialized training and ensures sufficient stock of tactical supplies and equipment; maintains liaison with appropriate Department entities; acts as a leader at the scene of crime; and, reviews and completes all reports for the approval of a Captain.

The class title of State Sergeant within the State Department is assigned to geographic patrol divisions, specialized divisions and administrative units of these divisions. When assigned to a patrol function, the Sergeant may be a Watch Commander or Assistant Watch Commander during his/her tour of duty. In this capacity, the Sergeant prepares daily car plan assignments; prepares and presents roll call training; inspects personnel and equipment for conformity to Department standards; supervises the desk, patrol officers on foot or in vehicles; responds to crime scenes at the request of police officers; handles radio calls and dispatches personnel; keeps the supervisors informed of issues of concern to them; trains and supervises probationary officers; and performs related functions. State Sergeants assigned to specialized divisions perform specific duties characteristic of these divisions. The qualifications required to become a Police Sergeant are as follows: demonstrates exceptional behaviour whilst on and off duty, has great knowledge of laws and penal codes, exceeds department expectations, demonstrates exceptional resourcefulness while on duty, abides by all rules, procedures and practises of the SAST. To gain the promotion, you must complete the Sergeant Test found in the training center.

Troppers comprise the largest number of sworn officers in the Department. The Trooper rank is divided into two pay grade advancement ranks: Trooper I and II. A Trooper I is a probationary officer who automatically advances to Trooper II upon successful completion of his/her probationary period. They are also referred to as needing field training. A Trooper may be assigned to a foot beat, a black and white patrol car, or a bicycle. Normally, when a state recruit graduates from the Police Academy, he/she is assigned to a geographic patrol division within the state and is considered as a probationary officer and placed under the supervision of a higher ranking officer, normally a Trooper II or a Sergeant. A probationary Trooper assigned to a patrol unit performs basic duties such as:

Responding to the scene of a crime or an accident

Interviewing suspects, witnesses

Writing crime reports

Responding to radio calls

Monitoring any suspicious activity of ongoing crimes

Coordinating vehicular traffic

Visiting open businesses such as banks, markets, department stores, service stations, and other types to establish a rapport with owners

Booking suspects and evidence and transporting them to the appropriate State Department facility

Responding to citizens’ and visitors’ questions

Preparing Daily Field Activity Reports

Attending and coordinating neighborhood watch meetings

Conduct speed traps and traffic stops

Performing numerous other activities in support of the community policing philosophy

A Police Officer assigned to a specialized division or as a Desk Officer performs all of the aforementioned duties in addition to performing duties that are unique to these specialized divisions. In addition, a Police Officer may be assigned to Department of Corrections (DOC) duty. The opportunities available to a Police Officer within the State Police are so diverse, they are too numerous to mention on this page. To be promoted from Officer I to Officer II you must complete and pass the Officer Test found in the training center.

3- Uniform and Equipment Structure of the San Andreas State Troopers.

4- Vehicle and Weapon Structure of the San Andreas State Troopers.

 

               

5- San Andreas State Troopers Station Locations.

6- San Andreas State Troopers Patrol Districts.

S.W.A.T. DEPARTMENT

1- DEFINITION OF S.W.A.T.

1.1 A Special Weapons and Tactics (SWAT) team is a designated law enforcement team, whose members are recruited, selected, trained, equipped and assigned to resolve critical incidents involving a threat to public safety which would otherwise exceed the capabilities of traditional law enforcement first responders and/or investigative units.

1.2 SWAT is an accepted title for a team with specialized training and expertise as defined above and further defined within these standards. The primary characteristic of SWAT that distinguishes it from other units is the focus of effort. SWAT teams are focused on tactical solutions, as opposed to other functions, such as investigation. The purpose of SWAT is to increase the likelihood of safely resolving critical incidents. Nothing in these standards is intended to preclude agencies from utilizing specially trained units in areas such as narcotics investigations, felony apprehension and other tasks. However, agencies which don’t have their own SWAT teams and instead utilize specially trained units shall have a Memorandum of Agreement (MOA) with a SWAT team that meets these standards. The agreement shall specify that the SWAT team is the designated agency to handle SWAT-specific incidents and that the specially trained units shall only engage in the following operations until the arrival of the SWAT.

2- PURPOSE OF S.W.A.T.

2.1 The primary purpose of SWAT is to provide a systematic approach to saving lives in accordance with the priorities of life and the specific standards set forth herein, in concert with the totality of circumstances presented.

2.2 While life safety is a priority of SWAT, the specific circumstances will dictate the level of force necessary to adequately protect the public and the officers involved. Resolution of some incidents may require the specific application of various levels of force, up to and including, deadly force.

3- SCOPE

 3.1 The scope of these standards includes policies, procedures, training and tactics that relate to SWAT team organization, operations, personnel and equipment.

4- S.W.A.T. TEAM CONFIGURATION

4.1 SWAT teams shall be comprised of members with the training and expertise to responsibly engage in the following operations, in accordance with NTOA standards; at a minimum this shall include:  Tactical Command  Containment  Emergency Action  Deliberate Action  Precision Long Rifle

4.2 Where size and/or demographics limit the capabilities of an agency, these standards require that multi-jurisdictional resources will be combined and coordinated in a manner which is consistent with reliable tactics, techniques and procedures. Coordination should comply with the laws of the relevant state, which may require mutual aid or intergovernmental agreements.

5- AGENCY POLICY GOVERNING SWAT TEAMS

 5.1 Individual agencies shall develop written policies designed to meet the needs of their operational environment and which are also consistent with NTOA standards.

5.2 SWAT Policy Documents ― Minimum Requirements;  Team organization and function shall be detailed in a specific written policy, which includes an organizational diagram.  Missions assigned to SWAT teams shall include: hostage rescue, barricade, sniper, high-risk warrant service and high-risk apprehension, dignitary protection, terrorism response, special assignments and other incidents which exceed the capability and/ or capacity of an agency’s first responders and/or investigative units.  Personnel selection, retention, dismissal and reinstatement criteria.  Training requirements as designated by tasks. Minimum time periods required to develop and maintain assigned critical skills.  Activation and deployment of the SWAT team.  Command relationships between the SWAT team, Incident Commander, Crisis Negotiation Team (CNT) and any other joint or support elements.  If applicable, Mutual Aid Agreements and/or governmental support requests shall be incorporated into policy. 5.3 Agency policies and Standard Operating Procedures (SOPs) shall be reviewed annually and the review shall include a risk assessment based on the following criteria;  Legal: Implications of legal rulings and precedents on current training and operations and policy.  Training: Compliance with applicable law and NTOA standards, as well as ongoing assessment of risk management processes.  Operational: Risk assessment of team assignments and tactical incident responses.

5.4 Agencies shall develop SOPs which detail appropriate guidelines for the conduct of team activities, such as;  Training: Tactical command shall approve the development of appropriate annual plans, lesson plans, schedules, and management protocols for the conduct of training which are consistent with NTOA standards. This shall include, but are not limited to, designation and delineation of critical skills and the required internal certification processes as well as development of minimum training hour requirements based on the critical skills identified. Training must incorporate current NTOA standards relating to safe conduct and the development of scenario-based exercises. Minimum Training Standards - Collateral Part Time SWAT: Prerequisite: 40 hours basic SWAT course Monthly: 16 hours critical skills maintenance Specialty assignments: An additional 8 hours per month (i.e., long rifle, tactical emergency medical support, etc.) Annual: 40 hours in-service full team training Minimum Training Standards - Full-Time SWAT: Prerequisite: 40 hours basic SWAT course Monthly: 25% of on-duty time, including specialty assignments.  Equipment: Appropriation, care, maintenance and removal of obsolete or faulty team equipment.  Personnel: Selection, retention, mandatory physical and tactical competency and other appropriate personnel management processes, to include the development of protocols and processes for the selection of team leaders.  Personnel: Selection, retention, mandatory physical and tactical competency and other appropriate personnel management processes; development of protocols and processes for the selection of SWAT commanders including minimum training and experience criteria before assumption of command.  The design, activation and implementation of an appropriately staffed command post, which may include a Tactical Operations Center, Crisis Negotiation Center, Media Relations Center, etc.  The development of appropriate protocols and procedures, including SOPs, for the conduct of long-term or extended operations. Protocols shall include, at a minimum, processes for relief and rotation of personnel and proper staffing and training of a supplemental incident command center.  Develop an appropriate format for After Action Reports (AARs) which captures tactical and incident debriefing information for training purposes.  SWAT command shall review all AARs, critiques, tactics and actions taken by all elements during the critical incident.  SWAT command shall produce a written annual report, which shall include a recap of all activations, arrests, use of force, weapons/narcotics seizures and other critical information.

6- OPERATIONAL PLANNING

6.1 The SWAT team shall develop an operational plan in a consistent format for pre planning purposes. The planning processes shall include target scouting; development of detailed written Operations Orders, detailed Operations Order briefings, operation rehearsals and pre-mission inspections.

6.2 Operational planning concepts shall include procedures for responding to ongoing or evolving incidents, including the development of SOPs relating to rapid responses to emergent situations.

6.3 All SWAT team members shall be trained and shall demonstrate proficiency in operational planning concepts.

7- SWAT TEAM AUGMENTATION

7.1 Where SWAT teams have access to additional supporting elements, they shall establish internal Standard Operating Procedures (SOPs) and/or external Memorandums of Understanding (MOUs), Memorandums of Agreement (MOAs) or Inter-Governmental Agreements (IGAs). At a minimum, these agreements shall clearly delineate, establish and specify law enforcement chain of command, operational control, duties and responsibilities of supporting units and joint training requirements. Agreements shall also specify which agency is charged with jurisdiction in the event of a criminal investigation involving the actions of a SWAT member, such as an officer involved shooting.

8- MULTI-JURISDICTIONAL SWAT OPERATIONS

8.1 The SWAT team shall develop appropriate agreements, protocols and procedures for support relationships between and among neighboring teams for the handling of extraordinary incidents which exceed the capabilities and resources of the primary jurisdictional team. Standard Operating Procedures (SOPs) and/or external Memorandums of Understanding (MOUs), Memorandums of Agreement (MOAs) or Inter-Governmental Agreements (IGAs) shall clearly delineate, establish and specify law enforcement chain of command, operational control, duties and responsibilities of supporting units and joint training requirements. Agreements shall also specify which agency is charged with jurisdiction in the event of a criminal investigation involving the actions of a SWAT member, such as an officer involved shooting.

9- UNIFORM,WEAPONS,VEHICLE STRUCTURE

 

AIR SUPPORT UNIT

1-POLICY

The primary responsibility of the San Andreas State Police Department's Aviation Unit is to directly support and assist uniformed and investigative personnel in their efforts to prevent crime, apprehend criminals, and serve the general public.The safety of flight personnel, passengers, and the public, as well as the maintenance of the aircraft, will supersede all other factors as the unit attempts to carry out its mission.The feasibility of any assignment to which the unit is called to respond will rest with the Pilot in Command (PIC) performing the assignment. The Police Commissioner, along with the Commanding Officer, Aviation Unit. At no time will a firearm be discharged from the aircraft. Discharging a firearm from the aircraft is PROHIBITED. No aircraft will be permitted to fly outside the borders of San Andreas.

2-TYPES OF AERIAL OPERATIONS

 The Aviation Unit may be called to respond to the following police operations:

1. Preventive patrol (primary mission).

2. Surveillance/reconnaissance.

3. Suspect/evidence searches.

4. Vehicle pursuit control.

5. Photographic flights.

6. Rescue operations.

7. Command/control platform for police and fire staff and any other assignment to which the unit can safely and effectively be of service as determined by the PIC.

3-SAFETY PRECAUTIONS

1. All personnel will stay at least 100 feet from the aircraft while the main rotor is turning. Do not approach the aircraft unless authorized by the pilot or observer of the operating aircraft. Only approach the aircraft from the front, in direct view of the flight crew.

2. When exiting from an aircraft, always walk toward the front of the aircraft in view of the crew.

3. When approaching or exiting the aircraft, walk in a crouched position. Never approach or leave the aircraft on the uphill side of the aircraft. Always approach or depart from the downhill side.

4. Do not smoke within 100 feet of any aircraft at any time.

5. Do not park or move any ground vehicle or other large object within 100 feet of an operating aircraft.

6. Remove hats and other loose gear before approaching the aircraft.

7. Oleoresin Capsicum (OC) spray or any form of aerosol mace will not be carried on board the aircraft.

8. All helicopter flight crews will ensure:

A. Landing areas remain clear of any equipment, debris, or unauthorized personnel.

B. Flights are terminated 30 minutes prior to fuel exhaustion.

C. That no patrol flight will be conducted when the ceiling is less than 800 feet and visibility is less than two miles during daylight and when the ceiling is less than 1000 feet and visibility is less than two miles during nighttime operations. When the weather is below unit minimums, but more than 600 feet and one mile, the PIC and unit supervisor will evaluate each request for a mission.

D. That if either member of the flight crew becomes ill or fatigued, the flight will be terminated immediately.

E. That when a threat or an actual sniper incident occurs, the aircraft will leave the immediate area until safe conditions prevail.

F. That each member of the crew creates an environment that is conducive to positive crew interaction, good cockpit management, and positive control transfer.

4-SCHEDULING OF FLIGHTS

A. Flight schedules will be determined on a daily basis by the on-duty ranking unit supervisor or in their absence the pilot in command. They shall remain flexible based on weather and the mechanical condition of the aircraft.

B. To schedule a flight request, submit a memorandum to the Commanding Officer, Aviation Unit. All requests will include: 1. Description of the service needed, crime patterns or suspect's method of operation, etc. 2. Exact location, noting landmarks, pertinent building descriptions, and other useful identifying information. 3. Date, time of day, and the expected duration of the flight. 4. Person to be contacted to coordinate operations.

C. Any police personnel requiring the immediate services of the Aviation Unit during patrol hours (e.g., pursuits, suspect searches) shall request their assistance through Police Radio. Provide Police Radio with as much information as possible including: 1. Why the helicopter is needed and how they can assist. 2. Pertinent descriptions of vehicles, persons, buildings, etc. 3. Location and direction. 4. Whether the searchlight (NightSun) should or should not be used.

D. Scheduled flight requests from outside agencies or departments, other than the Philadelphia Fire Department, must be submitted in writing to the Commanding Officer, Aviation Unit for approval. Requests for immediate service from the surrounding four counties (Bucks, Delaware, Montgomery, Chester) for which the Aviation Unit provides service for, will be approved by an Aviation Unit supervisor, and forwarded to the Police Commissioner or designee for final approval.

E. Flight requests for immediate service can be made via police radio or by contacting Aviation Unit headquarters. The feasibility and availability of any assignment to which the unit is called to respond, will rest with the on-duty ranking unit supervisor or in their absence, the pilot in command.

F. Community groups requesting information or tours of the aircraft and Aviation Unit facilities must do so in writing to the Commanding Officer, Aviation Unit.

5-PATROL AND OTHER OPERATIONAL PROCEDURES

A. Preventive patrol shall either be over pre-designated areas (as directed by the Commanding Officer of the Unit) or in a routine manner similar to mobile ground patrols. B. When responding to particular incidents or calls for service, the aircraft will maintain surveillance and radio contact with ground units until their services are no longer needed or a higher priority assignment is dispatched.

C. The priority ranking system of assignments developed by Police Radio will be utilized for assignments given to the helicopter crew. When the PIC and observer determine that their services will be of little or no value during a particular assignment, they shall advise Police Radio and resume patrol.

D. Where coordination of air and ground units is necessary, the flight crew shall gather and transmit pertinent information directly to a ground supervisor or commander.

E. When it becomes necessary for commanders to personally have an aerial view of the scene of a particular incident, that commander will communicate that need to Police Radio who will contact the flight crew. The PIC will then determine the nearest location to the requesting commander where a safe landing can be made.

F. When coordinating operations, the observer will check with ground personnel before activating the NightSun spotlight. There may be occasions where ground units have determined that the light may be more of a hindrance or degrade their tactical position. G. The flight crew will be aware of the sound level produced by the aircraft, which may hamper ground communications during certain operations.

H. While in a chase with a suspect weather on foot or in a vehicle the Air Unit must not drop below 400 feet in Altitude.

I. While in flight, you are required to fly at a cruising altitude of 500 feet.

6-EMERGENCY LANDING INVOLVING INJURY OR SEVERE PROPERTY DAMAGE

1.The flight crew will Notify Police Radio giving the location and extent of injuries and damage.

2. Render first aid.

3. Preserve the crash scene and when possible, do not move the aircraft and its contents.

4. Protect the public and the aircraft from further injury or damage.

5. Assist the Accident Investigation District (AID) and FBI investigators.

Police Radio will notify and dispatch the following:

1. Fire Department.

2. Patrol supervisor, a patrol car, and an emergency patrol wagon.

3. Commanding Officer, Aviation Unit.

4. Commanding Officer, district of occurrence or CIB commander.

5. On duty supervisor of the Aviation Unit.

6. AID supervisor and investigator.

7. FBI investigators.

Responding Police Personnel will:

1. Assist the flight crew and others who may be injured.

2. Protect the scene of the accident.

3. Establish a communications car and chronological log.AID will be responsible for the entire departmental investigation and will be assisted by personnel from the Aviation Unit. The AID investigator will: 1. Process the scene thoroughly. 2. Include photographs and a complete sketch of the scene, which will contain wreckage, property damage, buildings, poles, wires, trees, etc. 3. Note distances and heights.

4. Assist the FBI investigators.

5. Prepare all necessary departmental paperwork. NOTE: If the accident is suspicious or criminal activity is alleged, the detective division of occurrence will be responsible for the investigation and be assisted by AID and members of the Aviation Unit.

7-EMERGENCY LANDING WITH NO INJURY OR SEVERE DAMAGE TO PROPERTY

The flight crew will:

1. Immediately notify Police Radio of the location and give condition.

2. Request the presence of a patrol supervisor and one patrol car.

3. Evaluate the cause of the problem that forced the landing.

4. Remain with the aircraft if repairs can be made on site.

5. If repairs cannot be made on site, stay with the aircraft until it is moved to a permanent location and assist in securing it.

8-UNIFORM

Certified Air Support Pilots will wear the Dark Blue Flight Suit (6/19 Outfits: Flight Suits) while Piloting or Riding in the Helicopter.

FEDERAL DEPARTMENT

1-PURPOSE

The Federal departments are responsible for monitoring laws, government employees, lead investigations, maintaining the stability with in all of San Andreas . Agents are authorized to carry firearms and are often called in to perform official busts or capture high profile criminals. Agents may face dangerous situations, work erratic hours and be required to travel extensively.

Agents are in charge of investigating over 200 different categories of violations related to national security and federal law. The criminal activity a agent may investigate includes bank robberies, terrorism, corruption, cybercrime, organized crime, espionage and drug trafficking.

The mission of the Federal Department is to protect and defend the United States against terrorist and foreign intelligence threats, to uphold and enforce the criminal laws of the United States, and to provide leadership and criminal justice services to federal, state, municipal, and international agencies and partners; and to perform these responsibilities in a manner that is responsive to the needs of the public and is faithful to the Constitution of the United States.

2-FEDERAL DEPARTMENT REQUIREMENTS TO APPLY

  1. SASP Captain Rank
  2. S.W.A.T. Certified
  3. Air Support Certified
  4. Interviewed By A Federal Agent
  5. Full Background Check

3-FEDERAL HEADQUARTERS

  1. Humane Labs Headquarters is where you should report for briefing and interrogations.
  2. Also another location is AGENTS personnel CEO businesses for questioning and interviews suspects or witnesses.

4-FEDERAL DIVISIONS

  1. IAA - Internal Affairs Agency - Responsible for all Department and officer complaints, including corruption of public office. Any business complaints and reports.
  2. IRS - Internal Revenue Services - Responsible for all banking and account transactions, including stocks, loans, credits, assets, taxes, and transfers.
  3. FIB - Federal Investigations Bureau - Gangs and Terrorism unit including all major crimes and federal level offenses, Criminal organizations and more, works solely with DOA
  4. DOA - Drugs Observation Agency - Drugs, Gangs and Terrorism unit including all major crimes and federal level offenses, Criminal organizations and more, works solely with FIB

5-JURISDICTION

  1. Federal Departments have jurisdiction over any and every public road way on the map.
  2. Agents patrol the entire map including Highways, Interstates and roads, only taking callouts for backup from other law enforcement agencies.
  3. Agents can also respond as back-up to calls, and if we are close enough we can respond to a call.

6-DAILY TASKS OF A FEDERAL AGENT

  1. Agents don't have a typical workday and their job duties can vary greatly depending on their investigation.
  2. An Agent may be called upon to follow a specific individual or group of people and observe their activities for an extended period of time.
  3. Agents have to go undercover occasionally, adopting a new personality, and infiltrate a criminal group to discover the nature of their activities.
  4. Common duties that Agents perform include research, investigation, patrolling and filling out reports/tickets.

7-VEHICLES/EQUIPMENT

  1. All Agents have an option to drive in there Personal Registered Vehicle during investigations and day to day duties.
  2. All Agents can also use the unmarked buffalo or the unmarked suv.  
  3. Agents when doing traffic stops or any other proceedings must use Government issued vehicles equipped with lights and sirens.
  4. The current standard issue firearm for FIB officers is the Heavy Pistol. Each FIB patrol car is equipped with a 12‑gauge shotgun and a Carbine Rifle. Less Lethal options for officers include the PR-24 Side Baton and the Stun Gun(Flare Gun). Agents have been allowed to mount tactical lights to their Handguns, Shotguns and Carbine Rifles.

8-UNIFORM

  1. All Agents are required to have both our Suit and Field Agent uniform.
  2. Agents also have undercover uniforms they can wear while undercover, these uniforms will vary depending on their undercover assignment.
  3. Black Sports Coat (76/83 SUIT JACKETS), White Shirt (22/37 BUSINESS SHIRTS), Black Pants (63/68 SUIT PANTS), All Black Oxfords (57/64 SMART SHOES), Charcoal Straight Tie (18/86 TIES), LCD Earpiece, Optional: Glasses.
  4. Navy Track Jacket (22/33 TRACK JACKETS), Tan Utility Pants (Utility Pants), Black Tactical Boots (66/115 Boots), White Shirt (22/37 BUSINESS SHIRTS), Charcoal Straight Tie (18/86 TIES), Tan Cap (CAPS FORWARD),  LCD Earpiece, Optional: Glasses, Gloves.

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