SAT Prep- English                                                                                                                                 Page  of

Units:

 

Unit #1 Introduction to the SAT

Unit #2 Reading Comprehension Strategies

Unit #3 Grammar, Mechanics, Punctuation, and Diction

Unit #4 Rhetoric, Logic, and Argument

Unit #5 Post Assessment and The College Application and Essay



Unit Title

Unit #1 Introduction to the SAT

Timeframe 

5 weeks

Unit Summary

Students will complete a pre-assessment full SAT test. They will use the data from this test to create a portfolio of personals strengths and weaknesses that will be used throughout the duration of the year. This unit will introduce students to the layout of the test. Students will also learn test-taking strategies.

Learning Targets

Essential Questions

  • What does my pre-course score tell me about my skills?
  • What are my goals for the SATs?
  • What test-taking strategies should I adopt?
  • How does the SAT test impact my career goals?
  • Where should I focus my time to maximize my score?

Enduring Understandings

Students will understand:

  • Test taking strategies
  • What their scores reveal about their ability levels
  • The purpose of the SAT

Know

By the end of this unit, students will know

  • Their strengths and weaknesses based on the pre-assessment data
  • Their test-taking style, and what specific SAT strategies they need to practice
  • How the SAT is related to their individual post high school goals.

Do

By the end of this unit, students will be able to

  • Complete a reading section in a time frame
  • Address specific test-taking deficits with practiced strategies
  • Identify their goal score on the actual SAT test
  • Analyze their reading and writing levels based on test data

Evidence of Learning

Formative

  • Test taker personality quiz
  • Weekly New York Times Op/Ed Readings
  • Grammar Grabbers
  • Ongoing Vocabulary Charts (with checkers)
  • Naviance college checklists
  • Portfolio creation and management
  • Pre-Assessment “Breaks”
  • Strategy checks for understanding (Google Classroom Daily)
  • Teacher observation of student performance  
  • Formal and informal writing samples
  • Projects  
  • Synchronous and asynchronous discussions
  • Diagnostic tests  
  • Socratic Circles
  • Debates and oral presentations
  • https://www.khanacademy.org/test-prep/sat

Summative/ Benchmark

  • Pre-Assessment Test
  • Essays (timed and untimed)
  • Portfolio Checks
  • Projects
  • Multiple Choice Reading Comprehension
  • Multiple Choice Grammar Section
  • Timed Rhetorical Writing Response Section (with revisions)

Alternative Assessments

• The SAT Test

• The Question of the Day

• Presentations

• AP Lit and Language Question Supplements

• PARCC Style Question Supplements

Learning Activities

  • Pre-Assessment Test (Full Test 1)
  • Review of Reading Comprehension Skills
  • Lexile Assessments
  • Grammar Writing Review (based on test)
  • Group Choosing of “Daily” Readings
  • Teams Chosen
  • Collaborative Discussion of Test Sections
  • Introduction to the SAT Test Presentation
  • Review Games with SAT Questions
  • Timing on Test Practice Sheets
  • Close Reading Strategies
  • Digital Text Annotation Strategies
  • Weekly Debates of Hot Topics (Focus on Rhetoric)
  • Creation of Digital Portfolios
  • Read, Discuss, and Analyze a Text
  • Annotations of Text
  • Prewriting and Organization Charts
  • https://www.khanacademy.org/test-prep/sat

Materials / Equipment / Resources

Core Instructional

Materials and Texts

-Barron’s New SAT Prep Book (student copies)

-Kaplan Practice Workbook

-Google Classroom

- https://www.khanacademy.org/resources/k-12-teachers-1/official-sat-practice/a/sat-practice-guide-for-teachers 

Equipment

Chromebooks, Google Classroom, LCD Projector, Screen

Supplemental Resources

-Text: 8 Practice Tests for the SAT

-SAT Writing Workbook

-SAT Reading Workbook

-Grammar Refresher

-Collegeboard.org

Standards

Content Statement

Indicator

RI.11-12.1.

Accurately cite strong and thorough textual evidence, (e.g., via discussion, written response, etc.), to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferentially, including determining where the text leaves matters uncertain.

RI.11-12.2.

Determine two or more central ideas of a text, and analyze their development and how they interact to provide a complex analysis; provide an objective summary of the text.

RI.11-12.4.

Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including figurative, connotative, and technical meanings; analyze how an author uses and refines the meaning of a key term or terms over the course of a text (e.g., how Madison defines faction in Federalist No. 10).

RI.11-12.5.

Analyze and evaluate the effectiveness of the structure an author uses in his or her exposition or argument, including whether the structure makes points clear, convincing, and engaging.

RI.11-12.6.

Determine an author’s point of view or purpose in a text in which the rhetoric is particularly effective, analyzing how style and content contribute to the power, persuasiveness or beauty of the text.

W.11-12.1

Write arguments to support claims in an analysis of substantive topics or texts, using valid reasoning and relevant and sufficient evidence.

  1. Introduce precise, knowledgeable claim(s), establish the significance of the claim(s), distinguish the claim(s) from alternate or opposing claims, and create an organization that logically sequences claim(s), counterclaims, reasons, and evidence.

 B.        Develop claim(s) and counterclaims avoiding common logical fallacies and using sound reasoning and thoroughly, supplying the most relevant evidence for each while pointing out the strengths and limitations of both in a manner that anticipates the audience’s knowledge level, concerns, values, and possible biases.

C.        Use transitions (e.g. words, phrases, clauses) to link the major sections of the text, create cohesion, and clarify the relationships between claim(s) and reasons, between reasons and evidence, and between claim(s) and counterclaims.

D.   Establish and maintain a style and tone appropriate to the audience and purpose (e.g. formal and objective for academic writing) while attending to the norms and conventions of the discipline in which they are writing.

E.        Provide a concluding paragraph or section that supports the argument presented (e.g., articulating implications or the significance of the topic).

W.11-12.4.

Produce clear and coherent writing in which the development, organization, and style are appropriate to task, purpose, and audience.

W.11-12.5.

Develop and strengthen writing as needed by planning, revising, editing, rewriting, or trying a new approach

SL.11-12.1.

Initiate and participate effectively in a range of collaborative discussions (one-on- one, in groups, and teacher-led) with peers on grades 11–12 topics, texts, and issues, building on others’ ideas and expressing their own clearly and persuasively.

A.   Come to discussions prepared, having read and researched material under study; explicitly draw on that preparation by referring to evidence from texts and other research on the topic or issue to stimulate a thoughtful, well reasoned exchange of ideas.

L.11-12.3

. Apply knowledge of language to understand how language functions in different contexts, to make effective choices for meaning or style, and to comprehend more fully when reading or listening.

A.   Vary syntax for effect, apply an understanding of syntax to the study of complex texts.

21st Century Skills and Themes

Interdisciplinary Connections

Career Ready Practices

9.2 Career Awareness, Exploration, and Preparation  

 

  • CRP2. Apply appropriate academic and technical skills.
  • CRP4.Communicate clearly and effectively and with reason.
  • CRP10. Plan education and career paths aligned to personal goals.
  • CRP11. Use technology to enhance productivity.
  • CRP12.Work productively in teams while using cultural global competence.

By the end of 8th grade,

  • 9.2.8.B.1 Research careers within the 16 Career Clusters and determine attributes of career success.
  • 9.2.8.B.2 Develop a Personalized Student Learning Plan with the assistance of an adult mentor that includes information about career areas of interest, goals and an educational plan.

By the end of 12th grade,

  • 9.2.12.C.1 Review career goals and determine steps necessary for attainment.
  • 9.2.12.C.2 Modify Personalized Student Learning Plans to support declared career goals.

Technology Standards - 8.1

9-12th Grade

A. Technology Operations and Concepts: Students demonstrate a sound understanding of technology concepts, systems and operations.

  • Understand and use technology systems.

8.1.12.A.1 Create a personal digital portfolio which reflects personal and academic interests, achievements, and career aspirations by using a variety of digital tools and resources.

  • Select and use applications effectively and productively.

8.1.12.A.2 Produce and edit a multi-page digital document for a commercial or professional audience and present it to peers and/or professionals in that related area for review.

8.1.12.A.3 Collaborate in online courses, learning communities, social networks or virtual worlds to discuss a resolution to a problem or issue.

8.1.12.A.5 Create a report from a relational database consisting of at least two tables and describe the process, and explain the report results.

  • Demonstrate personal responsibility for lifelong learning.

8.1.12.D.3 Compare and contrast policies on filtering and censorship both locally and globally.

Modifications/Accommodations

IEPs

  • Students will be given additional time for timed sections.
  • Students will be given one on one support as needed.
  • Modifications of projects and materials as needed
  • Use graphic organizers
  • Modify tests as needed
  • Use modified SAT grading Rubrics
  • Review/testing matched to student pace
  • Test directions read/explained thoroughly
  • Mnemonic aids/devices
  • Frequent checks for understanding

504s

  • Projects are designed so teacher may add or omit criteria based on student needs.
  • Shortened assignments
  • Extended time is allotted for students as directed
  • Provide students for multiple choices for how they can represent their understandings (e.g. multisensory techniques-auditory/visual aids;
  • Provide multiple grouping opportunities
  • Structure learning around explaining or solving a social or community-based issue
  • Study sheets/summary sheets/outlines of most important facts
  • Supplemental aids (vocabulary, summary cards, modern translation of original work, etc.); Using audio of texts
  • Visual demonstrations and multisensory materials
  • Mnemonic aids/devices
  • Additional time for test preparation
  • Review/testing matched to student pace
  • Test directions read/explained thoroughly
  • Modified grading rubrics as needed

ELLs

  • Offer graphic organizers where needed
  • Read with a partner or teacher
  • Allow extra support and test preparation
  • Allow students to use thesaurus and dictionary tools while writing and reading
  • Structure lessons around questions that are authentic, relate to students’ interests, social/family background and knowledge of their community Students will be allowed to use online dictionary and thesaurus options
  • Students will be given additional time to brainstorm and organize writing.
  • Provide multiple grouping opportunities for students to share their ideas and to encourage work among various backgrounds and cultures
  • Provide multiple literacy options
  • Allow students to read articles and essays

G/T

  • Students will be offered additional practice questions.
  • When done with work, students will have practice tests to analyze
  • Student choice of texts, projects, etc.
  • Structure learning around explaining or solving a social or community-based issue



Unit Title

Unit #2 Reading Comprehension Strategies

Timeframe 

10 weeks

Unit Summary

Students will focus on reading fiction and nonfiction texts with purpose. Students will learn how to read for specific elements of style. Students will practice annotation of difficult texts and focus on improving reading comprehension.

Learning Targets

Essential Questions

  • Which passages are going to present me with the most trouble?
  • What are my reading strengths?
  • What are my reading weaknesses?
  • How can I annotate a text quickly and without losing too much time?
  • What types of questions should I expect on the SAT test?
  • What are my goals for this unit?
  • Why are Latin roots a key to vocabulary improvement?
  • What is the difference between reading fiction and reading nonfiction?
  • Where should I focus my time to maximize my score?
  • What structural writing devices do I need to know for the test?
  • What literary devices do I need to know for the test?
  • What are the main components of various types of nonfiction writing?
  • How can I understand the main ideas of a piece of writing?

Enduring Understandings

Students will understand:

  • How language is evolved
  • How to evaluate nonfiction for purpose
  • How to detect the goal of a piece of nonfiction writing
  • What literary and rhetorical elements to look for while reading
  • How to wrestle with a difficult text
  • How to read literature with purpose
  • How to answer multiple choice sections

Know

By the end of this unit, students will know

  • Their strengths and weaknesses in reading
  • The major literary devices used in fiction
  • The typical questions asked on the SAT reading comprehension section
  • The best ways to identify an author’s purpose, tone, and meaning
  • Strategies for coping with a difficult test or question

Do

By the end of this unit, students will be able to

  • Read a passage for one single purpose
  • Complete various multiple choice practice sections
  • Learn and use Latin roots to help with difficult vocabulary
  • Annotate using a style of their own choosing (choice of various tested styles)

Evidence of Learning

Formative

  • Completion of Multiple Choice Sections
  • Annotations
  • Group Discussions of Readings
  • Latin Roots Group Meetings and Practices
  • Weekly New York Times Op/Ed Readings
  • Grammar Grabbers
  • Ongoing Vocabulary Charts (with checker systems)
  • Portfolio creation and management
  • Strategy checks for understanding (Google Classroom Daily)
  • Teacher observation of student performance  
  • Formal and informal practice questions
  • Projects  
  • Synchronous and asynchronous discussions
  • Diagnostic tests  
  • Socratic Circles
  • Debates and oral presentations
  • https://www.khanacademy.org/test-prep/sat

Summative/ Benchmark

  • Literary Devices Test
  • Latin Roots Project
  • Teacher and software generated multiple choices tests and quizzes
  • Pre-Assessment Test
  • Essays (timed and untimed)
  • Portfolio Checks
  • Projects
  • Multiple Choice Reading Comprehension
  • Multiple Choice Grammar Section
  • Timed Rhetorical Writing Response Section (with revisions)

Alternative Assessments

• The SAT Test

• The Question of the Day

• Presentations

• AP Lit and Language Question Supplements

• Parcc Style Question Supplements

Learning Activities

  • Multiple Choice Practice Sections
  • Group Competitions on Practice Questions
  • Kahoot Game Practice
  • Group Close Readings followed by Individual Readings
  • Teacher and Peer Modeling of Reading Strategies
  • Collaborative Discussion of Test Sections
  • Introduction to the SAT Test Presentation
  • Review Games with SAT questions
  • Timing on Test Practice Sheets
  • Close Reading Strategies
  • Digital Text Annotation Strategies
  • Weekly Debates of Hot Topics (Focus on Rhetoric)
  • Creation of Digital Portfolios
  • Read, Discuss, and Analyze a Text
  • Annotations of Text
  • Prewriting and Organization Charts
  • https://www.khanacademy.org/test-prep/sat

Materials / Equipment / Resources

Core Instructional

Materials and Texts

-Barron’s New SAT Prep Book (student copies)

-Kaplan Practice Workbook

-Google Classroom

- https://www.khanacademy.org/resources/k-12-teachers-1/official-sat-practice/a/sat-practice-guide-for-teachers 

Equipment

Chromebooks, Google Classroom, LCD Projector, Screen

Supplemental Resources

-Text: 8 Practice Tests for the SAT

-SAT Writing Workbook

-SAT Reading Workbook

-Grammar Refresher

-Collegeboard.org


Standards

Content Statement

Indicator

RL.11-12.1.

Cite strong and thorough textual evidence and make relevant connections to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text, including determining where the text leaves matters uncertain.

RL.11-12.2.

Determine two or more themes or central ideas of a text and analyze their development over the course of the text, including how they interact and build on one another to produce a complex account; provide an objective summary of the text.n.

RL.11-12.3.

Analyze the impact of the author’s choices regarding how to develop and relate elements of a story or drama (e.g., where a story is set, how the action is ordered, how the characters are introduced and developed).

RL.11-12.4.

Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in the text, including figurative and connotative meanings; analyze the impact of specific word choices on meaning and tone, including words with multiple meanings or language that is particularly fresh, engaging, or beautiful. (e.g., Shakespeare as well as other authors.)

RL.11-12.5.

Analyze how an author’s choices concerning how to structure specific parts of a text (e.g., the choice of where to begin or end a story, the choice to provide a comedic or tragic resolution) contribute to its overall structure and meaning as well as its aesthetic impact.

RL.11-12.6.

Analyze a case in which grasping a point of view requires distinguishing what is directly stated in a text from what is really meant (e.g., satire, sarcasm, irony, or understatement).

RI.11-12.1.

Accurately cite strong and thorough textual evidence, (e.g., via discussion, written response, etc.), to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferentially, including determining where the text leaves matters uncertain.

RI.11-12.2.

Determine two or more central ideas of a text, and analyze their development and how they interact to provide a complex analysis; provide an objective summary of the text.

RI.11-12.4.

Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including figurative, connotative, and technical meanings; analyze how an author uses and refines the meaning of a key term or terms over the course of a text (e.g., how Madison defines faction in Federalist No. 10).

RI.11-12.5.

Analyze and evaluate the effectiveness of the structure an author uses in his or her exposition or argument, including whether the structure makes points clear, convincing, and engaging.

RI.11-12.6.

Determine an author’s point of view or purpose in a text in which the rhetoric is particularly effective, analyzing how style and content contribute to the power, persuasiveness or beauty of the text.

SL.11-12.2.

Integrate multiple sources of information presented in diverse media or formats (e.g., visually, quantitatively, qualitatively, orally) evaluating the credibility and accuracy of each source.

L.11-12.1.

Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English grammar and usage when writing or speaking.

A.   Apply the understanding that usage is a matter of convention, can change over time, and is sometimes contested.

L.11-12.2.

Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English capitalization, punctuation, and spelling when writing.

A.   Observe hyphenation conventions.

B.    Spell correctly.

21st Century Skills and Themes

Interdisciplinary Connections

Career Ready Practices

9.2 Career Awareness, Exploration, and Preparation  

 

  • CRP2. Apply appropriate academic and technical skills.
  • CRP4.Communicate clearly and effectively and with reason.
  • CRP10. Plan education and career paths aligned to personal goals.
  • CRP11. Use technology to enhance productivity.
  • CRP12.Work productively in teams while using cultural global competence.

  • 9.2.8.B.2 Develop a Personalized Student Learning Plan with the assistance of an adult mentor that includes information about career areas of interest, goals and an educational plan.

  • 9.2.12.C.2 Modify Personalized Student Learning Plans to support declared career goals.

Technology Standards - 8.1

9-12th Grade

A. Technology Operations and Concepts: Students demonstrate a sound understanding of technology concepts, systems and operations.

  • Understand and use technology systems.

8.1.12.A.1 Create a personal digital portfolio which reflects personal and academic interests, achievements, and career aspirations by using a variety of digital tools and resources.

  • Select and use applications effectively and productively.

8.1.12.A.2 Produce and edit a multi-page digital document for a commercial or professional audience and present it to peers and/or professionals in that related area for review.

8.1.12.A.3 Collaborate in online courses, learning communities, social networks or virtual worlds to discuss a resolution to a problem or issue.

8.1.12.A.5 Create a report from a relational database consisting of at least two tables and describe the process, and explain the report results.

  • Demonstrate personal responsibility for lifelong learning.

8.1.12.D.3 Compare and contrast policies on filtering and censorship both locally and globally.

Modifications/Accommodations

IEPs

  • Students will be given additional time for timed sections.
  • Students will be given one on one support as needed.
  • Modifications of projects and materials as needed
  • Use graphic organizers
  • Modify tests as needed
  • Use modified SAT grading Rubrics
  • Review/testing matched to student pace
  • Test directions read/explained thoroughly
  • Mnemonic aids/devices
  • Frequent checks for understanding

504s

  • Projects are designed so teacher may add or omit criteria based on student needs.
  • Shortened assignments
  • Extended time is allotted for students as directed
  • Provide students for multiple choices for how they can represent their understandings (e.g. multisensory techniques-auditory/visual aids;
  • Provide multiple grouping opportunities
  • Structure learning around explaining or solving a social or community-based issue
  • Study sheets/summary sheets/outlines of most important facts
  • Supplemental aids (vocabulary, summary cards, modern translation of original work, etc.); Using audio of texts
  • Visual demonstrations and multisensory materials
  • Mnemonic aids/devices
  • Additional time for test preparation
  • Review/testing matched to student pace
  • Test directions read/explained thoroughly
  • Modified grading rubrics as needed

ELLs

  • Offer graphic organizers where needed
  • Read with a partner or teacher
  • Allow extra support and test preparation
  • Allow students to use thesaurus and dictionary tools while writing and reading
  • Structure lessons around questions that are authentic, relate to students’ interests, social/family background and knowledge of their community Students will be allowed to use online dictionary and thesaurus options
  • Students will be given additional time to brainstorm and organize writing.
  • Provide multiple grouping opportunities for students to share their ideas and to encourage work among various backgrounds and cultures
  • Provide multiple literacy options
  • Allow students to read articles and essays

G/T

  • Students will be offered additional practice questions.
  • When done with work, students will have practice tests to analyze
  • Student choice of texts, projects, etc.
  • Structure learning around explaining or solving a social or community-based issue



Unit Title

Unit #3 Grammar, Mechanics, Punctuation, and Diction

Timeframe 

10 weeks

Unit Summary

Students will focus on mastering and reviewing the major problems with sentence structure that are most commonly tested in multiple choice writing section of the Test. The skills of mechanics, spelling, word choice, diction, and grammar will be reviewed.

Learning Targets

Essential Questions

  • Why does the college board test grammar and mechanics?
  • What are the major parts of a sentence?
  • What are my strengths in grammar?
  • What are my weakness in writing and editing?
  • What is the difference between grammar, mechanics, diction, punctuation, and diction? What role does each of them play in a sentence?
  • What are the types of punctuation I need to know to be college and career ready?
  • What are my goals for this unit?
  • How can identify mistakes in sentences, paragraphs, and passages?
  • How can I improve my score on

Enduring Understandings

Students will understand:

  • Parts of Speech 
  • Proper Punctuation and Capitalization
  • How to detect an error in a sentence
  • The difference between mechanics and diction
  • The 20 most common mistakes tested on the test
  • How to improve a sentence
  • Why word choice matters

Know

By the end of this unit, students will know

  • Their strengths and weaknesses in grammar
  • The proper way to punctuate their work
  • How the parts of speech come together to form strong sentences
  • The best ways to correct or improve a sentence or passage
  • The major literary devices used in fiction
  • The typical questions asked on the SAT writing multiple choice sections
  • The common patterns used in grammar checks on the actual SAT test
  • Strategies for coping with a difficult test or question

Do

By the end of this unit, students will be able to

  • Evaluate their own writing for common errors in grammar and mechanics
  • Identify the part of speech of a word
  • Understand how to use colons and semicolons
  • Know how to properly capitalize and punctuate a sentence
  • Identify errors in usage including: parallelism errors, tense errors, subject/verb agreement
  • Identify fragments and correct them
  • Identify run-ons and correct them
  • Complete various multiple choice practice sections
  • Learn how to work with time constraints during this portion of the test.

Evidence of Learning

Formative

  • Completion of Multiple Choice Sections
  • Annotations
  • Group Discussions of Readings
  • Latin Roots Group Meetings and Practices
  • Weekly New York Times Op/Ed Readings
  • Grammar Grabbers
  • Ongoing Vocabulary Charts (with checker systems)
  • Portfolio creation and management
  • Strategy checks for understanding (Google Classroom Daily)
  • Teacher observation of student performance  
  • Formal and informal practice questions
  • Presentations on major Errors in Grammar
  • Synchronous and asynchronous discussions
  • Diagnostic tests  
  • Research
  • https://www.khanacademy.org/test-prep/sat

Summative/ Benchmark

  • Multiple Choice Grammar Sections
  • Group Project- Social Media Grammar Nightmares
  • Test on Grammar Rules and Parts of Speech
  • Teacher and software generated multiple choices tests and quizzes
  • Pre-Assessment Test
  • Portfolio Checks
  • Projects

Alternative Assessments

• The SAT Test

• Online Grammar Practice

• The Question of the Day

• Presentations

• AP Lit and Language Question Supplements

• Parcc style question Supplements

Learning Activities

  • Multiple Choice Practice Sections
  • Group reviews and competitions with multiple choice questions
  • Notes and research for rules of punctuation and dialogue
  • Group Competitions on Practice Questions
  • Kahoot Game Practice
  • Powerpoint Presentations on Diction and Mechanics
  • I-Spy Social Media Grammar Police Activities
  • Reverse Classroom- Students will teach each other classroom rules.
  • Collaborative Discussion of Test Sections
  • Review Games with SAT questions
  • Timing on Test Practice Sheets
  • Close reading strategies
  • Work on Portfolio Goals Regarding Writing
  • digital text annotation strategies
  • Weekly Debates of Hot Topics (Focus on Rhetoric)
  • Creation of Digital Portfolios
  • Read, discuss, and and analyze a text
  • Annotations of text (as needed for passages in grammar sections)
  • https://www.khanacademy.org/test-prep/sat

Materials / Equipment / Resources

Core Instructional

Materials and Texts

-Barron’s New SAT Prep Book (student copies)

-Kaplan Practice Workbook

-Google Classroom

-Grammar Workbook for SAT’s

-The Ultimate Guide to SAT Grammar

-Writer’s Notebooks

- https://www.khanacademy.org/resources/k-12-teachers-1/official-sat-practice/a/sat-practice-guide-for-teachers 

Equipment

Chromebooks, Google Classroom,Google Presentations, LCD Projector, Screen,

Supplemental Resources

-Text: 8 Practice Tests for the SAT

-SAT Writing Workbook

-SAT Reading Workbook

-Grammar Refresher

-Collegeboard.org

Ixl.com

Quill.org

grammarflip.com

 Grammar worksheets

Standards

Content Statement

Indicator

W.11-12.5.

 Develop and strengthen writing as needed by planning, revising, editing, rewriting, trying a new approach, or consulting a style manual (such as MLA or APA Style), focusing on addressing what is most significant for a specific purpose and audience.

W.11-12.6.

Use technology, including the Internet, to produce, share, and update individual or shared writing products in response to ongoing feedback, including new arguments or information.

W.11-12.10.

Write routinely over extended time frames (time for research, reflection, and revision) and shorter time frames (a single sitting or a day or two) for a range of tasks, purposes.

L.11-12.1.

Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English grammar and usage when writing or speaking.

A.   Apply the understanding that usage is a matter of convention, can change over time, and is sometimes contested.

L.11-12.2.

Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English capitalization, punctuation, and spelling when writing.

A.   Observe hyphenation conventions.

B.    Spell correctly.

L.11-12.3.

Apply knowledge of language to understand how language functions in different contexts, to make effective choices for meaning or style, and to comprehend more fully when reading or listening.

A.   Vary syntax for effect, apply an understanding of syntax to the study of complex texts.

L.11-12.4.

L.11-12.4. (cont’d)

Determine or clarify the meaning of unknown and multiple-meaning words and phrases based on grades 11–12 reading and content, choosing flexibly from a range of strategies.

A.   Use context (e.g., the overall meaning of a sentence, paragraph, or text; a word’s position or function in a sentence) as a clue to the meaning of a word or phrase.

B.    Identify and correctly use patterns of word changes that indicate different meanings or parts of speech (e.g., conceive, conception, conceivable).

C.    Consult general and specialized reference materials (e.g., dictionaries, glossaries, thesauruses), both print and digital, to find the pronunciation of a word or determine or clarify its precise meaning, its part of speech, its etymology, or its standard usage.

D.   Verify the preliminary determination of the meaning of a word or phrase (e.g., by checking the inferred meaning in context or in a dictionary).

L.11-12.6.

Acquire and use accurately general academic and domain-specific words and phrases, sufficient for reading, writing, speaking, and listening at the college and career readiness level; demonstrate independence in gathering vocabulary knowledge when considering a word or phrase important to comprehension or expression.

21st Century Skills and Themes

Interdisciplinary Connections

Career Ready Practices

9.2 Career Awareness, Exploration, and Preparation  

 

  • CRP2. Apply appropriate academic and technical skills.
  • CRP4.Communicate clearly and effectively and with reason.
  • CRP11. Use technology to enhance productivity.

  • 9.2.12.C.2 Modify Personalized Student Learning Plans to support declared career goals.

Technology Standards - 8.1

9-12th Grade

A. Technology Operations and Concepts: Students demonstrate a sound understanding of technology concepts, systems and operations.

  • Understand and use technology systems.

8.1.12.A.1 Create a personal digital portfolio which reflects personal and academic interests, achievements, and career aspirations by using a variety of digital tools and resources.

  • Select and use applications effectively and productively.

8.1.12.A.2 Produce and edit a multi-page digital document for a commercial or professional audience and present it to peers and/or professionals in that related area for review.

8.1.12.A.3 Collaborate in online courses, learning communities, social networks or virtual worlds to discuss a resolution to a problem or issue.

  • Demonstrate personal responsibility for lifelong learning.

8.1.12.D.3 Compare and contrast policies on filtering and censorship both locally and globally.

Modifications/Accommodations

IEPs

  • Students will be given additional time for timed sections.
  • Students will be given one on one support as needed.
  • Modifications of projects and materials as needed
  • Use graphic organizers
  • Modify tests as needed
  • Use modified SAT grading Rubrics
  • Review/testing matched to student pace
  • Test directions read/explained thoroughly
  • Mnemonic aids/devices
  • Frequent checks for understanding

504s

  • Projects are designed so teacher may add or omit criteria based on student needs.
  • Shortened assignments
  • Extended time is allotted for students as directed
  • Provide students for multiple choices for how they can represent their understandings (e.g. multisensory techniques-auditory/visual aids;
  • Provide multiple grouping opportunities
  • Structure learning around explaining or solving a social or community-based issue
  • Study sheets/summary sheets/outlines of most important facts
  • Supplemental aids (vocabulary, summary cards, modern translation of original work, etc.); Using audio of texts
  • Visual demonstrations and multisensory materials
  • Mnemonic aids/devices
  • Additional time for test preparation
  • Review/testing matched to student pace
  • Test directions read/explained thoroughly
  • Modified grading rubrics as needed

ELLs

  • Offer graphic organizers where needed
  • Read with a partner or teacher
  • Allow extra support and test preparation
  • Allow students to use thesaurus and dictionary tools while writing and reading
  • Structure lessons around questions that are authentic, relate to students’ interests, social/family background and knowledge of their community Students will be allowed to use online dictionary and thesaurus options
  • Students will be given additional time to brainstorm and organize writing.
  • Provide multiple grouping opportunities for students to share their ideas and to encourage work among various backgrounds and cultures
  • Provide multiple literacy options
  • Allow students to read articles and essays

G/T

  • Students will be offered additional practice questions.
  • When done with work, students will have practice tests to analyze
  • Student choice of texts, projects, etc.
  • Structure learning around explaining or solving a social or community-based issue


Unit Title

Unit #4 Rhetoric, Logic, and Argument

Timeframe 

7 weeks

Unit Summary

Students will study the art of rhetoric, logic and logical fallacies, and its role in life and on the SAT test. Students will apply their knowledge of how arguments are constructed to the analysis essay portion of the test.

Learning Targets

Essential Questions

  • Which does it mean to analyze an argument?
  • What makes for a “good” argument?
  • How does our modern media manipulate others with argument?
  • What is logic?
  • What are logical fallacies and how are they used in arguments?
  • How do advertisements demonstrate the pitfalls of bad reasoning?
  • How can I evaluate an argument using logic and rhetorical strategies?
  • How can I read and annotate an argument quickly and with rhetorical analysis in mind?
  • What types of questions should I expect on the SAT test?
  • What are my goals for this unit?
  • What are the goals of an analysis essay?

Enduring Understandings

Students will understand:

  • How rhetoric has evolved through philosophical history
  • How to evaluate nonfiction for purpose
  • How to detect the goal of a piece of nonfiction writing
  • What literary and rhetorical elements to look for while reading
  • How to wrestle with a difficult text
  • How to spot logical fallacies in an argument.
  • How to measure the validity and logic of an argument
  • How to create an analysis essay
  • The types of evidence used in argument

Know

By the end of this unit, students will know

  • Their strengths and weaknesses in reading
  • The major literary devices used in fiction
  • The typical questions asked on the SAT reading comprehension section
  • The best ways to identify an author’s purpose, tone, and meaning
  • Strategies for coping with a difficult test or question

Do

By the end of this unit, students will be able to

  • Critique arguments
  • analyze how rhetoric is used in everyday life
  • write a timed analysis essay
  • Edit and revise writing
  • Identify logical fallacies
  • Analyze the strength of an argument
  • Read and annotate nonfiction articles

Evidence of Learning

Formative

  • Practice Timed Writing Sections
  • “Hot Topic” Debates
  • New Rhetoric Analysis
  • Grading Practice with Real SAT essays
  • Annotations
  • Group Discussions of Readings
  • Portfolio creation and management
  • Strategy checks for understanding (Google Classroom Daily)
  • Teacher observation of student performance  
  • Formal and informal practice questions
  • Projects  
  • Synchronous and asynchronous discussions
  • Diagnostic tests  
  • Socratic Circles
  • Portfolio Adjustments
  • Daily Discussion
  • https://www.khanacademy.org/test-prep/sat

Summative/ Benchmark

  • Timed SAT Essay Test
  • Create Your Own Rhetorical Commercial Projects
  • Media and Fallacies Project
  • Journals on Famous Political Speeches
  • Teacher and software generated multiple choices tests and quizzes
  • Multiple Choice Reading Comprehension
  • Multiple Choice Grammar Section
  • Timed Rhetorical Writing Response Section (with revisions)

Alternative Assessments

• Alternative SAT test questions

he SAT Test

• The Question of the Day

• Presentations

• AP Lit and Language Question Supplements

• Parcc style question Supplements

Learning Activities

  • Multiple Choice Practice Sections
  • Timed Essay Writing
  • Group Competitions on Practice Questions
  • Kahoot Game Practice
  • Group Close Readings followed by Individual Readings
  • Teacher and Peer Modeling of Reading Strategies
  • Collaborative Discussion of Test Sections
  • Introduction to the SAT Test Presentation
  • Review Games with SAT questions
  • Timing on Test Practice Sheets
  • Close reading strategies
  • digital text annotation strategies
  • Weekly Debates of Hot Topics (Focus on Rhetoric)
  • Creation of Digital Portfolios
  • Read, discuss, and and analyze a text
  • Annotations of text
  • Prewriting and organization charts
  • https://www.khanacademy.org/test-prep/sat

Materials / Equipment / Resources

Core Instructional

Materials and Texts

-Barron’s New SAT Prep Book (student copies)

-Kaplan Practice Workbook

-AP Language and Composition Text (nonfiction essay excerpts)

-The Outliers by Malcolm Gladwell

-Nickled and Dimed by Barbara Ehrenriech

-Spooked by Mary Roach

-Excerpts from “Greatest Speeches of All Time”

- https://www.khanacademy.org/resources/k-12-teachers-1/official-sat-practice/a/sat-practice-guide-for-teachers 

Equipment

Chromebooks, Google Classroom, LCD Projector, Screen

Supplemental Resources

-Text: 8 Practice Tests for the SAT

-SAT Writing Workbook

-SAT Reading Workbook

-Grammar Refresher

-Collegeboard.org,

Standards

Content Statement

Indicator

RL.11-12.1.

Cite strong and thorough textual evidence and make relevant connections to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text, including determining where the text leaves matters uncertain.

RI.11-12.1.

Accurately cite strong and thorough textual evidence, (e.g., via discussion, written response, etc.), to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferentially, including determining where the text leaves matters uncertain.

RI.11-12.2.

Determine two or more central ideas of a text, and analyze their development and how they interact to provide a complex analysis; provide an objective summary of the text.

RI.11-12.3.

Analyze a complex set of ideas or sequence of events and explain how specific individuals, ideas, or events interact and develop over the course of the text.

RI.11-12.4.

Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including figurative, connotative, and technical meanings; analyze how an author uses and refines the meaning of a key term or terms over the course of a text (e.g., how Madison defines faction in Federalist No. 10).

RI.11-12.5.

Analyze and evaluate the effectiveness of the structure an author uses in his or her exposition or argument, including whether the structure makes points clear, convincing, and engaging.

RI.11-12.6.

Determine an author’s point of view or purpose in a text in which the rhetoric is particularly effective, analyzing how style and content contribute to the power, persuasiveness or beauty of the text.

RI.11-12.7.

 

 Integrate and evaluate multiple sources of information presented in different media or formats (e.g., visually, quantitatively) as well as in words in order to address a question or solve a problem.

RI.11-12.8.

Describe and evaluate the reasoning in seminal U.S. and global texts, including the application of constitutional principles and use of legal reasoning (e.g., in U.S. Supreme Court majority opinions and dissents) and the premises, purposes, and arguments in works of public advocacy (e.g., The Federalist, presidential addresses).

RI.11-12.9.

Analyze and reflect on (e.g. practical knowledge, historical/cultural context, and background knowledge) documents of historical and literary significance for their themes, purposes and rhetorical features, including primary source documents relevant to U.S. and/or global history.

W.11-12.1.

Write arguments to support claims in an analysis of substantive topics or texts, using valid reasoning and relevant and sufficient evidence.

  1.  Introduce precise, knowledgeable claim(s), establish the significance of the claim(s), distinguish the claim(s) from alternate or opposing claims, and create an organization that logically sequences claim(s), counterclaims, reasons, and evidence.

B.        Develop claim(s) and counterclaims avoiding common logical fallacies and using sound reasoning and thoroughly, supplying the most relevant evidence for each while pointing out the strengths and limitations of both in a manner that anticipates the audience’s knowledge level, concerns, values, and possible biases.

C.        Use transitions (e.g. words, phrases, clauses) to link the major sections of the text, create cohesion, and clarify the relationships between claim(s) and reasons, between reasons and evidence, and between claim(s) and counterclaims.

D.   Establish and maintain a style and tone appropriate to the audience and purpose (e.g. formal and objective for academic writing) while attending to the norms and conventions of the discipline in which they are writing.

E.        Provide a concluding paragraph or section that supports the argument presented (e.g., articulating implications or the significance of the topic).

W.11-12.2.

 Write informative/explanatory texts to examine and convey complex ideas, concepts, and information clearly and accurately through the effective selection, organization, and analysis of content.

A.   Introduce a topic; organize complex ideas, concepts, and information so that each new element builds on that which precedes it to create a unified whole; include formatting (e.g., headings), graphics (e.g., figures, tables), and multimedia when useful to aiding comprehension.

B.    Develop the topic thoroughly by selecting the most significant and relevant facts, extended definitions, concrete details, quotations, or other information and examples appropriate to the audience’s knowledge of the topic.

C.    Use appropriate and varied transitions and syntax to link the major sections of the text, create cohesion, and clarify the relationships among complex ideas and concepts.

D.   Use precise language, domain-specific vocabulary, and techniques such as metaphor, simile, and analogy to manage the complexity of the topic.

E.    Establish and maintain a style and tone appropriate to the audience and purpose (e.g. formal and objective for academic writing) while attending to the norms and conventions of the discipline in which they are writing.

F.    Provide a concluding paragraph or section that supports the argument presented (e.g., articulating implications or the significance of the topic).

W.11-12.4.

Produce clear and coherent writing in which the development, organization, and style are appropriate to task, purpose, and audience.

W.11-12.5.

Develop and strengthen writing as needed by planning, revising, editing, rewriting, or trying a new approach.

W.11-12.9.

Draw evidence from literary or informational texts to support analysis, reflection, and research.

21st Century Skills and Themes

Interdisciplinary Connections

Career Ready Practices

9.2 Career Awareness, Exploration, and Preparation  

 

  • CRP2. Apply appropriate academic and technical skills.
  • CRP4.Communicate clearly and effectively and with reason.
  • CRP10. Plan education and career paths aligned to personal goals.
  • CRP11. Use technology to enhance productivity.
  • CRP12.Work productively in teams while using cultural global competence.

  • 9.2.8.B.2 Develop a Personalized Student Learning Plan with the assistance of an adult mentor that includes information about career areas of interest, goals and an educational plan.

Technology Standards - 8.1

9-12th Grade

A. Technology Operations and Concepts: Students demonstrate a sound understanding of technology concepts, systems and operations.

  • Understand and use technology systems.

8.1.12.A.1 Create a personal digital portfolio which reflects personal and academic interests, achievements, and career aspirations by using a variety of digital tools and resources.

  • Select and use applications effectively and productively.

8.1.12.A.2 Produce and edit a multi-page digital document for a commercial or professional audience and present it to peers and/or professionals in that related area for review.

8.1.12.A.3 Collaborate in online courses, learning communities, social networks or virtual worlds to discuss a resolution to a problem or issue.

Modifications/Accommodations

IEPs

  • Students will be given additional time for timed sections.
  • Students will be given one on one support as needed.
  • Modifications of projects and materials as needed
  • Use graphic organizers
  • Modify tests as needed
  • Use modified SAT grading Rubrics
  • Review/testing matched to student pace
  • Test directions read/explained thoroughly
  • Mnemonic aids/devices
  • Frequent checks for understanding

504s

  • Projects are designed so teacher may add or omit criteria based on student needs.
  • Shortened assignments
  • Extended time is allotted for students as directed
  • Provide students for multiple choices for how they can represent their understandings (e.g. multisensory techniques-auditory/visual aids;
  • Provide multiple grouping opportunities
  • Structure learning around explaining or solving a social or community-based issue
  • Study sheets/summary sheets/outlines of most important facts
  • Supplemental aids (vocabulary, summary cards, modern translation of original work, etc.); Using audio of texts
  • Visual demonstrations and multisensory materials
  • Mnemonic aids/devices
  • Additional time for test preparation
  • Review/testing matched to student pace
  • Test directions read/explained thoroughly
  • Modified grading rubrics as needed

ELLs

  • Offer graphic organizers where needed
  • Read with a partner or teacher
  • Allow extra support and test preparation
  • Allow students to use thesaurus and dictionary tools while writing and reading
  • Structure lessons around questions that are authentic, relate to students’ interests, social/family background and knowledge of their community Students will be allowed to use online dictionary and thesaurus options
  • Students will be given additional time to brainstorm and organize writing.
  • Provide multiple grouping opportunities for students to share their ideas and to encourage work among various backgrounds and cultures
  • Provide multiple literacy options
  • Allow students to read articles and essays

G/T

  • Students will be offered additional practice questions.
  • When done with work, students will have practice tests to analyze
  • Student choice of texts, projects, etc.
  • Structure learning around explaining or solving a social or community-based issue



Unit Title

Unit #5 Post Assessment and The College Application and Essay

Timeframe 

3 weeks

Unit Summary

Students will complete a post-assessment full length SAT test and analyze their areas of improvement for the year. Students will also write the Common Application Essay for senior year, and choose colleges to apply to and begin to prepare fall applications.

Learning Targets

Essential Questions

  • How have my skills evolved through the year?
  • What skills should I continue to hone throughout my career?
  • How will the SAT skills learned in the course benefit my college and career practices?
  • What makes me unique and how can I incorporate that into my application essay?
  • How can I present myself in college application essays?
  • What colleges will I be applying to?

Enduring Understandings

Students will understand:

  • What elements of the test still need attention
  • How to write a good college application essay
  • The College Application Process
  • Reading and writing under time constraints

Know

By the end of this unit, students will know

  • Their strengths and weaknesses in reading and writing
  • An estimated score for the test
  • Which application essays they will complete
  • A few colleges / career routes to explore in the fall

Do

By the end of this unit, students will be able to

  • Create a narrative essay
  • Create and revise an argumentative essay
  • Create and revise informational essays
  • Complete various multiple choice practice sections
  • Learn and use Latin roots to help with difficult vocabulary
  • Create their online profiles for the Common Application and Naviance

Evidence of Learning

Formative

  • Completion of Multiple Choice Sections and Writing Excerpts
  • Group Discussions of Scores
  • Weekly New York Times Op/Ed Readings
  • Portfolio creation and management
  • Teacher observation of student performance  
  • Formal and informal practice questions
  • Projects  
  • Synchronous and asynchronous discussions
  • Diagnostic tests  
  • Socratic Circles
  • Debates and oral presentations
  • https://www.khanacademy.org/test-prep/sat

Summative/ Benchmark

  • Post Assessment Benchmark (Full SAT Test)
  • Narrative Essays for Common App.
  • Teacher and software generated multiple choices tests and quizzes
  • Portfolio Checks
  • Projects

Alternative Assessments

• The SAT Test

•Naviance Personality/ Career / College Questionnaires

• The Question of the Day

• Presentations

• AP Lit and Language Question Supplements

• Parcc style question Supplements

Learning Activities

  • Multiple Choice Practice Sections
  • Portfolio and Data Reviews
  • Group Competitions on Practice Questions
  • Kahoot Game Practice
  • Group Close Readings followed by Individual Readings
  • Teacher and Peer Modeling of Reading Strategies
  • Collaborative Discussion of Test Sections
  • Introduction to the SAT Test Presentation
  • Review Games with SAT questions
  • Timing on Test Practice Sheets
  • Close reading strategies
  • digital text annotation strategies
  • Weekly Debates of Hot Topics (Focus on Rhetoric)
  • Creation of Digital Portfolios
  • Read, discuss, and and analyze a text
  • Annotations of text
  • Prewriting and organization charts
  • Essay Writing Group Editing Sessions
  • https://www.khanacademy.org/test-prep/sat

Materials / Equipment / Resources

Core Instructional

Materials and Texts

-Barron’s New SAT Prep Book (student copies)

-Kaplan Practice Workbook

-Google Classroom

- https://www.khanacademy.org/resources/k-12-teachers-1/official-sat-practice/a/sat-practice-guide-for-teachers 

Equipment

Chromebooks, Google Classroom, LCD Projector, Screen

Supplemental Resources

-Text: 8 Practice Tests for the SAT

-SAT Writing Workbook

-SAT Reading Workbook

-Grammar Refresher

-Collegeboard.org,

Standards

Content Statement

Indicator

NJSLSA.R1.

 

Read closely to determine what the text says explicitly and to make logical inferences and relevant connections from it; cite specific textual evidence when writing or speaking to support conclusions drawn from the text.

RL.11-12.1.

Cite strong and thorough textual evidence and make relevant connections to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text, including determining where the text leaves matters uncertain.

RL.11-12.5.

Analyze how an author’s choices concerning how to structure specific parts of a text (e.g., the choice of where to begin or end a story, the choice to provide a comedic or tragic resolution) contribute to its overall structure and meaning as well as its aesthetic impact.

RL.11-12.6.

Analyze a case in which grasping a point of view requires distinguishing what is directly stated in a text from what is really meant (e.g., satire, sarcasm, irony, or understatement).

RI.11-12.1.

Accurately cite strong and thorough textual evidence, (e.g., via discussion, written response, etc.), to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferentially, including determining where the text leaves matters uncertain.

RI.11-12.2.

Determine two or more central ideas of a text, and analyze their development and how they interact to provide a complex analysis; provide an objective summary of the text.

RI.11-12.4.

Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including figurative, connotative, and technical meanings; analyze how an author uses and refines the meaning of a key term or terms over the course of a text (e.g., how Madison defines faction in Federalist No. 10).

RI.11-12.5.

Analyze and evaluate the effectiveness of the structure an author uses in his or her exposition or argument, including whether the structure makes points clear, convincing, and engaging.

W.11-12.1.

Write arguments to support claims in an analysis of substantive topics or texts, using valid reasoning and relevant and sufficient evidence.

  1. Introduce precise, knowledgeable claim(s), establish the significance of the claim(s), distinguish the claim(s) from alternate or opposing claims, and create an organization that logically sequences claim(s), counterclaims, reasons, and evidence.

B.        Develop claim(s) and counterclaims avoiding common logical fallacies and using sound reasoning and thoroughly, supplying the most relevant evidence for each while pointing out the strengths and limitations of both in a manner that anticipates the audience’s knowledge level, concerns, values, and possible biases.

C.        Use transitions (e.g. words, phrases, clauses) to link the major sections of the text, create cohesion, and clarify the relationships between claim(s) and reasons, between reasons and evidence, and between claim(s) and counterclaims.

D.   Establish and maintain a style and tone appropriate to the audience and purpose (e.g. formal and objective for academic writing) while attending to the norms and conventions of the discipline in which they are writing.

E.        Provide a concluding paragraph or section that supports the argument presented (e.g., articulating implications or the significance of the topic).

W.11-12.2.

Write informative/explanatory texts to examine and convey complex ideas and information clearly and accurately through the effective selection, organization, and analysis of content.

A.   Introduce a topic; organize complex ideas, concepts, and information so that each new element builds on that which precedes it to create a unified whole; include formatting (e.g., headings), graphics (e.g., figures, tables), and multimedia when useful to aiding comprehension.

B.    Develop the topic thoroughly by selecting the most significant and relevant facts, extended definitions, concrete details, quotations, or other information and examples appropriate to the audience’s knowledge of the topic.

C.    Use appropriate and varied transitions and syntax to link the major sections of the text, create cohesion, and clarify the relationships among complex ideas and concepts.

D.   Use precise language, domain-specific vocabulary, and techniques such as metaphor, simile, and analogy to manage the complexity of the topic.

E.    Establish and maintain a style and tone appropriate to the audience and purpose (e.g. formal and objective for academic writing) while attending to the norms and conventions of the discipline in which they are writing.

F.    Provide a concluding paragraph or section that supports the argument presented (e.g., articulating implications or the significance of the topic).

W.11-12.3.

Write narratives to develop real or imagined experiences or events using effective technique, well-chosen details, and well-structured event sequences.

RI.11-12.6.

Determine an author’s point of view or purpose in a text in which the rhetoric is particularly effective, analyzing how style and content contribute to the power, persuasiveness or beauty of the text.

W.11-12.9.

 Draw evidence from literary or informational texts to support analysis, reflection, and research.

A.   Apply grades 11–12 Reading standards to literature (e.g., “Demonstrate knowledge of eighteenth-, nineteenth- and early-twentieth-century foundational works, including how two or more texts from the same period treat similar themes or topics”).

B.        Apply grades 11–12 Reading standards to literary nonfiction (e.g., “Delineate and evaluate the reasoning in seminal texts, including the application of constitutional principles and use of legal reasoning [e.g., in U.S. Supreme Court Case majority opinions and dissents] and the premises, purposes, and arguments in works of public advocacy [e.g., The Federalist, presidential addresses]”).

W.11-12.10.

Write routinely over extended time frames (time for research, reflection, and revision) and shorter time frames (a single sitting or a day or two) for a range of tasks, purposes.

SL.11-12.1.

Initiate and participate effectively in a range of collaborative discussions (one-on- one, in groups, and teacher-led) with peers on grades 11–12 topics, texts, and issues, building on others’ ideas and expressing their own clearly and persuasively.

21st Century Skills and Themes

Interdisciplinary Connections

Career Ready Practices

9.2 Career Awareness, Exploration, and Preparation  

 

  • CRP10. Plan education and career paths aligned to personal goals.

  • 9.2.12.C.2 Modify Personalized Student Learning Plans to support declared career goals.

Technology Standards - 8.1

9-12th Grade

A. Technology Operations and Concepts: Students demonstrate a sound understanding of technology concepts, systems and operations.

  • Understand and use technology systems.

8.1.12.A.1 Create a personal digital portfolio which reflects personal and academic interests, achievements, and career aspirations by using a variety of digital tools and resources.

  • Select and use applications effectively and productively.

8.1.12.A.2 Produce and edit a multi-page digital document for a commercial or professional audience and present it to peers and/or professionals in that related area for review.

8.1.12.A.3 Collaborate in online courses, learning communities, social networks or virtual worlds to discuss a resolution to a problem or issue.

8.1.12.A.5 Create a report from a relational database consisting of at least two tables and describe the process, and explain the report results.

  • Demonstrate personal responsibility for lifelong learning.

8.1.12.D.3 Compare and contrast policies on filtering and censorship both locally and globally.

Modifications/Accommodations

IEPs

  • Students will be given additional time for timed sections.
  • Students will be given one on one support as needed.
  • Modifications of projects and materials as needed
  • Use graphic organizers
  • Modify tests as needed
  • Use modified SAT grading Rubrics
  • Review/testing matched to student pace
  • Test directions read/explained thoroughly
  • Mnemonic aids/devices
  • Frequent checks for understanding

504s

  • Projects are designed so teacher may add or omit criteria based on student needs.
  • Shortened assignments
  • Extended time is allotted for students as directed
  • Provide students for multiple choices for how they can represent their understandings (e.g. multisensory techniques-auditory/visual aids;
  • Provide multiple grouping opportunities
  • Structure learning around explaining or solving a social or community-based issue
  • Study sheets/summary sheets/outlines of most important facts
  • Supplemental aids (vocabulary, summary cards, modern translation of original work, etc.); Using audio of texts
  • Visual demonstrations and multisensory materials
  • Mnemonic aids/devices
  • Additional time for test preparation
  • Review/testing matched to student pace
  • Test directions read/explained thoroughly
  • Modified grading rubrics as needed

ELLs

  • Offer graphic organizers where needed
  • Read with a partner or teacher
  • Allow extra support and test preparation
  • Allow students to use thesaurus and dictionary tools while writing and reading
  • Structure lessons around questions that are authentic, relate to students’ interests, social/family background and knowledge of their community Students will be allowed to use online dictionary and thesaurus options
  • Students will be given additional time to brainstorm and organize writing.
  • Provide multiple grouping opportunities for students to share their ideas and to encourage work among various backgrounds and cultures
  • Provide multiple literacy options
  • Allow students to read articles and essays

G/T

  • Students will be offered additional practice questions.
  • When done with work, students will have practice tests to analyze
  • Student choice of texts, projects, etc.
  • Structure learning around explaining or solving a social or community-based issue