Poetry Assignment

Using Literature of Great Gatsby to Inspire Creativity

Choose THREE options for your original poetry.  Write THREE poems between 15-25 lines. Think about how you can use both denotative and connotative language in your writing. We will have a Campfire Reading of our poetry where each student will have the opportunity to read two out of the three poems. We will gather around in a circle on the floor, turn off the lights, and have the crackling fire video playing in the background as we read our poetry and support one another sharing our original work. Use these ideas that connect back to Great Gatsby to inspire you to write original poetry. Do you have another idea that could connect your writing to Gatsby? Talk to your teacher.

1

Wealth

Write a poem where you explore the idea of wealth in society.

2

Alienation

Write a poem where you explore the idea of alienation in society.

3

American Dream

Write a poem where you explore the idea of the American dream of prosperity in society.

4

Social Classes

Write a poem where you explore the idea of social classes in society.

5

Identity Crisis

Write a poem where you explore the idea of  an identity crisis within an individual or a larger entity.

6

Love

Write a poem where you explore the idea of love.

7

Dissatisfaction

Write a poem where you explore the idea of dissatisfaction in society.

8

Isolation

Write a poem where you explore the idea of isolation in society.

9

Role of Women

Write a poem where you explore the idea of role of women in society.

10

Role of Men

Write a poem where you explore the idea of role of men in society.

11

Lies and Deceit

Write a poem where you explore the idea of lies and deceit.

12

Facade

Write a poem where you explore living in a facade and not showing truly who you are as a person.

13

Stereotypes

Write a poem where you explore a stereotype in society.

14

Symbolic Setting

Write a poem where you explore the symbolic use of a setting.

15

Symbolism

Just as Fitzgerald uses the green light to represent the dreams and ambitions of Gatsby, develop a poem with a symbol.  

16

Recurring Motif

Use a recurring motif in Gatsby in a different way in an original poem such as the use of weather (rain), heat, color (yellow/gold), etc.

17

Love as a Fantasy

Write a poem about obsessive love. Consider Gatsby’s love for Daisy.

18

Troubled Past

Write a poem where you develop a wistful tone (sad longing or yearning) to go back in the past for some reason.

19

Greed

Write a poem where you explore or embrace the pursuit of money and wealth in excess, living in decadence, self-indulgence.

20

Superficiality

Write a poem where you show disdain or criticism for the superficiality of some aspect of society.

21

Recreating the Past

Gatsby believes he can recreate the past. Write a poem where you go back to a time in your life and recreate that memory.

22

Memories

Authors use flashbacks to remember important moments. Write a poem where you have a flashback to an important memory.

23

Biased View of Life

Nick is clearly biased. While he struggles with Gatsby, he respects his romantic readiness. Nick’s point of view also reveals his disdain for the carelessness of the Buchanans. Write a poem where you explore some biased perspective.

24

Corruption

Gatsby goes to great lengths to win Daisy and justifies a life of corruption to do it. Explore the idea of corruption in an original poem.

25

Luxury

Write a poem where explore the idea of luxury and indulgence. Consider what we see at Gatsby’s parties and what you know of the time period to help inspire you.

26

Awkwardness

Gatsby and Daisy experience an awkward moment when they first meet at Nick’s house for tea. Explore a moment of awkwardness.

27

Connecting Again

Gatsby and Daisy are able to connect again after Nick leaves, reflecting on memories and enjoying time together. Write a poem where you explore two people connecting together after a time apart.

28

Judgment

The eyes of Dr. T.J. Eckleburg brood over the Valley of Ashes and Mr. Wilson’s garage where Tom’s mistress lives, expressing judgment of the environment. Write a poem where you explore judgment of a situation or an aspect in society.

Name____________________________        Period___________        Date_______

Original Poem Assignment

As you write your three poems for the Great Gatsby unit and for our Poetry Campfire Reading, I would like to see you analyze one of the poems, using this format. For your portfolio that you will submit to TURNITIN.COM, you will include three original poems, with one of these poems including an analysis of FOUR specific stylistic elements. Refer back to your poetry notes to help determine what stylistic elements you want to include in your poem and analysis. Please color code your document.

Stylistic Devices & Explanation of the Significance of the Stylistic Element

Title: Thank You, Very Much

by Mrs. MacFarland

1.Structure: The poem has a circular structure, posing a rhetorical question in the beginning of the poem about the role the speaker plays in a person’s life, questioning the conservative perception that the other person has of her as a woman. The speaker then gives a candid response to the question speaking directly to the other person by saying that she wants to “shatter the glass bulb around [his] head,” reinforcing that she is determined to fight the old-fashioned views of women.  As the poem progresses, she makes a claim that she is not the woman that has been established by the person’s preconceived notions of women. In the end, she states, that she is a “woman” and “not your dishwasher, cook, maid, and tutor.” By bringing the poem back to the initial rhetorical question in the first line, the poet reinforces her position as an independent woman who refuses to be dependent on any man.

How did I get the role of dishwasher, cook, maid, and tutor?

I thought I was an independent woman

Yes, a mother

Yes, a wife

But I don’t want to be tied to the 1950s version in your mind

While the man is out hunting, the wife is at home with the kids

I want to take a baseball bat and shatter the glass bulb around your head that thinks life

Is a scene from the “Leave it to Beaver” sitcom

Because the reality is simple

I hate mopping the floors, folding your laundry, and fighting with the kids to get homework done

I miss the young 20 something self that was single and carefree that only had to worry about herself

That didn’t have to hear you come home and ask why the carpets were  not vacuumed while you were out galavanting with a masculine gun in your hand, shooting  the proverbial dinner of dove for us

So, let me get something straight….

There is no peace in this house right now when your words come down on me like daggers of ignorance

I am a woman

Not your dishwasher, cook, maid, and tutor

Thank you, very much.

2. Word Choice: The speaker uses colloquial language that is terse and caustic at times to convey her frustration of the stereotype of a woman as a domestic housekeeper. The informal and conversational language reveals that the relationship is a close one, but that there is tension between the speaker and her partner. When the speaker states, “So, let me get something straight” gives a commanding tone that is both biting and empowering, but also sarcastic as she says, “Thank you, very much” which only reinforces through verbal irony that she is not grateful, but even resentful that she has to verbalize her frustrations.

3. Tone: The indignant and  angry tone  is clearly seen in the speaker as she defies the stereotypes that are placed on her, which is seen in her refusal to accept a “1950s version” of a wife. She also shows this anger by wanting to metaphorically “shatter the glass bulb” around her partner’s head, reinforcing the need to change the person’s “ignorance” that has left the person with a conservative view of women. Furthermore, she uses sarcastic yet resentful language when she states, “while you were out galavanting with a masculine gun in your hand, shooting the proverbial dinner of dove for us.” She implies that she challenges the perception that men bring home food for the table because that is the duty of being “masculine.”

4. Elements of Poetry (figurative language): The speaker uses figurative language to convey her disdain for a stereotypical view of a woman. She specifically uses an allusion to refer to a 1950s show “Leave it to Beaver” to signal that she doesn’t want to be the domestic housekeeper for the family, which is portrayed in this show. Additionally, she incorporates a simile “like daggers” to refer to the person’s words being painful and then metaphorically says the “daggers” are of “ignorance.”   The reference to “daggers” shows the emotional turmoil and frustration she physically feels by being constrained to this domestic stereotype of a woman. The metaphor of “daggers” to “ignorance” reinforces that she views this person’s perspective as antiquated and flawed, and not progressive as the era she is in suggests.

POETRY CAMPFIRE RUBRIC

100%

7

ADVANCED ACHIEVEMENT

95%

6 EXEMPLARY ACHIEVEMENT

88%

5 PROFICIENT ACHIEVEMENT

78% or 70%

4 or  3 SUFFICIENT to LIMITED ACHIEVEMENT

 60%  50%

2  or 1 VERY LIMITED ACHIEVEMENT

CRITERION B: PRODUCING A TEXT

100% Student makes perceptive stylistic choices in terms of literary devices, demonstrating good awareness of impact on an audience

95% Overall, student makes perceptive stylistic choices in terms of literary devices, demonstrating good awareness of impact on an audience

88% Student makes thoughtful stylistic choices in terms of literary devices demonstrating good awareness of impact on an audience

78% or 70% Student makes some stylistic choices in terms of  literary devices demonstrating adequate awareness of impact on an audience

60% or 50% Student makes minimal stylistic choices in terms of, literary devices, demonstrating limited awareness of impact on an audience

Considerations: Incorporates figurative language, tone/persona, setting, theme, structure, imagery, etc.

CRITERION B: EVALUATING YOUR STYLE

The writing demonstrates a CONSISTENTLY and CONVINCING analysis and EVALUATION of

textual features and the author’s broader choices in relation to the chosen topic.

The writing demonstrates an appropriate and AT TIME INSIGHTFUL analysis and evaluation of textual features and the author’s broader choices in relation to the chosen topic.

The writing demonstrates a GENERALLY appropriate analysis and evaluation of textual features and the author’s broader choices in relation to the chosen topic.

The writing demonstrates SOME appropriate analysis of textual features and the author’s

broader choices in relation to the chosen topic, but is reliant on description.

The writing is descriptive and/or demonstrates LITTLE relevant analysis of textual features and/or

the author’s broader choices in relation to the chosen topic.

Considerations: Links stylistic choice to effect on audience and development of theme

CRITERION D: USING LANGUAGE

100% Criterion D, Language: Language is VERY CLEAR, EFFECTIVELY, carefully chosen and PRECISE, with a high degree of

ACCURACY in grammar, vocabulary and sentence construction; register and style are effective and appropriate to the task.

95% Criterion D, Language: Overall, language is CLEAR and CAREFULLY chosen, with a GOOD degree of ACCURACY in grammar, vocabulary and sentence construction; register and style are consistently appropriate to the task. One or two minor errors may be noted.

88% Criterion D, Language: Language is clear and carefully chosen with an ADEQUATE degree of accuracy in grammar,

vocabulary and sentence construction despite SOME LAPSES; register and style are mostly

appropriate to the task.

78% Criterion D, Language: Language is SOMETIMES clear and carefully chosen; grammar, vocabulary and sentence construction are FAIRLY accurate, although ERRORS and inconsistencies are apparent; the register and style are to some extent appropriate.

60%, Criterion D, Organization: Language is RARELY clear and appropriate; there are many errors in grammar, vocabulary and sentence construction and little sense of register and style.

Considerations: Includes accurate grammar, spelling, precise and varied diction, imagery, etc.