An Orthodox Christian Handbook

on the Koine Greek Bible:

LXX/OG & Byzantine Textform

by

Fr. Dcn. Thomas Sandberg


Contents

Series Introduction

Preface

abreviations

Introduction

LXX

GNT

Glossary

Works Cited/Bibliography

Indices


Introduction

Originally I wanted to use the 2005/2018 Byz. One of my criticisms of the orthodox study bible was that it used the TR and not the Patrirachal text, so to be consistent with myself and congruent with the great work already started by Fr. ? with the EOB...


***LXX/OG***

Chapter 1

ΓΕΝΕΣΙΣ

Γένεσις ΣΤʹ:1-8 (LXXRE 6:1-8—Human Wickedness)

6:2 ἰδόντες δὲ οἱ υἱοὶ τοῦ θεοῦ τὰς θυγατέρας τῶν ἀνθρώπων ὅτι καλαί εἰσιν, ἔλαβον ἑαυτοῖς γυναῖκας ἀπὸ πασῶν, ὧν ἐξελέξαντο.

οἱ υἱοὶ τοῦ θεοῦ. In Swete, we read οἱ ἄγγελοι τοῦ θεοῦ. “The descendants of Seth and Enos are here called Sons of God, from their religion and piety: whereas the ungodly race of Cain, who by their carnal affections lay grovelling upon the earth, are called the children of men. The unhappy consequence of the former marrying with the latter, ought to be a warning to Christians to be very circumspect in their marriages; and not to suffer themselves to be determined in choice by their carnal passion, to the prejudice of virtue or religion. Ch.—See S. Chrys. hom. 22, &c. Some copies of the Sept. having the angels of God, induced some of the ancients to suppose, that these spiritual beings (to whom, by another mistake, they attributed a sort of aerial bodies) had commerce with women, as the pagans derived their heroes from a mortal and a god. But this notion, which is borrowed from the book of Henoch, is quite exploded.”[1]

Γένεσις ΙΗʹ:1-15 (LXXRE 18:1-15—Abraham’s Three Visitors)

18:10 εἶπεν δέ Ἐπαναστρέφων ἥξω πρὸς σὲ κατὰ τὸν καιρὸν τοῦτον εἰς ὥρας, καὶ ἕξει υἱὸν Σαρρα ἡ γυνή σου. Σαρρα δὲ ἤκουσεν πρὸς τῇ θύρᾳ τῆς σκηνῆς, οὖσα ὄπισθεν αὐτοῦ.

κατὰ τὸν καιρὸν τοῦτον εἰς ὥρας. In the Genesis volume of Brill’s Septuagint Commentary Series, we read:

The guest then makes a surprising declaration; when he returns within the year Sarah will have a son. The precise translation of the Greek phrase κατὰ τὸν καιρὸν τοῦτον εἰς ὥρας [...] is debated [...]. As discussed above, καιρὸς denotes time, but not chronological time. Instead, it can mean something as specific as ‘season’ (e.g., 1:14) or, as here and elsewhere, a ‘designated time’ for something momentous to occur (e.g., 6:13). The Greek word ὥρα also has a wide range of meanings, many of them similar to καιρὸς (e.g., ‘time,’ ‘season’, ‘occasion’), especially in LXX-G (Muraoka 2002, 282–283). The difficulty in producing a precise literal translation has led many to resort to a rendering that acknowledges the momentous significance of these two words as well as their place in the narrative context. At some special time or season within the year, the mysterious visitor would return and Sarah would have a son.[2]

Γένεσις ΙΗʹ:16-33 (LXXRE 18:16-33—Abraham Intercedes for Sodom and Gomorrah)

18:30 καὶ εἶπεν Μή τι, κύριε, ἐὰν λαλήσω· ἐὰν δὲ εὑρεθῶσιν ἐκεῖ τριάκοντα; καὶ εἶπεν Οὐ μὴ ἀπολέσω, ἐὰν εὕρω ἐκεῖ τριάκοντα.

Μή τι. Elliptical negation.[3] <<Μή τι, κύριε, ἐὰν λαλήσω.>>

Γένεσις ΙΘʹ:12-29 (LXXRE 19:12-29—Destruction of Sodom and Gomorrah)

19:16 καὶ ἐταράχθησαν· καὶ ἐκράτησαν οἱ ἄγγελοι τῆς χειρὸς αὐτοῦ καὶ τῆς χειρὸς τῆς γυναικὸς αὐτοῦ καὶ τῶν χειρῶν τῶν δύο θυγατέρων αὐτοῦ ἐν τῷ φείσασθαι κύριον αὐτοῦ.

The OSB butchers this verse by mis-translating it with what appears to be a mixture of Brenton and the NKJV.

19:22 σπεῦσον οὖν τοῦ σωθῆναι ἐκεῖ· οὐ γὰρ δυνήσομαι ποιῆσαι πρᾶγμα ἕως τοῦ σε εἰσελθεῖν ἐκεῖ. διὰ τοῦτο ἐκάλεσεν τὸ ὄνομα τῆς πόλεως ἐκείνης Σηγωρ.

σπεῦσον οὖν τοῦ σωθῆναι ἐκεῖ & ἕως τοῦ σε εἰσελθεῖν ἐκεῖ. Genitive articular infinitive.

The genitive of the articular infinitive (not dependent on a preposition) has a wide range of usage in Paul and especially in Lk. Mt and Mk use it to a limited extent, but in the remaining books it appears either rarely or not at all. It belongs, in other words, to a higher stratum of Koine (often in the LXX, rare in the papyri, s. Mlt. 219f. [348f.]; M.-H. 448ff.; Mayser II 1, 321ff. Examples from Polyb., Diodor. etc. in Allen 32f.; Jannaris p. 578). In classical usage, it is used either with a noun or a verb which governs the gen., or it is employed (from Thuc. on, but not very frequently; Rosenkranz, IF 48 [1930] 167) to denote purpose (equivalent to a final clause or an infinitive with ἕνεκα). Both constructions are found in the NT, but the usage has been extended to approximately the same degree as that of ἵνα.[4]

Another peculiarity of the articular infinitive in P-B [Post-Classical Greek to Byzantine Greek] is its unusual frequency in the genitive without a governing preposition. It stands in a loose construction, which originated in A [Attic] [...], has a decidedly final force (frequently preceded by μή), and so performs the work of a final clause or final participle (‘in order to,’ ‘in order that’; [...]).

[...] Sept. Gen. [...] σπεῦσον ΤΟΥ σωθῆναι ἐκεῖ.[5]

Σηγωρ. The reliance of the OSB on the NKJV shines through here by keeping the English translation of the Hebrew, “Zoar.” The Greek Σηγωρ into English is transliterated in Brenton and NETS, “Segor.”

The term Pentapolis appeared in the biblical book of Wisdom (10:6) to refer to the region containing the five cities of Sodom, Gomorrah, Segor (Zoar), Admah and Zeboim. These cities once united to fight off the invasion of other kings (Gen 14:1–11). During the first centuries of the common era, the existence of Segor was still known (Zoora: Josephus, Bell. Iud. IV, 8,4; Ptolemy, V, 17,5; *Eusebius, Onom. 232,236). It became an episcopal see, and its bishop was present at the Council of *Chalcedon (451).[6]

[here]

***GNT***

Chapter ?

ΤΟ ΚΑΤΑ ΜΑΤΘΑΙΟΝ

ΑΓΙΟΝ ΕΥΑΓΓΕΛΙΟΝ

Ματθαῖον Αʹ:1-17 (EOB 1:1-17—The Genealogy of Jesus)

1:1 Βίβλος γενέσεως Ἰησοῦ Χριστοῦ, υἱοῦ Δαυῒδ υἱοῦ Ἀβραάμ.

Βίβλος. Does not mean “book.”

Χριστοῦ. Proper name, as translated in the EOB. In robertson we read on page 795… ”...” Χριστοῦ is not capitalized in Byz2005. 2018?

1:6 verse

Solomon difference between Pat By05/F35

1:7 Σολομὼν δὲ ἐγέννησε τὸν Ῥοβοάμ, Ῥοβοὰμ δὲ ἐγέννησε τὸν Ἀβιά, Ἀβιὰ δὲ ἐγέννησε τὸν Ἀσά,

τὸν Ἀσά. In Παραλειπομένων Αʹ (1 Supplements/1 Chronicles) 3:10 we read: “Υἱοὶ Σαλωμων· Ροβοαμ, Αβια υἱὸς αὐτοῦ, Ασα υἱὸς αὐτοῦ, Ιωσαφατ υἱὸς αὐτοῦ,”[7] and Vulgate reads Asa in OT and NT. Old Latin?

1:8 verse

Asa. see above

1:10 Ἐζεκίας δὲ ἐγέννησε τὸν Μανασσῆ, Μανασσῆς δὲ ἐγέννησε τὸν Ἀμών, Ἀμὼν δὲ ἐγέννησε τὸν Ἰωσίαν,

τὸν Ἀμών. In Παραλειπομένων Αʹ (1 Supplements/1 Chronicles) 3:14 we read: Αμων υἱὸς αὐτοῦ, Ιωσια υἱὸς αὐτοῦ.[8] The Vulgate reads Amon in OT and NT. Old Latin?

Ματθαῖον Αʹ:18-25 (EOB 1:18-25—The Birth of Jesus)

1:19 Ἰωσὴφ δὲ ὁ ἀνὴρ αὐτῆς, δίκαιος ὢν καὶ μὴ θέλων αὐτὴν παραδειγματίσαι, ἐβουλήθη λάθρα ἀπολῦσαι αὐτήν.

παραδειγματίσαι. Aor act inf παραδειγματίζω (complementary).

Ματθαῖον Βʹ:1-12 (EOB 2:1-12—The visit of the wise men (magi))

2:6 καὶ σὺ Βηθλεέμ, γῆ Ἰούδα, οὐδαμῶς ἐλαχίστη εἶ ἐν τοῖς ἡγεμόσιν Ἰούδα· ἐκ σοῦ γὰρ ἐξελεύσεται ἡγούμενος, ὅστις ποιμανεῖ τὸν λαόν μου τὸν Ἰσραήλ.

ἐξελεύσεται. Fut mid ind 3rd sg ἐξέρχομαι.

Ματθαῖον Βʹ:13-23 (EOB 2:13-23—The sojourn in Egypt—The massacre of the infants))

2:18 φωνὴ ἐν Ῥαμᾷ ἠκούσθη, θρῆνος καὶ κλαυθμὸς καὶ ὀδυρμὸς πολύς· Ῥαχὴλ κλαίουσα τὰ τέκνα αὐτῆς, καὶ οὐκ ἤθελε παρακληθῆναι, ὅτι οὐκ εἰσίν.

θρῆνος καὶ. In LXX/OG Ἱερεμίας (Ieremias/Jeremiah) 38:15 (31:15 in the Clementine Vulgate and MT) we read: Οὕτως εἶπεν κύριος Φωνὴ ἐν Ραμα ἠκούσθη θρήνου καὶ κλαυθμοῦ καὶ ὀδυρμοῦ· Ραχηλ ἀποκλαιομένη οὐκ ἤθελεν παύσασθαι ἐπὶ τοῖς υἱοῖς αὐτῆς, ὅτι οὐκ εἰσίν.[9] The Clementine Vulgate reads as the LXX/OG in OT but not in the NT. Old Latin?

2:23 καὶ ἐλθὼν κατῴκησεν εἰς πόλιν λεγομένην Ναζαρέτ, ὅπως πληρωθῇ τὸ ῥηθὲν διὰ τῶν προφητῶν ὅτι Ναζωραῖος κληθήσεται.

ὅτι Ναζωραῖος κληθήσεται. The EOB follows the KJV. BHGNT says translates “that.” Zerwick ss417 says “that” is incorrect and translates “because,” and in so doing reveals what the EOB note on this verse says is lacking. [quotes everything here]

Ματθαῖον Δʹ:12-25 (EOB 4:12-25—The beginning of the Lord’s ministry in Galilee—First disciples)

4:12 Ἀκούσας δὲ ὁ Ἰησοῦς ὅτι Ἰωάννης παρεδόθη, ἀνεχώρησεν εἰς τὴν Γαλιλαίαν,

Ἀκούσας. Aor act ptc masc nom sg ἀκούω (temporal/causal/attendant circumstance). Adverbial participle that precedes the main verb; it is modifying ἀνεχώρησεν.[10]

5:23 - μνησθῇς ubs 5 reader/passive--analytical codes bible/passive deponent--zerwick/deponent/ etc. check all eggnt pass-dep---lingand ex ket pass dep--

5:37 - evil one - see Irons Syntax/BDAG for fathers who takes it as a masculine substantive and some who do not etc.

Ματθαῖον Εʹ:38-48 (EOB 5:38-48—Retaliation and love for one’s enemies)

5:47 καὶ ἐὰν ἀσπάσησθε τοὺς φίλους ὑμῶν μόνον, τί περισσὸν ποιεῖτε; οὐχὶ καὶ οἱ τελῶναι οὕτω ποιοῦσιν;

τοὺς φίλους.

οἱ τελῶναι. Nominative subject of ποιῦσιν. The Clementine Vulgate reads: Et si salutaveritis fratres vestros tantum, quid amplius facitis? nonne et ethnici hoc faciunt?[11]

οὕτω. Adverb (demonstrative) thus, so. UBS5 reads ...τὸ αὐτὸ ποιοῦσιν; (...do the same?) The PT & Byz2005 read ...οὕτω ποιοῦσιν; (...so do?) The EOB reads “...do the same?” and shows one of the faults of the EOB as a translation. In the Introduction to the EOB we read,

“The EOB/NT project began as a revision of the WEB (World English Bible) which is a fairly accurate, easy-to-read and well-respected public-domain translation based on the [Hodges-Farstad] Majority Text. [...] It is primarily an update of the 1901 edition of the ASV (American Standard Version) using the Biblia Hebraica Stuttgartensia (also called The Stuttgart Bible) in the Old Testament, and the Byzantine [Hodges-Farstad] Majority Text (MT) in the New.”[12]

The EOB accidentally follows the ASV: ASV: “do not even the Gentiles the same?” EOB: “Do not even the tax collectors do the same?” The EOB should read “Do not even the collectors of tolls so do?” as it says in the PT οὐχὶ καὶ οἱ τελῶναι οὕτω ποιοῦσιν; For the grammar of the ASV translation see RGK/Decker §6.19.

Ματθαῖον ΣΤʹ:1-4 (EOB 6:1-4—Almsgiving)

Matt 6:4 εν τω φανερώ.

Matt 6:6 ἐν τῷ φανερῷ

Ματθαῖον ΣΤʹ:5-15 (EOB 6:5-15—Prayer—‘The Lord’s Prayer’)

6:11 τὸν ἄρτον ἡμῶν τὸν ἐπιούσιον δὸς ἡμῖν σήμερον·

τὸν ἐπιούσιον. Accusative masculine singular of ἐπιούσιος. A.T. Robertson informs us:

Our daily bread (ton arton hēmōn ton epiousion). This adjective “daily” (epiousion) coming after “Give us this day” (dos hēmīn sēmeron) has given expositors a great deal of trouble. The effort has been made to derive it from epi and ōn (ousa). It clearly comes from epi and iōn (epi and eimi [ἐπί and εἰμί]) like tēi epiousēi (“on the coming day,” “the next day,” [Acts 16:11]). But the adjective epiousios is rare and Origen said it was made by the Evangelists Matthew and Luke to reproduce the idea of an Aramaic original. Moulton and Milligan, Vocabulary say: “The papyri have as yet shed no clear light upon this difficult word (Matt. 6:11; Luke 11:3), which was in all probability a new coinage by the author of the Greek Q to render his Aramaic Original” (this in 1919). Deissmann claims that only about fifty purely New Testament or “Christian” words can be admitted out of the more than 5,000 used. “But when a word is not recognizable at sight as a Jewish or Christian new formation, we must consider it as an ordinary Greek word until the contrary is proved. Epiousios has all the appearance of a word that originated in trade and traffic of the everyday life of the people (cf. my hints in Neutestamentliche Studien Georg Heinrici dargebracht, Leipzig, 1914, pp. 118f.). The opinion here expressed has been confirmed by A. Debrunner’s discovery (Theol. Lit. Ztg. 1925, Col. 119) of epiousios in an ancient housekeeping book” (Light from the Ancient East, [Fourth ed. 1922], p. 78 and note 1). So then it is not a word coined by the Evangelist or by Q to express an Aramaic original. The word occurs also in three late MSS. after 2Macc. 1:8, tous epiousious after tous artous. The meaning, in view of the kindred participle (epiousēi) in [Acts 16:11], seems to be “for the coming day,” a daily prayer for the needs of the next day as every housekeeper understands like the housekeeping book discovered by Debrunner.[13]

The reference “Theol. Lit. Ztg. 1925, Col. 119” is also mentioned in a footnote in TDNT Vol. II, page 591 as “ThLZ, 50 (1925), 119”. I found it in  Theologische Literaturzeitung here: https://www.digizeitschriften.de/download/urn:nbn:de:bsz:21-dt-20703/urn:nbn:de:bsz:21-dt-20703___log00139.pdf

People make much out of this word, due to the Vulgates influence on English translations. Above Robertson and Deissman delineate the meaning to us and show why a proper understanding Koine Greek in light of Koine Greek is important.

6:13 καὶ μὴ εἰσενέγκῃς ἡμᾶς εἰς πειρασμόν, ἀλλὰ ῥῦσαι ἡμᾶς ἀπὸ τοῦ πονηροῦ. ὅτι σοῦ ἐστιν ἡ βασιλεία καὶ ἡ δύναμις καὶ ἡ δόξα εἰς τοὺς αἰῶνας· ἀμήν.

ἀπὸ τοῦ πονηροῦ. “From the evil one” see Paine p.?

ὅτι σοῦ ἐστιν ἡ βασιλεία καὶ ἡ δύναμις καὶ ἡ δόξα εἰς τοὺς αἰῶνας· ἀμήν. See David’s praises in Παραλειπομένων Αʹ (1 Supplements/1 Chronicles) 29:11-13.

6:15 ἐὰν δὲ μὴ ἀφῆτε τοῖς ἀνθρώποις τὰ παραπτώματα αὐτῶν, οὐδὲ ὁ πατὴρ ὑμῶν ἀφήσει τὰ παραπτώματα ὑμῶν.

τὰ παραπτώματα. Accusative direct object of ἀφῆτε.

αὐτῶν. Subjective genitive.

The reading with τὰ παραπτώματα αὐτῶν is found in the Byzantine Text and interestingly enough it is included in brackets in W & H (I’m assuming this is because it is found in B (03) but not ℵ (01)); however, it is not in the Clementine Vulgate nor the Weber Vulgate.

Ματθαῖον ΣΤʹ:16-23 (EOB 6:16-23—About fasting—Treasures in heaven—The light of the body)

6:18 ὅπως μὴ φανῇς τοῖς ἀνθρώποις νηστεύων, ἀλλὰ τῷ πατρί σου τῷ ἐν τῷ κρυπτῷ, καὶ ὁ πατήρ σου ὁ βλέπων ἐν τῷ κρυπτῷ ἀποδώσει σοι ἐν τῷ φανερῷ.

ἐν τῷ φανερῷ. Manner. ἐν τῷ φανερῷ here is not found in Byz2005, F35, nor the Vulgate, but it is found in the TR, which would lead me to believe that it is an addition to the PT under the influence of the TR. However, when we read the apparatus in UBS5: “σοι ἐν τῷ φανερῷ Δ 0233 157 205 579 1071 1241 1243 1342 1505 Byzpt [E] Lectpt, AD (ita, b, c, g1, h, k ὑμῖν for σοι) syrpalms armmss geo slav Diatessaronarm” where Lectpt, AD means “A part of the lectionary manuscript tradition in agreement with the lectionary text of the Greek Church (i. e., the edition by Apostoliki Diakonia, Athens).” As far as I’m aware, the lectionary edition by Apostoliki Diakonia does in fact differ at times from the PT[14]

6:23 ἐὰν δὲ ὁ ὀφθαλμός σου πονηρὸς ᾖ, ὅλον τὸ σῶμά σου σκοτεινὸν ἔσται. εἰ οὖν τὸ φῶς τὸ ἐν σοὶ σκότος ἐστί, τὸ σκότος πόσον;

πόσον; UBS5 reads τὸ σκότος πόσον. (With most translations from the Critical Text ending with “!” see BDAG and EGGNT Matthew for why.) The PT & Byz2005 read τὸ σκότος πόσον; (how great [is the] darkness?) The EOB reads “how great is the darkness!” and shows one of the faults of the EOB as a translation due to it being a revision of a translation from the HFMT rather than a fresh translation from the PT. In the Introduction to the EOB we read,

“The EOB/NT project began as a revision of the WEB (World English Bible) which is a fairly accurate, easy-to-read and well-respected public-domain translation based on the [Hodges-Farstad] Majority Text. [...] It is primarily an update of the 1901 edition of the ASV (American Standard Version) using the Biblia Hebraica Stuttgartensia (also called The Stuttgart Bible) in the Old Testament, and the Byzantine [Hodges-Farstad] Majority Text (MT) in the New.”[15]

The EOB accidentally follows the Hodges-Farstad Majority Text: HFMT: “Ἐὰν δὲ ὁ ὀφθαλμός σου πονηρὸς ᾖ, ὅλον τὸ σῶμά σου σκοτεινὸν ἔσται. Εἰ οὖν τὸ φῶς τὸ ἐν σοὶ σκότος ἐστί, τὸ σκότος πόσον!”[16] EOB: “But if your eye is evil, your whole body will be full of darkness. If therefore the light that is in you is darkness, how great is the darkness!” The EOB should read “But if your eye is evil, your whole body will be full of darkness. If therefore the light that is in you is darkness, how great is the darkness?” as it says in the PT.

[here]

Matt 26:71 - punctuation


Glossary

Kεραία—Greek numeral sign, Unicode U+0374.

Nominative absolute—if you’ve read Wallace, unneeded.


Bibliography

Aland, Barbara, Kurt Aland, Iōan D. Karavidopoulos, Carlo Maria Martini, Bruce M. Metzger, Barclay M. Newman, and Florian Voss. The Greek New Testament: A Reader's Edition. Deutsche Bibelgesellschaft, 2017.

Anderson, Paul D. ““The Greek Orthodox Lectionary and the New Testament: History, Text, and Traditions.” The Journal of OCABS, Vol 5, No 1 (2012). Accessed July 24, 2019. http://ocabs.org/journal/index.php/jocabs/article/viewFile/65/35.

Berardino, A. Di. Di Berardino, Angelo, ed. Encyclopedia of Ancient Christianity. Accordance electronic edition, version 1.1. Downer’s Grove: InverVarsity Press, 2014.

Biblia Sacra Juxta Vulgatam Clementinam. Ed. electronica. Bellingham, WA: Logos Bible Software, 2005.

Blass, F., A. Debrunner, and Robert W. Funk. A Greek Grammar of the New Testament and Other Early Christian Literature. Accordance electronic edition, version 1.3. Chicago: The University of Chicago Press, 1961.

Brayford, Susan. Genesis, Septuagint Commentary Series. Leiden: Brill, 2007.

Cleenewerck, Laurent, ed. The Eastern/Greek Orthodox Bible: New Testament. Laurent A. Cleenewerck, 2011.

Cleenewerck, Laurent, ed. The Eastern/Greek Orthodox Bible: New Testament, Pocket Edition. Columbia, MO: New Rome Press, 2015.

Deferrari, Roy J., Inviolata M. Barry, and Ignatius McGuiness. A Lexicon of Saint Thomas Aquinas Based on the Summa Theologica and Selected Passages of His Other Works. Baltimore, MD: Catholic University of America Press, 1948.

Deissman, Adolf. Light From the Ancient East. Fourth Edition. New York and London: Harper & Brothers, 1922.

Douay-Rheims Bible: Richard Challoner Revisions/The Holy Bible, Translated from the Latin Vulgate. Bellingham, WA: Logos Bible Software, 2009.

Harden, J. M. Dictionary of the Vulgate New Testament. London; New York: Society of Promoting Christian Knowledge; The Macmillan Co., 1921.

Haydock, George Leo. Haydock’s Catholic Bible Commentary. New York: Edward Dunigan and Brother, 1859.

Hellenic Bible Society. New Testament Patriarchal Text (ANTONIADIS TEXT) 1904. Hellenic Bible Society, 1904.

Irons, Charles Lee. A Syntax Guide for Readers of the Greek New Testament. Kregel Academic, 2016.

Jannaris, Antonios Nicholas. An Historical Greek Grammar: Chiefly of the Attic Dialect ; as Written and Spoken from Classical Antiquity down to the Present Time. London: Macmillan, 1897.

Kothe, Jochen. "Werbung." Theologische Literaturzeitung: Monatsschrift Für Das Gesamte Gebiet Der Theologie Und Religionswissenschaft. January 01, 1970. Accessed July 18, 2019. https://www.digizeitschriften.de/dms/img/?PID=urn:nbn:de:bsz:21-dt-20703|log00138.

Muraoka, Takamitsu. A Greek-English Lexicon of the Septuagint. Louvain: Peeters, 2009.

Robertson, A. T. Word Pictures in the New Testament. Accordance electronic edition, version 2.0. Altamonte Springs: OakTree Software, 2001.

Robinson, Maurice A., and William G. Pierpont, eds. The New Testament in the Original Greek: Byzantine Textform 2018. VTR Publications, 2018.

The New Testament in the Original Greek: Byzantine Textform 2005, with Morphology. Bellingham, WA: Logos Bible Software, 2006.

Robinson, Maurice A. and William G. Pierpont, eds. The New Testament in the Original Greek: Byzantine Textform 2005. 1st, Accordance electronic edition, version 1.4. Altamonte Springs: OakTree Software, 2005.

Zerwick, Max. Biblical Greek Illustrated by Examples. English ed., adapted from the fourth Latin ed. Vol. 114. Scripta Pontificii Instituti Biblici. Rome: Pontificio Istituto Biblico, 1963.

LEH

NETS

Brenton LXX

Rahlf-Hanhart LXX

Reader’s LXX

OSB accordance and physical

accordance and physical pat gnt

Accordance swete LXX

Accordance TDNT, Volume 2

Majority text and apar logos

Lsj accordance

Accordance RGK/decker

Accordance ubs5

Acc KJV

Acc Stephanus 1550 TR

Acc 1901 ASV

Lxxre

Acc rahlfs-hanhart

Acc w & h & physical w & h

Acc Weber Vulgate

Acc Clementine Vulgate

Acc f35


[1] George Leo Haydock, Haydock’s Catholic Bible Commentary (New York: Edward Dunigan and Brother, 1859), Ge 6:2.

[2] Susan Brayford, Genesis, Septuagint Commentary Series (Leiden: Brill, 2007), 312.

[3] Takamitsu Muraoka, A Greek-English Lexicon of the Septuagint (Louvain: Peeters, 2009), 458.

[4] F. Blass, A. Debrunner, and Robert W. Funk, A Greek Grammar of the New Testament and Other Early Christian Literature, Accordance electronic edition, version 1.3 (Chicago: The University of Chicago Press, 1961), §400 .

[5] Antonios Nicholas. Jannaris, An Historical Greek Grammar: Chiefly of the Attic Dialect ; as Written and Spoken from Classical Antiquity down to the Present Time (London: Macmillan, 1897), 578. Note: In the text Jannaris has  ͂ over the capital Υ of τοῦ.

[6] A. Di Berardino, ed. Encyclopedia of Ancient Christianity, Accordance electronic edition, version 1.1 (Downer’s Grove: InverVarsity Press, 2014), Vol 3, p. 137.

[7] Rahlfs-Hanhart LXX

[8] Ibid.

[9] Ibid.

[10] Thank you and credit to James R. Street, Nerdy Language Majors, 6 June 2019.

[11]  Biblia Sacra Juxta Vulgatam Clementinam., Ed. electronica (Bellingham, WA: Logos Bible Software, 2005), Mt 5:47.

[12] Laurent Cleenewerck, ed., The Eastern/Greek Orthodox Bible: New Testament, Pocket Edition (Columbia, MO: New Rome Press, 2015), 15-16.

[13] A.T. Robertson, Word Pictures in the New Testament, Accordance electronic edition, version 2.0. (Altamonte Springs: OakTree Software, 2001), Matthew 6:11.

[14] Paul D. Anderson, “The Greek Orthodox Lectionary and the New Testament: History, Text, and Traditions,” The Journal of OCABS, Vol 5, No 1 (2012), accessed July 24, 2019, http://ocabs.org/journal/index.php/jocabs/article/viewFile/65/35.

[15] Laurent Cleenewerck, ed., The Eastern/Greek Orthodox Bible: New Testament, Pocket Edition (Columbia, MO: New Rome Press, 2015), 15-16.

[16] Zane Clark Hodges, Arthur L. Farstad, and William C. Dunkin, The Greek New Testament according to the Majority Text, 2nd ed. (Nashville: T. Nelson Publishers, 1985), Mt 6:23.