Course Number: PAS 511
Course Title: MISSION AND EVANGELIZATION

Dr. J. Marianne Siegmund

msiegmund@holyapostles.edu 

1. COURSE DESCRIPTION

This course explores biblical-theological foundations of mission, the forms of evangelization, education for evangelization, specific missionary vocation, challenges in evangelization and an exploration of St. John Paul II’s call for new ardor, expression, and method in evangelization (Course Catalogue). 

2. LEARNING OUTCOMES

3. COURSE SCHEDULE

By the Incarnation, God “has revealed to mankind who He is. This definitive self-revelation of God is the fundamental reason why the Church is missionary by her very nature. She cannot do other than proclaim the Gospel, that is, the fullness of the truth which God has enabled us to know about Himself” (John Paul II, Redemptoris Missio #5). Mission and evangelization are fundamental to the nature of the Church and to the Christian.

The Holy Apostles College and Seminary mission statement is “to cultivate lay, consecrated and ordained Catholic leaders for the purpose of evangelization” (HACS Catalogue, p. 2). Through weekly readings, learning activities and discussion board postings, the student advances toward the goal of becoming a Catholic leader in the new evangelization.

The mission of evangelization implies knowledge of Church doctrine and an appropriate application of doctrine to real-life situations. Through a study of Mission and Evangelization, the student will be equipped to evangelize contemporary society in light of the universal call to holiness. Through weekly readings, learning activities and discussion board postings, the student advances toward the goal of becoming a Catholic leader in the new evangelization.

In order to evangelize, knowledge of the Church’s teachings is essential, but it is not sufficient in itself. The evangelizer must be able to apply Church teaching with charity, understanding, and prudence to concrete situations. Whether the leader encounters the rare instance of presenting formal lessons on missiology or evangelization, or whether one encounters the more common instance of articulating Church teaching in the face of error or heresy, this course is designed to facilitate competence in part, through responding to several real-life scenarios in the discussion board.

Please begin each week by reading and listening to the course content posted in Populi. Please be sure to complete the readings and learning activities before responding to any essay assignment or discussion question.

*NB: Other than the required books purchased for the course, links to additional course materials, resources, and readings are provided below or in Populi.

Week One: The Trinitarian Foundation of Mission and Evangelization

Reading

Recommended Reading  

Week Two: The Nature of Mission and Evangelization 

Reading

Recommended Reading

Week Three: The Biblical Foundation of Mission and Evangelization

Reading

Week Four: The Mystery of the Redemption in Mission and Evangelization

Reading

Recommended Reading  

Week Five: A Brief History of Missionary Activity in the Church 

Reading

Week Six: The Church is Missionary by Nature 

Reading

Week Seven: Missionary Spirit of Cooperation and the Harmony Between Action and Contemplation 

Reading

Week Eight: The Content of Evangelization 

Reading

Week Nine: Inculturation, Interreligious Dialogue and Methods of Evangelization 

Reading

Recommended Reading

Week Ten: The Formation of Missionary-Evangelizers in the Joy of the Gospel

Reading

Recommended Reading

Week Eleven: The New Evangelization and Pope Saint John Paul II 

Week Twelve: The Power of Beauty, Goodness, and Truth in Evangelization

Reading

Week Thirteen: Opportunities and Obstacles in the New Evangelization 

Reading

Recommended Reading

Week Fourteen: Missionary Spirituality and the Willingness to Suffer

Reading

Week Fifteen: The Holy Eucharist and the Missionary-Evangelizer in the Contemporary World

Reading

4. COURSE REQUIREMENTS

Guidelines for Papers

Before beginning your essays, please refer to the HACS Stylesheet, also called the Guidelines for Papers, Projects, and Theses. Please also consult the Notice on Assignments, which is available in the course platform Welcome Page. The student must follow both the Guidelines and the Notice on Assignments for each paper. Please note that both documents contain valuable material on the proper format for items such as the title page, pagination, font, margins, bibliography, and other required information. Should a student not follow the proper format as indicated in the Guidelines or follow the directives in the Notice on Assignments, the essay grade will be lowered and the paper may be returned to the student for correction.

Citations in Discussion Posts (NB: Discussion Posts Only)

Plagiarism is a serious offense against academic honesty. In order to avoid plagiarism, the student must place direct quotations in quotation marks and must footnote sources wherever an idea not one’s own was obtained. When giving a direct quotation from any source or when referring to an idea not one’s own, the student must use either a footnote or a parenthetical notation. The parenthetical notation is accepted in discussion posts and in citations of Sacred Scripture. NB: Footnotes are required in papers, with the exception of parenthetical notations, which are used only for Sacred Scripture. Please consult the HACS Guidelines for Papers handbook for examples of footnote and bibliography entries.

Where permitted, a parenthetical notation is placed at the end of the sentence and before the punctuation mark. Give the author’s last name, followed by a comma, then the title of the book or article, followed by another comma, and then record the page or paragraph number to which you refer.

When quoting from a website in a discussion post, providing the link to the document suffices. Alternatively, one may give the website name, the author (if given), the title, the web location of the article, and the date it was accessed.

Examples of Parenthetical Notations (Discussion Posts Only)

Examples of Parenthetical Notations for Magisterial Documents (Discussion Posts Only) 

When quoting a Magisterial document, simply provide the name of the Pope (or Congregation, or Council), the document title (preferably in Latin, which is easily available), and the paragraph number.

How to Insert a Footnote in a Discussion Post

As indicated in the HACS Guidelines for Papers handbook, please use footnotes for the essays. Consult the Guidelines for the proper format. For the discussion posts, one may use either parenthetical notations or footnotes. To insert a footnote in a discussion post, one needs to type a special character (^) at the beginning and end of the numbers to make a superscript in Populi (e.g., ^1^, ^2^, etcetera). Use the special characters for superscript also in the footnotes.

5. REQUIRED READINGS AND RESOURCES

6. SUGGESTED READINGS AND RESOURCES

7. EVALUATION

Evaluation of the student’s written work is based upon the explanation contained on this syllabus and in the Notice on Assignments located on the Welcome Page in Populi.

The student is encouraged to consult with the Online Writing Lab for assistance in composing the assigned essays. The Online Writing Lab is available at http://www.holyapostles.edu/owl.

*NB: Please note the following message from the Online Writing Lab: Please allow time for scheduling up to two weeks in advance of your due date. You will always be scheduled within seven days of requesting the appointment, and that will provide you with another seven days to ready the paper for submission following the appointment. Emergency scheduling is available if noted in the subject heading of your email. Email the text to be critiqued, along with the prompt / assignment, to submitpaper@holyapostles.edu at least twenty-four hours in advance of your scheduled session.

     Essay Requirements

     Essay Guidelines

Course Procedure and Discussion Postings

GRADING SCALE

A 94-100; A- 90-93; B+ 87-89; B 84-86; B- 80-83; C+ 77-79; C 74-76; C- 70-73 60-69; F 59 and below

GRADING RUBRIC FOR DISCUSSION BOARD POSTINGS

1 (F)

2 (D)

3 (C)

4 (B)

5 (A)

Inadequate response

Response merely provides laudatory encouragement for original post, e.g., “Excellent post! You really have thought of something there.”

Poor response

Response misses the point of the original posting or merely summarizes original posting to which it responds.

Acceptable response

Response makes a contribution to the posting to which it responds.

Individually-conscious contributory response

Response makes a contribution to the posting to which it responds and fosters its development.

Community-conscious contributory response

Response makes a contribution to the learning community and fosters its development.

CONTENT

Absence of Understanding

Posting shows no awareness of the concepts addressed in the topic by shifting off-topic

Misunderstanding

Posting demonstrates a misunderstanding of the basic concepts addressed in the topic through an inability to re-explain them

Adequate Understanding

Posting demonstrates an adequate understanding of the basic concepts addressed in the topic by a re-explanation of them

Solid understanding

Posting demonstrates an understanding of the basic concepts addressed in the topic and uses that understanding effectively in the examples it provides

Insightful understanding

Posting demonstrates an understanding of the basic concepts of the topic through the use of examples and by making connections to other concepts

WRITING & EXPRESSION

Incomplete writing

Posting is only partially written or fails to address the topic

Writing difficult to understand, serious improvement needed

Posting touches only on the surface of the topic and proceeds to talk about something else; confusing organization or development; little elaboration of position; insufficient control of sentence structure and vocabulary; unacceptable number of errors in grammar, mechanics, and usage

Acceptable writing, but could use some sharpening of skill

Posting is an uneven response to parts of the topic; somewhat conventional treatment; satisfactory organization, but more development needed; adequate syntax and diction, but could use more vigor; overall control of grammar, mechanics, and usage, but some errors

Solid writing with something interesting to say

Posting is an adequate response to the topic; some depth and complexity in treatment; persuasive organization and development, with suitable reasons and examples; level-appropriate syntax and diction; mastery of grammar, mechanics, and usage, with hardly any error

Command-level writing, making a clear impression

Posting is a thorough response to the topic; thoughtful and insightful examination of issues; compelling organization and development; superior syntax and diction; error-free grammar, mechanics, and usage

RESEARCH

Missing Research

Paper shows no evidence of research: citation of sources missing.

Inadequate research and/or documentation

Over-reliance on few sources; spotty documentation of facts in text; pattern of citation errors.

Weak research and/or documentation

Inadequate number or quality of sources; many facts not referenced; several errors in citation format.

Adequate research and documentation but needs improvement

Good choice of sources but could be improved with some additions or better selection; did not always cite sources.

Solid research and documentation

A number of relevant scholarly sources revealing solid research; sources appropriately referenced in paper; only a few minor citation errors.

GRADING RUBRIC FOR ESSAYS

0 pts. – Paper
Posting;

3 pts. – Paper
Posting;

6 pts. – Paper
Posting;

9 pts. – Paper
Posting;

12 pts. – Paper
Posting;

15 pts. – Paper
Posting;

CONTENT

Absence of Understanding

Analysis shows no awareness of the discipline or its methodologies as they relate to the topic.

Lack of Understanding

Analysis seems to misunderstand some basic concepts of the discipline or lacks ability to articulate them.

Inadequate understanding

Analysis is sometimes unclear in understanding or articulating concepts of the discipline.

Adequate understanding

Analysis demonstrates an understanding of basic concepts of the discipline but could express them with greater clarity.

Solid Understanding

Analysis demonstrates a clear understanding and articulation of concepts with some sense of their wider implications.

Insightful understanding

Analysis clearly demonstrates an understanding and articulation of concepts of the discipline as they relate to the topic; highlights connections to other concepts; integrates concepts into wider contexts.

RESEARCH

Missing Research

Paper shows no evidence of research: citation of sources missing.

Inadequate research and/or documentation

Over-reliance on few sources; spotty documentation of facts in text; pattern of citation errors.

Weak research and/or documentation

Inadequate number or quality of sources; many facts not referenced; several errors in citation format.

Adequate research and documentation but needs improvement

Good choice of sources but could be improved with some additions or better selection; did not always cite sources; too many citation errors.

Solid research and documentation

A number of relevant scholarly sources revealing solid research; sources appropriately referenced in paper; only a few minor citation errors.

Excellent critical research and documentation

Critically selected and relevant scholarly sources demonstrating extensive, in-depth research; sources skillfully incorporated into paper at all necessary points; all citations follow standard bibliographic format.

WRITING & EXPRESSION

Incomplete writing

Analysis is only partially written or completely misses the topic.

Writing difficult to understand, serious improvement needed

Analysis fails to address the topic; confusing organization or development; little elaboration of position; insufficient control of sentence structure and vocabulary; unacceptable number of errors in grammar, mechanics, and usage.

Episodic writing, a mix of strengths and weaknesses.

Analysis noticeably neglects or misinterprets the topic; simplistic or repetitive treatment, only partially internalized; weak organization and development, some meandering; simple sentences, below-level diction; distracting errors in grammar, mechanics, and usage.

Acceptable writing, but could use some sharpening of skill

Analysis is an uneven response to parts of the topic; somewhat conventional treatment; satisfactory organization, but more development needed; adequate syntax and diction, but could use more vigor; overall control of grammar, mechanics, and usage, but some errors.

Solid writing, with something interesting to say.

Analysis is an adequate response to the topic; some depth and complexity in treatment; persuasive organization and development, with suitable reasons and examples; level-appropriate syntax and diction; mastery of grammar, mechanics, and usage, with hardly any error.

Command-level writing, making a clear impression

Analysis is a thorough response to the topic; thoughtful and insightful examination of issues; compelling organization and development; superior syntax and diction; error-free grammar, mechanics, and usage.

8. DISABILITIES ACCOMMODATIONS POLICY

Holy Apostles College and Seminary is committed to the goal of achieving equal educational opportunities and full participation in higher education for persons with disabilities who qualify for admission to the College. Students enrolled in online courses who have documented disabilities requiring special accommodations should contact Mr. Bob Mish, who is the Assistant Dean of Online Learning, at rmish@holyapostles.edu or 860-632-3015. In all cases, reasonable accommodations will be made to ensure that all students with disabilities have access to course materials in a mode in which they can receive them. Students who have technological limitations (e.g., slow Internet connection speeds in convents) are asked to notify their instructors the first week of class for alternative means of delivery.

9. ACADEMIC HONESTY POLICY

    Students at Holy Apostles College & Seminary are expected to practice academic honesty.

    Avoiding Plagiarism

In its broadest sense, plagiarism is using someone else's work or ideas, presented or claimed as your own.    At this stage in your academic career, you should be fully conscious of what it means to plagiarize. This is an inherently unethical activity because it entails the uncredited use of someone else's expression of ideas for another's personal advancement; that is, it entails the use of a person merely as a means to another person’s ends.

    Students, where applicable:

   Consequences of Academic Dishonesty

Because of the nature of this class, academic dishonesty is taken very seriously.  Students participating in   academic dishonesty may be removed from the course and from the program.

10. ATTENDANCE POLICY

Even though the student is not required to be logged in at any precise time or day, one is expected to login several times during each week. Because this class is being taught entirely in a technology-mediated forum, it is important to actively participate each week in the course. In a traditional classroom setting for a 3-credit course, students would be required, per the federal standards, to be in class three 50-minute sessions (or 2.5 hours a week) and prepare for class discussions six 50-minute sessions (or 5 hours) a week. Expect to devote at least nine 50-minute sessions (or 7.5 quality hours) a week to this course. A failure on the student’s part to actively participate in the life of the course may result in a reduction of the final grade.

11. INCOMPLETE POLICY

An Incomplete is a temporary grade assigned at the discretion of the faculty member. It is typically allowed in situations in which the student has satisfactorily completed major components of the course and has the ability to finish the remaining work without re-enrolling, but has encountered extenuating circumstances, such as illness, that prevent his or her doing so prior to the last day of class.

To request an incomplete, distance-learning students must first download a copy of the Incomplete Request Form. This document is located within the Shared folder of the Files tab in Populi. Secondly, students must fill in any necessary information directly within the PDF document. Lastly, students must send their form to their professor via email for approval. “Approval” should be understood as the professor responding to the student’s email in favor of granting the “Incomplete” status of the student.

Students receiving an Incomplete must submit the missing course work by the end of the sixth week following the semester in which they were enrolled. An incomplete grade (I) automatically turns into the grade of “F” if the course work is not completed.

Students who have completed little or no work are ineligible for an incomplete. Students who feel they are in danger of failing the course due to an inability to complete course assignments should withdraw from the course.

A “W” (Withdrawal) will appear on the student’s permanent record for any course dropped after the end of the first week of a semester to the end of the third week. A “WF” (Withdrawal/Fail) will appear on the student’s permanent record for any course dropped after the end of the third week of a semester and on or before the Friday before the last week of the semester.

12. ABOUT YOUR PROFESSOR

        

Dr. J. Marianne Siegmund, Online Adjunct Professor of Theology, Holy Apostles College and Seminary

Dr. J. Marianne Siegmund earned her B.A. in Philosophy at Christendom College in Front Royal, Virginia and her M.A. in Religious Studies at the Notre Dame Graduate School of Christendom College in Alexandria, Virginia. After several years of teaching, she returned to graduate school, earning her Licentiate in Sacred Theology (Marriage and Family) at the Pontifical John Paul II Institute for Studies on Marriage and Family at the Catholic University of America in Washington, D.C. After graduate studies in philosophy at the University of Dallas and a summer immersed in further coursework at the Far Eastern National University in Vladivostok, Russia, she went to Italy for doctoral studies. Her Doctorate in Theology (Spirituality) is from the Pontifical University of Saint Thomas Aquinas in Urbe / Angelicum in Rome, Italy. Dr. Siegmund has taught at several colleges and universities, lectured, delivered scholarly papers at conferences across the nation, and has published several articles in philosophy and theology. Dr. Siegmund is a member of the Society of Catholic Social Scientists, the Fellowship of Catholic Scholars, and the American Catholic Philosophical Association. Dr. Siegmund is a member of the online faculty at Holy Apostles College and Seminary.